Citation
The Miami times.

Material Information

Title:
The Miami times.
Uniform Title:
Miami times
Creator:
Rachel J. Reeves ( chairman )
Place of Publication:
Miami, FL
Publisher:
Miami Times
Rachel J. Reeves
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers. -- Florida
Newspapers. -- Miami (Fla.)
Newspapers. -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)
Newspapers -- Florida ( LCSH )
African American newspaper editors
African American press
Civil rights
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates:
25.787676 x -80.224145

Notes

General Note:
"Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note:
"Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note:
Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
General Note:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note:
Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Funding:
This project was funded under the provisions of the DLIS Florida American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) from the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Florida's DLIS Florida ARPA program is administered by the Department of State's Division of Library and Information Services.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
022998866 ( ALEPH )
ABZ6315 ( NOTIS )
02264129 ( OCLC )
0739-0319 ( ISBN )

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Full Text
pm | SS"

wy

South's Largest
Black Weekly
ABC Circulation

Serving
Greater Miami
Since 1923

UPS 344340

TEMPORA MUTANTUR ET NOS

VOLUME 68 NUMBER 41

50°

Happy
Fathers

Day

MIAMI, FLORIDA, THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1991

36 PAGES

Rvan Headlines Delta Fest

Roz Ryan, 15-year night club performer of jazz, rock,
disco, funk, pop, rhythm & blues, will > EE
headline the Miami Alumnae Chapter
of Delta Sigma Theta's Golden
Anniversary celebration at the Caleb
Center Saturday, June 15. An
actress-singer, Ryan, of TV's “Amen”,
is also noted as a singer who has
recorded several songs and who has
performed in nightclubs in Detroit,
Chicago, New York, Las Vegas and,
recently, in Miami at the Encore Room J
and Williams Island Supper Club to |
packed audiences. She has also per-
formed in the theatre. For tickets, call

RYAN
Golden Anniversary Celebration chair Dr. Nettie Dove,
238-2965.

rEe i i 3 ¢
[imes Journalism Award Winner

The first recipient of The Miami Times Journalism Scho-
larship at Florida International Uni- |
versity is Nicole Parke, 19, a 1988 gra-
duate of North Miami High School.
She will receive $1,350 in the fall
semester from a $1,000 grant from
The Miami Times and $350 in match-
ing funds from the university. Nicole
is the daughter of Lynval and Lillieth
Parke, 3110 Salinas Way, Miramar.
She is planning a career in print jour-
nalism following her graduation from
FIU's School of Journalism and Mass
Communication next year. The school
won accreditation with honors earlier
this year and will soon be granted free-standing status at
FIU with director Art Heise becoming its first dean.

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2

Black students who are Valedictorians and Salutato-
rians this year are: Lashawn Thomas and Donna L. Atwa-
ter, Academy for Community Education; Nadine Rolise
Chesson, Valedictorian, Miami Carol City Senior High;
Craig LaJuan Clay and Pierre-Ant Jean-Baptiste, Miami
Central Senior High; Robert Carol Morris and Tracy
Renate Lee, Miami Douglas McArthur Senior High-North;
Angela Manuel and Terry Parks, Miami Douglas McArthur
Senior High-South; Looby Calixte Similien, Salutatorian,
Miami Edison Senior High; Trynegwa Keyon Diggs, Saluta-
torian, Miami Norland Senior High; Flai Livingston, Delroy
A. Blue, Miami Northwestern Senior High; Valarie Wil-
liams, Valedictorian, New World School of the Arts; Lanelle
S. Williams, Salutatorian, North Miami Senior High.

Baseball Ignores

The Wayne Huizenga group seems almost certain to be
awarded a baseball expansion franchise following a
recommendation to that effect by a committee of the
National League. The proposal could be endorsed by team
owners as early as this week. The team would be housed at
the Joe Robbie Stadium in North Dade and that will
worsen a dispute between stadium owners and the
9,000-member homeowners association groups nearby as
well as Boycott Miami organizers, who had called for Black
participation in the franchise. “There is no celebration for
us,” said Johnnie McMillian, president of the Miami-Dade
NAACP. “Blacks have no real part to play in the decision-
making process.” :

ALLS Festival in oo.

On Saturday, June 15, 10 a.m.-5 p.r., g
the South Dade Minority Cultural Arts
Task Force will host its second Annual Cul-
tural Arts Festival at Richmond Heights
Park, 14375 Boggs Drive. Continental
Societies Inc., anon-profit group of women,
is the sponsor for the task force. “The festi-
val will bring a very clear message to the
community, that is, one must understand
a culture to know a people,“ said Larcenia
Bullard, project manager of the task force.

)
BULLARD
NAACD V

a) /% A n %
INA R |

outh Pageant Saturday

On Saturday, June 15, at the Airport Hilton, 1870 Grif-
fin Road, Dania, the Miami-Dade Youth Council NAACP
will crown the 1991 Little Mr./Miss NAACP. This year's
contestants are Travon Petit, Robert Rowe, Jr., Zachara
Greene, Byron Hankerson, Evian Joseph, Courtney Smith
and Rhsodii Gerdas. The winners will compete in the
National Competition in Houston, Texas, July 6-12. Dona-
tion is $12. The public is invited to attend.

Hearings On UTD Complaint

A state commission was expected in the area for three
days of hearings starting Wednesday, June 12, into
charges of unfair labor practices against Campbell Drive
Middle principal by United Teachers of Dade. The hearings
continue June 13 and 14, starting at 9 a.m., at Homestead
City Hall's conference room. PULSE, which has taken up
the case of the Black principal, vowed to monitor the hear-
ings closely.

Judge Phil Davis Is Among 3
Being Probed For Corruption

By NWACHUKWU EZEM
Circuit Judge Phillip Davis, the
first Black to win countywide elec-

| tion without first being nominated

ne ———————

to office is among four sitting and
one former judge being investi-

gated for alleged bribery in a feder-
al and state sting operation.
The homes of the five men were
raided in a sudden swoop by feder-
al agents Saturday. Documents
were seized from the homes and

the chambers of the judges.
The judges have all taken paid
administrative leave and, as the
investigation proceeds, official
reports claim that cash marked by
agents in the sting was found in the

homes of all the judges except
Davis.

But agents. allege that some
$30,000 was paid out to Davis

Continued On Page 2A

Alumnae Chapter Of Delta Sigma Theta Celeb

The Miami Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sor-
ority will celebrate its Golden Anniversary with a series of
activities this weekend. In photo are members of the chap-
ter. An anniversary show will feature nationally known

rate 50th Anniversary

performer Roz Ryan at the Caleb Center on Saturday,
along with local talent James Randolph. (See pages 3B-5B
for special salute to the Deltas.)

Hardwick Quits JESCA: Others May Leave

By MOHAMED HAMALUDIN

The James E. Scott Community
Association (JESCA) will launch a
state-wide effort to recruit a suc-
cessor to the beleagured executive
director of the James E. Scott Com-

munity Association (JESCA) who
finally called it quits last Thursday,
setting the stage for the departure
of more senior officials, according
to reliable sources close to the

agency.

Goombay Time In The Grove

Percy “Vola” Francis, leader of the Saxon Super Stars
junkanoo band from Nassau, Bahamas, performing at

the Goombay Festival in Coconut Grove last weekend.
Times photo/CLAYTON HARRELL

BS

The sources said that top-level
resignations have been demanded
as well and that these could come
in a proposed “restructuring” of the
board of directors.

Hardwick submitted his letter of
resignation Thursday to board
chairperson Glenda Harris. It was
read at a heated five-hour board
meeting Friday but copies were not
circulated. The letter was accepted
unanimously, the sources said.

The sources said that the board
has asked for the voluntary resig-
nations of executive vice president
Clyde Pettaway, who was Hard-
wick's lieutenant, and Wanda
Cody, a consultant at the agency.

[tis also understood that several
motions were passed at the board
meeting asking for the resigna-
tions of Harris as well as James
Lamont, the treasurer, and Helen
Ross, the secretary.

The sources said it was only a
matter of time before those board
officials quit.

Some board members have
already resigned. They include Bill
Allen and Tom Brady. A few others
offered to leave but were asked to
stay on. They include formeg chair-
person Charles George who, the
sources said, was virtually ousted
through Hardwick's influence after
George set up a high-powered task
force to look into problems at the
agency which is more than 60
years old.

Following reports that the State
Attorney's Office was investigating
possible financial irregularities at
JESCA, Hardwick took paid leave
but pressure mounted on him to
resign. Following his departure,
Lydia Neisman, an executive vice

Continued On Page 2A

NAACP Gives Highest
Award To Boycott Team

By TAWNICIA FERGUSON
Reporter Intern

The theme for the Miami-Dade
Branch NAACP's Third Annual
Awards Banquet Saturday was
“Preparing the New Generation for
the Struggle.” Held at Studio One
83 in Carol City, it drew over 1,000
people.

Johnnie McMillian, president,
presented awards to those people
and organizations who showed
notable support for the NAACP.
Among them was the newest
award, the Neal Adams/Richard
Powell Civil Rights Award, named
in honor of two “freedom fighters”
who have dedicated their lives to
“the struggle” and have been active
with the NAACP for over 40 years.

It is presented to the person or
organization who have demon-
strated courage and unending
dedication to the cause and the

winners were Boycott Miami: Coal-
ition for Progress and Deloris
Wright.

The President's Award for out-
standing service to the branch
went to sixth vice-president and
Mistress of Ceremonies Betty Fer-
guson and executive board mem-
ber Doris Hart.

And 10 graduating seniors from

Continued On Page 2A

| CRUICH .. iin riinnianiens

Classified ..........c.oivnniis 8C
I Deaths... iiiiniiinnias 2C
ORE css arises pisses 4A
| Entertainment ................... 1D
Lifestyle............cuemmurnassn 1B
National .......ci.ccinnsinrsnsonsin 7A
SPO cinema 7D

[ Street Talk......ic.cconrerriarne
I rroire WOR ....ooeeiisenses



2A THE MIAMI TIMES

Thursday, June 13, 1991

Federal Probe Of Bribery Targets
Judge Phillip Davis And 4 Others

Continued From Page 1A

allegedly after he went easy on a
supposed suspect who was really
part of the 18-month sting
operation.

Other subjects of the probe
include Circuit Judges Roy T. Gel-
berand Alphonso Sepe and County
Judge Harvey N. Shenberg, along
with former judge David Goodhart,
now in private practice.

No charges have been filed
against anyone and the men have
denied wrongdoing.

The 37-year-old Davis is one of
the youngest and newest circuit
judges in Dade. Born in Hartford,
Ct., he graduated from Providence
College, the Boston University
School of Social Work and the Bos-
ton College Law School.

He joined the Dade County pro-
secutor's office in 1981 and was
elected a circuit judge in 1988 after
a bitter campaign against Fredrick
R. Mann.

Federal and state agents con-
fronted Davis as he was getting
ready to go to the Metro Justice
Building for the jury deliberations
in a rape and kidnap trial. Judge
Ralph Person took his place.

In their search of Davis's home,
agents took financial and other
records and, from his chamber,
took a pad marked “Things to do
Today", folders captioned “Fairway

Travel”, “Airlines”, “Federal
Express”, “Connecticut National
Bank”, “Connecticut Student

Loan”, Letter to Charles Diblasi
from Phillip Davis, Letter to Phillip
Davis from Dade County and
copies of appeal summaries.

A joint statement by U.S. Attor-

:
\

PHILLIP DAVIS, Circuit Judge,
among targets of federal corrup-
tion probe

ney Dexter Lehtinen and Dade
State Attorney Janet Reno revealed
the operation and the searches,
saying they were authorized by
Chief Federal Judge James
Lawrence King.

Based on information received,
the U.S. government, with the
cooperation and assistance of
state authorities, had been con-
ducting an undercover investiga-
tion of judicial corruption in Flori-
da's 11th Judicial Circuit, the
statement said.

The State Attorney's office, the
U.S. Attorney's office, the Federal
Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and
the Florida Department of Law
Enforcement (FDLE) worked as a
team in the operation.

The statement said the covert
phases of the investigation war-
ranted placing fictitious cases
before some judges in which FBI
and FDLE agents appeared before
them as defendants.

During the prosecution of the
cases, money was paid to the
judges for various corrupt activi-
ties such as improper release of
confidential information, return of
property to defendants, reduction
of bail bonds and suppression of
evidence, the statement alleged.

Ramond Takiff, an attorney for-
merly defending former Panamian
leader Gen. Manuel Noriega before
he was brought to United States to
face drug charges, cooperated with
the government as a confidential
witness in the investigation of cor-
ruption among judges, the state-
ment said.

Takiff had to withdraw as Norie-
ga's attorney after he agreed to
cooperate with the government in
the on-going investigation.

The government has mot reve-
aled what promise was made to
Takiff before he agreed to coop-
erate in the undercover
investigation.

While none of the judges has
been indicted or charged with any
definite offense, Lehtinen and
Reno in the statement said “the
importance of this investigation for
our community places a premium
upon expeditious completion.”

They also said the seriousness
of the investigation requires thor-
oughness and fairness to all those
concerned.

“We will seek to balance these
factors in bringing the continuing
investigation to a resolution at the
earliest possible time,” the state-
ment added. :

Efforts to reach Davis and his
attorney Richard Sharpstein for
comment were unsuccessful.

Hardwick Quits As JESCA Chief

Continued From Page 1A

president, will act as director.

George is chairing a committee
that will screen applicants for the
job. The sources said the commit-
tee had been set up to find an inter-
im director when Hardwick had
not yet resigned. Some dozen
resumes had been received by the
end of last week.

Meanwhile, the board brushed
aside a call from the task force set
up by George earlier in the year
that it resign en bloc. That was
seen to be an unnecessary step
and one that could have led to the
dissolution of the agency, the sour-
ces said.

It now appears that the board
will lose some of its members and
bring in some new blood as well as
a fresh director as it seeks to pull
out of a financial quagmire.

The Internal Revenue Service
has sued the agency for over
$400,000 and, because of the
automatic lien on JESCA assets,
funding agencies such as the
United Way have frozen further
disbursements.

The sources gave no indication
astowhether the agency is drafting
a plan to rise out of such money
problems. It appeared that the
priority now is to restore credibility
to the agency which, at one time,
had a budget of $7 million and has
been serving 8,000 needy people in
various categories with a staff of
300.

Hardwick headed the agency for
some 22 years and ‘saw it grow to
the biggest of its kind in the coun-
ty. But some of the revelations
about financial activities have
stunned many people. One reliable
source said over $300,000 of JES-

Tucker Blasts Bush On

Continued From Page 1A

the Miami-Dade Branch Youth
Council, active since elementary
school, were awarded $100 each.

Dr. C. Delores Tucker, guest
speaker, said she was very disap-
pointed that Blacks in Florida and
throughout the country still have
to struggle for civil rights. “There
are so many other important
things to struggle for,” she said.
“And, after all this time, we still
have to struggle for our civil
rights.”

Dr. Tucker said that President
George Bush's policy is a political
ploy to divert White America's
attention away from what she said
is the serious racial tension that
exists in the United States. “He will
throw a parade in Washington,
D.C., to celebrate the skirmish in
the Middle East against a country
that we supplied with weapons,”
she said angrily, “but he won't pass

a simple civil rights bill.” (President
Bush vetoed a bill last year and is
threatening to do so again this
year.)

Dr. Tucker suggested that one
reason the Black community
seems to be in an eternal struggle
is that there is always more talk
than action. She praised Boycott
Miami organizers for their effective
“quiet riot” and she challenged
Black schoolteachers to work with-
in the system to see that Black stu-
dents get a “proper education.” The
failure of Black students to
achieve, she said, is the fault of
apathetic Black teachers. She
urged the teachers to work with the
NAACP for the sake of the children.

Anotherreason that Blacks can-
not get ahead, Dr. Tucker theor-

ized, is that they don’t keep their

money in their communities. “In
the Asian community, the dollar
turns over about 16 times before
leaving,” she said. “In the Jewish

CA funds intended for the needy
was diverted to personal use.

The American Express corpo-
rate account of the agency indi-
cates tens of thousands of dollars
going to what are evidently person-
al purchases. They include visits to
Disney World, men's clothing and
accessories, hotel and airline
charges, jewels, toys, perfumes,
home furnishings, car rental.

The total on the account for a
20-month period was $167,000,
followed by another $175,000
used from petty cash in a
34-month period.

The Miami Herald reported sev-
eral weeks ago that Hardwick and
his former finance director George
Thoroman signed some 96 checks
made out to themselves and totall-
ing over $100,000. The two men
denied wrongdoing and Thoroman
has dropped out of sight.

Rights Bill

community, it turns over eight or

“nine times. But, in the Black com-

munity, the dollar turns over only
one time before we give it away to
support somebody else.”

Blacks, she arged, are very cap-
able of producing high-quality
goods, but they simply do not sup-
port one another.

Tucker, former Secretary of
State of Pennsylvania, 1971 to
1977, is chair of the Democratic
National Committee Black Caucus
and president of the Bethune-
DuBois Fund. She was the first
Black to serve as president of the
Naitonal Federation of Democratic

Women, convening founder and,
vice president of the National Polit-

ical Congress of Black Women and
founding president of the Martin
Luther King Association for Non-
Violent Change.

In 1991, she launched the
publication Vital Issues: The Jour-
nal of African-American Speeches.

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PL Sam ha CIE EA

Thursday, June 13, 1991

Grambling

By OMAR ST. PAUL

LOS ANGELES — Miss
Grambling State University, Tif-
fany Williams, emerged winner
1991 Miss Collegiate African-
American Pageant Sunday night.

Williams took the title from a
field of 32 contestants in what
pageant organizers described as
one of the most competitive in its
seven-year history.

The show was filmed on the
“Star Search” set at Universal Stu-
dios in Hollywood and will be tele-
vised later.

With the title, the 22-year-old
senioralsoreceivesa $10,000 cash
award, a brand new Chrysler Sha-
dow convertible, a scholarship
worth $1,000 donated by Emerge
Magazine, a week's stay in the
Clark Gable penthouse suite cour-
tesy of the Roosevelt Hotel and an
all-expense paid trip to Grenada
sponsored by Class Magazine. In
addition, she will be touring the
country on speaking engagements
at Black universities and will make
live performances to showcase her
singing talent.

Williams hails from St. Louis,
Missouri, but now calls Abbeyville,
Louisiana (population 12,000) her
home. She will graduate next May
with a double major in computer

Senior Wins Crown In
1991 Miss Collegiate Pageant

science and statistics.

Despite her success at the
pageant, Williams sees her future
in the corporate boardroom.

“You can achieve anything,” she
said, “if you believe in yourself and
in God.”

Reminded that two of her pre-
decessors had gone on to achieve
stardom — Adrienne (A.J.) John-
son, who performed in the 1989 hit
movie, “House Party,” and record-
ing artist, Sybil — she said that she
was keeping her options open.

Runner-up was Adrienne Base-
den, 21, a senior at Wilberforce
University, majoring in sociology.
A native of Seattle, Washington,
she will attend graduate school in
May 1992, to specialize in real
estate and economic development.

Third place went to Nicole
Sutherland from New Orleans,
Louisiana. Now 21, she plans to
graduate in May 1992, with a
degree in jazz studies and business
management. She says her future
lies in the entertainment field.

The contestants also included
Michelle Herrington (Bethune-
Cookman) and Marcia Foster (Flor-
ida’ A&M).

The idea of a pageant to cele-
brate pride in African heritage
began in Miami with Frank Merca-

do, who, in 1984, was a 22-year-
old senior at the University of
Miami. His gift of gab won over loc-
al attorney George Knox, who, in
turn, convinced Miami Commis-
sioner Miller Dawkins and the rest
of the city commission of the viabil-
ity of such a show. The result was
the inaugural staging of the Miss
Collegiate African-American
Pageant in 1985 and the launching
of the career of Adrienne Johnson,
the first winner.

Today, Mercado is the president
of Alto-Marc Communications but
still manages the day-to-day oper-
ations of the pageant he conceived.
He is also involved in the political
arena, serving as a staff consultant
for the Bush/Quayle Presidential
Campaign Headquarters in
Washington, D.C.

Mercado believes that every
business person, at whatever level
of success, ought to help someone
outside of his or her immediate
family. Without help, he said, he
would have been just another per-
son with an idea which never came
to fruition.

Each year, the pageant
attracts growing interest from
established stars of stage and
screen, as well as corporate spon-
sorship. Kadeem Hardison of “A

Drew Students Visit The Capital

The students of the Atlantis
Gifted Center of the Charles R.
Drew Elementary School, 1775
N.W. 60th St., have become exper-
ts on the nation’s capital. Thirty
thousand dollars was raised to
fund a field trip to Washington,
D.C. The center overcame many
obstacles, such as airline price
changes and lack of overall funds.
Delta Airline adjusted airline fees
and many private donors, busi-
ness organizations and parents
supported the effort.

It was a unique experience for
the students. Some of them had
never been outside of Dade Coun-
ty. For many, it was their first air-
line flight and their first trip to the
capital.

The students met with Vice-
President Dan Quayle's aide,
toured the Vice-President's Office
and Senate, visited the Smithso-
nian museums, the Lincoln monu-
ment, Frederick Douglass's home
and other historic sites.

They had an added bonus when
they met Charlene Drew Jarvis,
daughter of the late medical pion-

*. eer Dr. Charles R. Drew, for whom

their school is named. The stu-
dents were disappointed to find
that there was no monument for
Dr. Drew.

After speaking with Jarvis, a
councilwoman in the District of
Columbia, it was decided that the
Atlantis Gifted Center students
will spearhead an effort to lobby
their congress persons for Dr.
Drew's home to become a national
museum, monument or memorial.

As part of the learning experi-
ence, the students kept a journal
every evening of the day’s events.
These journals were shared with

“When somebody commits an

offense such as Hardwick has .

done, the only thing left for him to
do is to quit. Why should JESCA's
reputation be tarnished by his
refusal to step down? The center is
vital to ouryoung people, and must
remain open. But Hardwick and
his croonies should go.”

eh

Charles R. Drew Atlantis Center students in front of the

Capitol building during recent trip to Washington, D.C.

the other students upon their
return to school.

The excitement and learning
experience of the trip to Washing-

Toll Collector
Miami

JOANNE BROWN

“Yes. He has ruined JESCA's

ton, D.C. has inspired the students
to make this an annual event. Fun-
draising for next year's trip will
begin in September.

good name. He and the two White
people he was in league with took
money that was intended to help
those who really need assistance.
Correct me if I'm wrong, but the
only thing left for him to do was res-
ign. Furthermore, I believe that he
should be made to repay every pen-
ny he took. This is a sad case of

power abuse.”

STACY VICKERS
Counselor
Miami

“Kick his butt out. Under no cir-
cumstances whatsoever should he
continue to direct the center. Who #
knows what he would get up to §
next? Handing in his resignation
benefits the community plus it is
the only decent thing left for him to
do. If he did not resign he could
further jeopardize the center. He
has done the wrong thing; it was
now time for him to do the right
thing.”

BEVERLY LEWIS
Housewife
Miami

“I say he should go. JESCA is an
organization that iggvery well
known in the commuiiity. They
have given a lot of hope to people
who otherwise would have ended
up in jail. They hold meetings to
discuss matters relevant to us.
And they find shelter for those who
have no where to go. Why should
the organization suffer because of
one man. He and his board should
be shown the door.”

MELVIN BYRD
Landscaper
Miami

“Yes. | have every admiration for
JESCA,; they have been doing won-
derful work in the Black cornank

. Young people are given jobs an

Youre this keeps them off the
streets and out of jail. But Hard-
wick has done a dirty deed. He has
taken money away from his own.
There is absolutely no room for dis-
cussion: the man had to go and the
complete administration should go
with him. The slate must be wiped
clean, so that the good work that
JESCA is renowned for continues.”

YVENER LAFRANCE
Hairdresser
Miami

“Definitely. Why is it that every
time Blacks try to do something
good for themselves a bad apple
attempts to ruin the whole bunch?
He has taken money out of the
mouths of people who need help.
The longer it took him to resign, the
more he was damaging the organi-
zation. He had no right to do that. ,
The center needs to stay open but
for the benefit of the community,
Hardwick had to resign.”

WILLIAMS

BASEDEN

Different World” and Holly Robin-
son of “21 Jump Street” were hosts
this year and, on hand to perform
were Kool Moe Dee and Najee.
Judges were Darryl Bell, Marla
Gibbs, Dr. Sam Myers, Keith Lock-
hart, Maxwell Thomas, Sandra
Evers-Manly, Bethann Hardison,
Dolores Robinson, Richard Law-
son, Beverly Todd, and Reginald
VelJohnson.

Corporate sponsors included
Proline Corporation, Roosevelt
Hotel, Universal Studios, Proctor
and Gamble, American Airlines,
Chrysler, Coca Cola, Emerge
Magazine, Class Magazine, New
York Cosmetics, and Unity
Broadcasting.

Lotto Jackpot
At $6 Million

The Lotto Jackpot will be at an esti-
mated $6 million again this
Saturday. Two winning tickets
were purchased in Boca Raton and
St. Petersburg for last week's draw-
ing and will split the $6 million
prize. The numbers were
10-24-32-37-45-47.

The Fantasy Five winning com-
binations were: Wednesday, June
5, 12-24-27-28-30, payoff 5 of 5, 3
winners, $284,199.71, 4 of 5, 750
winners, $323, 25820 winners,
$4.50; Monday, June 9,
1-13-20-21-25, 5 of 5, 3 winners,
$286,181.20, 4 of 5, 666 winners,
$337, 50, 3 of 5, 22050 winners,
$5; Wednesday, June 7,
21-10-13-28-32, 5 of 5, 3 winners,
$349,85.05, 4 of 5, 110 winners,
$329. 50, 3 of 5, 27568 winners,
$5.50.

Meanwhile the Cash 3 numbers
from Wednesday, June 5, up until
yesterday are: 0-9-4, 3-9-4, 1-8-0,
7-3-9, 5-3-2, 1-4-2, 1-4-4.

LaFREDA R. ROBINSON

YOLANDA R. ROBINSON

Miami Sisters Keep
Eyes On Excellence

Two Miami sisters are continu-
ing to strive for excellence in the
pursuit of higher education.

LeFreda R. Robinson, 1983 gra-
duate of Archbishop Curley /Notre
Dame High School and 1987 gra-
duate of Tennessee State Universi-
ty, will start her final year in the fall
in the doctorate program at Mercer
University, Southern School of
Pharmacy, in Atlanta, GA.

Yolanda D. Robinson, 1988 gra-
duate of Miami Edison Senior High
School, willbegin her senioryear at
Tennessee State University, in
Nashville, TN, in the fall.

Freddie and Susie Robinson are
the proud parents of these indus-
trious young ladies.

LaFreda worked one year in
research in the Microbiology
department at Meharry Medical
College in Nashville, TN, upon gra-
duating from Tennessee State
University.

Dr. George C. Hill, head of the
department, recommended her for
the Pharm.D. program at Mercer
and she received a scholarship
from the Kathryn Whitten Trust
Fund.

During LaFreda's matriculation
at Mercer, she became an active
participant in many extra-
curricular activities, such as being

Police Charge Man
With Killing Toddler

By DELICIA HICKS
Reporter Intern

Police Sunday charged Willie
Eugene Jackson, 39, of Okeecho-
bee, with second-degree muder
after his 2-year-old son died from a
scalding bath.

The Dade County Medical Exa-
miner said that skin burns caused
by the scalding were the reason for
the toddler's death. The boy was
taken Saturday to Jackson
Memorial Hospital, where he died.
Dr. Roger Mittleman, Medical Exa-
miner, said that second to third-
degree burns covered over 80 per-
cent of the child's body.

A witness told police that, before
the child was placed in the tub, the
water was rising with steam and
she heard the boy screaming from
the bathroom. When she tried to
intervene, Jackson slapped her,
she said.

BM Two men shot into a Northwest
Miami apartment at 4:40 p.m.
Saturday killing one man and criti-
cally wounding another. Feliz
Perez, 5, of 2417 N.W. 26th St., was
shot several times and was listed in

§ “critical condition.

Manolo Garcia, 38, was shot in
the chest and died at Jackson
Memorial Hospital.

Miami homicide detective Fer-
nando Cabeza said the shootings
were possibly drug-related. Police
said the two men fled on foot, then,
later, stole a car a few blocks away.
The car was recovered in an area of
Dade County, but the suspects
remained at large.

BW Burglars broke into Miami-Dade
Community College's North Cam-
pus, 11380 N.W. 27th Ave.
between May 30 and Monday, and
took a $1,649 computer, a $370
printer, a $104 console and $576
in software.

BW Burglars entered a home in the
1800 block of N.W. 127th Street
Wednesday between 8 and 9:30
a.m. and took $1,280 in gold jewel-
ry. The homeowner told police that
there was no sign of forced entry,
but that his son lost the house key
one month ago.

BW Burglars forced their way into a
window of a tented home in the
2300 block of N.W. 151st Street
Wednesday between 2 and 6 p.m.
and stole 10 purses worth $1,000
and a $200 jogging suit.

HW Someone broke into a home in
the 2100 block of Service Road and
stole a television, aVCR, anda Nin-
tendo game set. There were no
signs of forced entry.

HM A woman returned home from
shopping Tuesday to find her home
in the 9000 block of Northwest
36th Avenue ransacked. Burglars
took $2,400 in gold jewelry and a
$70 telephone.

HM A man was shot in the thigh at
Northwest 52nd Street and 26th

Avenue as he walked west. He said
the gunman wearing light blue
pants, a red-and-black jacket and
a gray ski-mask approached him,
saying, “Remember me,” then fired
two shots and fled. He was taken to
Jackson Memorial Hosptial where
he was later released.

any.

SPREADING LARCENY

«® Curious how the 19 present and former state lawmak-
“ers charged with failing toreport gifts are all White. Either
our Black legislators have an incorruptible quality about
them — or the people who bear “gifts” do not think they can
influence events in Tallahassee and so are not deserving of

= The Key West police Chief, Tom Webster, who does not
have too many fans among the Blacks in his city, could be
on the way out finally. Monroe Circuit Judge Jeff Overby
recently ruled that City Manager Felix Cooper can termi-
nate Webster's contract at any time. The man draws
$103,515 a year for that small town — much more than is
paid to the chief in Miami. And some of the worst abuse of
police power against Blacks has taken place during his
tenure. Blacks won't shed a tear if he is fired.

the immediate past president of
the Student National Pharmaceut-
ical Association, American Society
of Pharmacists, Georgia Hospital
Pharmacist and Christian Student
Pharmacist.

LaFreda was elected into Who's
Who Among Students in American
Universities and Colleges, 1990-91
and Outstanding Young Women of
America, 1991, and initiated and
served as Dean of Pledges for Phi
Delta Chi, a pharmacy fraternity.

Yolanda is an honor student at
Tennessee State University,
majoring in Speech Communica-
tion and Theatre, with a minor in
political science. She was elected
senior class president, was co-
chairperson of university peer
counselors and was selected to the
yearbook staff, the Tennessean.

In addition to these ativities, she
will be a columnist for the Meter,
the school newspaper, and an Edi-
torial Assistant of the Interpreter
Magazine.

The past two years, Yolanda has
taken on the active challenge of

being the freshman dorm's resi-
dent assistant.

She was initiated into Alpha Psi
chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sor-
ority Inc. She will serve as the
chapter's undergraduate intake
co-chairperson. She was also
inducted into the National Honor
Society and the Golden Key Honor
Society in 1991. She was selected
as an Outstanding College Student
of America and moved to the
National Dean's List of American
Colleges.

Yolanda interned in the commu-
nications department at Miami's
Channel 34. This summer, she is
interning in Nashville, TN, at the
United Methodist Communication
Department.

= The Shell filling station at the corner of 54th Street and
7th Avenue does not provide full service during the night.
But some motorists have complained that if they pull up at
the full service pump and serve themselves, the price that
rings up is not $1.27 but $1.65 a gallon. Unsuspecting
motorists could be taken in by it so some have started look-
ing closely at the pumps and demanding they be charged
at the right price. The station should make it easier for
motorists by either charging the appropriate price or clos-
ing the full-service pumps at night.

w The Jewish Community could be on a collision course
with Blacks over the Civil Rights Bill which President
George Bush has promised to veto. The Anti-Defamation
League is expressing “serious reservations” about the bill,
especially on the issue of “quotas”. Blacks want the bill
signed. Stay tuned.

w The Spanish American League Against Discrimination
(SALAD) is suddenly finding what the NAACP proved over a
year ago — that discrimination is alive and well in Miami
Beach. In fact, this time, SALAD is looking into, of all
things, anti-Semitism on the Beach.

w Former Dade Housing chief James E. Baugh, who res-
igned in the face of federal charges of bribery while he was
an official in Washington, has been found innocent by a
federal jury. Baugh was forced out of his position after the
charges were laid and there is some talk that he plans to
take up the matter with Metro now that his name has been
cleared. He had been accused of taking a bribe from
Washington contractor John B. Clyburn to help the latter
win a U.S. HUD contract in 1986. Clyburn was also found
innocent of the charge.

w Don't think that because the White media is not report-
ing on the Boycott it has lost steam. The lates’ to join in is
New Covenant Presbyterian Church, bringir g to 60 the
number of local groups backing the campaign, along with
31 national organizations.

Ch Re Ra rE



4A Les June 13, 1991

Editorials

Doing The Right Thing

t must have been painful for Mr. Archie Hardwick to finally
1 summon the courage to hand in hisresignation last Thurs-

day as executive director of the James E. Scott Community

Association (JESCA). With that action, he brought to a
close some 22 years of service to an organization over which he
presided as it grew from small size to the largest of its kind in the
area.

But Mr. Hardwick had no choice. Once he became the focus of
criminal investigations into possible financial wrongdoing and it
was clear that his agency was hurting to the point of collapse, it
was riecessary for him to step aside permanently. The investiga-
tions are still proceeding, so there is no apportionment of guilt
here, however damning some of the evidence may seem.

But the resignation of the executive director may not be
enough. There are others who have been tarnished by the finan-
cial scandal that has paralyzed JESCA. They too must be bold
enough torecognize that their presence on the board or as execu-
tives of the agency hurts more than it helps and they too should
depart. ;

The time is long past to clean house at JESCA and redirect
energies not to attributing blame but to re-establishing stability
and credibility to an agency that is a leader in its field.

Time will tell the extent of the legacy which Mr. Hardwick has
bequeathed and whether it can withstand the test of the scandal
which now surrounds it.

Ignoring Black Concerns

ajor league sports as an institution is big business

that, in its dealings with African Americans, is no bet-

ter than a glorified plantation system. That isno origi-

nal conclusion but it becomes pertinent now that the
National League, despite the urgent concerns of African Ameri-
cans in Dade County, is poised to grant a baseball franchise to a
local group of investors.

One concern stems from the homeowners near the Joe Robbie
Stadium, in North Dade, where the proposed expansion will be
housed. Those concerns are older than the stadium itself and are
still being litigated in the courts.

Another concern is that of the organizers of Boycott Miami,
who rightly feel that issuing a franchise without any effort to
address some of their economic complaints is no better than sup-
port for the established forces that have been the cause of the
many socio-economic problems facing Blacks.

Major league sports would have you believe that problems
such as these are a domestic matter that should not weigh in the
decision to grant a franchise. Nothing could be further from the
truth. If an institution as powerful as organized big-time sports is
irr this country cannot see the dire necessity to use its consider-
able clout to influence change for the better then it is only a mat-
ter of time before the racial cohesiveness that characterizes the
sporting world becomes fractured.

The National League will be doing everyone a favor if it requires
that the franchise applicants from South Florida make a good-
faith commitment not only to allay the fears of homeowners
about noise pollution and traffic congestion but also that the
partnership fully involves Black investors and businesses. It is

the honorable thing to do.

~ Time For Reflection

his has not been a good period of time for Black Miami.

First came the news that senior officials at the James E.

Scott Community Association (JESCA) were the focus of

criminal investigations into possible financial irregular-
ities. The agency has been reeling since then and has taken
weeks before starting to put itself in order.

Mr. Archie Hardwick, executive director of JESCA for 22
years, and a target of the probe, resigned last Thursday. Other
senior staff and some board members are likely to be forced out
as well. The 8,000 persons served by JESCA wait anxiously in
hope that the agency will weather the storm.

Then came reports that two very well liked young pastors of

. the new breed of activist priests had resigned from their chur-
ches in circumstances still not fully made clear.

Rev. Victor Curry has quit at Mt. Carmel Missionary Baptist
Church and Rev. Richard Dunn has left his post as assistant
pastor of Drake Memorial Missionary Baptist Church. They are
continuing their mission to awaken Black Miami to an aware-
ness of the conditions around us and to keep the right issues on
the frontburner.

On their radio program, “Issue for the Day”, on WMBM, they
pull no punches when discussing current topics. They continue
to inspire many people who look on them as an alternative to the
“old leadership.” But questions have now arisen that, at least in
the minds of some, could hinder their effectiveness.

And, even more recently, it was announced that Circuit Judge
Mr. Phillip Davis is among four sitting and one former judge who
are the subject of a federal investigation of bribery and corrup-
tion. Mr. Davis made history not so long ago when he became the
first Black in Dade County to win a county-wide election before
being first appointed to elected office. The FBI raid on his home
astonished his admirers and supporters.

Judge Davis, through his attorney, maintains he has done no
wrong and, until it is proved otherwise, there is no reason what-
soever to believe he did. The federal government has to demons-
trate conclusively that this is not another case of a bright Black
man being the subject of harassment because he is on the
upward climb. That has happened to too many other Black men
here in Dade County and in the rest of the United States to be
taken lightly.

Meanwhile, none of this should detract from the fact that
Black Miami is in a new phase of the struggle for our rights and
our place in the sun. There will be those who will fall by the way-
side. Others will be persecuted because of their activism and
their threat tothe “system”. But solong as our faith remains firm,
nothing can derail us on our journey to the mountain top.

Now, more than ever, we need to keep our eyes on the prize.

Ruling Favors The Rich

he two most recent opinions from the United States

Supreme Court on abortion have not only made an

impact on the debate surrounding that emotionally

charged subject but also has the effect of favoring the
rich here and abroad.

But the concern right now is the unwholesome way in which
ideology is once again being forced on people whose socio-
economic condition is such that they must depend on the federal
government for much of their care. It is unconscionable to man-
ipulate that condition to achieve an ideological and political
objective. And that manipulation is possible only because not
enough poor people take the time to become registered voters
and going to the polls to vote for those who do not use federal dol-
lars in a manner that discriminates against the have nots.

H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder
GARTH C. REEVES JR., 1951-1982

The
Audit
Bureau

GARTH C. REEVES. SR., Publisher
RACHEL J. REEVES, Executive Editor
MOHAMED HAMALUDIN, Managing Editor

Member of Audit Bureau of Circulations
Second class postage paid at Miami, Florida

SEW OgEmTo

GEMINI

The Miami Times

: ISSN 0739-0319
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Street, Miami, Florida 33127

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Phone (305) 757-1147

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Subscription Rates: One Year $35.00-Six Months $20.00 — Foreign $50.00

Credo of the Black Press
THE BLACK PRESS believes that
America canbest lead the world from
racial and national antagonism when
itaccords to every person, regardless I
of race, creed or color, his or her
human and legal rights. Hating no
person, fearing no person, the Black
Press strives to help every person in
the firm belief that all persons are
hurt as long as anyone is held back.

MEMBER

ARE AINRA

ASSOCIATION

AP 2ssociated Press
Letters To The Edito

Blacks Doing Well In Clerk’s Office

To the Editor:

Regarding Spreading Larceny of May 30:

It has always been my personal conviction that all minorities should
have an equal chance for available opportunities. I would like to point
out that of the 68 individuals that have been hired by the Clerk's Office
since November of 1990, 24 or 35 percent are African Americans. This
figure is higher than the over 22 percent population of African Ameri-
cans in Dade County. Furthermore, 36.5 percent of all employees in the
Clerk’s Office are African Americans, as compared with 34.5 percent of
total county employees.

Since taking office, there have been several promotions of African
Americans, which were merited by excellent work. There are a total of
126 supervisory /managerial positions in the Clerk's Office, 38 of which,
or 31 percent, are filled by African Americans.

With regard to the departure of Rubin Young, Rubin resigned totakea
position with Rep. Burke, which presented a greater challenge. We were
sorry to see him leave, but wish him well.

After reading the above, I am struck by the fact that the foregoing
seems to be dealing with numbers, mathematics and percentages. What
they cannot hope to express is the emotional reward of seeing doors
opened to opportunity and the chance for men and women to fulfill
themselves to the utmost of their abilities.

I will hold that door open wide at every conceivable opportunity.

MARSHALL ADER
Clerk
Circuit and County Courts

Preserve Black Studies Collection

To the Editor:

Corresponding to all the comments from readers about the Afro-
American representation in Dade Public Libraries: Perhaps many mem-
bers of the public are not aware that there is an outstanding Black Stu-
dies collection at the North Dade Regional Library, and rumor has it that
this collection, which has been devotedly developed over the last 10
years, is about to be integrated into the main collection. The public
would still have access to the books, but again our culture would be lost
as a separate and special area for those people who want to study and
explore our culture. Not even Black Archives has such a large collection
as is in North Dade Regional.

We should not just have a section of a library, such as the language
sections at Main Library and West Dade and South Dade Regional
Library; we should have an outstanding collection of our own to be equal
with the Hispanic Library, which is predominantly Spanish in its collec-
tion. Not only are our interests hidden and small, they are about to be
lost within a general collection of books.

Why is there no recognition of Afro-American culture in the Dade
County Library System? Why don't our children have a chance to enrich
their live through studying their culture at public libraries?

RON LOPEZ
North Miami

Racism Greater In America

To the Editor:

Referring to Yolanda Green's article, page 5A, May 23, in which she
described her visit to Europe, I take objection to her inaccurate observa-
tions concerning Blacks living in Britain. Her article is more judgemen-
tal than accurate and reads like the scribbled page in a personal diary
than informative journalism. Her belief that English people as a whole
speak with a “posh” accent shows her lack of knowledge of British socie-
ty and the class system. What might sound “posh” to her as a foreigner
would sound “working class” to an English suburbanite. | know because
I am a Black who grew up there.

Ms. Green sounds as though she went “looking for trouble.” Young
lady, the next time you travel, go with an open mind. Be prepared to like
the people you meet and remember that you are the foreigner when you
are abroad. Black citizens of other countries are flesh and blood like you.
1 will not deny there is racism in Britain but it can be nowhere as insidi-
ous as the racism practiced here in the U.S. Remember, it was not long
ago that Blacks were finally permitted to cross Miami's Biscayne Boule-
vard into Miami Beach without being arrested.

MARLENE GRAHAM
Miami

Britain Is More Integrated

To the Editor:

As a Black English woman, I have spoken to several other Blacks from
England and they all agree with me. The article by Yolanda Green, which
appeared in The Miami Times of May 23, page 5A, was totally off course.

Britain is a more integrated society than America. People are not
placed in categories according to color. For her information, a class sys-
tem exists over there. People of the same class, be they Black or White,
are grouped together. The reason for a high percentage of inter-racial
marriages is because there is less racial hatred on both sides. Did Miss
Green ever stop to think that the sole Black woman she spoke to may
have had a bad day? Miss Green makes a grave mistake when she uses
that one coincidence to classify a whole people.

She made many more inaccuracies about Europe, but do not intend
to address them in this letter. I would suggest, however, that if she
wishes to comment on the matter, she should live there for a minimum
of two years, before she again attempts to state her inaccurate percep-
tions, so that she at least gets her facts straight.

JANE SPENCER
South River Drive

McCrary Not Sued

To the Editor:

The Miami Times is human — it erred.

InyourJune 6, 1991, issue of The Miami Times, it is reported that the
undersigned has been sued by the U.S. Government for $270 million. I
would point out that I did serve as a member of the Board of Directo rs of
CenTrust Bank, but I was not sued as reported in June 6, 1991.

I am sure that you will retract this inadvertent mistake.

JESSE J. McCRARY, JR.
Attorney,

Editor's Note: Mr. McCrary is correct, si

Why The Price Increase?

To the Editor:

For 36 years or more, residents of the Overtown community have sup-
ported first the Kwik Check now Winn-Dixie Stores located at 2300 N.W.
7th Ave. We have had a good relationship with management and corpo-
ration presidents. This is why I cannot understand why check-cashing
increased in cost without warning from 50 cents to $2. Is it costing
Winn-Dixie to deposit checks in the bank? We certainly need an

explanation.

ANNE MARIE ADKER
Overtown

Civil Rights Journal

By Benjamin Chavis

National Effort Needed
To Halt Loss Of Land

June 23, 1991 has been desig-
nated “Save Black Owned
Land/Black Farmer Day” by the
African American Land Preserva-
tion Fund. We wholeheartedly sup-
port this effort to focus national
attention on one of the most seri-
ous crises confronting African
Americans in the 1990s: the dra-
matic increase in the loss of land in
the United States.

Once again it is absolutely
necessary for us to remind our con-
stituencies across the nation that
all is not well in the African Ameri-
can community and, on the issue
of land loss, the problem appears
to be getting worse.

Back in 1920,
African Ameri-
cans owned over .
15 million acres of
land throughout
the nation, parti-
cularly in the
South. But,
today, African
Americans are
losing land at the
highest rate of
any single racial or ethnic group in
America. In 1991, African Ameri-
cans are losing more than 1,000
acres a day, again particularly in
the South.

Is this one of the manifestations
of the so-called “new South"? Or is
this phenomenon part and parcel
of a national effort to further dis-
empower the African American
community by the greed of power-
ful political and real estate inter-
ests? Or is the cause of this prob-
lem simply miseducation and una-
wareness among African
Americans about the seriousness
of land loss issues? The truth is
that there is a combination of
many factors that has led to this

situation; yet, it is important, in
the words of the African American
Land Preservation Fund, “to sound
a national alarm.”

Mr. Clayton Hammond of the
National Black Farmers Harvest
based in Philadelphia, Pa., stated,
“African Americans must develop
the capacity to feed themselves,
given these trends in the area of
food production. Unless we act
now, by the year 2000 African
Americans will be virtually a land-
less people, making no significant
contribution to food production.”

African American farmers in the _

past were almost 15 percent of all
farmers in the United States. But,
today, African American farmers
only represent less than one per-
cent of all farmers remaining in the
nation.

Boldly, the African’ American
Land Preservation Fund has set a
1991-1992 fundraising goal of
$2.5 million to help establish an

* Agricultural Revolving Loan Fund,

Agricultural Land Trust, and the
Minority Capacity-Building Fund
and the Minority Land Registry —
all to help stem the tide of increas-
ing African American land loss.

Whether it is in the South or
other parts of the nation, African
Americans and others who care
about the “quality of life” need to
respond to this issue. Support
Black Land Loss Day and contri-
bute time, energy and resources.
Call 1-800-444-8935,
1-800-672-5839 or
1-215-471-0957. Lend a helping
hand. The land you save may be
your own.

Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis is execu-
tive director of the Commission for
Racial Justice of the United Church
of Christ.

War On Crime

By RASHAD EL-AMIN

For some time, there has been
talk in this country about a War on
Crime. Many so-called leaders view
the solution to the epidemic of

‘criminal activity is to hire more
police officers and open more jails.
Their only answer is to come after
the fact and attempt to put a band
aid on the problem, rather than
going to the core and removing the
circumstances that create and
promote criminal activity.

No one is born a criminal. I
repeat: no one is born a criminal.
We allow criminals to be created
through our neglect and insensi-
tivity to conditions that exist in our
great country.

The War on Crime must begin
with re-awakening the conscience
of human beings in this society.
The War on Crime must begin with
placing the fear of God, the respect
of God, back in society.

Do we really want to solve the
problem of crime in this country?
The best police officer to have in
this society is our own conscience.
If my conscience is awake and I fear
displeasing God, then I'm not going
to go into society and commit crime
on top of crime. I will have a self-
checking mechanism in me. When
I think about committing a crime,
my conscience will provide the
safeguard against acting in an
unlawful manner provided it is

awake. However, when I'm encour-
aged by popular culture to “do my
own thing,” then my own thing
might be breaking into someone
else's house. :

One of the recent things that
have happened in popular culture
in recent years is the phrase “do
the right thing.” Society and the
leaders of popular culture can turn
this plague of criminal activity
around. As long as we continue to
allow human beings’ fear of dis-
pleasing God to be destroyed, we
are certainly not going to see
human being respect their fellow
or be concerned with “doing the
right thing.”

Whether we like it or not, re-
establishing conscience in the
masses of America’s citizens is the
greatest thing that we can do to les-
sen criminal activity in this coun-
try. Crime is not going to disappear
but, if an individual is thinking
about “doing the right thing,” then
there is a chance that he or she will
do the right thing.

Some form of prayer should be
returned to our public school
system.

Editor's Quote Book

‘Most men pursue pleasure
with such breathless haste that
they hurry past it.”’

Soren Kierkegaard



iD

— ® v ©

| La ®

Thursday, June 13, 1991

5A

Rich Cultural Heritage Of Haitians
Is Cement For Unity Among Blacks

By JONAS GEORGES

“In a recent class discussion, the
question was raised as to the kind
of understanding Haitians have of
Black America, in general and Afri-
can Americans, in particular. The
perception, assured the interlocu-
tor, is that Haitians tend to be
extremely negative when it comes
to relationships
with the other
Black ethnic
groups. The com-
ments that fol-
lowed were as °
diverse as the
class had per-
sons. However,
the underlying
fact is that the ©
perception was GEORGES
confirmed that Haitians in general
are not very happy with Black
America.

The reality is that there is real
tension between the two groups.
One senses a mutual fear. As a
friend of mine puts it: “As far as we
African Americans, it is the fear of
the unknown.” On the other hand,
for us Haitians, it is the fear of what
I call a “distorted reality.”

In talking to responsible per-
sons of both sides, I detect a
genuine concern and a sincere
desire to improve relationships.
Why allow fear to have the upper
hand when we have the power and
overcome fear? Does not the Scrip-
ture teach us that “perfect love dis-
pels all fear"?

In the words of some of my Afri-
can American colleagues, the dis-
appointment of that community in
the behavior of their Haitian
brothers and sisters is so profound
that some have decided to with-
draw the little bit of solidarity they
had with Haitians in their struggle
for fairness and justice. Such con-
sideration originates from the fact
that Haitians are expected to be
immune to the stereotyping other
ethnic groups manifest towards
Black people in General. The ques-
tion is: Why should we be diffe-
rent? Does our ethnic background
have anything to do with this? Do
our brothers and sisters want to go
by our position in this society to
require “obeisance” from us?

Whatever the reason, the gulf
between Haitians and African
Americans is areal one; we are very
far apart. As I see it, there are pro-
found and intrinsic reasons for
this. The first one is societal; it has
its root-cause in the endemic ques-

tion of portrayal and stereotyping
perpetuated by the mass media,
particularly the electronic media.

That African Americans are por-
trayed in negative terms in the
media is no news to anyone, but
that Haitians would buy into that
is a hard pill to swallow. Why not,
when the conditions that brought
the majority of us to this country
are taken into consideration? Why
should we hesitate to take at face-
value what is presented to us with
such largesse and goodwill?

It is natural that our worst
nightmare would be to get close to
“those people on the other side of
I-95 whose favorite toy is a gun,
whose preferred pastime is ped-
dling and/or abusing substances .
. . Don’t you know, they are so
irresponsible that they prefer to
live off the welfare system instead
of working. Their sons have no
place for school in their lives and
their daughters spend their time
parading their fatherless children.

Every person who arrives in
Miami and who does not see Black
Americans in this light has got to
be kidding or is naive to the point of
stupidity. For us, it's a matter of life
and death; it’s a matter of survival.
Until we know better, we have no
choice but to “follow the leader.”
Better be safe than sorry.

Does this sound like blame? It's
not meant to be. [ want it to be an
honest, first-hand experience of a
situation that must stop, because
it just cannot continue anymore.

The second principal reason for
the hostile estrangement we exper-
ience has to do with African Ameri-
cans themselves. Frankly, I
expected better understanding, a
greater sense of solidarity from our
brothers and sisters. Judging from
the cold reception we receive, it
would seem as if our presence is as
much as, if not more than, a dis-
grace for fellow Americans
uprooted as it is for the rest of the
population.

Our commonness (Black
exploited sufferers, victims of dis-
crimination and unfairness),
instead of bringing us together, is
being utilized to set us against one
another. I seem to be hearing the
echo of voices saying, “These poor,
miserable people will make us look
worse than we already are. Make
no mistake about it, the more dis-
tance we take from these people,
the better we'll look.”

Am I paranoid? I wish to God I

Childwatch

By Marian Wright Edelman

But For The Grace Of God

By MARIAN WRIGHT EDELMAN

“I want to be dependent on just
me, sol don't have to feel like I have
to ask anyone for anything,” said
Annette.

But depending on yourselfis dif-
ficult when you're a single parent
with six children to feed and clothe.
Without a high-school diploma or
work experience, her options were
limited. Turning to welfare and
public housing helped her family
survive. She had personal ambi-
tions but lacked the confidence
and motivation to fulfill them.

Fortunately, Annette had the
opportunity to get her high-school
diploma when. _ _
classes were,
brought to the
housing project
where she lives. g
Armed with a dip-
loma, she had the ji
courage to looki§
for work. Now
she's employed at
a fast-food
restaurant, slow-
ly saving money. She's quick to
point out that bringing home a
paycheck — no matter how small
— is an important step on the road
to independence.

In a different part of town are the
Jacksons. ‘Unlike Annette, they
have their own home and receive
no government assistance. They
are independent, for now, but are
barely making ends meet.

Mr. Jackson works at a local
hardware store while his wife cares
for their two children and her
mother-in-law. They qualified for
food stamps once but, the next
month, Mr. Jackson earned more
than $800 and received nothing.

The Jacksons have weathered

a

" many hardships but they're taking

their toll on the family. Just when
they've gotten ahead, something
happens to push them further
back financially. Recently, their
youngest boy was in an accident.
Since Mr. Smith receives no health
insurance through work, cannot
afford private insurance and
doesn't qualify for Medicare, he
had to pay the entire medical bill.

This hard-working family has
nothing to show for their efforts

except a pile of bills which Mrs.
Smith had to sell some of their
clothes and furniture to pay. They
hope their children will have the
opportunity to attend college and
escape their situation.

Are there any breaks for poor
families? Annette and the Smiths
will tell you no. It's not easy making
ends meeet, even when they try to
get ahead. It's hard to get a break

when life keeps knocking you
down. Only if Mr. Smith lost his job
or left his family would they qualify
for Medicaid and welfare.

One sign of hope is the Famiy
Support Act of 1988. It requires
states to help families receiving
welfare benefits to enter the Job
Opportunities and Skills (JOBS)
program. Other important mea-
sures helping poor families and
children are the expansion of Medi-
caid, phasing-in coverage over the
decade of all children with family
incomes below the federal poverty

t level and improved tax credits to

provide some financial relief for
low-income working families with
children.

While these improvements are
long overdue but important, we
cannot lose sight of the determined
people like Annette and the Smiths
who want more out of life for them-
selves and their children. Too
many poor families with children
live through the fear of losing
everything at any time but, by the
grace of God, they manage to get
through another day. These fami-
lies — especially single parents
with children — face the daily pos-
sibility their children will go hun-
gry or homeless.

Finding a way out — through
education, economic opportuni-
ties, hard work — is a dream all
parents have for their children.
Our leaders can no longer ignore
these families, especially children,

who face barriers that too often.

stunt their physical, intellectual,
social and emotional growth and
ultimately stunts our community's
and nation's future.
kk kk % ER

Marian Wright Edelman is
founder and president of the Child-
ren's Defense Fund, a national
voice for children, based in
Washington, D.C.

were, for if those voices were to be
true, African Americans would
unfortunately be caught in the
game — | mean the game of por-
trayal and stereotyping described
above. It would be unfortunate
that our people would consent to
wear the outfit tailored specifically
for them. No, we are not as bad as
we are made to look.

The answer is not in division;
neither is it in hostility, nor is it in
indifference; it is in mutual accep-
tance and reciprocal understand-
ing. If we decide to work and walk
closer, the fortress of misunder-
standing will fall as a castle of
cards; the thick wall that keeps us
apart will come tumbling down and
the truth will set us free. United we
stand, divided we will sutely fall.

The third main obstacle on our
way to cordial relationships is our
different culture. It is both to our
advantage and to that of the grea-
ter community that Haitian cul-
ture be preserved. The strength of
our cultural pattern should never
be a threat; it is our heritage. Any
attempt at assimilating it will lead
to more frustration and disregard-
ing it will not help either. It should
be considered as the cement that is
called to build a more lasting relati-
ionship based on mutual under-
standing and full acceptance of
each other. Diversity, we should
know, is no enemy to unity.

If the Haitians speak Creole and
French, it is to better ascertain
their links with their roots, for a
tree without roots is no match to
the storm. Therefore, it is normal,

HARRIS
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ved{312)235-1527

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natural for a people to stick to its
language as the main vehicle of its
identity. As long as a person is in a
position to speak to his or her lan-
guage with impunity, another lan-
guage will continue to be a luxury,
a Sunday outfit to be used only out
of convenience.

This has been the case for all
minorities in this or another coun-
try. Why are we being asked to
behave differently? Is that not dis-
crimination? Speaking a different
language, far from being a basis for
separation, should be a means of
integration. Is it not true that a per-
son who speaks two languages is
worth two? This is no excuse for

separation and alienation.

It has never been the desire of
Haitians to exhibit their cultural
inheritance or to speak their native
language in exclusivity of other
means of expression in Miami. On
the contrary, many of us make
incalculable efforts to learn the
English language — many are the

. Haitians who are proficient in

Creole, French, English and Span-
ish. Qui dit mieux? (Who can beat
that?) Who are better assets to the
cultural richness of the region?
The Haitians . . .

If a large number of our people
depend on the farm owners of Belle
Glade, Homestead and others to

make a living, and very many of our
men and women have torely on the
goodwill of the factory owners of
Hialeah and Miami, we all antici-
pate mutual understanding,
empathy and loyal collaboration of
Black America. We may well be the
latest, poorest immigrants of
America — but what if we had
something to offer?

Jonas Georges, a native of Haiti,
arrived in Miami in 1987. He did
undergraduate studies in Educa-
tion in Haiti and obtained the Mas-
ter of Divinity in the U.S.A. His
career is in teaching and caring
since he is a Salvation Army
captain.

Child Abuse Prevention Needs Cooperation

By LOUIS W. SULLIVAN

During this time of heightened
awareness of the need for preven-
tion of child abuse, we must all
make a commitment to rescue the
children whose trusting, wide-
eyed innocence is being violated
and snuffed out. Each year, hun-
dreds of thousands of children are
being starved and abandoned,

burned and
severely beaten, ¢
raped and}

3

sodomized,
berated and’
belittled.

Inrecentyears,
child abuse has
taken on epidem- gall
ic proportions pi.
and siofening I :
dimensions: sex- SULLIVAN
ual abuse, physical abuse, verbal
abuse, neglect and exploitation.
The horror stories are very real and
the sad aftermath overflows our
hospitals, foster-care homes,
social-worker caseloads and court
dockets.

The reported incidence and sev-
erity of the injuries associated with
child abuse have escalated enorm-
ously. Nationwide, reports of child
abuse quadrupled during the '80s.
In 1989, more than 1.5 million
cases of child abuse and neglect
were substantiated across the
nation, more than one in 30 child-
ren were victims.

In its latest report, the U.S.
Advisory Board on Child Abuse
and Neglect declared this crisis a
national emergency. We need to
turn the spotlight of concern on
those children being abused by the
adults who are supposed to protect
them and provide for their well-
being. Our nation cannot remain
unmoved in the face of this nation-
al tragedy.

Historically, our people respond
overwhelmingly when a child faces
danger. Recently, 500 people spent
the night combing a wooded area
looking for a lost 3-year-old. That
same concerted effort and focused
rescue operation must be mounted
to save the youngsters being
wounded and tortured on the bat-
tlefields of their homes.

Some of the recent child-abuse
trends have been particularly dis-
turbing. State Bar Associations
have had to intervene to deal with
the swell of family court caseloads
of children abused by crack-
addicted parents. There are con-
troversial reports of rituals involv-
ing child abuse. There is a vast and
unconscionable market exploiting
children in child pornography.

Beyond the horrors an abused
child experiences at the time, the

harm from child abuse and neglect
has enormous long-term consequ-
ences that affect all of society. The
evidence is clear that maltreat-
ment can have deleterious effects
on children’s mental health and
development, both short and long-
term. Preliminary findings of on-
going research indicate abused
children are more likely to suffer
drops in 1Q, learning disabilities,
depression and drug problems.
New research shows the consequ-
ences of child abuse can be obvi-
ous even 20 years later and that
the effects are pervasive, mental,
physical and social in nature. Sui-
cide, violence, delinquency, drug
and alcohol abuse and other forms
of criminality are frequently child-

abuse related.

These diverse ramifications of
the problem and the complex,
inter-related causes of child abuse
and the neglect require a broad,
holistic approach and an integra-
tion of services to affected families
in order to significantly affect the
trends producing child abuse. It is
not enough to merely treat the
results of child abuse. It is not
enough to merely treat the results
of child abuse and neglect, we
must address the root causes and
the societal trends.

Central to all our strategies is an
emphasis on strengthening Ameri-
can families so they can provide
nurturing environments for child
development. People in the field are
telling us they have never seen
families so damaged, some irrepar-
ably. Crack, cocaine, alcohol, and
other drugs are mutilating our
families.

A British expert on the underly-
ing psycho-social problems related
to child abuse, Dr. Leonard Taitz,
has stated that “broken homes
play an important part” in child
abuse. Others have identified dys-
functional families, social isolation
and the loss of the extended family
network, substance abuse, the
economic stress of poverty and a
family history of irrational and
impulsive behavior as contributing
causes.

The Department of Health and
Human Services is calling for help

from all sectors of society — from
the federal government from state
and local agencies, from teachers,
from the medical profession, from
business leaders, from volunteer
workers. Everyone needs to help;
none of us can afford to remain
aloof.

Abuse and neglect can happen
in every form and in every neigh-
borhood. We all have to be an integ-
ral part of the effort to remedy this
crisis. I was saddened to hear
about two children who are now
blind for life because of medical
neglect and physical abuse by their
parents. During a parental ram-
page at their home one night, the
children ran away and went door-
to-door in their neighborhood tell-
ing people what was happening in
their home and asking for help. No
one was willing to help. The child-
ren ended up calling the police
from a phone booth. When help
arrived, it was too late. Those two
children are now safe in foster

homes, but they are permanently
blind.

Our people and our communi-
ties must become better informed
and more concerned. Many are
confused about what to do and
about what works. Others wonder
whether they should get involved.
Some deny that chid abuse can
happen among their neighbors.

At the federal level, the Depart-
ment of Health and Human Ser-

vices has created a multi-faceted
initiative that will address the
problem on four different fronts.
First, though active leadership the
initiative will focus attention on the
problem and how people can make
a difference. Second, the initiative
will raise the priority of this issue
and build coalitions and partner-
ships to tackle the problem. Third,
the initiative will link HHS and
other federal departments in coor-
dinated and cooperative programs
and functions. Fourth, the initia-
tive will strengthen local efforts to
coordinate responses to the needs
of vulnerable children.

But, beyond the authorization
and appropriation levels of the fed-
eral government, we are committed
to highlighting issues, framing sol-
utions, and motivating actions. In
addition to addressing today's
emergency, these efforts, we hope,
will also break the ongoing
intergenerational cycle of abuse.

America must begin now to
establish a caring community for
those children who are vulnerable
to abuse and neglect. Each of us
must accept personal responsibili-
ty to help remove the horrible spec-
ter of child abuse from the lives of
our vulnerable children. To elimi-
nate child abuse, each of us must
become “our neighbor's keeper.”

Dr. Louis W. Sullivan is Secret-
ary of Health and Human Services.

Our Men Can’t Get Anywhere
By Hanging Out Under Trees

By ROBERT B. INGRAM

Traveling around Dade County,
orie can become disheartened by
the number of African men seen
wasting their time “hanging out”
under trees. Considering the num-
ber of lynchings in our history, it
would seem that the last place we,
as African Ameri-
can men, should
want to “hang
out” is under a
tree.

When ques-
tioning this phe-
nomenon, one of
the most popular
answers comes
back: “It's too hot
to be cooped up in
the house.” But hot or cold, find a
tree and you will find two, three or
more brothers “hanging out” under
it. So peculiar is this condition one
has to ask: “Are African American
men born to hang out under
trees?”

This is an important question to
answer when one considers that
we are 50 percent of those incar-
cerated. Not only that; one in four
of our young brothers is either in
prison, on probation or on parole
— a rate that is four times that of
our brothers in apartheid South
Africa. We need to come out from
under the tree.

We have a startling homicide
rate of 125.2 deaths per 100,00
people within the 24-44 age-range:
we need to come out from under
the tree.

By the time they hit their 20th
birthday, nearly one in our of our
young men will be a high school

INGRAM

dropout; we need to come out from
under tree.

African American males are
approximately 12 million strong.
We represent an arc of humanity
that bends from the anti-slavery
consciousness of Nat Turner to the
political genius of Gov. Douglas
Wilder, yet we are endangered.
Why? Because too much of our
brain power is wasting away
“hanging out™ under a tree.

As long as we “hang out” under
the tree, we will be unable to “get
out” of this sophisticated social
trap.

As long as we “hang out”, we will
always be “left out”.

We need to come out from under
the tree. To improve our condition,
we don't necessarily need men in
powerful positions; we need men
who will make their positions
powerful.

Remember, we are different
from any other immigrant in this
town because we were brought
from Africa against our will. Yet,
through it all, we shed the first
blood of American independence;
10,000 of us fought in the Spanish-
Amerian war; 3,000 of us fought for
American indpendence under
George Washington; thousands

more recently fought in the Persian
Gulf; and none or us ever
attempted to assassinate a Presi-
dent. We did not obtain this moral
fortitude hanging out under a tree.

We, as African Americans, have
much to offer one another and the
world. We are the same people who
built the first university, drew the
plans for the first pyramid,
fathered medicine, performed the
first open-heart surgery, pioneered
agri-science and created over 300
products from peanuts, published
the first almanac, designed the
streets of our nation's capital,
invented the first automatic refrig-
eration system for long-haul
trucks and revolutionized the
sugar industry by inventing a
refining process that reduced the
cost and increased the profit in
cane farming.

Brothers, come out form under
the trees so that we can continue to
fortify our philosophers, our activ-
ists, our writers, our poets, our
families, our friends and, yes, even
pray for our enemies.

Dr. Robert Ingram is Mayor of
Opa-locka and a college professor
and pastor.

Miami, FL 33127.

Your Comments Welcome

The Miami Times welcomes and encourages comments from its
readers for publication. Letters must be briefand to the point, prefer-
ably typed, and must be signed. The name, address and telephone
number, where possible, of the writer must also be included. Dead-
line for letters is Monday at noon of the week of publication. Send let-
ters to: Letters to the Editor, The Miami Times, 900 N.W. 54th St.,



THE MIAMI TIMES

6A

Thursday, June 13, 1991

Cultural Expression Is Serving As Vehicle To Draw People Together

By MARVA McCLEAN

Evolving from 300 years of
intriguing and eventful history,
Caribbean culture has gelled into
an expression that is uniquely its
own. From the establishment of
slave colonies, cultural express-
ions have always ramked highly
important. Through these express-
ions, the African was able to main-
tain identity with
the Motherland
and maintain his §
or her personal
identity as well.
This was one part
the colonizerj
couldn't take
away or enslave.
Nurtured in part .
defiance, part ? w oa
sentiment, culture became the
symbol of freedom beating within
the breast of the slave. The beating
of the drums, rhythm and move-
ment of the body, the sound of the
voice — these elements remained
the African’s and outside the con-
trol of the colonizer.

Some 400 years later, cultural
expressions are very much a sym-
bol of the people's independence
and indefatigable spirit. This they
take everywhere. Living in South
Florida means being part of an
extensive migrant community.
With the proliferation of ethnic
groups, there is always the possi-
bility of one becoming a nameless
face, invisible among the throng.
As Caribbean people assimilate
here, however, they are making
serious attempts to establish a cul-
tural framework to give meaning
and definition to their lives.

The Caribbean community is
one where parties, festivals, con-
certs and theatre take center-
stage. Cultural expressions are as
varied and as spicy as the food.

Community leaders from the
various islands have set up special
groups responsible for the struc-
turing of these activities. These
include the Trinidad and Tobago
Cultural Association, Belize Asso-
ciation of Florida, Florida Organi-
zation of Jamaicans, South Florida
Association of Dominicans, St.
Lucia Association of Greater
Miami. The organization is run by
volunteers who reach out into the
community, looking for strength
and support as they encourage
others to participate.

Throughout the year, the Carib-
bean community is a cornucopia of
creativity. A people of perfor-
mance, Caribbean natives put
their creative imagination to work
in hosting soca fetes, reggae
shows, concerts, theatrical pro-
ductions, beauty pageants and
more formal activities such as
Independence Balls and Tea Par-
ties. There are also sporting activi-

ties such as football competitions,
cricket matches and netball
games.

These activities are more than
just entertainment; they are a seri-
ous expression of a people who are
taking time to shape the traditional
forces of their culture to give defini-
tion to who they are even here on
foreign soil. There is always a focus
on history, political development
and triumph over trials and
tribulations.

Independence is a special punc-
tuation point in our lives. For all of
us, it holds special meaning,
reminding us that we are a free
people no matter where we are.
None of us needs a second prompt-
ing to join hands and hearts and
celebrate in grand style,” says
Elgeta Thompson-Martin, head of
the Caribbean Music Festival, the
organization responsible for the
staging of the Grand Jamaica Inde-
pendence Ball each year.

Last year saw some 500 revelers
celebrating in grand style at the
Hotel Intercontinental on the eve of
Jamaica's independence anniver-
sary. This year, the celebration will
be hosted at that venue July 27
with Jamaica's Minister of Labor,
Portia Simpson, as guest speaker.
The afternoon will begin with cock-
tails, followed by dinner, presenta-
tions and a fine entertainment
package including band and disco
music.

Reggae Festival

The Miami Reggae Festival, first
held in 1985, forms part of this
independence celebration. It is
held annually at the Bicentennial
Park in downtown Miami with the
participation of thousands of mus-
ic enthusiasts, vendors and fun-
seekers. Originally called Jamai-
can Awareness Day, the festival
has expanded territorial bounda-
ries to become an international
affair similar to Jamaica's Reggae
Sunsplash.

It is now the largest Reggae festi-
val in the United States, pulling big
names in the international music
industry such as Marcia Griffiths,
Marley Kids, Lovindeer, Samantha
Rose and Roots Radics Band. Each
year, this event receives support
from large corporations such as
The Miami Herald, Florida Power
and Light and WEDR, 99Jamz. Key
city and county officials also
participate.

Such support is important in
transmitting the message that
these cultural outpourings are
considered important by govern-
ment officials and corporate
America. And that goes a long way
in adding substance to the events,
while also providing organizers
with funding contributions neces-
sary for success.

Dominican Republic Under
Fire For Haitian Child Labor

By RICKEY SINGH

BRIDGETOWN, Barbados
(CANA) — Human-rights organiza-
tions concerned about evidence
that the Dominican Republic is
involved in trafficking in Haitian
children to work in sugar-cane
fields are pressing for a stalling of
its bid to join the Caribbean Com-
munity (CARICOM).

A new report by the Lawyers
Committee for Human Rights,
released June 1, details substan-
tial violations by state-owned
sugar-cane plantations in the
Dominican Republic, including
“trafficking in Haitian children and
the use of child forced labor.”

The 107-page report, “A Child-
hood Abducted,” details the viola-
tions of the rights of children in
suger-cane fields in the Dominican
Republic.

The report follows closely
another by three human-rights
bodies — Americas Watch, Carib-
bean Rights and National Coalition
for Haitian Refugees —on “the con-
tinuing deceptive recruitment and
forced labor” on the state-owned
sugar plantations in the Domini-
can Republic.

CANA understands that this
report by three human rights
groups which mounted a mission
to the Dominican Republic last
February, as well as the New York-
based Lawyers Committee report,
will be forwarded to the UN Human
Rights Commission and the secre-
tariats of the Organization of
American States and CARICOM.

All four human-right organiza-
tions feel that CARICOM govern-
ments could help to remedy the
serious problem of exploitation of
Haitian labor in the Dominican
Republic by linking it to the efforts
of President Joaquin Balaguer's
government to seek membership of
the Community.

Editor's Quote Book

‘““You’ll never find a better
sparring partner than adver-
sity.”’

Walt Schmidt

The Balaguer administration
has denied any official policy that
permits the use of forced child
labor. It had given its assurance
prior to last year's 11th CARICOM
heads’ meeting in Jamaica that it
would respect the rights of all
workers in accordance with the
established conventions of the
International Labor Organization
(ILD).

Caribbean Immigrants

Cultural activist and entrepre-
neur Mike Shaw, who heads Sun-
shine Productions, notes, “Carib-
bean people are definitely making
an impact on South Florida's cul-
tural landscape. I think we have
got the message across that we are
serious with what we are about. We
are definitely making the cultural
experience richer and more
textured.

Shaw's production company is
well known for bringing top-quality
theatre to South Florida, especially
the staging of the prestigious
Jamaica National Pantomime. In
1990, it brought to the Gusman
Center “Schoolers”, a lively story of
the trials and triumphs of Jamai-
can school children. On the
weekend starting May 4, the pan-
tomime, “Fifty Fifty", was staged at
Gusman as well. This production
was of particular significance as it
celebrated the 50th anniversary of
the pantomime, a national institu-
tion in Jamaica. The plot incorpor-
ated several symbols of celebration
into the ‘story, which brought
together many aspects of Jamai-
can culture through dance and
lively dialogue.

Goombay Festival, which was
celebrated last weekend, has been
an annual event since 1976 and is
the biggest Black heritage cultural
event in South Florida. It honors
and highlights the historical roots
of the Bahamians who were the
first Black settlers in Florida.

Dating back to the 1880s, Baha-
mians came via Key West to Flori-
da’'s mainland, contributing signif-
icantly to its development. Today,
Coconut Grove's historic Charles
Avenue is the center of the city's
rich Bahamian cultural heritage.
Goombay 1990 drew a crowd of
550,000 and had Betty Wright as
Festival Queen. This year, it was
anticipated that 660,000 would
participate in the celebration June
7-9. Final figures are not yet in.

Uniting The Groups

More than any other Black her-
itage celebration, Goombay is
noted for its success in pulling
together the multi-ethnic popula-
tion of the area. While all the vari-
ous ethnic groups turn out, of
marked significance is the co-
mingling of Blacks from all over.
This is a fine example of Caribbean
people and African Americans
celebrating together. In general,
much more would be achieved if
the two groups of African descen-
dants — Caribbean natives and
African Americans — establish
closer cultural links and work on
highlighting their common
experience.

One community activist
charges, “Although there isnodata
on paper, we do not see enough
Caribbean people coming out in
support of events like Kizomba, the
Black Film Festival, Arabian
Knights Festival and other
activities.”

What has been noted is a ten-
dency for groups to remain in terri-
tories, giving support to what is
familiar. The Haitian festival had
on the North Campus of Miami-
Dade College May 17 and 18 is a
fine example. The poor turnout of
Miami's Black community at this

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interesting, exciting and well-
organized affair left much to be
desired.

Carnival Miami is one event
which is steadily charming its way
into Miami's cultural scene as it
pulls together the various island
groups into this time-honored
tradition.

It is a burst of color, excitement
and energy-attracting participants
from major U.S. cities, Canada,
England and the islands. Pat-
terned after Trinidad's carnival, it
reflects a cross-fertilization of all
the various cultures that have
impacted on Caribbean develop-
ment: Arawak Indians, French,
Dutch, British, East Indian, Chin-
ese, African. It is a showcase of
talent and creativity, involving the
participation of celebrated calyp-
sonians, masqueraders, costume
designers, musicians and
choreographers.

Each year since 1985, people of
all walks of life and ages come
together in the streets of Miami in
this massive celebration. Last
year's road march and finale tookl
place downtown at Miami's Bicen-
tennial Park in October. This year's
carnival will also be at that venue.
The highlight of Carnival is always
the parade of bands and the final
selection of ‘Carnival King and
Queen from among the parade of
masqueraders in elaborate
costumes.

For the competition, each band
selects a theme then goes on to dis-
play its creativity through its per-
formance. This is the most exciting
part of Carnival, the time when
revelers become part of the fanta-

sies, enthralled by the mesmeriz-
ing pull of the masqueraders.
Thousands take to the streets,
dancing to the rhythmic pulsating
beat of indigenous Caribbean
music, worming their way along on
the heels of their favorite band.

But Carnival is not a week-long
or a weekend affair. The months
before the grand culmination is
sprinkled with a refreshing array of
fetes, jump-ups, concerts, stage
shows and house parties. For Car-
ibbean people, especially Trinida-
dians, Carnival is communal, part
of their very life-force.

But even culture can have divi-
sions. A rift developed between the
West Indian American Day Carni-
val Association (the original orga-
nizers of Carnival Miami) and the
South Florida Band Leaders Asso-
ciation almost resulted in last
year's carnival being a whimper
rather than a bang. Itis hoped that
by the time October rolls around,
all the problems would have been
worked out, with the forces coming
together in producing a solid
program.

Unity Cry

Despite the cry for a more united
Caribbean community, most com-
munity leaders note that these cul-
tural activities are serving as a
catalyst in bringing people
together. A common denominator
is the spotlighting of the common-
ality of the people's heritage. Very
importantly, too, the wider society
is definitely conscious of the trea-
sure within its midst and is willing
to participate and contribute to the
harnessing of the community's
creative impulses.

“Nowhere is there the rapport
and communication between audi-

ence and performers more elec-
trifying than in Miami,” says Prof.
Rex Nettleford, noted historianand
head of Jamaica's National Dance
Theatre Company. The renowned
NDTC, with its team of dancers,
musicians and singers has been
performing in Miami since 1986.
There is usually standing-room-
only at each performance as hun-
dreds flock to see the celebrated
company perform. Undoubtedly,
the publicity it receives via The
Miami Herald, a main sponsor,
goes a long way in securing audi-
ence participation.

Miami's appreciative audience,
the support of corporations and
government officials, the existence
of coordinating bodies and the peo-
ple's thirst for indigenous material
are all important elements in the
success of these cultural out-
pourings. for the Caribbean peo-
ple, the activities are important
symbols of their heritage, giving
credence to who they are. They are
also a very important vehicle for
bridging gaps and assisting new-
comers to assimilate into the
society.

Through these activities, the
Caribbean community has done
much to demonstrate to the rest of
Miami that it is seriously intent on
being a part of the area. (Especially
for Jamaicans, much has been
achieved in overriding the negative
image of the “posse” and drug
traffickers.)

Miami's enthusiastic response
is a good indication that the area is
well on its way in appreciating the
varied ethnicity, culture and philo-
sophy of others.

Marva McClean is a Jamaican-
bom educator and writer who spe-
cializes in Caribbean affairs.

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NATIONAL NEWS

THE MIAMI TIMES
Thursday, June 13, 1991

7A

Democrats Face Pressure To Empower Minorities In Redistricting

By WILLIAM M. WELCH

WASHINGTON (AP) — For
months Judith Sanders-Castro
has heard Democratic Party prom-
ises to create additional Hispanic-
dominated congressional districts
in her state of Texas. So far, she
isn't buying it.

“They just sat there for an hour
and 40 minutes and told us what a
good job they were doing,” she said
after a recent meeting with top par-
ty officials in Washington. “We
didn’t think so.”

Sanders-Castro, who is political
access director for the Mexican
American Legal Defense and Edu-
cation Fund based in San Antonio,
says she fears Democrats are only
paying lip service to her concerns.
She contends the two new districts
proposed by Texas Democrats
don't have large enough Hispanic
populations to ensure the election
of Hispanic candidates.

Her skepticism reflects a dilem-
ma Democrats face in numerous
states as legislatures begin the
required task of drawing political
maps for the next decade.

Democrats want to live up to
their commitment to Blacks and
Hispanics, who, for decades, have
been important constituencies.
But, at the same time, they want to
keep as many minority voters as
possible inside existing districts
where they can keep electing
incumbent — and usually White —
Democrats.

The problem is trying to do both.
Minority desires to build more dis-
tricts likely to elect minority candi-
dates conflict with self-survival
instincts of Democratic
incumbents.

As a result, minority groups are
finding support for their efforts
from Republicans, the party less
supportive of minority goals such
as broad new civil-rights
legislation.

“Strange kinds of coalitions are
being formed,” said Rep. Edolphus
Towns, D-N.Y., chairman of the
Congressional Black Caucus.
“Blacks are saying, ‘Now is the time
for us.’ ”

The issue is most acute in states
covered by the 1965 Voting Rights
Act, where the law requires Justice
Department clearance of new dis-
trict maps to ensure minority
representation.

States such as California, Tex-
as, Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
South Carolina, North Carolina,
Virginia and Illinois all have the
potential for creating one or more
new Black or Hispanic-majority
districts for the U.S. House of
Representatives.

The Republican National Com-
mittee supports the creation of

more minority districts. Republi-
can strategists believe those new
districts would in many cases pull
predictably Democratic voters out
of the districts of White incumbent
Democrats, leaving them more vul-
nerable to challenges by

FRANK ROSS, keynote speaker
at the National Association of
Black Accountants awards ban-
quet, next Saturday.

Accountants To
Host Banquet

By HANNAH RASSU

The National Association of
Black Accountants is slated to hold
its 16th annual awards and scho-
larship banquet June 15 at Luke's
Entertainment Center, 8400 N.E.
2nd Ave., at 6 p.m.

Keynote speaker, Frank Ross,
CPA, will be coming from Washing-
ton for the event. He became the
first president of the organization

after founding the NABA in 1969.

Twyman Bentley, the outgoing
local chapter president, says that
the NABA, which is a member of
the Boycott Miami Coalition, is
proud to hold the banquet at a
Black institution.

“Being a full professional means
giving back to and supporting your

own community. I am confident |

that we will receive outstanding
service,” he told The Times.

For further details and to make -

reservations, call 770-6441.

Editor's Quote Book

““Our Creator would never
have made such lovely days and
have given us the deep hearts to
enjoy them unless we were meant
tobeimmortal.”’

Nathaniel Hawthorne

Republicans.

Democrats are clearly con-
cerned about the potential.

“I think the minority groups will
be very careful before they let these
unholy alliances come to fruition,”
said Jeff Wice, general counsel for
the Democratic State Legislative
Leaders Association and a reap-
portionment strategist.

Ben Ginsberg, general counsel
for the Republican National Com-
mittee, is pushing for such
alliances of political convenience
and mutual self-interest.

“It works to the gain of anybody
who has been hurt by prior redis-
tricting,” Ginsberg said. “That's us
and minorities.”

Towns says redistricting should
produce enough new Black-
dominated districts that the 26
Black members of Congress will
increase by 14 after the 1992 elec-
tions. If Democratic-controlled
state legislatures don't draw those
districts, he said, Blacks will join
Republicans to challenge them.

Most state legislatures have not
yet drawn up their new congres-
sional maps. (Hearings will take
place in Dade County in October.)

The key issue in many states will
be one of percentages — whether
drawing a district that is 51 per-
cent Black or Hispanic is suffi-
cient, or if 60 percent or 65 percent
minority population is necessary.
In many cases, Democrats want
lower percentages, Republicans
higher.

That is Sanders-Castro’s com-
plaint in Texas — that Democratic

proposals don't go far enough in
assuring minority domination of
the new seats.

Some experts argue that,
because of low rates of voter parti-
cipation, drawing districts with
bare majorities of voting-age
minorities isn't good enough; lar-
ger majorities are needed, they
argue.

In many of the Southern states,
drawing minority districts is made
more complicated by the wide dis-
persion of Blacks across rural
areas.

In North Carolina, for example,
there are suggestions for a Black-
majority district that runs from the
northeast corner of the state and
dips into heavily Black neighbor-
hoods of Durham, near the center
of the state.

In Illinois, where the 1990 Cen-
sus means a loss of two seats, the
problem is one of giving Hispanics
a new slice of a shrinking pie.

Hispanics want a new district
they control in Chicago. It would
come at the expense of two veteran
Democrats, Reps. Dan Rostenk-
owski, chairman of the Ways and
Means Committee, and Rep. Wil-
liam Lipinski, by taking reliably
Democratic Hispanic voters out of
their districts.

They and other incumbent
Democratic members of Congress
reportedly agreed in private to
resist efforts to draw a new Hispan-
ic district. Hispanic groups were
angered. Republican Gov. Jim
Edgar and GOP legislative leaders
are backing the Hispanics.

In Texas, Sanders-Castro says
both sides — Democrats and
Republicans — are looking out for
themselves. “Basically we are in

Blacks’ View Of
Japanese Favorable

WASHINGTON, (PRNewswire)
— Despite recent strains in their
relationship, Blacks hold generally
favorable attitudes toward the
Japanese in this country and in
Japan. This was one of the major
findings of a nationwide opinion
survey of Black Americans con-
ducted by the Joint Center for
Political and Economic Studies.

The survey, conducted by tele-
phone last September among a
national sample of Black and
White respondents, examined gen-
eral attitudes toward the Japan-
ese, perceptions of the effects of
Japan's economic power on the
United States and support for
trade sanctions against Japanese
imports and prospects for impro-
ving Black-Japanese relations.

While the survey found that
Blacks and Whites hold similar
overall views of the Japanese, the
findings uncovered a number of
differences, as well. Among the key
findings are:

HW Blacks’ views of Japanese are
generally positive, although less so
than those of Whites (66 percent to
81 percent).

this battle with no friends,” she
said. said.

“If our concerns happen to also increasin g
correspond with Republican con- representation.”

cerns, fine. If they don't, fine,” she
“We're concerned with
minority

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THE MIAMI TIMES

8A

Thursday, June 13, 1991

Ta ow

I ae ne ae Sor GO

After more than 15 years of mis-
rule, Mengistu Haile Mariam
deserted his tragic country, leaving
his army defeated and his people
plunged in chaos. His legacy for
Ethiopia is one of misery, famine
and economic bankruptcy. After
tyrannizing his nation and forcing
his people to bend to his will,
reports Gemini News Service, he
has bequeathed a bloody and
uncertain future.

ALAN RAKE

Of the nine African dictators
toppled within the last nine
months, Mengistu Haile Mariam is
by far the most important. Ethiopi-
a, one of Africa's most populous
nations, whose people now num-
ber over 50 million, was in a state of
crisis throughout his 16 years of
misrule. Now, with rebel forces
pouring into Addis Ababa, it seems
destined to a bleak and unstable
future.

Instead of settling with the rebel
factions when there was still a
chance to build a stable future,
Mengistu resisted them to the last
and has perpetuated the uncer-
tainty. His legacy is bitter.

”
m

J Ces

La)
, ;

li by
in

be

MENGISTU HAILE MARIAM, mil-
itary strongman who ruled
Ethiopia for 16 years.

More Africans died under him
than any under other African tyr-
ant (compared with him, Ugandan
dictator Idi Admin was but a toy-
boy). His Ethiopian people died in
their millions in years of war,

Community Calendar

BH The Class of 1948 of the
Dorsey High School Alumni
Association will meet Saturday,
June 15, 8 p.m., at 3180 N.W. 50th
St.

H The Dorsey-Norwestern Alum-
ni Association's first Annual
Coaches Banquet will be held at
Luke's Entertainment Center,
8400 N.E. 2nd Ave., Friday, June
14, 7 p.m. Contact 634-6894,
evenings, or 754-8705, mornings.

HB Mississippi Valley State Uni-
versity Alumni of South Florida
will meet at the home of Barbara
Wilfork, 2260 N.W. 175th St.,
Saturday, June 15, 7 p.m. Call
835-7154, 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. or
238-4730, James Denegall.

BH Miami Northwestern's gradua-
tion is on Thursday, June 20, 2
p-m., at Dade County Auditorium.
You must have a ticket to enter and
must be seated by 1:45 p.m.

HB Miami Carol City Class of 1971
will hold its 20th class reunion at
the Embassy Suites Hotel near; the
(airport) June 14-16. Contact
Wimberly Larkin, 688-4952, or the
hotel front desk.

BH Miami Southridge Adult Edu-
cation Center offers free reading,
Math and writing in adult educa-
tion clases. Tuesday, Thursday,
6:45-10 p.m. Call 238-6110 or visit
19355 S.W. 114th Ave., 2:30-9:30
p.m.

HB Thena Crowder Community
School, 757 N.W. 66th St., will
host the last meeting of the
Informed Families on Thursday,
June 13, starting at 7.

H Dorsey High School Alumni,
Classes of 1951, 1946 and 1941
will meet Saturday, June 15, 5
p.m., at the home of James and
Anna Wright, 14730 S.W. 105th
Ct., Richmond Heights. For a ride,
call Charles Mitchell, 945-0202, or
Dr. Richard J. Strachan,
691-3209.

HM Miami Northwestern Class of
1961 will celebrate the 30th class
reunion June 21-July 1. The ban-
quet will be at Luke's Entertain-
ment Center, Saturday, June 22.
Call 681-0016 or 628-1052.

BH B.T.W. Class of 1944 will not
meet Saturday, June 15. Call
634-9809.

HB The G.W.Carver Class of 1966
will meet Saturday, June 15, 2760
N.W. 171st Terr., to discuss its
25th year reunion June 21-23.
Contact Houston Marshall,
446-2436.

BM Miami Jackson Class of 1972
will fellowship at Mt. Calvary Bap-
tist Church, 1140 N.W. 62nd St.
Meet at the church at 10:45 a.m.
on Father's Day, June 16.

H Booker T. Washington Alumni
Association will meet Thursday,
June 13, 7 p.m., at the school,
1200 N.W. 6th Ave., Room 105.

B® The Miami Association of
Black Social Workers invites all
human services professionals to
join in a Networking Get-Together,
6-8 p.m., Tuesday, June 18, at the
Family Christian Association,
6015 N.W. 7th Ave. Call 579-3618.

HM A concert featuring the String
Ensembles of Liberty City
Elementary, Charles R. Drew
Middle and Miami Northwestern
Senior High School will be staged
June 14, 7:30 p.m., in the auditor-
fum of Northwestern, 7007 N.W.
12th Ave. Call 836-0991 or
836-9319.

BE The Miami Women's Health
Center at North Shore Hospital
and Medical Center, 1190 N.W.
95th St., is offering a two-part
series to discover more of who we
are and what we want, in addition
to what we have to offer to better
select and secure satisfying and
rewarding work. Secondly, to
understand key elements of what
and how to successfully market
ourselves: Part I, June 13, 7-9
p-m.; Part II, June 20, 7-9 p.m., in
the Medical Arts Building, Suite
402. The Center will also offer a
discussion group for parents of
teenagers, June 20, 7-8:30 p.m., in
Suite 402. Contact 835-6165.

HM The City of Miami Department
of Parks and Recreation Prog-
rams for the Handicapped is
sponsoring its Annual Moon Over
Miami Dance for this disabled on
Wednesday, June 19 at the Coco-
nut Grove Exhibition Center, 3360
Pan American Drive, 7-9:30 p.m.

H The Metro-Dade County Con-
sumer Protection/Advocate
Division and the Miami-Dade
Public Library System will pre-
sent a free small claims court clinic
Tuesday, June 18, 7 p.m., at Coral
Reef Branch Library, 9211 Coral
Reef Dr.

HE Pilot Club of Miami Shores will
hold a rummage sale at Biscayne
Park Recreational Center, Satur-
day, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m., and Sun-
day, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Phone
835-6136.

B On Saturday, June 15, the Saba
Shriner's Temple #186 and the
City of Pompano Beach, Recrea-
tion Activities Department, will
sponsor a Shriners Youth Fun
Day, 10. a.m.-4 p.m. Call
786-4131, 972-2650 or 785-7551.

HB The Miami Lighthouse for the
Blind will celebrate Helen Keller
Deaf-Blind Awareness Week June
23-29, designated by Congress to
honor the late Keller who played a
prominent role in the establish-
ment of the local institution 60
years ago. Contact Wade King,
279-9870 or Janet Dover,
856-2288.

HB The Inner City Chapter of
Parents of Murdered Children
and Other Survivors of Homicide
Victims will meet Tuesday, June
18, 7:30 p.m., at the Caleb Center,
Conference Room B, 5400 N.W.
22nd Ave. Call Doris Williams,
685-9073.

HB The Ministers Laymen Forum,
in association with the United
Community Council of Black
Affairs, will host a breakfast forum
on “The Political Empowerment of
Dade County's Black Community,”
with speakers State Rep. Daryl
Reeves and attorney Gary Siplin, at
Canaan Baptist Church, 7610 Bis-
cayne Blvd., on Saturday, June 15,
8:30-10:30 a.m. Admission is free
and the public is invited. Contact
Alvino Monk, 371-7931 or
757-1665.

HM The newly-organized Northwest
Chapter of the American Associ-
ation of Retired Persons (AARP)
will meet Wednesday, June 19, 11
a.m., in the Recreation Center of
Hadley Park. Membership is open
to persons 50 and over. Contact
Nancy Dawkins, president,
633-1163, or Ida Cash, 633-3806.

BH Brownsville Improvement
Association, Saturday, June 15,
will host a Father's Day picnic,
inviting everyone to attend at no
charge, including fathers who are
homeless. It will be held at the
Brownsville Community Center,
2741 N.W. 49th St., noon to 8 p.m.

famine, disease and purges. Two
million are estimated to have died
inside the country and three mil-
lion more fled as refugees.

Mengistu's objective through-
out was survival. He eliminated
senior leaders who challenged
him. He exterminated thousands
of ordinary Ethiopians who
resisted him. He liquidated politi-
cal opponents in a series of purges.

He stuck rigidly to an outdated
Marxist ideology because it gave
him Soviet support, not because he
had any deep commitment. When
the Soviet dropped him to concen-
trate on the crisis within Russia, he
tried to wipe out all traces of social-
ism in a pathetic last-minute
attempt to build alliances with the
West.

He left a bankrupt economy in
hock to Soviet and Western credi-
tors to the tune of some $5 billion.
His agricultural and land-reform
policies were a total failure. Forced
collectivization was rejected by the
independent-minded Ethiopian
peasants. Agricultural production
fell, while deforestation and soil
erosion exposed the people to suc-
cessive droughts and famines.

Until the bitter end, he refused
to recognize the extreme problems
of Ethiopian nationalities. When
he took power, the Eritreans hoped
his new revolutionary regime
would give them a new deal, but his
response was simply to pour more
and more demoralized troops into
the unwinnable, imperialist war.

He did not recognize the depths
of nationalism that gave the rise to
the other liberation movements
which finally toppled him. Even at
the end, he did not go voluntarily,
but only when he realized the
rebels were at the gates of Addis
Ababa, the capital. Finally, he lis-
tened to the foreign powers press-
ing him to go in the hope that
meaningful peace talks could be
held.

An unlikely alliance developed

between the Americans and Presi-
dent Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe,
who sent an envoy to Addis Ababa
saying Mengistu would be able to
retire with his wife and family to his
Zimbabwean ranch. Realizing his
time was up, he deserted his army
and his people and fled without
informing his closest lieutenants.

But, even after his departure,
his successor, Gen. Tesfaya Gebre
Kidhan, with United States and
international backing, could not
buy off the rebels with the offer of
peace talks “without - conditions.
The major rebel groups were win-
ning the war so easily that they
knew the could impose their own
military solution. The Ethiopian
Peoples Revolutionary Democratic
Front (a Tigrean-dominated
alliance) was poised to take Addis
Ababa. The collapse was sudden
and dramatic. It seized control on
May 28.

The Eritrean Peoples’ Liberation
Front, after its marathon 30-year
liberation war, has at last liberated
the whole of Eritrea, including its
capital Asmara, taken after an
18-month seige, and its two main
ports of Massawa and Assab.
Other liberation groups are also on
the march.

The EPRDF, formed by the Tig-
rean Peoples Liberation Front and
non-Tigrean allies, is now in con-
trol of Addis Ababa, but it has very
different objectives from other lib-
eration movements. In the first
place it wants a united Ethiopia,
while the Eritreans in the EPLF
want to hold a referendum in their
home territory in which its people
are expected to opt for full indepen-
dence for Eritrea. If Eritrea is
allowed to secede, it will control
both of Ethiopia's main ports (Mas-
sawa and Assab) and its main
transport outlets to the world.

Other liberation movements
also have conflicting aims and
objectives. The Oromo Liberation
Front, representing the most

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populous nationality in Ethiopia,
is running a low-key campaign in
the West. The Afar Liberation Front
is waiting its turn in the east.

In Addis Ababa, a whole host of
opposition politicians, grouped in
the Coalition of Democratic Forces,
are waiting to assert themselves
before the EPRDF government can
assert its authority.

Mengistu’s legacy of setting one
group against another, his bloody
purges, his hated secret police
have left wounds that could pro-
voke a bloodbath as old scores are
settled. All parties say that they
want a democratic constitution.
They have also proposed that there
should be an interim coalition gov-
ernment to handle the transition
period. Even the EPLF is prepared
to go along with this stage, provid-

fH]

|
«INDIAN |
fl || OCEAN I

ing it can still offer its people the
choice between independence and
a form of association with Ethiopi-
a. Buta long-term constitution will
still have to be worked out.

A host of thorny questions
remain. Will the new Ethiopia be
unitary, federal or confederal?
Specifically, will Eritrea be allowed
to opt out? How much self-
determination will the others
demand for themselves? Will it be
possible to organize free and fair
elections? Will international moni-
toring be possible.?

Can a national army be pruned
out of the warring guerilla factions
and the government forces? What
will prevent a bloody Liberian-style
situation developing with rival
guerilla leaders vying for power?

Mengistu has left no answers.

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Thursday, June 13, 1991

THE MIAMI TIMES

9A

Boycott Groups Number 91 As Support Grows For Campaign

The number of groups that have
announced support for the Boycott
Miami campaign has now grown to
90 in the nine and a half months
since the Black Lawyers Associa-
tion launched the protest over the
snub to Nelson Mandela and the
police beating of unarmed Haitians
last year.

Some 31 national organizations
have pledged solidarity with the
campaign in some way, along with
60 local groups. The latest are the
Professional Black Firefighters
Association of the City of Miami,
the Mays High School Alumni
Association which has recom-
mended that all Mays reunions for
this year be cancelled, the Progres-
sive Officers Club of the Metro-
Dade Police Department, the Asso-
ciation of African-American
Architects and Engineers of Flori-
da, the American Arab Business
and Professional Coalition Inc., the
Gate City Bar Association (Atlanta,
Georgia), Covenant Baptist
Church, and New Covenant Pre-
sbyterian Church.

The boycott organizers initially
demanded an apology for the fai-
lure of official Greater Miami to roll
out the red carpet when Mandela
visited June 28 as afirst step toany
dialogue to end the protest which
has caused Dade's tourism indus-
try several million dollars.

Under the campaign conven-
tioneers and. tourists are being
urged not to come to Greater Miami
until the dispute is resolved.

The organizers modified their
call last December to arequest that
keys to the cities and official pro-
clamations be issued retroactively
to the world's best known anti-

CO is

It's A Matter of Respect

apartheid fighter. That modifica-
tion in the original demand came
after an apparent softening of the
position of Miami Mayor Xavier
Suarez.

He became the lightning rod for
the boycott after he joined with
other Hispanic Dade mayors in
signing a statement critical of
Mandela. He has since expressed
regret at any hurt caused by the
snub but has steadfastly refused to
apologize. But the campaign also
targets Metro Mayor Steve Clark
and Miami Beach Mayor Alex
Daoud.

The situation has been at an
impasse since last December but a
steadily growing number of groups
here and nationally have been join-
ing the campaign.

The groups listed as of April as
supporting the boycott are:

HE National groups: National Bar
Association, National Medical
Association, National Alliance of
Postal and Federal Employees,
National Conference of Black May-
ors, National Forum for Black
Public Administrators, Council on
Black American Affairs, Omega Psi
Phi Fraternity, National Black Pro-
secutors Association, National
Association of Black Accountants,

Migrant Kids Benefit

From Rep.

Last Thursday, in the Governors
Conference Room, Freshman Rep.
Daryl Jones (D-118, Miami),
watched as Gov. Chiles signed his
migrant bill (House Bill 1221) into
law.

The bill provides legislative
intent to give children of migrant
farm-workers high priority for
placement in the “subsidized child
day-care programs.” :

Migrant children and their fami-:

lies currently receive health ser-
vices at federally funded migrant
health centers, community health
centers, and HRS county public

Jones Bill

health units. However, treatment

often comes only after a medical
condition has advanced to the
point of extreme illness or damage
that involves considerably greater
expense for treatment than would
be necessary for treatment at an
earlier stage of illness.

“By moving migrant children
into the ‘at-risk’ category, these
children can be placed in adequate
day-care facilities while their
parents work,” said Jones. “This
bill is a bold step towards aidirg
families with no alternative then
day care in an orange grove.”

Business Boost From Logan Bill

Rep. Willie Logan (D-Opa-locka)
was successful in moving a bill
through the recent session of the
Florida House designed to bolster
the ability of small and minority
businesses to compete for contract
awards with state agencies.

“This bill will promote and
enhance small and minority busi-
ness enterprise ‘in Florida,” said
Logan. “I am hopeful that the ideas
in it will have a solid long-term
impact on small and minority
businesses,” he added.

The Small Business Assistance
Act encourages agencies to meet

(wwe in on awo0 visit 7 UNIVERSAL STUDIOS FLORIDA 3

the minority business enterprise
goals established by the 1990
Department of General Services
Disparity Study rather than the
current 15 percent goal.

It requires local governments to
accept minority business enter-
prises that are certified by the
Department of General Services as
fully certified for their respective
minority business enterprise prog-
rams. It prohibits local govern-
ments from revoking the certifica-
tion of any minority business
enterprise which has been certified
by the department.

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Kappa Alpha Phi Fraternity,
National Black Media Coalition,
Naional Organization For Women.

Also, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraterni-
ty, National Association for Sickle

Cell Disease, Mound City Bar
Association (St. Louis), National

Association of Black Social Work-
ers, American Civil Liberties

Union, American Association of

Black Women Entrepreneurs, Alp-

ha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Alliance

of Minority Women for Business

and Political Development, Black
Nurses Association, Minority Own-

ership Litigation Fund.

Also, Minority Business Enter-
prise Legal Defense and Education
Fund, George Edgecomb Bar Aso-
ciation (Tampa), Metropolitan Bar
Association of New York, The
United Methodist Church, Health
and Welfare Ministries Program
Department, National Black Law
National
Council of Educational Opportuni-
ties Association, National Alliance
Against Racist and Political Rep-
ression, and the Gate City Bar

Students Association,

Association (Atlanta, Georgia).

HW Local groups: Black Lawyers
Association (Dade County),
National Bar Association, Women
Lawyers Division, Dade County
Chapter, Haitian Task Force, Alp-
ha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Pi Delta
Omega Chapter, Miami Associa-
tion of Black Social Workers, Ome-
ga Psi Phi Fraternity, Sigma Alpha
Chapter, Phi Beta Sigma Fraterni-
ty, Rho Sigma Chapter, South Flor-
ida Association of Black Psycholo-
gists, South Florida Coalition of
Black Trade Unionists, Zeta Phi
Beta Sorority, Beta Tau Zeta Chap-
ter, Miami-Dade Urban Bankers
Association, Miami-Dade Chapter,
National Pan Hellenic Council.
Also, Delta Sigma Theta Sorori-
ty, Dade County Alumnae Chap-
ter, Kappa Alpha Phi Fraternity,
Miami Alumnae Chapter, Orange
Blossom Classic Committee, Anti-
och Missionary Baptist Church of
Liberty City, Dade United Associa-
tion, Love Trinity Pentecostal
Church, Mount Pleasant Baptist
Church, Shining Light Spiritual
Holiness Church, New Covenant
Presbyterian Church, Black Busi-

SEARS cena.

ness Association, Continental
Societies, Greater Miami Chapter,
Edison Center/Model City Mer-
chants Association, Jewish Cul-
tural Center.

Also, King of Clubs of Greater
Miami, King Street Entertainment,
National Association of Black
Accountants, Greater Miami
Chapter, National Organization of
Women, Dade County Chapter,
The Carats, The Links, Greater
Miami Chapter, United Communi-
ty Outreach Association, Southern
Christian Leadership Conference,
Dade County Chapter, Martin
Luther King Labor Community
Coalition, The African-American
Lively Arts Association, People
United to Save Humanity, Dade
County Chapter, Black Student
Union, Miami-Dade Community
College, Wolfson Campus, Delta
Sigma Theta Sorority, Miami
Alumnae Chapter, Florida Coali-
tion Against Domestic Violence,
United Black Students, University
of Miami, University of Miami
BLack Law Students Association,
St. Mary Missionary Baptist

Church.

Also, Coconut Grove Negro
Women's Club, Macedonia Mis-
sionary Baptist Church, Universi-
ty of Florida, Black Law Student
Association, African-American
International Foundation, Kerr
Memorial United Methodist
Church, Unrepresented Peoples
Political Action Council, Black
Organizational Leadership Deve-
lopment, Black Law Students
Association, Nova Law Center,
United Black Students, Antonio
Maceo Brigade Inc., St. Martin
DePorres Association, the Profes-
sional Black Firefighters Associa-
tion, the Mays High School Alumni
Association, the Progressive Offic-
ers Club of the Metro-Dade Police
Department, the Association of
African-American Architects and
Engineers, the American Arab
Business and Professional Coali-
tion Inc., Covenant Baptist
Church, and New Covenant Pre-
sbyterian Church.

For updated information, call
the Boycott hotline numbers:
953-0830 or 1-800-822-0830.

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THE MIAMI TIMES
Thursday, June 13, 1991

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Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Pollyanna Walkes of Miami inspects a survival vest before

issuing it to a Navy helicopter pilot. proous navy

Miami Single Mom Finds More
Than Financial Stability In Navy

By CHRIS TAYLOR

MAYPORT — Life as a single
parent is a demanding, emotional-
ly stressful and mind-expanding
experience. It can make a person
better or bitter. Stability in any
area can help a parent make a suc-
cess of a job optimally designed to
be shared by two. For Pollyanna
Walkes, daughter of Hazel Ward of
Miami, the U.S. Navy has provided
her with much-needed financial
security.

“The Navy has given me job sec-
urity,” Walkes says. “It's steady
work with no pay cuts or cuts in
hours.” In addition, the Navy is
helping her establish a fund for
future education using the bene-
fits of the G.I. Bill.

Walkes, a 1978 graduate of
Miami Carol City Senior High
School, also attended Miami Dade
Community College. She says the
Navy has also helped her regain
control of her life. “It's strength-
ened my family beliefs,” she says,
“and I've become extremely posi-
tive about myself and my abilities.”

“When I joined (the Navy), I was
already a single parent,” she adds.
“My job has taught me to, once
again, begin to rely on other peo-
ple, at least in the work environ-
ment. People depend upon me, like
I depend upon them; it's a team
effort.”

Walkes is an aircrew survival
equipment person with the
Mayport-based Helicopter Anti-

Jerilene Plez Selected Para-

Professional Of The Year

In ceremonies sponsored by the
United Teachers of Dade at the Bis-
cayne Bay Marriot Hotel, Dade
school superintendent Octavio
Visiedo honored Jerilene Plez as
Paraprofessional of the Year for
Alternative Schools.

She is employed at the Juvenile
Justice Center School where she
assists classroom teachers.

Plez graduated from Miami
Northwestern High School and
attended Miami-Dade Community
College.

She worked for the Department
of Parks and Recreation before
coming to Dade County Public
Schools in 1975. She has been at
the Juvenile Justice Center School
since 1978.

An active member of the Second
Canaan Missionary Baptist
Church, she sings in the Voices of
Canaan and does extensive work
with The Young Peoples Depart-
ment, acting as secretary for the

JERILENE PLEZ

Florida General
Convention.

Baptist

TL

submarine Squadron Light
(HSL-40). She tests, inspects and
maintains aviation survival gear
aboard the squadron's Seahawk
SH-60B helicopters.

HSL-40's helos are used to
detect, locate and destroy enemy
submarines at long range. They're
also assigned to be in constant
voice and data link contact with a
ship's Combat Information Center
(CIC).

In addition to its mission of
seeking and engaging submarines,
HSL-40 is able to provide targeting
information for over-the-horizon,
surface-to-surface missions. It
also has secondary uses in search
and rescue, medical evacuation,
vertical replenishment and com-
munication relay missions.

“If the aircraft breaks down,”
she says, “my equipment could be
the crew's last chance for survival.
I also train all crew members in the
proper use of the survival support
equipment.”

To a certain extent, the Navy has
become Walkes's survival equip-
ment. Because she joined the sea
service at 26, she is ineligible for
some of the programs that could
help her move into the officer ranks
but that doesn't faze her. “I'm high-
ly motivated,” she says. “I want to
climb as high and as fastas I can in
the enlisted rates.”

When she joined in 1987, reg-
ulations required that she name a
guardian for her son, Brian, then
9. Upon completion of boot camp,
followed by advanced training and
a promotion to 3rd class, she and
Brian were reunited.

“The Navy has been good to me
and I may make it a career,” she
says. “For now, I'm taking it one
enlistment at a time. I do want to
return to college and complete my
degree. My goal is to become a cer-
tified public accountant.” — NAVY
FEATURE

are (1tor) Carole Shields, immediate past president of Hospice Foundation Inc., who spear-
headed the scholarship-funding initiative; Kenneth J. Fedor, dean of the School of Busi-
ness Administration at the University of Miami; Sen. Carrie Meek; and, Sen. Jack D. Gor-
don, president of the Hospice Foundation.

Hospice Sets Up Scholarship In
Honor Of Senator Carrie Meek

Florida Sen. Jack D. Gordon (D-
Miami Beach), president of the
Hospice Foundation, recently
announced the establishment of
the Carrie Meek Scholarship in
Health Administration at the Uni-
versity of Miami Graduate School
of Business Administration.

The two-year scholarship is for
full tuition and books for an
American-born person of African
descent preparing for a career as a
health-care manager or
administrator.

The scholarship is named in
honor of State Sen. Carrie Meek (D-
Miami) in recognition of her role in
the development of hospice. Meek
was the sponsor of the original
Florida hospice licensing law,
which served as amodel for the rest
of the nation.

“This scholarship is structured
|

ol

as a measure of the kind of princi-
ples that had been written in the
hospice law and the kind of ideals
we have about access in society,”
Gordon said.

The award is offered in recogni-
tion of the compassionate and
competent care provided by the
hospice nursing assistants, most
of whom are Black women, who are
typically under-represented at
management level, hospice offi-
cials said.

“This is a special honor because
this scholarship is going to help
someone go the university who
would not have had that opportun-
ity,” said Meek. “That's access; it's
something that will not be brick
and mortar; it's something that will
embellish a human life and other
human lives.”

The Hospice Foundation Inc.
was formed in 1980 as a national
charitable organziation. It is head-
quartered in Miami and has an
office in Washington, D.C. In addi-
tion to its programs that provide
direct service to the financially dis-
tressed, the Foundation serves as
a “think tank," advocating state-of-
the-art improvements in the hos-
pice movement and care for the ter-
minally ill.

Hospice is a comprehensive
array of medical and social services
to help patients and their families
cope with the physical, emotional,
spiritual and financial distress
often associated with a terminal ill-
ness. It is a relatively new, cost-
effective concept for treating
patients with cancer, AIDS and
other life-limiting diseases.

Che Miami Times

The times are changed and we are changed with them

Section B

Thursday, June 13, 1991 |

Futuristic Elementary School That’s
Named For Gilbert Porter Opened

Dressed in blue, astronaut-like
jumpsuits, nearly 700 students
happily trekked along the West
Kendall roadways to their new Gil-
bert L. Porter Elementary School at
15851 S.W. 112th St.

As they arrived for the ribbon-
cutting ceremony, they chanted
“GLP! GLP!" The ribbon-cutting
was followed by a program on the
lawn of the school's central cour-
tyard, with speeches and perfor-
mances by students.

The March 11 opening-day cere-
mony also was a happy journey for
Dr. Gilbert L. Porter, for whom the
school is named. Porter Elemen-
tary, to be known as “The School of
Discovery,” has a space-age prog-
ram theme. It's the first elementary
school to open under the “Saturn”
program, in which a school is man-
aged by a principal who submitted
a successful proposal on how to
operate the institution.

Porter, whose grandparents
were slaves until they were freed in
the 1860s, was one of the first top
Black administrators in the Dade
County public school system. He
was special assistant to the super-
intendant of schools from 1968 to
1973, when he retired.

“I'm floating so high up here,”
Porter said from the podium, “I
can't come down. Thank you for
this wonderful honor.”

The opening was celebrated in
style. The kids, staff and teachers
were decked out in bright blue
astronaut jumpsuits to go along
with the space-age theme of their
new school, which is plastered
with pictures of the space shuttle
and other NASA paraphernalia.

The space motif extends past
pictures and jumpsuits. The office
is called Mission Control, the clinic
Sick Bay and the buildings have
names like Atlantis, Voyager and
Apollo. Some may even have
expected appearances by Captain
Kirk and Mr. Spock.

“I want the children to listen,”
Superintendent Octavio J. Visiedo
told the audience of 1,000 stu-
dents, parents, business and civic
leaders. “You have the privilege of
attending a new school named
after an individual dedicated to
fairness, who has left a legacy in
education.”

Added Region VI assistant
superintendent Eddie Pearson,
“He's a leader in desegregation in
education.”

Gilbert Lawrence Porter was
born in Baldwin City, Kansas. He
earned an A.B. degree in chemistry
from Talladega College, the M.A.
degree in educational administra-
tion from the University of Michi-
gan and his Ph.D. from Ohio State
University. y

He began as a teacher of science
in the public schools of Florida,
and was the first full-time paid
executive secretary of the Florida
State Teachers Association. When
that organization merged with The
Classroom Teachers Association,
he moved to Miami.

Dr. Porter is married to the for-
mer Willie Pearl Keller. They have
two children, Laurestine Porter
Hamm, a media specialist at Arcola
Lake Elementary, and Albert
Wesley, owner of the Porter Oil
Company.

Gilbert L. Porter Elementary is
headed by principal Fredric G. Zer-
lin, who was transferred from Little
River Elementary. “He is the most
dynamic and enthusiastic person
I've ever met,” said Dr. Porter.
Naomi Shorter Davis and Dr. Tarja

Dr. Gilbert Porter receives plaque from Black Archives. (ee

photo.

Dr. Gilbert Porter (right) with his wife Willie Pearl Porter

(center) and Principal Fredric G. Zerlin enjoying perfor-
mance at school named in his honor. tee phon.

Dr. Gilbert Porter and alumni from Talladega College who

Geis are the Saturn coordinators. presented him with a plaque. Lee pron.

Virginia Dennis, Aide Of The Year

Virginia Dennis, an Adult Day
Care Assistant, has been named
1990 Senior Aide of the Year by the
Jewish Family Service (JFS) Senior
AIDES Project.

Dennis, 63, started in the field
18 months ago as an enrollee in
JFS's employment and training
program for older workers. She
was placed at the National Parkin-
son Foundation (NPF) Adult Day
Care program where she had on-
the-job training to learn about car-
ing for older people.

“Ginger learned special tech-
niques for handling the mobility-
impaired Parkinson patient. She
developed observation skills and
good judgement about changes in
clients's conditions, which she
reports. Ginger protects particip-
ants from injury and displays sen-
sitivity to their needs and patience
for their demands. She always
shows a positive attitude to the

clients and their families,” says
progrm director Tessie Brankar.

Dennis cares for four grandchil
dren, sings in her church choir,
and helps with a program for

youngsters associated with the
church's Red Circle Auxiliary. She
has also volunteered at a food bank
as a packer. Dennis is a resident of
Liberty City.

Nurse Of The Year At
Cedars Medical Center

Ella LeFlore, R.N., a geriatric
nurse, received the Nurse of the
Year award at Cedars annual
Nurses' Week Dinner recenlty.

LeFlore was one of 22 nurses
selected by their peers to receive
Nurse of the Unit awards. She was
named Nurse of the Year for her
involvement in hospital activities
and committees, commendations
from physicians, peers and
patients, and certifications in her
area of specailty.

She joined Cedars in 1988. A
native of Mississippi, she has a

Jachelor's degree in biology from
Jackson State University.

As Nurse of the Year, LeFlore
was awarded a Lladro porcelain
sculpture with her name engraved
on amarble base and a $250 bonus
check.

“I was in shock," said LeFlore, “I
had no idea I'd be picked." She
added, “Cedars is wonderful. Peo-
ple here make you feel like part of a
family. I'm from the hospitality
state. Maybe I'm happy here
because Cedars is such a hospit-
able place.”



2 THE MIAMI TIMES

Thursday, June 13, 1991

People

Colette Audra White, a former
Miami Times intern, will be gra-
duating from Miami Central Senior
High, ranking 15th out of a class of
513...Prince A. Neal, son of Mr. &
Mrs. Samuel J. Stinson and the
grandson of Mr. & Mrs. Raymond
Holloway, has been offered an
appointment as a Cadet at the
United States Coast Guard
Academy, New London, CT. Prince
(aka Tony) is a 1990 graduate of
Palmetto Senior High School and is
one of 280 appointees who will
become members of the class of
1995. Once at the Academy, he will
join the more than 900 members of
the Corps of Cadets striving to
obtain a Bachelor of Science degree
in one of seven majors and a com-
mission as an Ensign in the United
States Coast Guard . . . Women's
Opportunity Network (WON) will
sponsor “An Afternoon In the
Grove Part II,” play and dinner,
June 15. Play, “Other People's
Money,” curtain at 2 p.m., Coconut
Grove Playhouse, 3500 Main High-
way, followed by dinner at Sun City
Motel, 17375 Collins Avenue. Call
633-6916 . . . Tanzana Clemmon
will wed Isaiah Dixon Saturday,
June 15, 6 p.m., at Greater St.
Johns, Rev. William H. Washing-
ton, pastor . . . Darryl Parks is
chairperson of the Florida Student
Association. He is FAMU student
body president.

* % % x % % x %

Chef Moses Ball, food service

instructor and Home Economics

Department at Atlantic
Vocational-Technical Center, has
been named Chef of The Year by
the Chefs Association of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, a local chapter of
the American Culinary Federation
. . . Metro-Dade firefighter Glenn
Moton, a four-year department
veteran, has been reccognized for
the second time as its Employee of
the Month. A member of the Metro-
Dade Fire Department's Public

3

Congrats

Education Division, he was hon-
ored also in April for his enthusias-
tic and comprehensive presenta-
tions made in conjunction with the
Fire Department's exhibit during
the Dade County Youth Fair and
Exposition. In 1990, he was March
Employee of the Month, along with
two other crew members, for his
role in the rescue of two house fire
victims who were trapped by win-
dow bars. Moton, 36, is a Carol City
resident.
* % % $8
Several standouts from Alaba-
ma State University's 1990 football
team were honored with team
awards during the Hornets’ recent
spring athletic banquet. Two
Miami Central High School gradu-
ates: were among them: Reggie
Brown, named Outstanding
Receiver, and Emanuel Martin,
Outstanding Defensive Back . . .
Khambrel Marshall has left Chan-
nel 10 and now works for WCIX-
Channel 6 . . . Jason Warren, a
third-year student at the Universi-
ty of Florida College of Medicine,
will be first in the school's history
to receive the National Medical
Association Merit Award for Out-
standing Academic Achievement.
Warren is one of four recipients
selected nationwide in recognition
of his contributions to his school
and community. The annual
award includes a $2,250 stipend
and is administered by National
Medical Fellowship Inc.
* 2 % % Xx % x %
Joycelyn Smith is in New York
visiting her son Roland and family
and to attend the junior high gra-
duation of grandson Neville Bar-
nett Burroughs . . . Among the
Dade County 1991 school retirees
are Enid Curtis Johnson, Marie
Singletary, Bessie Williams, Far-
ley Neasman, Wallace Chester,
Helen Robinson, Eloise Clark
Jennings and Juanita Jeffries. ..
Metro Commissioner Larry Hawk-

ins and Ira Clark, administrator,
Jackson Memorial Hospital/
Public Health Trust are speakers
today at League of Women. Voters
FYI luncheon series on Health Care
Financing Options at Southeast
Financial Center.
* & & 3% 3

Vandetta Theresa Roberta
Thomas and Harold Thomas
Scott Jr. will be married on July 6
in St. Mary's Cathedral. The bride
is the daughter of Leroy and Josie
Portier. The bridgegroom is the
son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Rolle. . .
Brigette Lee and Antonio Moody
will be married on June 22 in
Macedonia Baptist Church. The
bride is the daughter of William
and Dorothy Lee. The bridegroom
is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Monroe
Moody . . . Allison Austin Greene
and daughter Imani of St. Vincent,
West Indies, are in Miami visiting
her mom Helen and family.

Congratulations to the Clapp
and Floyd-Greene families, who
were honored at the commence-
ment exercises at Bethune Cook-
man College as “Total Families.”
(All members being Bethune-
Cookman graduates) . . . Among
Miamians seen at the wedding
reception of Art Hill and Licia Ane
Green-Hill at the Strathmore Art
Center in Rockville, Maryland,
were George Knox, Martin Fine,
Kevin Orr, Cyrus Jollivette and
Fran Chambers . . . Beulah Hum-
phries is being honored by her
family on her retirement after 20
years of service with Neiman Mar-
cus. The affair is scheduled for
Saturday, July 20, at Holiday Inn-
Calder.

* % x * % * *x *%

The Urban League of Greater
Miami will hold its 48 Annual
meeting and symposium on Fri-
day, June 28, at the Arthur McDuf-
fie Enrichment Center . . . Prayers
and get-well wishes are for Willie
Wright and Luriel Beneby.

EDITOR'S NOTE: If you are
interested in trying out as colum-
nist for Chatter that Matters, call
Mr. Hamaludin at 757-1147.

|

To Sheyes of Miami King, Queen & Court

Congratulations are in order for the Sheyes of Miami 1990-1991 King, Queen and Court.

Left to right: Tyrone Hilton, Xavier Smith, William Nealy,

Bryant Church (King), Latanya

Cox (Queen), Kendra Ferguson, Shekiah Marshall, and Tykesha Thomas. Owner, Juanita

Walker.

Announcement
Of Wedding

The marriage of Tanzana Cle-
mons to Isaiah Dixon will take
place on Saturday, June 15, 1991,
at Greater St. James Missionary
Baptist Church, 4875 N.W. 2nd
Ave.

The bride is the daughter of
Loretha and Norris Clemons and is
the great-granddaughter of former
pioneer member, Deacon Horatio
Johnson (deceased), and Bessie
Johnson. The groom is the son of
Dorothy Chayter and Sam Fuller.

Rev. William H. Washington Sr.
will officiate.

May God truly bless this new
beginning.

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Thursday, June 13, 1991

THE MIAMI TIMES

3B

OnJune9, 1941, Beta Zeta Sig-
ma Chapter (now known as Miami
Alumnae Chapter) of Delta Sigma
Theta Inc. was chartered in Miami,
Florida, under the DST national
presidency of Susie Austin.

Charter members were: Lugusta
Taylor Colston, Alice Jones Hawk-
ins, Mildred Jackson, Pearl Tate
Jenkins, Susie E. Corprew Lucus,
Oneida Byrdie Mickens, Maxine
Pollard Bright-Davies, Dorothy
Newton Maxwell, Primerose Barn-
well Tibbs, and Frances Tucker.

Six months after chartering, the
Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor
Dec. 7, 1941. America’s entry into
World War II was quick and deci-
sive. Military activity began to take
place in Miami.

“Although newly chartered,
Miami Deltas were there for our
World War II community and our
servicemen,” said Lugusta
Colston.

To help promote victory, Deltas
eagerly participated in projects
and activities such as the Victory
Clothing Drive and each of the
Bond Drives. Deltas performed vol-
unteer work in war and defense
activities, inter-racial study
groups, Red Cross drives, March of
Dimes, Community Chest, the
U.S.0. Club, migratory and Army
camps, and a job opportunities
project resulting in the employ-
ment of 75 Black men and women
as enumerators in the 1945 State
Census.

This was the first time Blacks
had been given the opportunity to
serve as enumerators in Miamiand
Dade County.

“Delta Signa Theta's Marie
Slaughter, who was a supervisor of
home economics for Dade county
schools, rendered volunteer ser-
vices by conducting classes in gar-
dening and canning for the adult
community,” stated Genevieve
Lockhart, former local president of
Miami Alumnae.

“Irene Straughter, another
Delta, was president of the recently
organized Greater Miami Metropo-
litan Council and served as chair-
man of the Home and Community
Division of Dade County Defense
Council and Chief Block Leader of
the Block Plan during the World
War II period,” Lockhart reported.
“It was Soror Slaughter's efforts
that brought First Lady Eleanor
Roosevelt to Miami for her first
public appearance in what was
then called . . . the Negro Section.”

Frances Tucker, another Delta,
was principal of Carver High
School and served on inter-racial
and educational committees
throughout the state. She earned
the title of Major in the Blue Star
Brigade of the 7th Bond Drive.

Salute To The Deltas

MAUREEN S. BETHEL, president

ofthe Miami Alumnae Chapterof

Delta Sigma Theta Sorority

The first queen of the annual
U.S.0. Fiesta Carnival was Delta's
own Genevieve Lockhart, 1945
president of the Murvelle Branch of
the YWCA, who gave hundreds of
volunteer hours working in the
War Defense projects that helped
promote victory.

“Scholarship fundraisers such
as the Annual Christmas Dance
and Annual Jabberwock were
established during the beginning
months of the chartering,” said for-
mer Soror Linnie Fannin. “The
Miami community was there in full
support for both these scholarship
fundraising projects. The Christ-
mas dances were held in Overtown
at the Rockland Palace, the Harlem
Square, or the Mary Elizabeth.
Jabberwock, which featured per-
forming art skits from all high
school and fraternal groups, was
presented at Booker T. Washing-
ton High School auditorium to
packed audiences. Delta awarded
scholarships of $100 each to
deserving young ladies who were
seniors from Booker T. Washing-
ton, George Washington Carver
and D.A. Dorsey high schools.”

Chapter presidents of the 40s
were Susie Lucus, Pearl Jenkins,
Frances Tucker, Juanita Kimball,
Jimmye Jones and Pearl Jenkins.

The decade of the 50s give Miami
Alumnae such outstanding local
presidents as Dorothy Maxwell,
Linnie Fannin, Lugusta Coleman
and Genevieve Lockhart. On the
political and spiritual scene, the
Civil Rights Movement was the
focus. “Deltas were there to partici-
pate in the fight for human rights
and to promote cultural and edu-
cational projects,” Dorothy Max-
well stated.

Miami Alumnae's elegant Debu-
tante Cotillion was born in 1950.
Initiated by Delta's own: Dorothy
Maxwell, the first Cotillion was

held in the Parish Hall of St. Agnes
Episcopal Church. Ten gifted yong
ladies were introduced to society.

Also in the Fifties, Dr. Dazelle D.
Simpson, a Delta, became the first
Black certified pediatrician in the
State of Florida. She later became
the first woman and the first Black
to serve on the admission commit-
tee at the University of Miami
School of Medicine.

In the decade of the 60s, “We
Shall Overcome” was the climate
throughout the world and Miami
Deltas were a part of the move-
ment. Local presidents of the Six-
ties, Genevieve Lockhart, Alice Sal-
mon, Dorothy Maxwell, Dorothy
Graham, Gussie Ervin and Fannie
Thurston, gave outstanding
leadership.

Engaging in voter registration
drives and other educational and
economic projects to promote
equality, Deltas formed commit-

‘tees and prompted community ser-

vices throughout the county.
“Through its social action prog-
ram, Deltas supported the Black-
owned Christian Memorial Hospi-
tal by fully equipping a three-bed
ward,” Colston said. The hospital
was staffed with such outstanding
doctors as Delta's own Dazelle
Simpson and her physician hus-
band Dr. George Simpson Jr; Dr.
Nathaniel Colston, husband of
Delta's Lugusta Colston; Dr. John
O. Brown, husband of Delta's Mar-
ie Fulkner Brown; Dr. William
Chapman, father of Delta's Wilhe-
mina Chapman Rhetta.

In the 60s, Delta awarded many
scholarships and helped the com-
munity to win many Civil Rights
battles in the educational, eco-
nomic and social areas.

The 1970s gave Delta such
dynamic local presidents as Fan-
nie Thurston, Dora Wright, Dor-
othy Sawyer and Mona Jackson,
whose thrust was to break new
Delta ground.

“The Five-Point Program
Thrust, which included health,
public services, educational deve-
lopment, economic development,
scholarship, communication
goals, was initiated and carried out
toits fullest,” said Dorothy Sawyer.

On the political front, Delta's
Carrie Meek was elected to the
Florida House of Representatives.
Delta's Barbara Carey was made
the first Black elected Metro-Dade
County Commissioner. On the
educational front, many Deltas
rose to high positions in schools,
colleges and universities, opening
doors and using their talents to
better serve the community.

The decade of the 1980s gave
Delta local presidents Mona Jack-
son, Nettie Dove, Rosa Harvey and

Mona Bethel Jackson: Model
Of Delta Who’s Moving On Up

Mona Bethel Jackson, wife,
mother of two and assistant princi-
pal of Redland Middle School,
Homestead, feels that life has more
to offer than just those things sur-
rounding one's personal world.

She feels that she’s the “volun-
teer type” and she enjoys helping
others. However, her greatest
reward is in the opportunity to see
those who have been helped by her
now offer aid to someone else.

When husband Herman Jack-
son and sons Keane, 21, and Her-

-man II, 15, are not keeping her
busy, Jackson spends much of her
time as a volunteer or. actively
working with civic and profession-
al organizations.

She has a background in sci-
ence, guidance and counseling
and administration. She feels that
itis important to help combat some
of society's existing ills — illiteracy,

teen pregnancy, suicide and
dropouts.

In addition to a Master's degree
in guidance and counseling from
Florida Atlantic University, Jack-
son has a Bachelor's degree in biol-
ogy from Florida A&M University.
She has completed further study at
the University of Miami, Florida
International University and Nova
University, much of it made possi-
ble through scholarships. She is
also certified in school administra-
tion and supervision. Jackson has
worked in Dade County Public
Schools as a science curriculum
coordinator, educational specialist
in student services and counselor
for high-school students and has
taught science in middle and high
schools. She completed the Dade
County Public Schools Executive
Training Program in 1990.

She has used her experience as
counselor-teacher-administrator
to work with many children and
organizations. Her affiliations
include: Dade County Sickle Cell
Foundation (past president, histo-
rian, vice president); Florida Asso-
ciation for Counseling and Deve-
lopment (1983-1985, District VI
Representative, 1985, president-
elect, 1986, first Black female
president); Dade County Associa-
tion for Counseling and Develop-
ment (1983-1984, president,
1982-1988, corresponding secret-
ary); Career Counseling Advisory
Committee, Member (DCPS),
1983-1985; Jack and Jill of Ameri-
ca (president-elect, Miami, Chap-
ter, 1990-president, vice presi-
dent, 1988-1990, member,
National Nominating Committee,
1990-president, Southeastern
Regional Nominating Committee

Dr. Rosebud Foster, Making
Strides In Health Education

Soror Dr. Rosebud Lightbourne
Foster of Miami Alumnae, whose
most recent position included vice
provost of Florida International
University, is performing a coura-
geous job for the underserved
population as the university's Pro-
fessor in Health Services Admi-
nistration. She is Project Director
of the federally funded area Health
Education Center jointly with the
Southeastern College of Osteo-
pathic Medicine.

In this role, Dr. Foster develops
and implements semi-annual
post-graduate continuing medical
education symposia in Europe.

In the spirit of a Delta “breaking
new Delta ground”, she planned,
developed, coordinated and moni-
tored a $1 million state-funded
contract with the Southeastern
College of Osteopathic Medicine to
initiate demonstration projects in

DR. ROSEBUD FOSTER
(

community health centers in
South Florida.

This rural, medically indigent
demonstration project promotes
the recruitment, training and
retention of medical students,
interns and resident physicians in
the provision of primary care to the
rural underserved population.

Dr. Foster received. her educa-
tion at Fisk, Meharry Medical Col-
lege (Nursing, B.S.N.), Wayne State
University (M.S.N.), the University
of Miami (Ed.D.) and post-
graduate residency at the Institute
for Women in Administration,
Bryn Mawr College, Pennsylvania.

50 Years Of Community Service In Essence Of Sisterhood

Charter Members Of Beta Zeta Sigma Chapter

Left to right, top row: Sorors Juanita Martin, Willie Jamison, Marie Slaughter, Pearl
Jenkins, Dorothy Newton, Jimmye Jones. 2nd row: Irene R. Straughter, Anna Mitch-
ell, Frances S. Tucker, Alice Hawkins. 3rd row: Genevieve Lockhart, Alma Brooks, Lin-
nie Fannin, Valancia Williams, Lugusta Colston, Estelle Waller, and Juanita Kimball,
Present. Not shown in picture are Sorors Ruth K. Jones, Maxine Pollard, and Sarah

stie.

Maureen Bethel. “Miami Alumnae
had grown tremendously, and to
utilize the talents of its many mem-
bers so that Deltas could give
added services to the community,
the Dade County Alumnae was
chartered on Jan. 10, 1981 as an
offshoot of Miami Alumnae,” Soror
Maud Newbold, past president of
the Dade Count Chapter,
reiterated.

Also in the 1980s, Miami Alum-
nae chartered Key West Alumnae.

The over 200 financial Miami
Alumnae members participated in
national social isses such as Public
Television Awareness, the Haitian
Refugee Project, the “Just Say No
To Drugs” campaign, health fairs,
stress and hypertension sympo-
siums, tutorial services, employ-
ment and training. Priority issues
also included voter registration,
legislation affecting education,
employment, School America,
child care and international
affairs. Deltas honored trailblazers
in education, making it an annual
May Week project and successfully
initiated Annual Test-wise and
Awareness workshops for high
school students which draw hun-
dreds of participants each year.

Politically, Deltas continued to
move upward. Delta's Carrie Meek
was elected the first Black female
Florida Senator. Delta's Barbara
Carey was elected Dade County
Commissioner. Delta's Rowena
Sutton was appointed first Black
female area superintendent of
Dade County Schools. Delta's Polly
McIntosh was appointed the first

iy.
MONA BETHEL JACKSON

Chair, 1991).

Also, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority
(president, 1976-1980, vice-
president, 1974-1976, parliamen-
tarian, 1980-1982;
1984-1988-Miami Alumane Chap-
ter); president, Beta Alpha Chapter
- Florida A&M University,
1967-1968; Member, National
Program Planning and Develoment
Committee, 1981-1983; National
Social Action Regional Commis-
sioner, 1979-1982; National Hai-
tian Task Force Chair, 1982-1983;
National School America Project,
Miami Alumnae Chapter Chair,
1989-1991; Haitian Refugee Cen-
ter, Board Secretary, 1983-1985;
Southeast Florida Literacy Net-
work Center, Board, 1990-1991.

Jackson was recently elected
alternate to District Citizen's
Advisory Committee for the South
Dade Feeder Pattern and to the
board of Longevity Associates.

She is the grandniece of one of
Miami oldest living pioneers,
Albert Gibson, and is truly a native
daughter who is committed to both
the community and her profession.

As Miami Alumnae Chapter
celebrates its 50th anniversary,
Jackson is working, as always. She
is a co-chair of the anniversary
committee, This year is also signif-
icant to her since it marks her
silver anniversary as a Delta. She
was inducted at Beta Alpha Chap-
ter, Florida A&M University.

Black assistant superintendent of
Federal Projects Administration
for Dade County Schools. Dr.
Rosebud Foster became vice pro-
vost and chief executive officer of
Florida International University
North Campus.

“A majority of the sorority mem-
bers are teachers, school admini-
strators, counselors, professors
and college and university admini-
strators,” said Lugusta Colston.

Also during the 80s, many
Deltas such as Soror Bernice Shor-
ter Meares, a pharmacist (like the
former Soror Olivia Edwards, also
a pharmacist) opened their own
businesses, becoming entrepre-
neurs. Miami Alumnae adopted
the Florene Nichols Inner City
Dance Company.

In the 1990s, under the local
presidency of Maureen Bethel and
hostess co-chair Rose Harvey,
Miami Alumane, along with Dade
County Alumnae hosted the
175-member strong 40th National
Convention of Delta Sigma Theta
Sorority Inc. Over 5,000 Deltasun-
der the national presidency of Dr.
Yvonne Kennedy, convened on
Miami Beach, projecting the
national theme: “Pass the Delta
Torch; Ignite a New Vision.”

Currently, Delta Sigma Theta
has over 600 chapters in the
United States, West Germany, the
Vrigin Islands, Bermuda, Haiti,
Liberia, the Bahamas and the
Republic of Korea.

Founded as a sorority on Jan.
13, 1913, at Howard University,
the established goals of Delta Sig-
ma Theta's 22 founding members
were “To be involved with the Grea-
ter issues . . . education, scholar-
ships, international relief funds,
woman's righs, children’s rights
and civil rights, . . . as well as the
enhancement of family life and cul-
tural heritage — all have been in
the forefront of Delta activities over
the years,” said local president

Maureen Bethel.
Miami Alumnae members such
Mona Jackson,

as Arcie Ewell,

Eleanor Coleman, Drs. Mildred
Berry, RosaJones, Emma Rembert
and Nettie Dove were appointed
leaders of various workshops for
the convention. Program activities
for the convention included deci-
sion making on internal policy
matters and office holders, a public
meeting where great teachers were
honored in line with Delta's com-
mitment to educational develop-
ment; School America, a health
fair; a career job, and trade show.
Other topics included drug abuse,
health, economic development and
the Black male.

The Miami Alumnae is proud of
the success of the National Con-
vention and extends its incere gra-
titude to the community for its
wonderful support and
attendance.

Miami Alumnae is most grateful
to the comunity for the half-
century of untiring support of its
educational programs and scho-
larship fundraising projects. In its
50-year history, the Miami Alum-
nae has sponsored approximately
50 Annual Christmas dances and
Jabberwocks. Since the origin of
the Debutante Cotillion 41 years
ago, over 20,000 young ladies have
been introduced into society and
over 200 scholarships ranging
from $100 to $6,000 each have
been awarded, totaling over
$120,000 in scholarships made
possible from the Annual Christ-
mas Dance and Annual
Jabberwock.

For the past five years, Deltas
have been awarding over $12,000
annually in scholarships. The
chapter has given thousands upon
thousands of hours of volunteer of
youth through its educational
projects.

Chapter president Maureen
Bethel, on behalf of the sorority,
extends a special invitation for all
to attend Miami Alumnae’s 50th
Anniversary Celebration on June
15 at the Joseph E. Caleb Auditor-
ium, where you, too, will be both
honored and celebrated.

Scene from ~Holiday Customs Around the World. "

Alice Johnson, Soror
Who Keeps Dream Alive

Soror Alice Johnson of Miami
Alumnae was the co-chair of the
publicity subcommittee for the
40th National Convention.

Soror Johnson, who is an arts
enthusiast, has produced a musi-
cal docu-drama, “Keepers of the
Dream.”

Miami-Dade Community Col-
lege has filmed “Keepers of the
Dream,” which highlights the life of
the late Dr. Martin L. King Jr.
through music, narrative, song
and creative dance. The film is
being distributed throughout
Dade County to schools and other
organizations. The musical is per-
formed by the John Pryor Reper-
tory Theater Company.

Soror Johnson, in collaboration
with husband John, has written
and produced over 10 musical
docudramas emphasizing multi-
cultural education.

This past school year, over
30,000 students were bused to the
Joseph E. Caleb Auditorium to see
the musicals “Holiday Customs
Around the World," “Keepers of the

v

DR. ALICE JOHNSON

Dream,” focusing on Rosa Parks,
played by actress Krystal High;
and, “A Salute to International
Heroes: Toussaint L'Ouverture,
Jose Marti and Marcus Garvey."
The docudramas were per-
formed by the Coconut Grove
Children's Theater, under the
direction of Cornelia Dozier.



THE MIAMI TIMES

4

Thursday, June 13, 1991

Salute To Deltas’ Golden Anniversary

Miami Alumnae Chapter Presented Its 41st
Annual Debutante Cotillion April 22

The Miami Alumnae Chapter
of Delta Sigma Theta pre-
sented its 41st Annual Debu-
tante Cotillion on April 21,
1991, at the James L. Knight
Center under the theme: “An
evening of enchantment.”

Fifty-two beautiful young
ladies were presented to socie-

1. Alvin Ailley Dance
Performance

2. Picnic at Morningside Park
3. Test-Wise Awareness
Workshops

4. Sickle Cell Walkathon

5. Thanksgiving Baskets for
the Needy

6. Talent and Fashion Shows

Francenia H. Scott, the co-
chairpersonships of Nellie
Wilder, Sarah Simmons,
Jeanette Mordica and the
committee, the debs enjoyed
three years of enriching exper-
iences that will forever
strengthen their moral and
spiritual values as young

daughter of Mr. and (Soror)
Mrs. Roosevelt Richardson
Jr., and student at American
Senior High — $1,500; debu-
tante Khadija Rabiah Smith,
daughter of Marvin and Cor-
nelia Smith, student at Miami
Carol City Senior — $1,000;
debutante Djenabra Mayee

ty in a memorable ceremony 7. Overnight Retreat at the ladies dedicated to serve as Croskey, daughter of Dr. and Tar
that was attended by more Embassy Suites Workshops leaders of tomorrow. Mrs. (Soror) Clyde Croskey, Tea
than 3,000. Delta paid tribute on College Life, Self Esteem At this cotillion, $12,000 in * student at Miami Norland py
to these young ladies of the and How to Get Along With scholarships were awarded. Senior High, $500; debutante 7
Miami-Dade Community who Parents. Debutante Flai Iris Livingston, Yolanda Rene Hobbs, daught- Na
personified the highest attain- 8. Black History Programs daughter of Arthur and Jac- er of Edward E. and the late Tm
ments in scholastic achieve- 9. Vesper Service — Mt. Tabor quelynLivingstonandanhon- Lela Hobbs and a senior at She
ment, social and cultural pur- Baptist Church or student at Northwestern Miami Northwestern High —
suits and leadership 10. College Success and Senior High, was first-place $500; and, debutante Tawana Tar
endeavors. Strategies Workshop winner, receiving a $4,500 Trenise Bryant, daughter of Mo
“They are shining examples 11. Three-day trip to New scholarship award. Yolanda Reaves and Curtis De
and unique role models whose Orleans, historical sight- Other scholarship award reci- Bryant, granddaughter of Di
participation inthe Debutante seeing tours, shoppingsprees, pients were: debutante Mary E. Evans and a student Je
organization for the past three college visitations (Xavier and Chanell Madison, daughter of at Miami Northwestern — Tas
years captured attention and Dillard Universities) Davie Madison and Barbara $500. Tas
interest of many,” said chap- 12. The Debutante Cotillion— Thomas and a student at Cor- Miami Alumnae congratulates Sts
ter president Maureen Bethel. “An Evening of Enchantment” al Gables Senior High — the 52 charming debutantes
The 1991 debutantes’ experi- 13. Awards Dinner $2,000; debutante April Joy for their outstanding partici- Lo
ences and events included: Under the chairpersonship of Kaigler, daughter of Deborah pation, and expresses sincere La
L. and George E. Kaigler who thanks to the parents and An
DEB attends Miami Edison Senior young escorts for their devo- 0
UTAN TE COMMITTEES pe 2 3, vane on ai Sa Debutante Cotillion Chairperson Francenia Scott gives bou- af
Francenia H. Scott, Chairperson : * quet of flowers to Dorothy Maxwell, initiator at Debutante
Nellie B. Wilder, Co-Chairperson Cotillion in 1950. Yo
Sara Simmons, Co-Chairperson 2
Jeanette Mordica, Co-Chairperson Er
SOUVENIR BOOK ESCORTS AND HONOR GUARDS Dr
Maude Holt, Chairperson Deborah Toombs, Chairperson ° Si
Nellie Wilder Noel Cobb x
Francenia Scott Jeanette Mordica
*Dorothy Maxwell A
MOTHERS & FATHERS Ve
DEBUTANTE COTILLION Dorothy Baker J

Barbara Anders
Elizabeth Davis
Ana Jackson
Jeanette Mordica
Edna Thompkins
Sara Simmons
Deborah Toombs

Noel Cobb

Dorothy Baker USHERS

Nellie Wilder Members of Miami Alumnae : Hi
Francenia Scott Chapter Debutante Committee

TRAVEL

Sara Simmons, Chairperson

Jeanette Mordica
Co-Chairperson

Elizabeth Davis

CHOREOGRAPHER
Barbara Anders

INVITATIONS

Noel Cobb, Chairperson
Brenda Bryant

Maude Holt

Ruby Rankin

Gwen Clark

Jacquelyn Crosby
Mildred Marquis

La Clyde Clark

Della Wilson

FINANCE

Edith Oden, Chairperson
Elizabeth Davis

Dorothy Baker

Maude Holt

Francenia Scott

Nancy Dawkins

ENRICHMENT

Carmen Davis, Chairperson
Gussie Ervin

Evelyn Harrison

Noel Cobb

Sara Simmons

Alstene McKinney

Donise Edwards

Brenda Bryant

Edna Thompkins

Retreat at the Embassy Suites April 1990

bi)

LaClyde Clark

Charlie Ann Richardson
Gussie Ervin

Carmen Davis

Rose Lawson

Edith Oden

Irene Williams

Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.
*Cotillion Founder

Escorts and Mothers

Ae Mr
i lied ro

Debs and Speaker at the Retreat

Retreat at the Embassy Suite April 1990



~ Meet The Debutantes Of 1991 Presented By £3
The Miami Alumnae Chapter Of Delta Sigma Theta SY

(rw)

. Salute To Deltas’ Golden Anniversary Thursday. June 15, 1551 DD
\

These Are The Debutantes

Tangela Janean Baker Chanell Madison

Jeanine Lynette Baron Karen Nicole Montgomery
Arlana Danielle Barr Yolanda DaShawn Moore
Natisha Claudine Barr Michele Mari Mordica
Tawana Trenise Bryant Hope Felicianna McDonald
Shamara LaQueda Byrd Cassandra Yvette Neal
Tameika Lisette Caudle

Mary Lecel Peters
Marguerite Deama Clark. Thack Nizole Dullom

Delicia Joyce Arvette Collins Rolens nn Richantion
Djenabra Mayee Croskey Ullyssia Renee Richardson

Taressa Camille Cross Verdell Renee Sands
Tamara LaShawne Floyd Keba Amell Sinkfield

Starlin Kamali Gardner Khadija Rabia Smith

Lori Juanita Gilbert Talana Monique Smith
La-Johnda Charese Goodman

Anglea Francise Hall Gracelyn Sharron Thomas
Yolanda Evette Hamm Dionne Lachanze Tillman
r Alicia Faye Henderson Tangela Bershun Tolbert
e Yolanda Rene Hobbs Delia Marie Welch
LaTrice Danielle Hubert Ashaki Mariama White
Erika Octavia Huffman Kaprice Yvette Williams
Dp Nita Bering: Jackson Robin Cinia Williams

Sicily Oriana Johnson Tangela Evonne Williams

Kemba Nalungo Jones Tangela Lavette Williams
April Joy Kaigler Karen Alicia Wilson
Vernatta Edwina Lee Tiffany Chante Wimberly
Flai Iris Livingston Mary ‘Elona Young

Debs and Escorts Debs and Escorts Debs and Fathers

Debs and Escorts

Debutante Debutante

Debs and Escorts Debs and Escorts



6B THE MIAMI TIMES
Thursday, June 13, 1991

Salute To Deltas’ Golden Anniversary

ed

In The Essence Of Sisterhood

“In Essence of Sisterhood”: Miami Alumnae and Dade County chapters pose with artist

Soror Malki Roberts (center front) at Gallery Antigua Inc. following exhibit and reception
for artist.

At The 40th Anniversary Celebration

In 1983, DST charter members, past presidents and 40-plus years sorority members
were honored at the 40th Anniversary Celebration. 1st row (L-R) Sorors Linie Finnin, Dor-
othy Graham, Nettie Dove, W. Williams, Hazel Wright. 2nd row: (L-R) Sorors Gwendolyn
Clark, Mona Jackson, two unnamed members, Fannie Thurston, Genevievz Lockhart and
Victoria Simpson.

Greeting Sorors At National Convention In Miami

The 1990 National Convention held in Miami, Miami Alumnae and Dade County chapter

members were hosts. In picture, Soror Nettie Dove shakes hands with Delta sister during
break at National Convention.

pl oe
= os Ton i

Ono -

St. Agnes Throug The ears

The first Debutante Cotillion was held at St. Agnes Parish
Hall in 1950.

Don’t Miss!
50 Years: In Essence of Sisterhood

A 30-minute musical docudrama conceived by
Soror Gwen High, written by Soror Alice Johnson
and directed and choreographed by Soror Barbara
Anders will depict and highlight the 50-year
history of Miami Alumnae.

"Education leadership.

Mr. J abberwock

Delta's first “Mr. Jabberwock”

Lloyd T. Bayley.

5 J abberwoc

-
90-92

“Delta's 1990-92 Miss Jabber-
wock” Dana Mari Smith.

1988-90" Nikki Flannigan. Delta

Miss J abberwock
1988-90

“Miss Jabberwock

thanks the community for its 50

years of Jabberwock support for
this annual scholarship
fundraiser.

Past Presidents
Of Miami Alumnae

1941-1942 Susie Lucas
1942-1943 Pearl Jenkins
1943-1944 Frances Tucker
1944-1946 Juanita Kimball
1946-1948 Jimmye Jones
1948-1950 Pearl Jenkins
1950-1952 Dorothy Maxwell
1952-1956 Linnie Fannin
1956-1958 Lugusta Colston
1958-1960 Genevieve Lockhart
1960-1962 Alice Salmon
1962-1964 Dorothy Maxwell
1964-1966 Dorothy Graham
1966-1968 Gussie Ervin
1968-1970 Fannie Thurston
1970-1972 Dora Wright
1972-1976 Dorothy Sawyer
1976-1980 Mona Jackson
1980-1984 Nettie Dove
1984-1988 Rosa Harvey

MH 1988-1992 Maureen Bethel

‘Keepers’ Award To Soror
President Yvonne Kennedy

“Keeper of the Times” award given to Soror by president
Yvonne Kennedy and past president Jeane Noble for National

James Randolph To Perform
At Golden Anniversary Gala

Nationally known actor James
Samuel Randolph will perform in
Deltas’ docudrama on June 15 at
the 50th Anniversary Gala.

Randolph has played in regional
theatres throughout the state to
packed audiences and has
received rave ovations. At the New
River Shakespeare Festival, he
played the title role in “OTHELLO.”
At the Florida Shakespeare Theat-
re, he played such roles as Sam in
“Master Harold & The Boys,” Capt.
Corcoran in “HMS Pinafore;” Ban-
quo in “Macbeth;” and DonJohn in
“Much Ado About Nothing.”

At the Florida Shakespeare Fes-
tival, he played the Player King in
“Ros And Guilare Dead;” Banquo
in “Macbeth;” and, Pooh-Bah in
“The Mikado.”

His national tours include the
role of Capt. Jim in “Captain Jim's
Fire Safety Review Revue.” He has
performed in films and television
with such well-known companies
as Paramount Pictures and P.B.S.,

JAMES S. RANDOLPH

Communicator Productions and
Avid Productions, WSVN-TV, and
MAS Films.

Randolph received his M.F.A.
from the University of Florida and
his B.F.A. from the University of
Miami.

MIAMI ALUMNAE CHAPTER
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.
GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY CELEBRANTS

Abbitt, Euphrates
Adams, Effie
Alexander, Lois
Allen, Sherrylane
Ammons, Edna
Anders, Barbara
Anyamele, Clarinda
Armbrister, Vashti
Austin, Susie
Bain, Barbara
Bain, Mary

Baker, Dorothy
Bayley, Ethel

Bell, Amelia
Berman, Dezma
Bermudez, Carolyn
Berry, Mildred
Bethel, Maureen
Bonner, Carolyn
Braynon, Gladys
Brown, Annie Ruth
Brown, Jesselyn
Brown, Marie
Brown, Maudelle
Bryant, Brenda
Bullard, Maedon
Bullock, Sarah
Campbell, Andrea
Carey, Barbara
Cash, Ida

Clark, Cynthia
Clark, LaClyde
Clarke, Cathy
Clarke, Gwendolyn
Cobb, Noel

Cole, Evelyn
Coleman, Cora
Coleman, Eleanor
Cooper, Sharon
Coverson, Edith
Cowan, Sandra
Crosby, Jacquelyn
Croskey, Luvernis
Culmer, Dorothy
Culpepper, Charlie
Davis, Annette
Davis, Carmen
Davis, Dorothy
Davis, Elizabeth
Davis, Helen
Davis, Naomi
Dawkins, Nancy
Dennis, Edwina
Devoe, Wanda
Dorsey, Wanda
Dove, Nettie
Duffie, Sara
Dunn, Cecelia
Dunnell, Carolyn
Eckles, Minnie
Edwards, Donise
Ervin, Gussie
Evans, Gloria
Everette, Mae
Everette, Theresa
Ewell, Arcie
Fannin, Linnie
Floyd, Genevieve
Freeman, Felicia
Gabbidon, Esther
Gable, Yvonne
Gardner, Inez
Gibson, Thelma
Grace, Regina
Graham, Dorothy
Granville, Rosalyn
Gray, Alfreda
Green, Lillian
Green, Peggie
Green, Vivilora
Hall, Josephine
Hamlet, Lorene
Harper, Carolyn
Harris, Barbara
Harrison, Evelyn
Harvey, Rosa
High, Gwendolyn
Hill, Joealyn

Holt, Maud
Homer, Theresa
Hooks, Juanita
Howard, Villetta
Hunter, Inell
Jackson, Ana
Jackson, Mona
Jackson, Yolanda C.
Jenkins, Patrice
Johnson, Alice
Johnson, Gloria
Johnson, Imogene
Johnson, Hyacinth
Johnson, Juanita
Jones, Cecelia
Jones, Rosa
Kidney, Gwendolyn
King, Althea

Kirksey, Helen
Koonce, Geraldine
Latimore, Katheryne
Lawson, Roselle
Lawson, Willowstine
Lee, Glorious
Lockhart, Genevieve
Love, Genevia
Lynch, Gladys
McGahee, Elaine
Mcintee, Donella
McKenzie, Martha
McKinney, Alstene
McLeod, Cheryl
McMillian, Lottie
McPhaul, Lucy
McPhee, Gloria
McRae, Ann

Mack, Ondrea
Major, Tanya
Marquis, Mildred
Maxwell, Dorothy
Mears, Bernice
Mills, Reeta
Mindingall, Dorothy
Mitchell, Mary
Moore, Brandhilda
Moorman, Rose
Mordica, Jeanette
Moses, Rhonda
Narcisse, Eddie
Neasman, Annie
Nelson, Gwendolyn
Nichols, Karen
Nichson, Doretha
Oden, Edith
O'Rourke, Wilma
Outler, Gay
Paramore, Iris
Paramore, Manor
Paramore, Shirley
Payne, Doretha
Peacock, Cynthia
Pittman, Alice
Pitts, Lucretia
Poitier, Bernadette
Poitier, Josephine
Polite, Cheryl
Powell, Sandra
Prime, Winifred
Rafi, Cynthia
Rakmings, Mary
Raiford, Margaree
Randolph, Gloria
Rankin, Rubye
Rembert, Emma
Rhetta, Wilhelmena
Rhoden, Valmarie
Richardson, Charlie
Robinson, Deneen
Ross, Cliffonia
Russell, Eugenia
Salahuddin, Patricia
Sands, Portia
Scott, Francenia
Shears, Sandy
Shaw, Mildred
Shiver, Rachel
Sillah, Ann Hope
Simpson, Regina J.
Simpson, Victoria
Sims, Ruth

Siplin, Pamela
Smith, Bernice
Storr, Rosa
Stinson, Barbara
Sutton, Joyce Kennedy
Sutton, Rowena
Sweeting, Anna Grace
Taylor, Lavern
Taylor, Peggy
Tellis, Octeon
Thomas, Myrtis
Thomas, Sharon
Thompkins, Edna
Thurston, Fannie
Toombs, Deborah
Trice, Fannie
Truesdale, Maybelline
Walker, Kathleen
Walker, Linda
Wallace, Sondra
Warren, Patricia
Washington, Sheila
Welch, Shawn
Wilder, Nellie
Williams, Irene
Williams, Jessie
Williams, Joyce
Williams, Queen
Williams, Valencia
Wilson, Bryley
Wilson, Della
Wright, Evelyn
Wright, Hazel
Wyche, Vera

Street
Middle
tion D
oted tc
ing a



Thursday, June 13, 1991

THE MIAMI TIMES

/B

In The Military

BH Navy Seaman Recruit John T.
Hodge, son of Gail Favors of N.-W.
50th Street, Miami, completed
recruit training at Recruit Training
Command, San Diego.

B Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class
Hector A. Jimenez, son of Antonio
and Ana M. Jimenez of N.W. 97th
Street, Miami, is deployed to the
Middle East in support of Opera-
tion Desert Storm and was prom-
oted to his present rank while serv-
ing aboard the destroyer USS

Spuance, homeported in Mayport,
Fla. He is a 1988 graduate of
American High School.

H Pvt. Walter L. Wilson Jr. com-
pleted basic training at Fort Leo-
nard Wood, Mo. The son of Hazel E.
and Walter L. Wilson of N.W. 86th
Street, Miami, he is a 1989 gradu-
ate of Miami Central Senior High
School.

HM Air Force Staff Sgt. Kevin Dixon
arrived for duty at Wright-

Southwinds

By Geraldine P. Davis

Three lovely young ladies, Nona
Elissa Gay, Jocelynne Patrice
McAdory and Carin Liana Ross,
were introduced to society by their
parents in L'Presentation de Les
Fleurs, Friday, June 7, at the Uni-
versity Club in the Amerifirst
Building in down-
town Miami.

Nona Gay is
the daughter of
Dr. and Mrs.
Joseph S. Gay,
sister of Joseph
Sirdastion and
Veronica Denise
Gay. Jocelynne §
McAdory is the
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. John T.
McAdory, sister of John Beardon
and Jillian Alexandria. Carin
Ross is the daughter of Dr. and
Mrs. Charles L. Ross Jr., and sis-
ter of Charles Loren.

Innocent and elegant in tradi-
tional full-length white gowns,
each debutante was escorted on
stage by her father and presented
by her mother. Music was provided
by Sonia Ingram, pianist, and
Darlene Weingarten, harpist.

The occasion recognized the
coming-of-age of their first born
and the presentation of their
daughters as a special gift to their
families, friends and society.

The escorts were Derrick Lamar
Mitchell, son of Dr. and Mrs.
Orrin Mitchell, Julian O'Hara
Bostic, son of Mr. and Mrs. Donald
Bostic, and Jesse Nicholas
Bacon, son of Dr. and Mrs. William
Bacon.

The junior hostesses were Ver-

onica Gay, Asha Hadley, Danielle

Jones, Anjanette McAdory, Jil-

lian McAdory, Kia Michell, Don-

na Neely and Meredith Robinson.
* 2% % & % %

Continental Societies chartered
a bus and took its Men on the Move
to Universal Studios in Orlando,
May 31. Enthusiasm skyrocketed
the moment the bus entered the
gate and continued throughout the
day.

The trip was the culminating
activity for the group in apprecia-
tion for their cooperation when
they were saturated with seminars
during the year.

The chaperons were Juanita
Franklin, Earlene Dotson, Carol
Bates, Connie Davis, Cynthia
Rider, yours truly and Ransom
Hill, principal of McArthur South,
and members of his staff. Juanita
Franklin is chairperson . . . The
American Black Community Cen-
ter will present its 4th Annual
Youth Challenge Project Confer-
ence June 27-30 at Florida Memor-
ial College. There will be perfor-
mances, exhibitions and work-
shops on personal and cultural
skills, including public speaking,
self-esteen, dance art workshops,
fashion.

* % x * * * % =

Gamma Rho Chapter of Eta Phi
Beta Sorority Inc's 1991 Bee-Ettes
Committee presented a Youth
Revival on June 5 at Richmond
Middle School. The featured
speaker was Rosetta Harris,
minister of education at Glendale
Baptist Church. The featured choir
was the Sing Out Miami Mass

Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio.
The son of Aaron and Pernease
Dixon of NW 26th Avenue, Miami,
he is a 1978 graduate of Miami
Jackson High School.

HW Air Force Senior Airman Ernes-
to Gibbs, a law enforcement spe-
cialist, arrived for duty at Vanden-
burg Air Force Base, Calif. The son
of Catherine A. Gibbs of N.W. 32nd
Street, Miami, he is a 1985 gradu-
ate of Miami Jackson Senior High
School.

HB Marine Lance Cpl. Ndongoi
Evans, son of Henry K. and Norma
R. Evans of N.W. 46th Street,
Miami, reported for duty with 1st

Choir under the direction of Larry
Walker . . . On June 15, at 6 p.m.,
Gamma Rho will present its 1991
Bee-Ettes at the Homestead Air
Force Base Officer's Club. The Bee-
Ettes are Traviata Cox, Shamina
Gilmore, Lakwanza McDowell,
Erika Slater and Tamara Snow.
The public is invited. For ticket
information, call 233-5577 or
235-8654 . . . Congratulations to
Shalley Jones, who was installed
as president of the National Associ-
ation of Urban Bankers at the
recent annual conference in
Chicago.
* % %* % % % ¥ *

Join the fun on Saturday, June
15, when the South Dade Minority
Cultural Arts Task Force presents
its 2nd Cultural Arts Festival. The
all-day activity will be held at Rich-
mond Heights Park, 14375 Boggs
Drive, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The
attractions will include EERK/
JERK and Poison Clan, the Jireh
Gospel Band, arts and craft dis-
plays, dance, music, drama, face-
painting, clowns, magicians,
unicyclists and free refreshments.
Larcenia Bulllard is project direc-
tor . . . Edward Bullard spoke at
West Laboratory School on an
environmental experience in glob-
al awareness. He shared his exper-
ience of growing up in the Baha-
mas. He also showed replicas of
Bahamian flags, pictures of Baha-
mian police officers and conch
shells he collected on the island. . .
The next meeting of the Trustee
Board of Deering Hospital will be
on July 15. They are looking for
chaplains from the South Dade
community of all denominations. If
you have any information on
health care services, or if you have
a helpful suggestion, call Jamie E.
Hopkins, chief executive director,
at 253-5611. James Marshall is
on the trustee board.

Music is the language of the heart. It's the sound
of joy. The sound of pain. The sound of love. A
sound made stirringly beautiful by African
American music makers throughout our history.
This Black Music Month; Burger King wants to
take the opportunity to thank these musicians
for their magnificent contributions to our
national culture.
So Burger King is sponsoring a special Black
Music Month television tribute this month. Be

sure to

check your local listings.

And celebrate the soul of American music.

oin the

Celebration

+ _L ntex the Blues Cruise Sweepstakes

at Burger King!

«Win a cruise for two in the Caribbean!

‘lus get a coupon for $1.00 off at one of the
record stores you see below when you buy a
Doo-Whopper Combo: Whopper, medium fries,
medium soft drink.

Marine Aircraft Wing, Okinawa,
Japan. A 1989 graduate of Miami
Springs Senior High School, he
joined the Marine Corps in Decem-
ber 1989.

HB Pvt. Morty E. Studstill com-
pleted basic training at Fort Leo-
nard Wood, MO. He is the son of
Ruby Studstill of NW. 51st Ter-
race, Miami.

HW Navy Seaman Recruit Huba E.
Tanos, son of Huba and Martha
Tanos of West Drive, Opa-locka,
completed recruit training at
Recruit Training Command, Great
Lakes, IL, and also became eligible
for three hours of college credit in
Physical Education and Hygiene. A
1990 graduate of Hialeah Senior
High School, he joined the Navy in
December 1990.

HB Navy Seaman Recruit Damon L.
Peele, son of Deldis Peele of N.W.
66th Street, completed recruit
training at Recruit Training Com-
mand, Orlando, Fla., and also
became eligible for three hours of
college credit in Physical Educa-
tion and Hygiene. He is a 1990 gra-
duate of Miami Northwestern High
School.

HM Air Force Tech. Sgt. Kevin L.
Tooks, a communications-
computer systems supervisor,
arrived for duty at Sembach Air
Base, Germany. He is the son of
Marie M. Tooks of N.W. 85th
Street, Miami, and George M.

Tooks of 3416 Gulfstream Road,
Orlando. His wife, Bernitha, is the
daughter of Carroll and Elzadie
Rollins of N.W. 18th Avenue, also
of Miami. He graduated from
Miami Central High School in 1975
and received an Associate degree
in 1978 from Miami-Dade Com-
munity College.

BH TuWanda O. Bryant has been
promoted in the U.S. Army to the
rank of private two. A food service
specialist at Rose Barracks, Ger-
many, she is the daughter of Fred-
die L. Bryant of N.W. 50th Street,
and a 1989 graduate of Miami
Northwestern Senior High School.

HN Pvt. Kevin G. Jones completed
basic training at Fort Jackson,
S.C. The son of James A. and Car-
ole J. Jones of N.W. 87th Street, he
is a 1990 graduate of Miami Centr-
al Senior High School.

BW Air Force Senior Airman Delvi-
nal L. Johnson, a material storage
and distribution specialist, arrived
for duty at England Air Force Base,
La. The daughter of Portia L. Kelly
of N.W. 64th Street, she is a 1983
graduate of Miami Beach Senior
High School.

BM Marine Pfc. Andy V. Joseph,
son of Rosita and Vernet A. Joseph
Sr. of N.W. 5th Place, Miami, com-
pleted recruit training at Marine
Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island,
S.C. He is a 1990 graduate of

Miami Norland Senior High
School.

HB Navy Seaman Recruit Luis T.
Saillant, son of Luis T. and Angela
U. Saillant of N.W. 199th Terrace,
completed recruit training at
Recruit Training Command,
Orlando, Fla., and also became
eligible for three hours of college
credit in Physical Education and
Hygiene. A 1990 graduate of Mira-
mar High School, he joined the
Navy in October 1990.

BM Navy Seaman Recruit Casey D.
Ferguson, son of Semaria
Gashorn of N.W. Fourth Avenue,
completed recruit training at
Recruit Training Command,
Orlando, Fla., and also became
eligible for three hours of college
credit in Physical Education and
Hygiene. A 1990 graduate of Miami
Edison High School, he joined the
Navy in November 1990.

HB Marine Pvt. Marcell L. Edwards,
a 1990 graduate of Miami Carol
City High School, completed
recruit trianing at Marine Corps
Recruit Depot, Parris Island, S.C.
He joined the Marine Corps in
October 1990.

HM Airman lst Class Claudette J.
Walker graduated from the infor-
mation management specialist
course at Keesler Air Force Base,
Biloxi, Miss. The daughter of Eniel
D. Coleman of N.W. 152 Terrace,
she is a 1990 graduate of Hialeah
Miami Lakes Senior High School.

o VERTICALS 60% OFF

e Venetian Blinds

¢ Shades

o Bedspreads

2

Draperies...!

| Al custom made . . .!
From

100" $100
88" to 100" $120
110” to. 100" $140
132” to 100" $150

66" to

VALANCES NOT
INCLUDED

Fabric, labor, rods
and installations
included

Shop at home . . .
Free estimates

CALL 633-6222

Als

1840 N.W. 22ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33135



‘a

S03 THE MIAMI TIMES
Thursday, June 13, 1991

Winn-Dixie dip

Saves You TO 1 § Yo

Over Jorge & Jerry's!

is the Money You Keep!

Most people have a weekly grocery budget. You want to stretch your money as far as you can and

still have quality products. You can do that at Winn-Dixie because we have low prices everyday and
that's a promise!

If your budget was *125.00 for the week
of April 27, 1991, you would save:

The chart below are actual purchases:

WINN (JORGE &
DIXIE |JERRY’S

64-02. SENECA APPLE JUICE. ...... ...... . ... ......._. 1.53 1.79

bo-oz. DOLE SLICED PINEAPPLE. ...... .... .. .. ..... .... .79 .99

612-02. STARKIST CHUNK LIGHT TUNA (inwater). ............... .61 .69

Pa-0z. DINTY MOORE BEEF STEW... ...... .... .... ........ 1.89 217

10-lbs. KINGSFORD CHARCOAL: ............ ................ 2.97 3.69

28-02. HEINZ KETCHUP (squeeze bottle). . ...................... 1.48 1.69

18-07. KRAET BARBECUE SAUCE. ... ..... . .. . .. ... .99 -99

16-07. JUICY JUICE redichonry). .......... co coi 1.53 1.69

8-0z. FRENCH’S MUSTARD (squeeze bottle). . . .................. .63 3

B-0z. EASY-OFF OVEN CLEANER... .. .... ... ... .. ..... 1.75 1.99

4-02. TASTER’S CHOICE FREEZE DRIED COFFEE... ........... 3.68 3.79

13.7-0z. BLACK FLAG ANT & ROACH (pine scent). . ............. 1.74 2.45

20-ihs. MAHATMA RICE... ~~ 4.88 6.85

46:02. HAWAIIAN PUNCH predy. ..................... ..... ... .81 1.15

B-0z. HUNT'S TOMATO SAUCE... ....... .... .. ..... .. eB -25

9-0z. ROYAL FLUSH AUTOMAT!C BOWL CLEANER. ............ .68 -.81

32-0z. HELLMAN’'S MAYONNAISE... ............ iui, 1.98 1.99

15-0z. HORMEL CHILI with beans). ...... .... ... ............. .99 1.21

8-0z. KRAFT FREE DRESSING (ranch). . ............o'uuuuio... 117 1.47

7va-0z. KRAFT MACARONI & CHEESE DINNER. . .............. .61 gL)

13-0z. bag MAXWELL HOUSE COFFEE (adc)... ............... 1.98 2-23

36-ct. SWEET HEART DUTCH COUNTRY INCH PAPER PLATES (bloom). . ...:... .99 2.09

2-02. WESSON ON... .. =. 5... 1.15 1.45

5-0z. LIBBY’S VIENNA SAUSAGE... .... ... ... .50 .69

16-02. LAWRY'S SEASONED'SALT. .......................... 2.38 3.15 oi
16-0z. VAN CAMP'S PORK & BEANS. ........................ .44 50

3-pak YOO-HOO (chocolate), - .-.... -. .. .. ... . viiivenvonvinas 97 1.29 WINN-DIXIE
200-ft. HANDIWRAP IT... . ....... .... =. ......... 1.93 2.25

8%0z. IFFY MUFFIN MIX @omy. ........... iota .30 .25 SAVES YOU
5-ibs. DIXIECRYSTAUS SUGAR. .......... . .... ......... 1.85 1.99

8-0z. GERBER CEREAL (rice/banana). . . . ....................... 1.21 1.33

13-02. KELLOGG'SRICEKRISPIES. =. ........ ...... ........ 2.23 2.69

54bs. PILLSBURY ELOUR ipisin)....... =... ons .98 -.99

2114-02. PILLSBURY FAMILY BROWNIE MIX. .................. 1.18 1.79

15-ct. GLAD LARGEKITCHENBAGS. ... ............ ......... 1.43 1.69

4-02. GERBER JUICE @ppiey. .. .. .. . ... . . 'i......0... ST - a1

24-07. KELLOGA'S CORN FLAKES... ...... ...... 10. ..... 2.25 2.75
100:ct LIPTON TEA'BAGS. ..... ... . .. rao..0 i 2-35 3.39

1612-02. BETTY CROCKER FROSTING (ready to spread vanilla). . . . . . . 115 119 (12107 SW. 152 St. - Miami)

6-0z. NESTLES SEMI-SWEET CHOCOLATE MORSELS. .......... 1.21 1.25
9.5-0z./2-pak DOVE BAR SOAP (white). . ................co..... 1.88 2.25
13-0z. ENFAMIL PROSOBEE BABY FORMULA. ................. 1.97 2.03
56-02. PARSON AMMONIA (lemon). . . ....... «ooo anni, 1.17 1.23
1812-02. DUNCAN HINES CAKE MIX (yellow). . . .... ocean. 1.05 -99
12-0z. CRYSTAL HOY SAUCE... .. .... ...... . ......... 3 -.89
16-0z. NESTLES QUIK (swawberry). .. ......... ............... 1.88 1.99
6-0z. GERBER BABY FOOD (bananaltapioca). . . . ................. -.48 -49
16-02. DEL RIO PEPPERONCINI (greek peppers). ................. 1.08 1.29
14-0Z. RAGU GARDEN STYLE SAUCE (italian combo). . ... .......... 117 1.29
15-02. CHEF BOY-AR-DEE RAVIOLI (beef). . .................... .93 1.07
15-02. CHEF BOY-AR-DEE SPAGHETTI & MEAT... .............. .93 1.07
3-ibs. CRISCO SHORTENING. .............................. 2.28 2.39
33-0z. DOWNY FABRIC SOFTENER. ..............oovvuvuiin 1.73 1.81
9-0z. OLD ENGLISH FURNITURE POLISH (aerosolllemon). . . ........ 1.63 1.89
21-02. COMET CLEANSER ............ .. ...........v...... .85 .89
14-0z. CHEERIOS (honey nut). . . ............. She 2.89 3.33
Jumbo CORONET SPARKLE DESIGNER PAPER TOWELS. ....... .58 AS
46-0z. VLASIC KOSHER DILL PICKLES. ...................... 1.49 2.93
8-pak CORONET DECORATOR BATHROOM TISSUES (white). . . . . . . 1.88 1.99
20-ct. HEFTY 16-0Z. TALL COLOR CUPS. .................... .99 1.39
40-0z. QUAKER QUICK GRITS... .............. ............ 1.35 1.39
48-0z. MUSSELMAN’S APPLE SAUCE. ....................... 1.48 2.19
3.3-0z. LIPTON DECAFFEINATTED ICED TEA MIX. ............. 3.43 3.89

128-02. CLOROX... ........... oa, 1.24 1.30

bree oma oe] eel Yas JORGE & JERRY'S

46-0z. SACRAMENTO TOAMTO JUICE

er iol SES 92 SAVES YOU
26-0z. HUNGRY JACK INSTANT POTATOES... ..........ooun... 2.67 2.99

12.02. CARNATION CANNED MILK... ..... ................... 57 -55

14-ct. HUGGIES DIAPERS (super trim medium). . .. ................ 3.58 3.79 C

16-0z. MUELLER’S SPAGHETTI (regular). . ........oovveernnnn.. .61 -.50

5-0z. HEINZ WORCERSTERSHIRE SAUCE... .................. 33 3S
TOTAL (tax not included). ...... ........ .... iissisviues 104.23 124.09

° °
Complete price survey was done April 27, 1991 Some competitive prices may have changed since that time (1 1247 SW. 152 St. - Miami)

You’re GoingTo See The Difference

WINN A DIXIE

bi | America’s Supermarket

tr
BI
in
m

wn
—

popes QUESTER BPR OSN



Methodists Churches Are Urged To
Deposit Funds In Community Banks

United Methodist institutions
responsible for investing and depo-
siting church funds are being
asked by the denomination’s chief
race-monitoring agency to use only
banks that reinvest in communi-
ties where they are chartered,
especially in low- and moderate-
income neighborhoods.

The denomination’s Commis-
sion on Religion and Race, during
its mid-March meeting in Charles-
ton, S.C., endorsed a call by a Bos-
ton pastor, Rev. Charles R. Stith,
urging regulators to amend the act
to require banks to do more in
areas where they operate.

For the past six years, promot-
ing economic opportunity for
minority communities has been
the focus of Stith's work as presi-
dent of the Organization for a New

Mt. Nebo Honoring
Deacon Miller

Mt. Nebo Baptist church will
honor its associate minister, Rev.

William M. Miller, who has been a
member of the church for 26 of his .

30 years in the ministry.

He has served throughout Dade
County through his ministry and
by being a Metro-Dade Housing
Inspector for 24 years.

Rev. Miller is married to Alfredia
Miller and they are the parents of
six children as well as grandpa-
rents of seven. They have one
great-grand.

Pastor Gardener, the officers
and members of Mt. Nebo invite
everyone to join them this Sunday
at 3:30 p.m. Their special guests
will be Rev. James. C. Ferguson Jr.

Equality.

The Community Reinvestment
Act (CRA) of 1977 requires that
each bank's rating with regard to
meeting community credit needs
be public record.

Stith, pastor of Union United
Methodist Church, said the
denomination must go beyond
requesting ratings because they
are meaningless. About 80 percent
ofthe banks being evaluated by the
Federal Reserve Board or other
regulatory agencies, he said,
receive “outstanding or satisfac-
tory” ratings.

According to Stith, United
Methodist institutions and chur-
chwide agencies should, in addi-
tion to requesting ratings, require
a profile of a bank's CRA policy and

REV. WILLIAM M. MILLER.

and congregation of the St.
Andrews Baptist Church of Opa-
locka.

Fruits Of The Saints Plan Reunion

The Fruits of the Saints, on the
theme, “By Their Fruits Ye Shall
Know Them”, will celebrate their
12th Annual Reunion Sunday,
June 16, at the Church of God of
Prophecy — Miami No. 1., 4528
N.W. First Ave. Bishop H.E.Dean,
pastor.

This special observance will
begin at 10 a.m. with Sunday
School; 11 a.m., Morning Worship
with speaker Bishop Brice Thomp-
son, overseer for Church of God of
Prophecy, Bahamas and Bermu-
da, at 2:30 p.m.

Pageant Sunday

The Ms. Rock of Ages Pageant
will be held at the church Sunday
at 5:30 p.m.

The contestants are Clara Hol-
ton, Ann Taylor, Sandra Lively and
Vera Hospedalis. Judges are Sha-
ron Wilson, Betty Ann Ivery and
Ann J. White.

“EYE ON

Reunion parade will be led by
the Florida Sunshine Band at 4
p.m.

Afternoon Worship will feature
the Baccalaureate Service for 1991
high school graduates. The tradi-
tional charge will be given by Major
Bertram Dean Jr., a teacher with
Dade County Public Schools.

There will be a special musical
festival featuring the South Florida
Mass Choir, Church of Jesus
Christ Choir, Prophecy Gospellet-
te, Brownsville Choir and Mt. Her-
man A.M.E. Choir.

At Rock Of Ages

Meanwhile, the Choir #1
anniversary will be held June 20th
through 23 with musical programs
on Thursday and Friday nights.

Sunrise Baptist Church and
pastor Jim Johnson Jr. will close
the anniversary on Sunday at 3
p.m.

[4

GOSPEL”

New Magazine Stirs Debate

»

By MARGARET MANSFIELD

Gospel music's latest con-
troversy: At about the same time
Blacks in gospel music were level-
ing charges of second-class treat-
ment by the Gospel Music Associa-
tion, another controversy was
stewing as the publishers of CCM,
a top music magazine catering to
the contemporary Christian com-
munity, revealed plans to launch
another magazine, this one target-
ing the gospel community.

The magazine, dubbed Ameri-
can Gospel, was set to make its
debut last month. But reports are
that staffers are spending more of
their time heading off the strife that
has surfaced ever since the
announcement. It seems many in
the gospel community view the
new venture as an attempt to
exploit the gospel market as well as
Black buyers, while undermining
existing Black publications.

Sitting squarely in the center of
this controversy is Theresa Hair-
ston, who publishes in gospel.
Hairston agrees with many of the
Blacks while citing, as a key issue,
the number of advertising dollars
and the support of major record
companies.

Hairston says that element
alone has driven most Black gospel
publishers out of business. “And
now American Gospel has come up
with the support and has said that
they are the experts in the field and
the Black community resents it."

The launching of American Gos-
pel magazine has not only alien-
tated many Blacks in gospel mus-
ic, but is challenging the survival of
the Score, which reports on all that
goes on in gospel music.

“I feel that it's interesting how
they've appointed themselves as
experts and the ways in which
they've trying to sell the gospel
public.” As publisher of the Score,

Y

Hairston must balance her posi-
tion against her role as a top gospel
executive with Benson Records.

“The Score is definitely a sepa-
rate entity from the position that I
hold as a gospel record company
executive and I don't mix the two,”
she said. Ifyou want more informa-
tion about The Score, just call
800-472-6731.

* % kk k x %

Catholic church names suc-

cessor to Archbishop Eugene

Marino: 52-year old James Lyke

became the new Roman Catholic
Archbishop of Atlanta. The
appointment makes him the
highest-ranking Black catholic in
the U.S.A. He replaces former
archbishop Eugene Marino, who
left amidst the scandal of a two-
year relationship with 27-year-old
Vicki Long, who now claims to be
Marino's wife.

Lyke told followers that they
should recall with clarity what
happened to Marino. “I would not
recommend that any of us forget
it,” he said.

Marino is still said to be in
seclusion.

Rev. Joan Brown Campbell
recently became the new general
secretary of the National Council of
Churches, the nation's largest ecu-
menical organization. Campbell,
59, is the first woman to hold the
position.

LEE BE BE I BE BE BJ

Just briefly: Christians cele-
brated victoriously at word of the
Supreme Court's ban of prohibit-
ing federally funded family plan-
ning clinics from advising abortion
as a medical option.

LOE BE BE BE BE BE BN J

This week's scripture: “Be
careful, however, that the exercise
of your freedom does not become a
stumbling block to the weak.” (I
Corinthians 8:9)

I

review its affirmative action
practices.

The commission also is urging
the denomination’s chief financial
agency, the General Councial on
Finance and Administration, to
include compliance with the CRA
as a criterion for depositing church
funds in financial institutions.

Chief among the blueprint's
objectives is establishment of bet-
ter communication between finan-
cial institutions and racial and
ethnic communities to increase
representation on banking boards
and to encourage regulatory agen-
cies to better monitor compliance
with the CRA. Details of the plan
are being presented before bank-
ing regulators and lenders across
the country, said Stith.

Rabbi Perlmeter
At St. John

St. John Baptist Church will
have as its 11 a.m. Father's Day
Service guest speaker Rabbi Rex
Perlmeter, Senior Rabbi of Temple
Israel of Greater Miami.

He is widely recognized for his
extensive involvement in the com-
munity, is responsible for the initi-
ation of the Homeless Feeding Pro-
jectat the Temple and is very active
with the Faith-In-The-City, a coali-
tion of the downtown churches and
synagogues.

In 1989, he was nominated for
the Community Relations Board's
Citizen of the Year Award. He was
installed this month as the Presi-
dent of the Rabbinical Association
of Greater Miami.

The Father's Day activity is an
effort of the Unity Day Committee
and is coordinated by Deacon Will
Miller.

Other events around the church
this month are: June 21, Church's
85th Anniversary Banquet at the
Miami Springs Country Club; June
22, Church Picnic at Oleta State

GERRY LATSON

Gerry Latson’s
Trial Sermon

Gerry Latson, a member since
age 7 of First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville, will
deliver his trial sermon on Sunday
at 5 p.m. at the church.

“We have been again blessed,
and are honored, to present Bro.
Latson to the religious community
as he acknowledges his personal
affirmation to our Lord and Savi-
our Jesus Christ,” said First Bap-
tist pastor Rev. John A. Sales.

A native Floridian, born in Holly-
wood, Latson completed his secon-
dary education at Hialeah Miami
Lakes Senior High School in 1977.
Upon graduation, he enlisted in
the U.S. Army and served through
1984, before pursuing a business
career at Prospect Hall College,
graduating in 1986.

“It's a real joy,” said Dea. Laur-
ence Wright, “to watch a boy grow
to a young man and then become a
man, remaining steadfast in his
belief of god. I have known Gerry all
his life and I am proud to see him
step out for the Lord.”

Latson is the son of Theodore
Latson and Mary Culpepper of Car-
ol City. He and his wife have two
children, Angel, 10 and Gerry Jr. 5.

Ebenezer Honor
For Graduates

Baccalaureate Services will be
held at Ebenezer United Methodist
Church on Sunday, June 16, at the
11:15 service.

A program has been planned for
the following students: Sharmaine
Duffie, Miami Springs Sr. High;
Johnnie K. Lathan, Miami Central
Sr. High; Melissa R. Lee, Miami
Beach Sr. High; Shalonda Regina
Lyons, Miami Edison Sr. High; Ter-
ry D. Mealing, Miami Northwestern
Sr. High; Lakeisha Readon, Miami
Senior High; and Gracelyn Tho-
mas, Miami Northwestern Sr.
High.

The Sunbeams and Choralettes
will observe their 18th Anniversary
Sunday, June 16.

Rev. James F. Jennings Is
pastor.

Che Miami Times

The

times are changed

are changed

J] J.
with them

~ Section C

Thursday, June 13, 1991

Mount Zion Continues Week
Of Revival And Installation

Mount Zion Baptist Church
continues its week of Revival Ser-
vices leading to the Installation of
its Minister, Dr. Ralph McKinley
Ross.

They continue to invite the com-

RABBI REX D. PERLMETER
Park; June 23, Anniversary
Service.

The church, meanwhile,
mourns the passing of Sis. Christ-
ine Arnold, daughter of Bro. Eddie

Arnold.
Rev. Henry Nevin is pastor.

Father’s Day
At St. Agnes

On Sunday, June 16, the St.
Agnes’ parish family will observe
both Father's Day and Baccalaure-
ate Sunday.

At the 10:45 a.m. service, the
1991 graduates of the parish fami-
ly, along with their guests, will be
in procession with the sacred
ministers and choir. Graduates
who have their robes are reminded
that they are to wear them. They
should be present and in the ves-
tiblue for the procession at 10:30
a.m.

The Episcopal Young Chur-
chmen Graduates’ Banquet will be
held on Saturday, June 15, 6 p.m.,
in Blackett Hall.

Vacation Church School 1991
dates are 24-28. It is of the greatest
importance that you get the proper
application form, fill it in and
return it to the church. Florence
Scavella Moncur coordinates Vac-
ation Church School for the
parish.

Continental Singers
Coming To Miami

The Continental Singers, an
internationally recognized Christ-
ian musical group, will premiere
their 1991 World Tour on Friday,
July 5, at Jesus Fellowship, 9775
S.W. 87th Ave., at 7:30 p.m.

The Continental Singers are
now in their 24th year and conti-
nuing their world-wide outreach
with “Set Them Free . . . A Concert
of Hope & Mercy,” a new program of
inspiration and worship.

The 36 vocalists, instrumental-
ists and technicians are young
people from all over the United
States as well as several foreign
countries. They will proclaim the
freedom in Jesus Christ and chal-
lenge you to follow His example to
reach out to the people of the world
and “set them free.”

Admission is free. For further
information, call the church office
at 595-5314.

Mozambique Backs
Jehovah’s Witnesses

The preaching activity of Jeho-
vah's Witnesses has been given
legal recognition in the southeast
African country of Mozambique.

A letter from the Ministry of Jus-
tice, dated Feb. 11, 1991, states:
“Jehovah's Witnesses, as other
religious institutions, enjoy all the
rights and guarantees stipulated
in the Constitution of the Republic
of Mozambique.”

It was signed by the country’s
Director of Religious Affairs.

This news was welcomed by the
5,235 Witnesses who reported
preaching the Bible's message this
past January, as well as are the
13,971 delegates who attended the
three “Pure Language” District
Conventions recently in Mozam-
bique, where 357 were baptized.

1

munity and churches to partici-
pate in the remaining services as
listed.

The services will begin each
night at 7:30 p.m. and will con-
clude Sunday, June 186, with the 6

Prayer Luncheon

Baruch Daughters of Jerusalem
Pilgrimage Worldwide Ministries
Inc. will hold its monthly Prayer
Luncheon at the Howard Johnson
Meeting Room, 12210 Biscayne
Boulevard, 11 a.m. on Saturday,
June 15.

Special guest speaker will be
Evangelist Sarah Willis, a lay
minister with the chaplaincy
department of Jackson Memorial
Hospital. She also serves on the
ministerial staff of Shekinah Glory
Ministries.

For reservations, call 688-4455
or 836-9786.

p-m. Installation Service.

This Sunday, June 16, has been
designated as Installation Day.
The church solicits your interest,
cooperation and visit.

Ministers and congregations
visiting are:

HB Thursday, June 13, Rev. Cleo
Albury, Bible Baptist Church,
Miami, FL.
HM Friday, June 14, Rev. George
McRae, Mt. Tabor Baptist Church,
Miami, FL.

HB Sunday, June 16, 7:30 a.m.,
Rev. Robert Carter, Mount Sinai
Baptist Church, Miami, FL; 10:45
a.m., Rev. Ralph McKinley Ross,
Mount Zion Baptist Church,
Miami, FL.

On Sunday also will be the
Installation Service at 6 p.m., with
Rev. Joseph Lawrence Roberts Jr.,
Ebenezer Baptist Church, Atlanta,
Georgia.

BY LAWRENCE W. ALTHOUSE

CREATING YOUR
OWN OBSTACLES

Background Scripture: Ezra 4:1-

6; S through 6.

Devotional Reading: Isaiah 66:
1-14.
When 1 first read the scripture

passages for this week, I determin-
ed to write a column about overcom-
ing obstacles. But, then I had to go
for an appointment and 1 thought
about this scripture portion on the
way to and from that appointment.
The more I thought about it, the
more | decided that this scripture
speaks to me most about not
creating your own obstacles in the
first place.

For that’s what the returned exiles
of Israel did: they triggered the op-
position of their neighbors to the
rebuilding of the temple of
Jerusalem. These neighbors were
Samaritans, many of them the
descendants of foreigners who were
resettled in the land of Israel after
the Assyrians conquered Israel in 722
B.C. Racially, they were a mixed
group. When they learned that the
Jews intended to rebuild the temple,
they came, offering: ‘‘Let us build
with you; for we worship your God
as you do, and we have been sacrific-
ing to him ever since the days of
Esarhaddon king of Assyria who
brought us here’. (4:20).

A RUDE SHOCK
The response of the Jews must

have come as a rude shock to the
Samaritans. Ezra tells us that the
Jewish leaders, Zerubbabel, Jeshua
and others replied: ‘‘You have
nothing to do with us in building a
house to our God; but we alone will
build to the Lord, the God of Israel,
as King Cyrus, the king of Persia has
commanded us’’ (4:3b). That
doesn’t leave any room for negotia-
tion: ‘‘nothing to do with us,”’ “‘we
alone will build...”

It is true that these returned exiles
thought that this was what God
wanted. Ezra and Nehemiah both
were fanatics on the subject of racial
purity. They wanted to have nothing
to do whatsoever with foreigners.
They were God’s chosen people.
A DIFFERENT VIEW

At the same time, there was
another radically opposing view that
can be found in the Old Testament,
too—the view of the Book of Ruth
in which a foreigner, Ruth, becomes
the heroine and great grandmother
of King David. It is believed that this
book was written around the same
time as the books of Ezra and
Nehemiah, to whose views it was
diametrically opposed.

The reaction of the Samaritans is
no more than we might expect:
“Then the people of the land (the
Samaritans) discouraged the people
of Judah, and made them afraid to
build, and hired counselors against
them to frustrate their purpose, all
the days of Cyrus king of Persia,
even until the reign of Darius king
of Persia’’ (4:4). This hostility which
the Jews brought upon themselves
long delayed the rebuilding of the
temple and kept this dispute alive in-
to the time of Jesus.

So, the trouble they faced when
they returned to Jerusalem was
largely of their own making. How
often do you and | create our own
obstacles?

(Based on copyrighted Outlines produced by the Com

mittee on the Uniform Series and used by permission. Re-
leased by Community & Suburban Press.)

SOUL SAVING STATION
1880 Washington Ave., Opa-locka

681-4868

Order of Services

Sunday School.......... 10 am.
Morning Worship..11.45 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Service..6.45 p.m.
Mon.-Sat.,...noon Day Prayer
Tue., 7.45 p.m.Mid-Week Ser.
Wed., 7.45 p.m...Bible Study
New Believers, Youth Ser.

Fri, 7.30 p.m.

Pastor: Rev. Carolyn Sheffield

THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST]
1491 NW 26th St, Miami

Order of Services
Sunday School 9 am. |
Worship 10 a.m.
Bible Study 7 4 p.m.
Tuesday Evening.

634-7407

a

Pastor: Elder Oliver Gordon Sr.

GREATER HOLY
CROSS M.B. CHURCH
1555 N.W. 93rd Terrace, Miami
836-3538 (754-5067)
Order of Services

Early Moming Worship
2nd & 3rd Sun... 7:30 am.

Worship... Sun. 11:00 am.
B.T.U........ Sun 4:00 p.m.
Eve. Worship.Sun. 5:00 p.m.
Prayer Service/Bible Study

Pastor: Rev. Dr. W.L. Strange Sr.

Wednesday........... 7:00 p.m.

Mount Hermon
AME. Church
2245 West Bunche Park Drive
OpaLocka, Florida 33054
Order of Service
Morning Service, .... 7 am.
9:30 am.
#8 Morning worship,.. 11 am.
8 Prayer and Class Meeting...
Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.
Bible Study, Fri, .7:30 p.m.
Holy Communion.....ue.wme
1st Sunday 7 & 11 am.
Holy Baptism, 3rd Sunday
Transportation available,
call 624-4861 or 625-5473
C. E. Jenkins, Sr,. D.D., Minister

LL

Zion Hope Missionary Baptist Church
5129 N.W. 17 Avenue, Miami
696-4341
ORDER OF SERVICE

Sunday School ......ccumuuni. 9:30 aM,
Morning Worship... 11:00 8M,
Sun. Evening Worship ...........6:00 p.m.
Youth Ministry — Monday .......8 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & ‘Bible Study
Tuesday 7 p.m.
Transportation Available for Sunday Mor-
ning Worship, call: 621-4518
Rev. Paul Freeman, Pastor

RHEMA CHRISTIAN CENTER

8610 N.W. 17th Ave. Miami, FL 33147
J.D.MARTIN, SENIOR MINISTER

A newly established Christian Center.

Come grow with us!

We welcome volunteer ministries:

1. Associate Ministers

2. Ministers of Education

3. Social Outreach Ministries

4. Evangelistic Ministries

5. Youth Ministries

6. Christian Counselors

7. Worship Directors

8. Music Conductors

9. Program Coodinators

10.Business Coordinators, & many more.

)



THE MIAMI TIMES

2C

Thursday, June 13, 1991

DEATHS—CARDS—MEMORIALS

Johnson

WILLIE BUCKLEY SR., 65,
Florida City, died June 7 at James
Archer Smith Hospital. Survivors
include sons, Willie Jr. and Ver-
non; sister, Clottie Thames;
brothers, John and Arthur. Ser-
vices will be on Saturday, 2 p.m., at
the House of God Pentecostal
Church, Homestead.

Manker

VIRGAL VAMPER, 32, 1581
N.W. 15th Ave., died June 5 at
Jackson Hospital. Survivors
include daughters, Jennifer and
Ruth; son, Virgal Jr.; parents,
Robert and Ruth; sisters, Barbara,
Patrica, Jeanette; brothers, Jeffery
and Charles. Services will be held
Saturday at the chapel, 1 p.m.;
interment, Lincoln Memorial Park.

BETTY K. LEWIS, 61, 1770
N.W. 167th St., died June 7 at
home. Survivors include daught-
ers, Andrea, Esther, Betty, Jean,
Lucy and Roxieann; son, Shedrick;
brother, Michael. Services will be
held Saturday at the chapel, 10
a.m.; interment, Southern Memor-
jal Park.

Barrett-Fryar

DEMECO TORRAY BAKER,
26, died June 9. Survivors include
mother, Pauline; father, L.C.; step-
father, Alonzo Smith; son, Quin-
ton; daughters, Crystal and Denis-
ha; brothers, Juanza Mitchell and
Afton Howard; sisters, Shawn, Tyr-
ie and Josie; grandmother, Mattie
Bragg; great-grandmother, Ida
Chisholm. Services will be on
Saturday, June 15, 1 p.m., at St.
John Baptist Church, 13740 S.W.
264th ST., Naranja. Repose will be
at the chapel, 3-8 p.m.

Walker

BESSIE MAE HEPBURN, 63,
Miami, died June 7 at Cedars Med-
ical Center. She was a former cook
at Jackson's Toddler Inn. Survi-
vors include husband, Daniel;
daughters, Paulette, Natalie Sin-
gleton; sons, Dwight, Miles and
Norman. Repose will be on Friday,
2-10 p.m., at Poitier Funeral
Home, 2300 N.W. 62nd St. Ser-
vices will be on Saturday, 1 p.m., at
Corinth Missionary Baptist
Church, 1435 N.W. 54th St.; inter-
ment, Dade Memorial Park North.

Mills

LUCY MELVIN DAVIS, 51,
4517 S.W. 19th St., Hollywood,
died June 10 at Memorial Hospital.
Survivors include daughters, Max-
ine Harris, and Bernice Harris;
sons, Paul Melvin, McCoy Harris,
David Lee Harris; mother, Maddie

‘Melvin. Viewing will be on Sunday,

2-9 p.m.; services, Monday, at
Ebenezer Baptist Church; inter-
ment, Hallandale Cemetery

ASHLEY MEGAN POLITE,
infant, 4235 N.W. 201 St., Carol
City, died June 7 at Memorial Hos-
pital. Survivors include mother,
Angela Rene; father, Anthony. Ser-
vices were held.

ALFRED BROWN, 37, 2122
Adam St., Apt. #208, Hollywood,
died June 5 at Broward General
Medical Center. Survivors include
mother, Lillie Mae; father, Willie;
sisters, Revoka, Dewanno;
brothers, Ulyssee, Loubiecha and
Muddy. Arrangements are
incomplete.

Card of Thanks Card of Thanks In Memoriam Card of Thanks

The family of the late,
LEVI J. MONROE
Mrs. Ena McKinney

would like to extend her

appreciation to all of her
friends and neighbors
that were so supportive
during her time of
bereavement.

May God bless you all.

Card of Thanks

In loving memory of,

CATHERINE
C. CAMBRIDGE
1927 - 1976
Fifteen years have
passed my love. It seems
as if it was yesterday.
Rest in perfect peace, we
love you but God loves
you best.
Your loving husband
and children. Sherril,

Granville Jr. and John ___

and all the grands.
Card of Thanks

The family of the late,

DEACON L.J. DAVIS
02/18/32 - 05/24/91
would like to take this
opportunity to express
our thanks to everyone
for their kindness ex-
tended during our hour
of bereavement.

Special thanks to the

Pastor Elder E. Alford
and members of Bethel
Mt. Zion Holy Union
Church of God, Ebenezer
Baptist Church pastor
and staff, Employees of
E.A. Stevens Funeral
Home.

To all of you, my neigh-
bors and friends. Your
kind and considerate
thoughts, cards, flowers
and food we thank you.

Wife, Ruth Davis; son,
Elton and family.

Card of Thanks

The family of the late,

REV. JOHN H. HAYS
1917 - 1991

express their heartfelt @

gratitude for so many
acts of kindness and
sympathy shown during
our hour of bereavement.
Thank you Straightway
Missionary Holiness
Church family. Special
thanks to Rev. Roscoe
Jackson of New Macedo-
nia Church, Rev. Ronald
Johnson of Apostolic Re-
vival Center, for their as-
piring messages. Surely
it was a time to rejoice
unto the Lord. Dear
friends Francita Riley,
Sis. Karweena and Ar-
leyah Martin, Dorothy
Williams, Prince Bar-B-
Que Pit, and Sutton's
Grocery and other
friends, and relatives not
mentioned.

Daddy, we love you
and miss you very much.
But, God knows what is
best for us.

God's richest bless-
ings upon everyone. Son,
Leroy, “Mr. Roy” Griffin;
daughters, Doretha Me-
nee “Dobbie”; Lisa Hays
Rolling “Busta“ and
sister-in-law, Roberta
Dixson.

The family of the late,

CHESTER MORRIS
DAVIS, JR.
1958 - 1991

who departed this life on
May 19,1991 wishes to
thank you sincerely for
sharing our sorrows.

Your kindness is deep-
ly appreciated and will
always be remembered.

May God bless and
keep you.

The Davis family.

In Memoriam

In loving memory of,

LEROY LEVAN JR.
who passed away on
June 4, 1975. Precious
memories how they lin-
ger. We remember all the
happy moments, that we
shared. When you were
here. Loving thoughts
will always linger and
your presence always
near.

Janie
Mother.

Thomas,

In Memoriam

In loving memory of,

ILL. ROBERT
WILLIAMS SR. 33

You will always be re-
membered and loved.
Your wife, Ruth Wil-
liams; children, Brenda
Williams Northcutt and
Robert Williams Jr.

Card of Thanks
The family of the late,

LAVARELL JOHNSON
wishes to express our
gratitude for all acts of
kindness during our
hour of bereavement.
You may have thought of
us or prayed for us, sent a
floral arrangement, cov-
ered dish, monetary do-
nations or paid a wel-
come visit.

Special thanks to
Community Funeral
Home, Rev. Atkinson,
Rev. Tullis, Mt. Calvary
Baptist Church, Rev.
K.A. Dukes and the
Mothers of New Jeru-
salem Primitive Baptist
Church, Rev. Pritchett,
Pat Simmons, Jacque-
line Singletary, Ms. Lu-
cille Lee, and Dade
County Corrections.

May God bless each of
you, The Johnson
Family.

In loving memory of,

DANIEL JOHNSON

“It's been three years”
Never shall your memo-
ries fade. Your mother
and the Johnson family.

Card of Thanks

The family of the late,

RAY KNIGHT

who departed this life
May 19,1991, wishes to
thank each and everyone
for their kindness shown
during our bereavement.
Special thanks to Rev.
Larkins and congrega-
tion of New Fellowship
Baptist Church and also,
to Portier Funeral Home
staff.

May God bless all of
you is my prayer.

Mary Knight and
family.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,

GEORGE E. MANSON
09/21/68 - 06/11/90

A precious one from us
is now gone, one year. A
voice we love is still. A
chair is vacant in our
home that never can be
filled. Our hearts,
thoughts and lives are
still filled with wonderful
memories of you.

With loving memories,
the Manson, Adams and
Naylor families.

Card of Thanks
The family of the late,

MARGARET DAVIS
who was born September
21, 1936 and died May
21,1991, wishes to ex-
press our sincere thanks
and appreciation to each
of you for “every act of
kindness shown during
our time of bereavement.
Above all it was your fer-
vent prayers that helped
to strengthen and sus-
tain us.

Special thanks to our
pastor Rev. A. J. Mays,
for the consoling eulogy
and the Royal Funeral
Home for their efficient
service.

May God bless and
keep each of you is our
prayer.

The Davis, Griffin and
Martin families.

The family of the late,

CHRISTINA MARSHALL
JACKSON

would like to express
their appreciation for
all acts of kindness,
cards and flowers
shown during our hour
of bereavement.

Special thanks to
Rev. Glenroy Deveaux,
Minister William John-
son, the Temple Bap-
tist Church family and
Carey-Rolle-Rahmings’
staff for their services.

May God bless each
of you.

Elsie Douglas and
family.

In Memoriam

In loving memory of
our daughter,

BRIDGETT
SHIRELLE COOPER
12/26/71 - 06/15/90

To some you are for-
gotten, to some you are of
the past.

But to us, the ones
who loved and lost you,
your memories will al-
ways last.

Love always Your pa-
rents, Malcolm Cooper
and Hattie Burns and
daughter Montavia.

Card of Thanks

The family of the late,

JONATHAN
ANDREW JOHNSON
12/24/86 - 05/25/91
gratefully acknowledges,
that you have brought
sunshine into our home.
You have visited, prayed,
brought gifts of all kinds,
performed services of
many kinds, called,
asked about us, and
simply cared. For this we

say thank you.

A special thank you to
Pastor and Sis. Billy Ba-
skin, the New Way Fam-
ily, and Royal Funeral
Home.

“So teach us to num-
ber our days, that we
may apply our hearts
unto wisdom.” —Psalm
90:12.

Rev. & Sis. Bobby
Johnson and family.

In Memoriam

In Loving Memory of

WESLEY O. HEPBURN

Who departed this life
on June 14th 1981,
gone, but not forgotten.
We miss you.

You will always be in
our heart.

Jill Hepburn, Mother
Adena Hepburn, Sister

Poitier

HARRY JAMES, 47, 222 N.W.
22nd St., #9, died at Coral Gables
Hospital. Survivors include
mother, Ada Harmon; sons, Leroy,
Harry, Melvin; brothers, Robert,
Michael Harmon, Roosevelt Har-
mon; sisters, Silveria, Lenora
Moore, Sandra Brade, Doretha
Harmon, Alberta Harmon. Ser-
vices will be held on Saturday at 1
at St. Luke Cousin Memorial
A.M.E. Church.

GWENDA LENORA BARFIELD,
34, 1370 N.W. 192nd St., died at
home. Survivors include mother,
Veneta Ballard; father, Willie Lin-
der; son, Leon Jr; daughters,
Natasha and Domesha; brothers,
Jeffrey, Richard, Kevin; sisters,
Selina Ballard, Joletha Hunt. Ser-
vices will be held on Saturday at 1
at St. John Baptist Church.

Range
Miami

EMMETT HAMPTON JR., 71,
4530 N.W. 179th St., died May 29
in Chicago. Survivors include
daughters, Bessie Dilworth of
Markham, Il, Ollie Grandberry of
Hazel Crest, Il, Bettye Hampton
Sheppard, Brenda O'Hearn of Chi-
cago and Jeanette; sons, Emmitt
111, Willie, Milton, Larry, Rufus and
Lee of Chicago; sisters, Mary Bell
Lee and Jeanette Raie fo Greenvil-
le, Mi. Services were held Saturday

‘at the chapel; interment, Southern
Memorial Park.

HENRY WAY, 80, 2280 N.W.
152nd Terr., died June 4 at Grey-
nolds Nursing Home. He was a
truck driver. Survivors include
wife, Laura Lee Scott; sister, Lizzie
Mae Jones. Services were held
Saturday at the chapel; interment,
Dade Memorial Park, North.

GERALDINE MOORE, 66, 1521
N.W. 55th Terr., died June 5 at
Cedars Medical Center. She work-
ed at King Cole Clothiers. Survi-
vors include son, Frank; daughter,
Patricia Johnson; aunt, Ella; cou-
sin, Mary Killings. Services were
held Monday at Greater Israel
Bethel Church; interment, Dade
Memorial Park, North.

MAYBELLE “MABLE"”
WESLEY, 77, 8420 N.W. 33rd
Ave., died June 6 in St. Augustine.
Survivors include daughters,
Alberta and Joanne Mack; grand-
sons, Eric Jenkins, Pedro James
Wesley and Franklin Douglas
Mack; granddaughter, Melissa.
Final rites will be in St. Augustine

. Saturday, 1 p.m.

JOHN DAVIS JR., 19, 15555
N.W. 158th St. Rd., died June 5 at
home. He was a student at Thomas
Jefferson Middle School. Survivors
include parents, John and Queen;
sistters, Cheryl Brown, Elizabeth
Nesbitt and Patrice Brown;
brother, Otis Watts. Services were
held Saturday at the chapel; inter-
ment, Dade Memorial Park, North.

HENRY L. HEAD, 43, 2334
N.W. 94th St., died June 4 at Vic-
toria Hospital. He was a counselor
with the Dade rehabilitation ser-
vices. Survivors include father,
L.B. of Greenwood; daughters,
Tonya, Taydra, Shanita West;
grandchildren, Shatia and Teneis-
ha West; sisters, Margerine Foots
and Berthan Swanson; nieces, Lin-
da Bain and Anika Taylor; nephew,
Michael Bert; step-father, Ingram
Common; grandniece, Christina
Taylor; grandnephews, Cleveland
Jr., Kevin and Jeffrey Bain; god-
daughters, Charsta, Danyell and
Crystal. Services were held Mon-
day at the chapel; interment, Dade
Memorial Park, North.

RAYMONDE LUIS, 3321 N.W.
174th St., diedJune 11 at St. Fran-
cis Hospice. Survivors include Luis
Pierre. Arrangments are

incomplete.

CHARLES H.A. WILLIAMS JR.,
71, 3150N.W. 12th Ave., diedJune
10 at Cedars Medical Center. He
was a Quality Control Specialist
with the U.S. Navy. Survivors
include wife, Amanda; sons, Char-
les I11, Gregory Bruce and Joel Tho-
mas; daughter, Amanda F. Tapia.
Services will be held Saturday, 2
p.m., at St. Agnes Episcopal
Church, final rites in Berkley, Cali-
fornia; family hour, 6:30 - 7:3C
p.m.

Homestead

ALTON ELLISON, 52, 750 N.W.
7th Ave., Florida City, died June 8
at Deering Hospital. Survivors
include wife, Celestine; mohter,
Mamie Lou; step-children, Rodney
Foster, Russell Dawson and Kim-
berly Roberts; brothers, Tommie,
Arthur; aunt, Cora Lee Grimes;
uncle, Frank Hughes. Final rites
and burial will be in Thomaston,
Georgia.

DAVID LEE FULLER, 34,
Goulds, died May 31 at James
Archer Smith Hospital. Survivors
include mother, Mae Bell Donald;
son, David Jr.; sister, Martha
Pryor; brothers, Brian, Curtis;
companion, Brenda Dumer. Final
rites and burial will be in Fort
Worth, Texas.

PATRICIA ELIZABETH
RICHARDSON (STRANCHAN),
62, 1929 N.W. 2nd Ct, #1, died at
home. Survivors include sons, Clif-
ford, Joel, Everett, Patrick;
daughters, Barbara Dixon, Vanes-
sa Bonner, Gail Nelson, Gay
Knight, Nina Mitchell. Services will
be held on Saturday at 2 p.m. at
Dade Memorial Park; viewing, 2-10
p.m., Friday.

yy

WALTER LEE McCLAIN JR.,
29, 2355 Superior St., died June 9.
Survivors include father, Walter
Sr.; mother, Victoria; children,
Marquis, Marquia; brother,
Christopher; sister, Angela. Ser-
vices will be held on Saturday, T0
a.m., at Antioch Baptist Church of
Brownsville.

DAVID BRYANT SR., 65, 1310
N.W. 16th St., #405, died June 5at
Cedars Medical Center. Survivors
include sons, David Jr., Micheal;
daughters, May Lois, Laverne Few-
quay; sisters, Elizabeth Wallace,
Shirley Bell, Essie Stakey, Mary
Blackman. Services will be held on
Thursday at 2 at the chapel.

IKE MITCHELL, 79, 2750 N.W.
49th St., died June 5 at home. Sur-
vivors include sister, Wanda Wil-
liams; niece, Florence Zephrine.
Arrangements are incomplete.

ROBERT LEE DUKES, 47,
2108 N.W. 3rd Ave., died June 4 at
Jackson Hospital. Survivors
include brothers, George, Owen,
Randolph, Albert, Donald, Veron,
Floyd, Michael; sisters, Mary, Bar-
bara Jean, Barbara Ann, Debra,
Gwendolyn, Maria. Services will be
held Saturday, 11 a.m., at St. Mark
M.B.Church.

JOHN BOND, 74, 135 Ocean
Dr., #414, died June 3 at South
Shore Hospital. Survivors include
wife, Ana Lucille. Services were
held.

A

JOHN McCOY, 69, 919 N.W..
29th St., #5, died at Baptist Hosp-
tial. Survivors include daughters,
P.S., Cynthia Roundtree; brothers,
James, George, Fred; sisters, Mary
Ellison, Francis Grant, Louise
Clark, Lurene Carline. Services
will be held today at Mt. Carmel
M.B. Church at 3.

ANDREW BAKER, 69, 15151
N.W. 18th Ave., died June 7 at
home. Survivors include sons, Wil-
liam, Curtis, Gus; daughters, Ellen
Cockett, Gail Harris; brother,
Emmett Taylor Jr.; sisters, Beverly
Ayers, Ethel Malone. Services will
be held on Saturday at 11 at St.
Luke Cousin Memorial A.M.E.
Church.

FRANK EDDIE GOA, 42, 1920
N.W. 62nd St., died June 10 at
Green Briar Nursing Home. Survi-
vors include wife, Lorraine; son,
Frank; daughter, Angela Fulton;
father, Herman; brothers, John
and Hermon Jr.; sisters, Mary
Ridge and Vergie Richardson.
Arrangements are incomplete.

LINDA WILKINS, 25, 395 N.W.
177th St., died June 10. Survivors
include sons, Lamont Scott and
Tavarius; mother, Dorothy; father,
Herman; brother, Craig. Services
will be held on Saturday.

Tuckers Celebrate
41st Anniversary

Happy 41st Anniversary to Mr.
& Mrs. Hardrick L. Tucker Sr.

After 41 years of marriage,
Hardrick and Rose Tucker of Opa-
locka, Fla., are still happy and
counting their many blessings.

In celebration of their years of
unity, they will host a formal cere-
mony with dinner and dancing to
follow on June 15 at Achievers
Hall. At that time, they will reaffirm
their commitments to each other.

Invited guests will follow
R.S.V.P. procedures.

o

Hall-Ferguson
Hewitt

EVADNEY MINETTA
LAWRENCE-GRANT, 39, banker,
died June 1. Survivors include
daughter, Sophia Lorraine Came-
ron; parents, Rupert and Mabel
Lawrence; sisters, Vilma
Lawrence-Miller, Delize Lawrence-
Lee; brothers, Ewart, Donald,
Kingsley and Windell Lawrence.
Services were held on Saturday,
June 8.

MATTIE BROWN HILL, 80,
domestic worker, died June 1. Sur-
vivors include daughters Lola
Roberts of Miami and Louis Wil-
brun of Rochester, N.Y.; sons,
Robert King of Miami and Earl King
of Baltimore; sister, Alice Allen of
Atlanta, Ga. Services were held on
Tuesday, June 11, at Mt. Carmel

Baptist Church.

JOEREATHER MILLER, 48,
cook, died June 6. Survivors
include husband, Louis. Final rites
and burial were held in Baxley,
Georgia.

ESSIE LEE GRIMES, 81, died
June 6. Survivors include daught-
er, Hilda Bodison; grandson,
James Mosely; great-
granddaughter, Tanya Mosely.
Arrangements are incomplete.

JENNIFER KING, 33, teacher,
died June 6. Survivors include
daughters, Tracey Denise, Arcadia
Dario, Pamela Altamese, and
Danyiel Alesia; mother, Lula
Roberts; father, Earl Lightbourne;
sisters, Yasmine, Vanessa, Ber-
nadett and Lori of Miami and
Bridgette of Clinton; brothers,
Gary and Richard of Miami. Ser-
vices were held on Tuesday, June
11, at Mt. Carmel Baptist Church.

CORAL. HARRIS, 77, domestic
worker, died June 8. Survivors
include sisters, Charlie M. Belton,
Geneva Reddick and Elnora Brin-
son; nephew, Johnny Griffin;
niece, Louise Britt. Arrangements
are incomplete.

GWENDOLYN JOYCE HALL,
44, died June 10. Survivors
include sons, Curtis, Darryl, Dave
and Henry Wright; grandson,
Rolando Wright; granddaughter,
Michelle Wright; aunt, Donnie
Adner; uncle, Herman Lewis; aunt,
Lula Hall. Services will be held on
Saturday, June 15, 3 p.m., at St.
James Baptist Church, Coconut

Grove.
Mitchell

FLORENTINA WILLIAMS, 72,
712 N.W. 108th St., died June 4 at
North Shore Medical Center. Sur-
vivors include son, Emery West;
grandchildren, Omari, Akili, Sudi,
Malik, Tariq, Aminah and Safiyah
of Washington, D.C.; brothers,
George O. West, Ernest J. West,
Edward West; sisters, Mary,
Emma Weston and Nellie Robin-
son. Services were held Tuesday,
June 11, at the chapel; interment,
Dade Memorial Park.

CHRISTINA LOVETTE
ARNOLD, 34, 858 N.W. 7th St.,
died June 8 at Cedars Medical
Center. Survivors include son,
Delvin; father, Eddie Lee; sisters,
Joann Monrose, Rose Sterling,
Eulene Edwards, Aleatha Lawson,
Gloria Randolph; step-sister,
Gwendolyn W. Pittman; brother,
Henry Nixon; uncle, James Morn-
ing. Service will be held Thursday,
June 13, 11 a.m., at St. Johns
Institional Baptist Church; inter-
ment, Lincoln Memorial Park.

Carey-Rolle
Rahmings

LEVI JOHN MONROE, 66,
1023 N.W. 47th St., died May 29 at
Cedars Medical Center. He was a
mechanic. Survivors include
mother, Ena McKinney. Services
were held Tuesday at St. Agnes
Episcopal Church; interment, Lin-
coln Memorial Park.

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Thursday, June 13, 1991

Community

JOSEPH DICKISON, 73, 1120
N.W. 49th St, died June 4 at
Gainsville V.A. Medical Center.
Survivors include daughter, Bar-
bara Battle; sons, Joseph Jr. and
Ricardo; sisters, Ruth Wallace,
Barbara Henry, Mary Jackson and
Frances Philpot. Services were
held on Wednesday at Church of
God, Ft. Lauderdale; interment,
Sunset Memorial Park.

MARC WILLIAMS JR., 46, 537
N.E. 72nd St., died June 6 at South
Shore Hospital. Survivors include
wife, Sonie; son, Ronie; brother,
Michael; sister, Elrose. Services
will be held on Saturday, 10 a.m. at
Notre Dame Catholic Church, 130
N.E. 62nd St.; interment, South-
ern Memorial Park.

ROBERT LEE JONES, 25, 395
N.W. 177th St., #130, died June 10
at Jackson Hospital. Survivors
include mother, Rosa; sisters,
Pearline Sherrod, Joyce Pruitt,
Overa Morton, Shirley Ferguson,
Doris Wiley, Sherrie Moore;
brothers, Bobby Harvel, Johnny,
Edward. Services will be held
Saturday, 11 a.m. at New Mt.
Pleasant Missionary Baptist
Church, 6200 N.W. Miami Ct.

-

MICHAEL EDWIN BROWN, 34,
2940 N.W. 57th St., died June 10
at Jackson Hospital. Survivors
include ‘daughters, Anna and
Tameka; sons, Ernest, and George;
mother, Catherine Combs; father,
Eddie; step-father, Henry Combs;
sister, Rosie; brother, Keith. Ser-
vices will be held Saturday, 1 p.m.,
at Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church, 2799 N.W. 46th St.; inter-
ment, ‘Dade Memorial Park.

LUVENIA MONTGOMERY, 65,
1250 N.W. 34th St., died June 5 at
home. Survivors include sisters,
Naomi Brown and Pauline;
brothers, Leon and Melvin. Ser-
vices will be held on Saturday, 1
p.m., at Miami Christian Center,
777 N.W. 85th St.; interment,
Southern Memorial Park.

JAMES SMITH, 54, 3500 N.W.
173rd Terr., died June 6 at Huma-
na Hospital Biscayne. Survivors
include wife, Marie; mother, Alice;
father, Henry; daughter, Elaine;
son, Elton; sister, Dorothy Robin-
son; brothers, Bernard and Ken-
neth. Services will be on Saturday,
1 p.m., at Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church, 1140 N.W. 62nd
St.; interment, Dade Memorial
Park.

FLORIAN DUMORNAY, 55,
1419 Adams Ave., Hollywood, died
June 5 at home. Survivors include
wife, Jenny; daughter, Lily. Ser-
vices will be on Monday, 11 a.m., at
the chapel; interment, Dade
Memorial Park.

635-4453
MEMORY

MANKER FUNERAL HOME
2075 N.W. 54th St, Miami, FL 33142â„¢ . {Mx

When time, which steals our years
away, shall steal our pleasures
too: The memory of the past will
stay and half our joys renew.

WHEN YOU USE A MANKER FUNERAL SERVICE, YOUR
FAMILY WILL BE PRESENTED WITH A BEAUTIFUL FAMILY
BIBLE WITH YOUR LOVED ONE'S NAME AND DATE OF
BIRTH AND DATE OF DEMISE IMPRINTED IN GOLD. ALSO
PRESENTED TO THE FAMILY IS A GOLD PLATED NAME
PLATE. THESE MEMORIALS WILL LAST FOR YEARS.

oo

REV. IRA T. McCALL Sr.

Gamble Tribute
To Fathers

A tribute to fathers will be given
Fathers’ Day, Sunday, June 16, in
honor of Rev. Ira McCall at Gamble
Memorial Church of God in Christ,
2:30 p.m., 1898 N.W. 43rd St.

On the program will be Gamble
Memorial Mass Choir, The C Lord
C's, Elder Reddick and The Shin-
ing Light Mass Choir, Sister Roset-
ta Ellis, and The Spiritual
Harmonizers.

All groups are invited. The hos-
tess will be Madam Rosa Shaw.

Dr. Julian C. Jackson is pastor.

Masons, Stars, Youth

Host Grand Lodge

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Free
and Accepted Masons and Order of
Eastern Stars Inc. celebrated its
first State Convention in Winter
Haven, FL, on June 7-9, with an
attendance of 125 brothers, sisters
and youth around Florida.

King Solomon Grand Lodge and
Coretta Scott King Grand Chapter
held its first Grand Lodge election
of officers. The following brothers
and sisters will guide the state of
Florida to higher heights through
knowledge, honesty, integrity and
understanding: Bro. William
Sunkett, Grand Master; Sis. Gir-
lean Tinsley, Grand Matron; Bro.
Steven Barrett, Grand Deputy
Master; Sis. Catherine White,
Grand Associate Matron; Bro.
Lawrence Pinckney, Grand Vice-
Deputy Master; Sis. Mary Robin-
son, Grand Vice-Associate Matron;
Bro. Herman Carter, State Joint
Council President; Friend Alvin
Miller, Grand Youth Director;
Friend Margaret Johnson, Grand
Youth Directress; Prince Benjimon
Kelly, Grand King Solomon; Prin-

GIRLEAN TINSLEY, Grand
Matron

cess Joan Smith, Grand Queen
Bathsheba; Princess Elouise Ste-
vens, Grand Hattipha.

The National Master, Ill. Natha-
niel Roberson, and Natioanl Grand
Matron Regina Miller were pre-
sented the keys to the city and a
proclamation by Commissioner
Ann Darby, the first and only Black
elected in the city.

Outreach Announces Revival

With Rev. Nathaniel Dodd Jr.

Outreach Excitement, located
at 3300 N.W. 17th Ave., is happy,
excited and blessed over the
upcoming Revival beginning Tues-
day night, June 18, at 8 p.m., and
nightly thereafter with Prophet
Nathaniel Dodd Jr. from Los
Angeles, California.

Rev. Dodd is the founder and
pastor of The Rock of Deliverance
Church in Los Angeles and has a
soul-winning ministry from the
street to the church. Giving all
honor to God, he will testify how
God delivered him from a life of sin

at the age of 14. He was a gang

leader in the city of Chicago. His
branch, the Blackstone Rangers,
was one of the largest gangs
around and consisted of 200
members.

In his youth, he was an abused
child, a runaway, which led him
into drugs — cocaine, marijuana,
acid, codeine and alcohol — and
because of excessive use, he over-
dosed many times.

Intermingling with the wrong
kind of people, he became a pimp
and had 13 women working on the
corners. But through it all, while
trying to get a saint out of the

PROPHET N. DODD Jr.

church, Jesus saved him and he
has been working for the Lord ever
since. God has been saving souls,
healing, delivering and working
miracles through his hands ever
since that wonderful day.

Remember this Holy Ghost
power-packed Revival begins
Tuesday night, June 18, and will
be nightly at 8 p.m.

Services Saturday For
Charles A. Williams Jr.

Funeral services for Charles A.
Williams Jr. will be held at two
o'clock Saturday afternoon at St.
Agnes Episcopal Church.

Williams, 71, died Monday at
Cedars Medical Center after suffer-
ing his fourth heart attack in the
past 17 years.’

A native Miamian, Williams
moved to California in 1943. Since
his rétirement, he has spent half of
his time at his Miami home at 3150
N.W. 12th Ave.

Born Sept. 9, 1919, to the late
Ethel R. Gibson and Dr. Charles
Williams Sr., he attended local
schools and graduated in 1938
from Booker T. Washington High.

Baptized and confirmed at St.
Agnes Church, he served as an
acolyte for many years. He was a
member of Miami's first Black Boy
Scout troop, serving along with
Lester Boggis and Garth Reeves.

He married Amanda Malone
April 7, 1940, and left the city two
years later when he enlisted in the
Navy for a station in California.
Upon his discharge from the Navy,
the couple made their home in
Berkeley. Williams spent 35 years
in federal civil service before
retiring.

A loving and caring person, Wil-
liams is survived by his wife, a
daughter, Amanda F. Tapia; three
sons, Charles III, Gregory and Joel.
All live in Berkeley, except Joel,
who lives in New York City.

Family visitation will be from

Hay Bille

A MARKER (URVEAL SF HVAE

CHARLES A. WILLIAMS JR.

6:30 to 7:30 Friday evening at
Range Funeral Home.

Following the funeral service,
the body will be shipped to Califor-
nia for final rites at St. Augustine's
Episcopal Church in Oakland.

MOTHER RUTH

Meanwhile, June 16,

447-7742.

God bless you.

REV. EARL PONDER

Pilgrim Rest
Says Thanks

Rev. Earl Ponder and the Pilgrim
Rest Family would like to thank

Rev. Willie James, associate minis-
ter of St. Barnabas, Rev. Charles

Boyd, pastor of Day Spring, and

congregation, Rev. Paul Freeman
of Zion Hope and congregation,

family and friends for Installation
Services rendered for Pastor

Ponder.

alone.

you home.
was best.
your rest.

hearts.

In Most Cherished Memory of

YVONNE ADRIENNE
PUYOL TURNER

Dec. 17, 1936 - June 15, 1985

It broke our hearts to lose you, but you did not go
A part of us went with you the day God called
God said that you were weary and did what he thought
He put his arms around you and whispered, come take
We thank God for her life and will forever hold in our

Atlas Turner, Husband
Trenese Turner, Daughter
Lorraine Puyol, Mother
The Turner and Puyol Families

Mother
Ruth will be honoring the fathers
and ministering in the sanctuary of
the Lord. The Voices of Excitement
Choir, under the direction of Pro-
fessor Judge Alexander, will be
singing you happy. You are invited
to join. For information, call

ILL. NATHANIEL ROBERSON,
National Grand Master

Recommendations were pro-
vided by Commissioners Helen
Miller and Steven Barrett on behalf
of Mayor Robert Ingram and com-
missioners of the City of Opa-
locka.

The convention theme was
“Brothers and Sisters Striving For
Success.”

The brothers, sisters and youth

‘Council,

SIS. REGINA MILLER, National
Grand Matron :

of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Free
and Accepted are preparing for the
National Convention that will be
held in Nassau, Bahamas, in mid-
August.

If you want to become a Mason
or Eastern Star or join the Youth
call, right away,
696-5568, 685-6939 or 691-1011.

Woman’s Day Musical At Holy Temple

Pastor Joseph Kelley of Holy
Temple M.B.C. is asking all choirs
and ushers to join him for revival
services tonight at Milrock M.B.C.

On Friday night, June 14, at 8
p.m., Choir No 1 will sponsor a
musical program on behalf of

. Women's Day.

On Saturday, June 14, the

.l NEW MT. PLEASANT, Rev.

W.R. Roundtree: Sunday after-
noon, Choir Number One's
Father's Day program; Rev. Black-
mon, associate minister, First
Baptist of Brownsville, speaker.
Wednesday-Friday, 7:30 p.m.,
Prayer Meeting to get ready for
Revival June 24-28 with Rev. W.E.
Kelly, pastor, Second Canaan
Baptist.

BH ANTIOCH BAPTIST, Liberty
City, Rev.Jimmy L. Bryant: In
observance of Father's Day, Sun-
day School Department will pre-
sent program by the Disciple
Class: six men will speak on each
letter in the word “father” taken
from the Bible. Family and Friends’
Day observance at 11 a.m. services
with Minister Nathan Robinson
the speaker. The oldest and
youngest father will be recognized
along with the member with the
largest number of guests.

church's annual picnic will be held
at C.B. Smith Park in Pembroke
Pines.

The Women's Day Committee
will sponsor a Father's Day Lunc-
heon at the Golden Glades Holiday
Inn on Sunday, June 16, at 2 p.m.
Contact Sis. Mary Brown at
685-7159 for more information.

H 93RD STREET COMMUNITY
M.B.C., Rev. A. Anderson: Honor-
ing for Deacon Wallace Moore at 11
a.m. services. Opa-locka Commis-
sioner Helen Miller will present
him with a proclamation.

HE JORDAN GROVE M.B.C., Rev.
Douglas Cook: Saturday Brunch
and a pre-Father's Day program,
June 15, 11 a.m., sponsored by
Usher Board #3. Theme: God's
Most Wanted Men. Speakers,
Minister Lee (Mt. Nebo), Minister
Johnson (93rd Street); Bro. Norris
(Mt. Carmel), Dea W. Wilson (Mt.
Pisgah), Dea. Julius Davis (New
Shiloh), Dea. Sidney Parrish and
Dea. Henry Sailor (Jordan Grove).
Rev. Brenard Johnson, summary.

BH MT. NEBO BAPTIST, Rev.
Avery K. Gardner: Pastor is ask-
ing the Mass Choir, combined

Continued on page 4C

Pastor Victor T. Curry Is

Called To Do

After seven years of faithfully
and diligently preaching and
teaching the word of God at the Mt.
Carmel Missionary Baptist
Church, Pastor Curry will be
pressing forward.

In 1984, Rev. Curry became the
third pastor in Mt. Carmel's his-
tory. Under his leadership, the Mt.
Carmel family has enriched the
community as well as established
various ministries: Nurse's Mini-
stry (conducts seminars and clas-
ses providing information on High
Blood Pressure, Cancer, AIDS,
CPR and many other subjects);
Substance Abuse Minstry (pro-
vides support to those suffering
from drugs, alcohol and depress-
ion); Counseling Ministry; Curry
Special; Deacon Family Ministry;
Bus Ministry (provides transporta-
tion to anyone desiring to attend
Sunday School and Sunday Ser-
vices); Christian Education
Department.

Also, College Career Ministry;
Birthday Fellowship Ministry;
After School Tutorial Program;
Singles’ Ministry; Agape Food
Ministry (an outreach year-round
food ministry for the needy); Agape

Greater Work

Love Feast (a Thanksgiving Feast
given for the needy and community
at large); Radio Outreach Ministry
(radio show aired on WMBM Mon-
day nights 8-9 p.m.); Career
Employment Ministry (provides
workshops on interviewing tech-
niques and application pointers).

Also, Thelma Bradley Scholar-
ship Funds (funds made available
to members of the congregation
wishing to further their education);
Youth/Young Adult Department
allowing youth to fellowship and
express their talents and ideas);
Youth Church, Senior Saint Choir,
Senior Saint Department, Cadets,
GEMS, New Member Orientation;
Video/Audio Ministry, Evangelism
Outreach Ministry, (members
attend the local prison and stock-
ade to encourage inmates to accept
Christ and they also spread the
word of God door-to-door in the
community) and the Lord's Kitch-
en II (feeds the hungry on Wednes-
day and Saturday).

Rev. Curry will be deeply missed
at Mt. Carmel and we pray that God
will continue to bless him as he
ventures into greater ministries for
God.

Paid Announcement

N. Patrick Range
Gregg L. Mason

3384 Grand Avenue
Coconut Grove, Florida
446-1173

Range

"a living service for the living”

M. Athalie Range

Serving Our Families From Three Location
5727 N. W. 17th Avenue
Miami, Florida
691-4343

Yvonne Major
David L. Williams

641 S. W. 8th Street
Homestead, Florida
245-6989



THE MIAMI TIMES

2C

Thursday, June 13, 1991

DEATHS—CARDS—MEMORIALS

Johnson

WILLIE BUCKLEY SR., 65,
Florida City, died June 7 at James
Archer Smith Hospital. Survivors
include sons, Willie Jr. and Ver-
non; sister, Clottie Thames;
brothers, John and Arthur. Ser-
vices will be on Saturday, 2 p.m., at
the House of God Pentecostal
Church, Homestead.

Manker

VIRGAL VAMPER, 32, 1581
N.W. 15th Ave., died June 5 at
Jackson Hospital. Survivors
include daughters, Jennifer and
Ruth; son, Virgal Jr.; parents,
Robert and Ruth; sisters, Barbara,
Patrica, Jeanette; brothers, Jeffery
and Charles. Services will be held
Saturday at the chapel, 1 p.m.;
interment, Lincoln Memorial Park.

BETTY K. LEWIS, 61, 1770
N.W. 167th St., died June 7 at
home. Survivors include daught-
ers, Andrea, Esther, Betty, Jean,
Lucy and Roxieann; son, Shedrick;
brother, Michael. Services will be
held Saturday at the chapel, 10
a.m.; interment, Southern Memor-
ial Park.

Barrett-Fryar

DEMECO TORRAY BAKER,
26, died June 9. Survivors include
mother, Pauline; father, L.C.; step-
father, Alonzo Smith; son, Quin-
ton; daughters, Crystal and Denis-
ha; brothers, Juanza Mitchell and
Afton Howard; sisters, Shawn, Tyr-
ie and Josie; grandmother, Mattie
Bragg; great-grandmother, Ida
Chisholm. Services will be on
Saturday, June 15, 1 p.m., at St.
John Baptist Church, 13740 S.W.
264th ST., Naranja. Repose will be
at the chapel, 3-8 p.m.

Walker

BESSIE MAE HEPBURN, 63,
Miami, died June 7 at Cedars Med-
ical Center. She was a former cook
at Jackson's Toddler Inn. Survi-
vors include husband, Daniel;
daughters, Paulette, Natalie Sin-
gleton; sons, Dwight, Miles and
Norman. Repose will be on Friday,
2-10 p.m., at Poitier Funeral
Home, 2300 N.W. 62nd St. Ser-
vices will be on Saturday, 1 p.m., at
Corinth Missionary Baptist
Church, 1435 N.W. 54th St.; inter-
ment, Dade Memorial Park North.

Mills

LUCY MELVIN DAVIS, 51,
4517 S.W. 19th St., Hollywood,
died June 10 at Memorial Hospital.
Survivors include daughters, Max-
ine Harris, and Bernice Harris;
sons, Paul Melvin, McCoy Harris,
David Lee Harris; mother, Maddie

‘Melvin. Viewing will be on Sunday,

2-9 p.m.; services, Monday, at
Ebenezer Baptist Church; inter-
ment, Hallandale Cemetery

ASHLEY MEGAN POLITE,
infant, 4235 N.W. 201 St., Carol
City, died June 7 at Memorial Hos-
pital. Survivors include mother,
Angela Rene; father, Anthony. Ser-
vices were held.

ALFRED BROWN, 37, 2122
Adam St., Apt. #208, Hollywood,
died June 5 at Broward General
Medical Center. Survivors include
mother, Lillie Mae; father, Willie;
sisters, Revoka, Dewanno;
brothers, Ulyssee, Loubiecha and
Muddy. Arrangements are
incomplete.

Card of Thanks Card of Thanks In Memoriam

The family of the late,
LEVI J. MONROE
Mrs. Ena McKinney

would like to extend her

appreciation to all of her
friends and neighbors
that were so supportive
during her time of
bereavement.

May God bless you all.

Card of Thanks
In loving memory of,

CATHERINE
C. CAMBRIDGE
1927 - 1976
Fifteen years have
passed my love. It seems
as if it was yesterday.
Rest in perfect peace, we
love you but God loves
you best.
Your loving husband
and children. Sherril,

Granville Jr. and John _

“and all the grands.
Card of Thanks

The family of the late,

DEACON L.J. DAVIS
02/18/32 - 05/24/91
would like to take this
opportunity to express
our thanks to everyone
for their kindness ex-
tended during our hour
of bereavement.

Special thanks to the
Pastor Elder E. Alford
and members of Bethel
Mt. Zion Holy Union
Church of God, Ebenezer
Baptist Church pastor
and staff, Employees of
E.A. Stevens Funeral
Home.

To all of you, my neigh-
bors and friends. Your
kind and considerate
thoughts, cards, flowers
and food we thank you.

Wife, Ruth Davis; son,
Elton and family.

Card of Thanks
The family of the late,

REV. JOHN H. HAYS
1917 - 1991

express their heartfelt
gratitude for so many |}

acts of kindness and
sympathy shown during
our hour of bereavement.
Thank you Straightway
Missionary Holiness
Church family. Special
thanks to Rev. Roscoe
Jackson of New Macedo-
nia Church, Rev. Ronald
Johnson of Apostolic Re-
vival Center, for their as-
piring messages. Surely
it was a time to rejoice
unto the Lord. Dear
friends Francita Riley,
Sis. Karweena and Ar-
leyah Martin, Dorothy
Williams, Prince Bar-B-
Que Pit, and Sutton’s
Grocery and other
friends, and relatives not
mentioned.

Daddy, we love you
and miss you very much.
But, God knows what is
best for us.

God's richest bless-
ings upon everyone. Son,
Leroy, “Mr. Roy” Griffin;
daughters, Doretha Me-
nee “Dobbie”; Lisa Hays
Rolling “Busta“ and
sister-in-law, Roberta
Dixson.

The family of the late,

CHESTER MORRIS
DAVIS, JR.
1958 - 1991

who departed this life on
May 19,1991 wishes to
thank you sincerely for
sharing our sorrows.

Your kindness is deep-
ly appreciated and will
always be remembered.

May God bless and
keep you.

The Davis family.

In Memoriam

In loving memory of,

LEROY LEVAN JR.
who passed away on
June 4, 1975. Precious
memories how they lin-
ger. We remember all the
happy moments, that we
shared. When you were
here. Loving thoughts
will always linger and
your presence always
near.

Janie
Mother.

Thomas,

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,

ILL. BERT
WILLIAMS SR. 33
You will always be re-

membered and loved.
Your wife, Ruth Wil-
liams; children, Brenda
Williams Northcutt and
Robert Williams Jr.

Card of Thanks
The family of the late,

LAVARELL JOHNSON
wishes to express our
gratitude for all acts of
kindness during our
hour of bereavement.
You may have thought of
us or prayed for us, senta
floral arrangement, cov-
ered dish, monetary do-
nations or paid a wel-
come visit.

Special thanks to
Community Funeral
Home, Rev. Atkinson,
Rev. Tullis, Mt. Calvary
Baptist Church, Rev.
K.A. Dukes and the
Mothers of New Jeru-
salem Primitive Baptist
Church, Rev. Pritchett,
Pat Simmons, Jacque-
line Singletary, Ms. Lu-
cille Lee, and Dade
County Corrections.

May God bless each of
you, The Johnson
Family.

In loving memory of,

DANIEL JOHNSON

“It's been three years”
Never shall your memo-
ries fade. Your mother
and the Johnson family.

Card of Thanks

The family of the late,

RAY KNIGHT

who departed this life
May 19,1991, wishes to
thank each and everyone
for their kindness shown
during our bereavement.
Special thanks to Rev.
Larkins and congrega-
tion of New Fellowship
Baptist Church and also,
to Portier Funeral Home
staff.

May God bless all of
you is my prayer.

Mary Knight and
family.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,

GEORGE E. MANSON
09/21/68 - 06/11/90

A precious one from us
is now gone, one year. A
voice we love is still. A
chair is vacant in 'our
home that never can be
filled. Our hearts,
thoughts and lives are
still filled with wonderful
memories of you.

With loving memories,
the Manson, Adams and
Naylor families.

Card of Thanks
The family of the late,

MARGARET DAVIS
who was born September
21, 1936 and died May
21,1991, wishes to ex-
press our sincere thanks
and appreciation to each
of you for every act of
kindness shown during
our time of bereavement.
Above all it was your fer-
vent prayers that helped
to strengthen and sus-
tain us.

Special thanks to our
pastor Rev. A. J. Mays,
for the consoling eulogy
and the Royal Funeral
Home for their efficient
service.

May God bless and
keep each of you is our
prayer.

The Davis, Griffin and
Martin families.

Card of Thanks
The family of the late,

CHRISTINA MARSHALL
JACKSON

would like to express
their appreciation for
all acts of kindness,
cards and flowers
shown during our hour
of bereavement.

Special thanks to
Rev. Glenroy Deveaux,
Minister William John-
son, the Temple Bap-
tist Church family and
Carey-Rolle-Rahmings’
staff for their services.

May God bless each
of you.

Elsie Douglas and
family.

In Memoriam

In loving memory of
our daughter,

BRIDGETTE
SHIRELLE COOPER
12/26/71 - 06/15/90
To some you are for-

. gotten, to some you are of

the past.

But to us, the ones
who loved and lost you,
your memories will al-
ways last.

Love always Your pa-
rents, Malcolm Cooper
and Hattie Burns and
daughter Montavia.

Card of Thanks

The family of the late,

JONATHAN
ANDREW JOHNSON
12/24/86 - 05/25/91
gratefully acknowledges,
that you have brought
sunshine into our home.
You have visited, prayed,
brought gifts of all kinds,
performed services of
many kinds, called,
asked about us, and
simply cared. For this we

say thank you.

A special thank you to
Pastor and Sis. Billy Ba-
skin, the New Way Fam-
ily, and Royal Funeral
Home.

“So teach us to num-
ber our days, that we
may apply our. hearts
unto wisdom.” —Psalm
90:12.

Rev. & Sis. Bobby
Johnson and family.

In Memoriam

In Loving Memory of

WESLEY O. HEPBURN

Who departed this life
on June 14th 1981,
gone, but not forgotten.
We miss you.

You will always be in
our heart.

Jill Hepburn, Mother
Adena Hepburn, Sister

Poitier

HARRY JAMES, 47, 222 N.W.
22nd St., #9, died at Coral Gables
Hospital. Survivors include
mother, Ada Harmon; sons, Leroy,
Harry, Melvin; brothers, Robert,
Michael Harmon, Roosevelt Har-
mon; sisters, Silveria, Lenora
Moore, Sandra Brade, Doretha
Harmon, Alberta Harmon. Ser-
vices will be held on Saturday at 1
at St. Luke Cousin Memorial
A.M.E. Church.

GWENDA LENORA BARFIELD,
34, 1370 N.W. 192nd St., died at
home. Survivors include mother,
Veneta Ballard; father, Willie Lin-
der; son, Leon Jr; daughters,
Natasha and Domesha; brothers,
Jeffrey, Richard, Kevin; sisters,
Selina Ballard, Joletha Hunt. Ser-
vices will be held on Saturday at 1
at St. John Baptist Church.

Range
Miami

EMMETT HAMPTON JR., 71,
4530 N.W. 179th St., died May 29
in Chicago. Survivors include
daughters, Bessie Dilworth of
Markham, II, Ollie Grandberry of
Hazel Crest, Il, Bettye Hampton
Sheppard, Brenda O’'Hearn of Chi-
cago and Jeanette; sons, Emmitt
111, Willie, Milton, Larry, Rufus and
Lee of Chicago; sisters, Mary Bell
Lee and Jeanette Raie fo Greenvil-
le, Mi. Services were held Saturday

at the chapel; interment, Southern
Memorial Park.

HENRY WAY, 80, 2280 N.W.
152nd Terr., died June 4 at Grey-
nolds Nursing Home. He was a
truck driver. Survivors include
wife, Laura Lee Scott; sister, Lizzie
Mae Jones. Services were held
Saturday at the chapel; interment,
Dade Memorial Park, North.

GERALDINE MOORE, 66, 1521
N.W. 55th Terr., died June 5 at
Cedars Medical Center. She work-
ed at King Cole Clothiers. Survi-
vors include son, Frank; daughter,
Patricia Johnson; aunt, Ella; cou-
sin, Mary Killings. Services were
held Monday at Greater Israel
Bethel Church; interment, Dade
Memorial Park, North.

MAYBELLE “MABLE"
WESLEY, 77, 8420 N.W. 33rd
Ave., died June 6 in St. Augustine.
Survivors include daughters,
Alberta and Joanne Mack; grand-
sons, Eric Jenkins, Pedro James
Wesley and Franklin Douglas
Mack; granddaughter, Melissa.
Final rites will be in St. Augustine
Saturday, 1 p.m.

JOHN DAVIS JR., 19, 15555
N.W. 158th St. Rd., died June 5 at
home. He was a student at Thomas
Jefferson Middle School. Survivors
include parents, John and Queen;
sistters, Cheryl Brown, Elizabeth
Nesbitt and Patrice Brown;
brother, Otis Watts. Services were
held Saturday at the chapel; inter-
ment, Dade Memorial Park, North.

HENRY L. HEAD, 43, 2334
N.W. 94th St., died June 4 at Vic-
toria Hospital. He was a counselor
with the Dade rehabilitation ser-
vices. Survivors include father,
L.B. of Greenwood; daughters,
Tonya, Taydra, Shanita West;
grandchildren, Shatia and Teneis-
ha West; sisters, Margerine Foots
and Berthan Swanson; nieces, Lin-
da Bain and Anika Taylor; nephew,
Michael Bert; step-father, Ingram
Common; grandniece, Christina
Taylor; grandnephews, Cleveland
Jr., Kevin and Jeffrey Bain; god-
daughters, Charsta, Danyell and
Crystal. Services were held Mon-
day at the chapel; interment, Dade
Memorial Park, North.

RAYMONDE LUIS, 3321 N.W.
174th St., diedJune 11 at St. Fran-
cis Hospice. Survivors include Luis
Pierre. Arrangments are
incomplete.

CHARLES H.A. WILLIAMS JR.,
71, 3150N.W. 12th Ave., diedJune
10 at Cedars Medical Center. He
was a Quality Control Specialist
with the U.S. Navy. Survivors
include wife, Amanda; sons, Char-
les 111, Gregory Bruce and Joel Tho-
mas; daughter, Amanda F. Tapia.
Services will be held Saturday, 2
p.m., at St. Agnes Episcopal
Church, final rites in Berkley, Cali-
fornia; family hour, 6:30 - 7:3C
p.m.

Homestead

ALTON ELLISON, 52, 750 N.W.
7th Ave., Florida City, died June 8
at Deering Hospital. Survivors
include wife, Celestine; mohter,
Mamie Lou; step-children, Rodney
Foster, Russell Dawson and Kim-
berly Roberts; brothers, Tommie,
Arthur; aunt, Cora Lee Grimes;
uncle, Frank Hughes. Final rites
and burial will be in Thomaston,
Georgia.

DAVID LEE FULLER, 34,
Goulds, died May 31 at James
Archer Smith Hospital. Survivors
include mother, Mae Bell Donald;
son, David Jr.; sister, Martha
Pryor; brothers, Brian, Curtis;
companion, Brenda Dumer. Final
rites and burial will be in Fort
Worth, Texas.

PATRICIA ELIZABETH
RICHARDSON (STRANCHAN),
62, 1929 N.W. 2nd Ct., #1, died at
home. Survivors include sons, Clif-
ford, - Joel, Everett, Patrick;

daughters, Barbara Dixon, Vanes-
sa Bonner, Gail Nelson, Gay
Knight, Nina Mitchell. Services will
be held on Saturday at 2 p.m. at
Dade Memorial Park; viewing, 2-10
p.m., Friday.

WALTER LEE McCLAIN JR.,
29, 2355 Superior St., died June 9.
Survivors include father, Walter
Sr.; mother, Victoria; children,
Marquis, Marquia; brother,
Christopher; sister, Angela. Ser-
vices will be held on Saturday, 10
a.m., at Antioch Baptist Church of
Brownsville.

DAVID BRYANT SR., 65, 1310
N.W. 16th St., #405, died June 5 at
Cedars Medical Center. Survivors
include sons, David Jr., Micheal;
daughters, May Lois, Laverne Few-
quay; sisters, Elizabeth Wallace,
Shirley Bell, Essie Stakey, Mary
Blackman. Services will be held on
Thursday at 2 at the chapel.

IKE MITCHELL, 79, 2750 N.W.
49th St., died June 5 at home. Sur-
vivors include sister, Wanda Wil-
liams; niece, Florence Zephrine.
Arrangements are incomplete.

ROBERT LEE DUKES, 47,
2108 N.W. 3rd Ave., died June 4 at
Jackson Hospital. Survivors
include brothers, George, Owen,
Randolph, Albert, Donald, Veron,
Floyd, Michael; sisters, Mary, Bar-
bara Jean, Barbara Ann, Debra,
Gwendolyn, Maria. Services will be
held Saturday, 11 a.m., at St. Mark
M.B.Church.

JOHN BOND, 74, 135 Ocean
Dr., #414, died June 3 at South
Shore Hospital. Survivors include
wife, Ana Lucille. Services were
held.

Zh

JOHN McCOY, 69, 1919 N.W..
29th St., #5, died at Baptist Hosp-
tial. Survivors include daughters,
P.S., Cynthia Roundtree; brothers,
James, George, Fred; sisters, Mary
Ellison, Francis Grant, Louise
Clark, Lurene Carline. Services
will be held today at Mt. Carmel
M.B. Church at 3.

ANDREW BAKER, 69, 15151
N.W. 18th Ave., died June 7 at
home. Survivors include sons, Wil-
liam, Curtis, Gus; daughters, Ellen
Cockett, Gail Harris; brother,
Emmett Taylor Jr.; sisters, Beverly
Ayers, Ethel Malone. Services will
be held on Saturday at 11 at St.
Luke Cousin Memorial A.M.E.
Church.

FRANK EDDIE GOA, 42, 1920
N.W. 62nd St., died June 10 at
Green Briar Nursing Home. Survi-
vors include wife, Lorraine; son,
Frank; daughter, Angela Fulton;
father, Herman; brothers, John
and Hermon Jr.; sisters, Mary
Ridge and Vergie Richardson.
Arrangements are incomplete.

LINDA WILKINS, 25, 395 N.W.
177th St., died June 10. Survivors
include sons, Lamont Scott and
Tavarius; mother, Dorothy; father,
Herman; brother, Craig. Services
will be held on Saturday.

Tuckers Celebrate
41st Anniversary

Happy 41st Anniversary to Mr.
& Mrs. Hardrick L. Tucker Sr.

After 41 years of marriage,
Hardrick and Rose Tucker of Opa-
locka, Fla., are still happy and
counting their many blessings.

In celebration of their years of
unity, they will host a formal cere-
mony with dinner and dancing to
follow on June 15 at Achievers
Hall. At that time, they will reaffirm
their commitments to each other.

Invited guests will follow
R.S.V.P. procedures.

Hall-Ferguson
Hewitt

EVADNEY MINETTA
LAWRENCE-GRANT, 39, banker,
died June 1. Survivors include
daughter, Sophia Lorraine Came-
ron; parents, Rupert and Mabel
Lawrence; sisters, Vilma
Lawrence-Miller, Delize Lawrence-
Lee; brothers, Ewart, Donald,
Kingsley and Windell Lawrence.
Services were held on Saturday,
June 8.

MATTIE BROWN HILL,
domestic worker, died June 1. Sur-
vivors include daughters Lola
Roberts of Miami and Louis Wil-
brun of Rochester, N.Y.; sons,
Robert King of Miami and Earl King
of Baltimore; sister, Alice Allen of
Atlanta, Ga. Services were held on
Tuesday, June 11, at Mt. Carmel

. Baptist Church.

JOEREATHER MILLER, 48,
cook, died June 6. Survivors
include husband, Louis. Finalrites
and burial were held in Baxley,
Georgia.

ESSIE LEE GRIMES, 81, died
June 6. Survivors include daught-
er, Hilda Bodison; grandson,
James Mosely; great-
granddaughter, Tanya Mosely.
Arrangements are incomplete.

JENNIFER KING, 33, teacher,
died June 6. Survivors include
daughters, Tracey Denise, Arcadia
Dario, Pamela Altamese, and
Danyiel Alesia; mother, Lula
Roberts; father, Earl Lightbourne;
sisters, Yasmine, Vanessa, Ber-
nadett and Lori of Miami and
Bridgette of Clinton; brothers,
Gary and Richard of Miami. Ser-
vices were held on Tuesday, June
11, at Mt. Carmel Baptist Church.

CORAL. HARRIS, 77, domestic
worker, died June 8. Survivors
include sisters, Charlie M. Belton,
Geneva Reddick and Elnora Brin-
son; nephew, Johnny Griffin;
niece, Louise Britt. Arrangements
are incomplete.

GWENDOLYN JOYCE HALL,
44, died June 10. Survivors
include sons, Curtis, Darryl, Dave
and Henry Wright; grandson,
Rolando Wright; granddaughter,
Michelle Wright; aunt, Donnie
Adner; uncle, Herman Lewis; aunt,
Lula Hall. Services will be held on
Saturday, June 15, 3 p.m., at St.
James Baptist Church, Coconut

Grove.
Mitchell

FLORENTINA WILLIAMS, 72,
712 N.W. 108th St., died June 4 at
North Shore Medical Center. Sur-
vivors include son, Emery West;
grandchildren, Omari, Akili, Sudi,
Malik, Tariq, Aminah and Safiyah
of Washington, D.C.; brothers,
George O. West, Ernest J. West,
Edward West; sisters, Mary,
Emma Weston and Nellie Robin-
son. Services were held Tuesday,
June 11, at the chapel; interment,
Dade Memorial Park.

CHRISTINA LOVETTE
ARNOLD, 34, 858 N.W. 7th St.,
died June 8 at Cedars Medical
Center. Survivors include son,
Delvin; father, Eddie Lee; sisters,
Joann Monrose, Rose Sterling,
Eulene Edwards, Aleatha Lawson,
Gloria Randolph; step-sister,
Gwendolyn W. Pittman; brother,
Henry Nixon; uncle, James Morn-
ing. Service will be held Thursday,
June 13, 11 a.m., at St. Johns
Institional Baptist Church; inter-
ment, Lincoln Memorial Park.

Carey-Rolle
Rahmings

LEVI JOHN MONROE, 66,
1023 N.W. 47th St., died May 29 at
Cedars Medical Center. He was a
mechanic. Survivors include
mother, Ena McKinney. Services
were held Tuesday at St. Agnes
Episcopal Church; interment, Lin-
coln Memorial Park.

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Thursday, June 13, 1991

Community

JOSEPH DICKISON, 73, 1120
N.W. 49th St., died June 4 at
Gainsville V.A. Medical Center.
Survivors include daughter, Bar-
bara Battle; sons, Joseph Jr. and
Ricardo; sisters, Ruth Wallace,
Barbara Henry, Mary Jackson and
Frances Philpot. Services were
held on Wednesday at Church of
God, Ft. Lauderdale; interment,
Sunset Memorial Park.

MARC WILLIAMS JR., 46, 537
N.E. 72nd St., died June 6 at South
Shore Hospital. Survivors include
wife, Sonie; son, Ronie; brother,
Michael; sister, Elrose. Services
will be held on Saturday, 10 a.m. at
Notre Dame Catholic Church, 130
N.E. 62nd St.; interment, South-
ern Memorial Park.

ROBERT LEE JONES, 25, 395
N.W. 177th St., #130, died June 10
at Jackson Hospital. Survivors
include mother, Rosa; sisters,
Pearline Sherrod, Joyce Pruitt,
Overa Morton, Shirley Ferguson,
Doris Wiley, Sherrie Moore;
brothers, Bobby Harvel, Johnny,
Edward. Services will be held
Saturday, 11 a.m. at New Mt.
Pleasant Missionary Baptist
Church, 6200 N.W. Miami Ct.

REV. IRA T. McCALL Sr.

Gamble Tribute
To Fathers

A tribute to fathers will be given
Fathers’ Day, Sunday, June 16, in
honor of Rev. Ira McCall at Gamble
Memorial Church of God in Christ,
2:30 p.m., 1898 N.W. 43rd St.

On the program will be Gamble
Memorial Mass Choir, The C Lord
C's, Elder Reddick and The Shin-
ing Light Mass Choir, Sister Roset-
ta Ellis, and The Spiritual
Harmonizers.

All groups are invited. The hos-
tess will be Madam Rosa Shaw.

Dr. Julian C. Jackson is pastor.

Masons, Stars, Youth

Host Grand Lodge

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Free
and Accepted Masons and Order of
Eastern Stars Inc. celebrated its
first State Convention in Winter
Haven, FL, on June 7-9, with an
attendance of 125 brothers, sisters
and youth around Florida.

King Solomon Grand Lodge and
Coretta Scott King Grand Chapter
held its first Grand Lodge election
of officers. The following brothers
and sisters will guide the state of
Florida to higher heights through
knowledge, honesty, integrity and
understanding: Bro. William
Sunkett, Grand Master; Sis. Gir-
lean Tinsley, Grand Matron; Bro.
Steven Barrett, Grand Deputy
Master; Sis. Catherine White,
Grand Associate Matron; Bro.
Lawrence Pinckney, Grand Vice-
Deputy Master; Sis. Mary Robin-
son, Grand Vice-Associate Matron;
Bro. Herman Carter, State Joint
Council President; Friend Alvin
Miller, Grand Youth Director;
Friend Margaret Johnson, Grand
Youth Directress; Prince Benjimon
Kelly, Grand King Solomon; Prin-

GIRLEAN TINSLEY, Grand
Matron

cess Joan Smith, Grand Queen
Bathsheba; Princess Elouise Ste-
vens, Grand Hattipha.

The National Master, Ill. Natha-
niel Roberson, and Natioanl Grand
Matron Regina Miller were pre-
sented the keys to the city and a
proclamation by Commissioner
Ann Darby, the first and only Black
elected in the city.

Outreach Announces Revival
With Rev. Nathaniel Dodd Jr.

Outreach Excitement, located
at 3300 N.W. 17th Ave., is happy,
excited and blessed over the
upcoming Revival beginning Tues-
day night, June 18, at 8 p.m., and
nightly thereafter with Prophet
Nathaniel Dodd Jr. from Los
Angeles, California.

Rev. Dodd is the founder and
pastor of The Rock of Deliverance
Church in Los Angeles and has a
soul-winning ministry from the
street to the church. Giving all
honor to God, he will testify how
God delivered him from a life of sin
at the age of 14. He was a gang
leader in the city of Chicago. His
branch, the Blackstone Rangers,
was one of the largest gangs
around and consisted of 200
members.

In his youth, he was an abused
child, a runaway, which led him
into drugs — cocaine, marijuana,
acid, codeine and alcohol — and
because of excessive use, he over-
dosed many times.

Intermingling with the wrong
kind of people, he became a pimp
and had 13 women working on the
corners. But through it all, while
trying to get a saint out of the

PROPHET N. DODD Jr.

church, Jesus saved him and he
has been working for the Lord ever
since. God has been saving souls,
healing, delivering and working
miracles through his hands ever
since that wonderful day.

Remember this Holy Ghost
power-packed Revival begins
Tuesday night, June 18, and will
be nightly at 8 p.m.

MOTHER RUTH

ILL. NATHANIEL ROBERSON,
National Grand Master

Recommendations were pro-
vided by Commissioners Helen
Miller and Steven Barrett on behalf
of Mayor Robert Ingram and com-
missioners of the City of Opa-
locka.

The convention theme was
“Brothers and Sisters Striving For
Success.” :

The brothers, sisters and youth

* Council,

SIS. REGINA MILLER, National
Grand Matron

of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Free
and Accepted are preparing for the
National Convention that will be
held in Nassau, Bahamas, in mid-
August.

If you want to become a Mason
or Eastern Star or join the Youth
call, right away,
696-5568, 685-6939 or 691-1011.

Woman's Day Musical At Holy Temple

Pastor Joseph Kelley of Holy
Temple M.B.C. is asking all choirs
and ushers to join him for revival
services tonight at Milrock M.B.C.

On Friday night, June 14, at 8
p.m., Choir No 1 will sponsor a
musical program on behalf of
Women's Day.

On Saturday, June 14, the

HB NEW MT. PLEASANT, Rev.
W.R. Roundtree: Sunday after-
noon, Choir Number One's
Father's Day program; Rev. Black-
mon, associate minister, First
Baptist of Brownsville, speaker.
Wednesday-Friday, 7:30 p.m.,
Prayer Meeting to get ready for
Revival June 24-28 with Rev. W.E.
Kelly, pastor, Second Canaan
Baptist.

BH ANTIOCH BAPTIST, Liberty
City, Rev.Jimmy L. Bryant: In
observance of Father's Day, Sun-
day School Department will pre-
sent program by the Disciple
Class: six men will speak on each

Meanwhile, June 16, Mother jeter in the word “father” taken

Ruth will be honoring the fathers fom the Bible. Family and Friends’
and ministering in the sanctuary of Day observance at 11 a.m. services
the Lord. The Voices of Excitement ith, Minister Nathan Robinson

Choir, under the direction of Pro- {he speaker. The oldest and

fessor Judge Alexander, will be yo, ngest father will be recognized
singing you happy. You are invited along with the member with the

church's annual picnic will be held
at C.B. Smith Park in Pembroke
Pines.

The Women's Day Committee
will sponsor a Father's Day Lunc-
heon at the Golden Glades Holiday
Inn on Sunday, June 16, at 2 p.m.
Contact Sis. Mary Brown at
685-7159 for more information.

BH 93RD STREET COMMUNITY
M.B.C., Rev. A. Anderson: Honor-
ing for Deacon Wallace Moore at 11
a.m. services. Opa-locka Commis-
sioner Helen Miller will present
him with a proclamation.

BH JORDAN GROVE M.B.C., Rev.
Douglas Cook: Saturday Brunch
and a pre-Father's Day program,
June 15, 11 a.m., sponsored by
Usher Board #3. Theme: God's
Most Wanted Men. Speakers,
Minister Lee (Mt. Nebo), Minister
Johnson (93rd Street); Bro. Norris
(Mt. Carmel), Dea W. Wilson: (Mt.
Pisgah), Dea. Julius Davis (New
Shiloh), Dea. Sidney Parrish and
Dea. Henry Sailor (Jordan Grove).
Rev. Brenard Johnson, summary.

EH MT. NEBO BAPTIST, Rev.
Avery K. Gardner: Pastor is ask-
ing the Mass Choir, combined

Continued on page 4C

to join. For information, call largest number of guests.

447-7742.

God bless you.

Pastor Victor T. Curry Is
Called To Do Greater Work

Services Saturday For

- a

MICHAEL EDWIN BROWN, 34,
2940 N.W. 57th St., died June 10
at Jackson Hospital. Survivors
include daughters, Anna and
Tameka; sons, Ernest, and George;
‘mother, Catherine Combs; father,
Eddie; step-father, Henry Combs;

Charles A. Williams Jr.

Funeral services for Charles A.
Williams Jr. will be held at two
o'clock Saturday afternoon at St.
Agnes Episcopal Church.

Williams, 71, died Monday at
Cedars Medical Center after suffer-

After seven years of faithfully
and diligently preaching and
teaching the word of God at the Mt.
Carmel Missionary Baptist
Church, Pastor Curry will be
pressing forward.

In 1984, Rev. Curry became the
third pastor in Mt. Carmel's his-
tory. Under his leadership, the Mt.

Love Feast (a Thanksgiving Feast
given for the needy and community
at large); Radio Outreach Ministry
(radio show aired on WMBM Mon-
day nights 8-9 p.m.); Career
Employment Ministry (provides
workshops on interviewing tech-
niques and application pointers).

Also, Thelma Bradley Scholar-
ship Funds (funds made available

ttack in the Carmel family has enriched the to members of the congregation
72, sister, Rosle; brother, Reith. Ser- th Sn 2 community of well as established wishing to further their education);
tal Vices willie held Sninrday, | p.10. A native Miamian, Williams various ministries: Nurse's Mini- Youth/Young Adult Department
ur- at Antioch Missionary Baptist d alife in 1943 Sin stry (conducts seminars and clas- allowing youth to fellowship and
; Church, 2799 N.W. 46th St.; inter- moved to California + Sines ; gages ; :
est; Url, 2 his retirement, he has spent half of ses providing information on High express their talents and ideas);
di, ment, Dade Memorial Park. his time at his Miami home at 3150 Blood Pressure, Cancer, AIDS, Youth Church, Senior Saint Choir,
yah LUVENIA MONTGOMERY, 65, NW. 12th Ave. CPR and many other subjects); Senior Saint Department, Cadets,
TS, 1250 N.W. 34th St., died June 5 at Born Sept. 9, 1919, to the late REV. EARL PONDER Substance Abuse Minstry (pro- GEMS, New Member Orientation;
est, home. Survivors include sisters, Ethel R. Gibson and Dr. Charles vides support to those suffering Video/Audio Ministry, Evangelism
ry, Naomi Brown and Pauline; williams Sr.,, he attended local Pilgrim Rest from drugs, alcohol and depress- Outreach Ministry, (members
in- brothers, Leon and Melvin. Ser- gchools and ' graduated in 1938 ion); Counseling Ministry; Curry attend the local prison and stock-
lay, vices will be held on Saturday, 1 from Booker T. Washington High. S ays Thanks Special; Deacon Family Ministry; ade toencourage inmates to accept
nt, p.m., at Miami Christian Center,

Baptist Church, 1140 N.W. 62nd Berkeley. Williams spent 35 years
St: interment, Dade Memorial in federal civil service before In Most Cherished Memory of
Park. retiring.
FLORIAN DUMORNAY, 55, A loving and caring person, Wil- Q 4
1419 Adams Ave., Hollywood, died liams is survived by his wife, a
June 5 at home. Survivors include daughter, Amanda F. Tapia; three
bo, wife, Jenny; daughter, Lily. Ser- sons, CharlesIII, Gregory and Joe), "a living service for the living
vices will be on Monday, 11 a.m., at All live in Berkeley, except Joel,
TE an iri A Dade who lives in New Tore ol Y VONNE ADRIENNE
St., M rial Park. Family visitation rom
cal TE PUYOL TURNER
S0Nn
iy Dec. 17, 1936 - June 15, 1985
ers,
= MANKER FUNERAL HOME |
Son, 2075 N.W. 54th St. Miami, FL 33142â„¢ .o {0
: |}
hes: 635-4453 It broke our hearts to lose you, but you did not go
day, MEMORY alone.
iy A part of us went with you the day God called
: : you home. N :
When time, which steals our years , M. Athalie Range
’ an God said that you were weary and did what he thought
away, shall steal Sup pisasures nbirvay ol Kova was best. y ay ji N. Patrick Range Yvonne Major
too; The memory O the past wi pi i arms Gregg L. Mason David L. Williams
stay and half our joys renew. Holy fille He put his around you and whispered, come take Serving Our Families From Three Location
A MANNER (LNERAL 67 HYAE your rest. $727 N. W. 17th Avenue
id WHEN YOU USE A MANKER FUNERAL SERVICE, YOUR We thank God for her life and will forever hold in our Miami, Florida
as a FAMILY WILL BE PRESENTED WITH A BEAUTIFUL FAMILY hearts. 691-4343
ude BIBLE WITH YOUR LOVED ONE'S NAME AND DATE OF Atlas Turner, Husband 3384 Grand Avenue 6418S. W. By gee
ices BIRTH AND DATE OF DEMISE IMPRINTED IN GOLD. ALSO Trenese Tumer, Daughter Coconut Grove, Florida Homesigad; Fo a
ies PRESENTED TO THE FAMILY IS A GOLD PLATED NAME Lorraine Puyol, Mother 446-1173 245+
PLATE. THESE MEMORIALS WILL LAST FOR YEARS. The Turner and Puyol Families

777 N.W. 85th St.; interment,
Southern Memorial Park.
JAMES SMITH, 54, 3500 N.W.
173rd Terr., died June 6 at Huma-
na Hospital Biscayne. Survivors
include wife, Marie; mother, Alice;
father, Henry; daughter, Elaine;
son, Elton; sister, Dorothy Robin-
son; brothers, Bernard and Ken-
neth. Services will be on Saturday,
1 p.m., at Mt. Calvary Missionary

Baptized and confirmed at St.
Agnes Church, he served as an
acolyte for many years. He was a
member of Miami's first Black Boy
Scout troop, serving along with
Lester Boggis and Garth Reeves.

He married Amanda Malone
April 7, 1940, and left the city two
years later when he enlisted in the
Navy for a station in California.
Upon his discharge from the Navy,
the couple made their home in

CHARLES A. WILLIAMS JR.

6:30 to 7:30 Friday evening at
Range Funeral Home.

Following the funeral service,
the body will be shipped to Califor-
nia for final rites at St. Augustine's
Episcopal Church in Oakland.

Rev. Earl Ponder and the Pilgrim

‘Rest Family would like to thank

Rev. Willie James, associate minis-
ter of St. Barnabas, Rev. Charles
Boyd, pastor of Day Spring, and
congregation, Rev. Paul Freeman
of Zion Hope and congregation,
family and friends for Installation
Services rendered for Pastor
Ponder.

Bus Ministry (provides transporta-
tion to anyone desiring to attend
Sunday School and Sunday Ser-
vices); Christian Education
Department.

Also, College Career Ministry;
Birthday Fellowship Ministry;
After School Tutorial Program;
Singles’ Ministry; Agape Food
Ministry (an outreach year-round
food ministry for the needy); Agape

Christ and they also spread the
word of God door-to-door in the
community) and the Lord's Kitch-
en II (feeds the hungry on Wednes-
day and Saturday).

Rev. Curry will be deeply missed
at Mt. Carmel and we pray that God
will continue to bless him as he
ventures into greater ministries for
God.

Paid Announcement



THE MIAMI TIMES

4

Thursday, June 13, 1991

Continued from page 3C

Usher Boards and members at
large to accompany him to Greater
Holy Cross Baptist Church Friday,
June 14, 8 p.m., for Dr. Strange's
Appreciation. Baccalaureate ser-
vices during 11 a.m. service; will
honor graduate Dionne Williams.

HB NEW SAINT MARK M.B.C.,
Rev. Silas Pinkney: Pastor's 16th
anniversary celebrations 8 p.m. as
follows: Monday, June 17, Rev.
Perkins and congregation, Valley
Grove M.B.C.; Wednesday, June
19, church program; Thursday,
June 20, Rev. Faniel and congrega-
tion, Bright Star M.B.C, Friday,
June 21, Elder Cauley and congre-
gation, True Vine Church of Jesus
Christ.

The First Annual Banquet will
be on Saturday, June 15, 7 p.m. at
Greater Holy Cross M.B. C., 1535

N.W. 93 Terr., Dr. W.L. Strange,
pastor.

HE EMMANUEL M.B.C., Rev. W.J.
Carpenter: Father's Day and Dea-
con's Day, Sunday, June 16, 3
p.m. Speaker Deacon Lawhorn.

H TEMPLE MISSIONARY BAP-
TIST CHURCH, Rev. Glenroy
Deveaux: Father's Day Program,
Men's Fellowship in charge, June
16, 11 a.m.

H ST. MARY'S W.M.C., Elder
Gladstone Hunter: Bro. Anthony
B. Stuart will be the speaker for
Father's Day June 16, 10:30 a.m.
service. Gospel choir will be
singing.

BH HOLY GHOST C.O.G.I.C.,
Bishop D.D. Arline: Former mem-
bers invited to Homecoming Ser-
vicesJune 14, 15, and 16. Services
at 8 p.m. Sunday service at 11:30
a.m. Bishop Arline will speak Sun-
day morning on the theme, “Tell
Hell I Ain't Coming.”

HB BETHEL M.B.C., Rev. C.L.
Malone: Second Annual Men's Fel-
lowship Day, Sunday, June 23, 4
p.m. Theme: “Striving to be Perfect
Men.” Speaker, Rev. Alfonso Jack-
son, St. James Baptist Church,
Coconut Grove; music by all-Male
Choir.

H ST. JAMES A.M.E., Rev. John
L. Bodison: Celebrating fathers
Sunday, June 16; 7 a.m., speaker,
Montrice Finklea; 11 a.m,, speak-

er, Dr. Leenette Pennington.

BH MT. OLIVETTE M.B.C., Rev.
Franklin Clark: Church family
will pay tribute to Class of 1991
Sunday, June 16, 11 a.m. Gradu-
ates asked to arrive by 10:45 a.m.
Sis. Terolyn Hunter, 1991 gradu-
ate of Florida A&M University, will
present the class. Program is
under the auspices of Sister Fergu-
son, Youth Directress. Special tri-
bute will also be paid to fathers.

HE MT. PLEASANT M.B.C., Rev.
James C. Wise: Sunday, June 16,
10:50 a.m., graduates will be hon-
ored. Speaker, State Rep. Daryl
Jones (District 118).

HB FIRST BAPTIST, Bunche Park,
Rev. Alexander Bostic Jr.: Fel-
lowship Breakfast Saturday, June
22, 8 a.m., sponsored by the men.
Celebration of 41st Church
anniversary starts Saturday, June
15, with Sis. Betty Ferguson,
speaker at Annual Banquet at
Florida Memorial College at 7:30
p-m. Sunday, June 16, 3 p.m., Rev.
Ralph Ross, former Minister of the
First United Baptist Church, High
Point, North Carolina, speaker.

BH UNION GROVE M.B.C., Rev.
Marvin McIntyre: Women's
Department will celebrate Mock
Women Day Sunday; services,
7:30 a.m., Sunday School, 9:30
a.m., worship, 11 a.m., with
speaker Evangelist Wilcox.

H BIBLE C.0.G. TRUE HOLI-
NESS, Bishop Rahming: Pastor's
29th anniversary, June 17-21, 8
p.m. as follows: June 17, Indepen-
dent Pentecostal, Bishop Coving-
ton; June 18, Miracle Valley, Elder
Norman McCray; June 19, Berea
M.B.C., Rev. A.J. Toles.

BH MT. CALVARY M.B.C., Rev.
Samuel Atchison: Friday, June
14, 7:30 p.m., Rev. Alex Tullis, pas-
tor, New Canaan B.C., and.congre-
gation will render services for
Women's Day. Sunday, June 16, 4
p.m., annual State Tea, with
crowning of Miss Mount Calvary.

BH MT. TABOR BAPTIST, Rev.
George E. McRae: Church will
honor graduates 10:45 a.m., Sun-
day, June 16. Ifyou wish to partici-
pate, call the church at 693-0820
and give your name to the
secretary.

BH GREATER ST. JAMES M.B.C.,

William H. Washington Sr.: Bac-
calaureate Worship Services Sun-
day, June 16, 11 a.m. Rev.
Washington will speak on “Choose
Ye This Day.”

Senior Usher Board will hold its
26th anniversary celebration Sun-
day, June 16, at 3:30 p.m. Youth
Choir will sing.

HE DAYSPRING M.B.C., Rev.
Charles R. Boyd: Mother V. Hicks
and Prayer Band, Pilgrim Rest
M.B.C., will have their anniversary
program at Dayspring Saturday,
June 15, 8 p.m. Rev. Anderson,
Ocela, Georgia, speaker. Gradua-
tion services on Sunday, 11 a.m.
Family and Friends Week June
19-21, 7:30 p.m. Deacons and
Deaconesses in charge Wednesday
night, ushers, Thursday; choirs,
Friday; closes Sunday, June 23,
with Rev. Thomas and congrega-
tion in charge.

BH SOUTH MIAMI C.O0.G.I.C.,
Elder Isaac Cohen: June 15, 9:30,
Prayer Breakfast; at 8 p.m., Sing-
Out Miami Mass Choir.

HB ST. MATTHEWS M.B.C., Rev.
Phillip Clarke Jr.: Junior Choir
meets Saturday, 11 a.m., for prac-
tice. Clarke's Special in first
sppearance Sunday morning. The
group is under Sis. Vernell Biggins;
Bro. Franklyn Williams, organist.
Bro. Warrern J. Clarke will deliver
Father's Day message. Sick and
shut-ins: James C. Moss, Charles
Moss, James Wright, Harcourd
Bullard, Cora Ferguson and Muriel
Curtis.

BH COMMUNITY PRAYER MIS-
SION Celebration of 15th anniver-
sary, Saturday, June 15, 7:30
p.m., at Dayspring Missionary
Baptist Church, Rev. Charles
Boyd, pastor. Speaker is Rev.
Anderson of Oceola, Ga.

HE NEW HOPE M.B.C., Rev. Ran-
dall E. Holts: Father's Day Prayer
Breakfast Saturday, June 15, 8
a.m., at Achiever's Hall, Usher
Board #2, sponsors. Mayor Robert
Ingram of Opa-locka, speaker.
Sunday, June 23, Youth Day; Rev.
James Bush, Antioch Baptist
Church, 11 a.m. speaker.

EH CHRIST CRUSADE FAMILY
CENTER, Pastor Juanita Min-
cey: Father's Day celebration Sun-
day, June 16, 8 a.m. Speaker, Pro-
phet Donald Bain, Prayer and
Praise. Temple.

1001 N.W. 54 St.
Suite K

Miami, Florida 33127

*Conduct Disorders

Tri-Arts Medical Bldg.

Phone: (305) 759-4271

BEHAVORIAL PROBLEMS

PARENT-CHILD BEHAVIOR CLINIC

MIAMI GARDENS PROF. CTR.
640 N.W. 183rd St.

Florida 33169

Phone: (305) 652-1081

Miami,

AFROCENTRIC BASED SERVICES
FOR THE BLACK BOY CHILD

FAMILY PROBLEMS
*Pre-marital Counseling/Step Parents

June 14, 8 p.m., for Dr. Strange’s
Appreciation. Baccalaureate ser-
vices during 11 a.m. service; will
honor graduate Dionne Williams.

HB GREATER HOLY CROSS
M.B.C., Rev. Dr. W.L. Strange Sr.:
Early worship, 7:30 a.m. The
church, with Second Canaan, Rev.
Kelly, pastor, will continue month-
ly Sunday School workshops,
Thursday, June 13, 7:30 p.m., and
each month on Thursday after the
second Sunday. Pastor's apprecia-
tion Friday, June 14, 8 pm., with
Rev. Avery Gardner and Mt. Nebo
M.B.C. Services continue every
Friday until the climax of the
appreciation on Sunday, July 21.
Pastor's banquet June 22, 7 p.m.,
at Allapattah Community Center.
Father's Day breakfast immediate-
ly after early morning worship
Sunday. All 1991 graduates asked
to be at Baccalaureate services
Sunday.

HB NEW JERUSALEM P.B.C.,
Elder K.A. Duke: Sunday School
picnic at Charles Hadley Park,
1300 N.W. 50th St., 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
At 7 p.m., Thomas Carlton Youth
Choir from Atlanta, Ga, in concert
at the church. Sunday, 8 a.m. bac-
calaureate service for graduates;
speaker, Jeanie Monroe. At 11
a.m., St. John P.B.C., Clearwater,
and Pastor A.V. Ward will close out
Youth Day activities.

“Every week
| am allowed to
cut the prices on
atleast 4 cars
so that | can
arrange for you
to ride out for a
down payment
under $1000
down. These
cars go fast.»

1987 FORD

Introducin

‘Under 4100

rom Miami Lincoln/

1987 CHEVY

BH THE WAY MINISTRIES: Mon-
day, June 17, Pastor Mortimher,
House of God M.R.F. Church;
Tuesday, June 18, Pastor L. Payne,
Church of Christ of Deliverance;
Wednesday, June 19, Pastor
James Rorie, Faith Deliverance
Cathedral, Hollywood; Thursday,
June 20, Pastor Andrew Lane, Afri-
can Universal Church of Holly-
wood; and Friday, June 21, Pastor
Evelyn Turnquist, Pilgrim New
Hope, Lake Park.

HB CHRISTIAN F.B.C.: Say No To
Drugs” program Friday, June 14.
Bring your boys and girls.

EH MACEDONIA M.B.C., Rev.
Rudolph Daniels: Baccalaureate
service Sunday, June 16, 11 a.m.
Speaker, Minister James Bush III,
Antioch of Brownsville. Theme:
“Your Dreams Are Within Your
Reach.” Pastor's eighth anniver-
‘sary observances 7:30 p.m. Family
Night, June 19; June 20, Rev.
Frank Glasford and New Life Bap-
tist Church; June 21, Rev. Douglas
Cook and Jordan Grove Baptist;
June 23, Rev. Horace Davis, Asso-
ciate Pastor, Macedonia; 11 a.m.
Rev. Raymond L. Massey; 4 p.m.,
Rev. Zachary Royal and St. Mary
Baptist Church.

4949 N.W. 7th Avenue

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Plus BIG MOMMA of

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cars traded in for
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TEMPO, 4 DR.
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CELEBRITY, 4 DR.
Air, Auto. Trans., Power Brakes-
Windows, AM/FM Stereo/
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$7995 value.

7195 Down
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TREATMENT METHODS

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$795 down, plus tax, tag. Total
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CENTURY, 4 DR.
Air, Auto. Trans. Power Brakes-
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Stereo/Cassette, Cruise Control,
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down, pls tax, tag. Total payments

Control, Tilt Wheel. A Seid
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approved credit, 7.40 with approved credit. approved credit. $
UNDER $1000 DN | UNDER $1000 DN | UNDER $1000 DN $I
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ARIES LE, 4 DR. | GRAND MARQUISLS | SKYLARK, 2DR. | BERETTA, 4 DR.
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Parent Effectiveness training $199 Mo. 253Mo. 182% Mo. ) 318" Mo
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BROWARD:



THE MIAMI TIMES

Thursday, June 13, 1991

5C

Skater Versatile On More Than Just The Ice

By HANNAH RASSU

Walt Disney’s World On Ice pro-
duction of “The Time Machine”
played at the Miami Arena recen-
tly, and when it did, Luis Lovett,
one of 46 professional skaters in
the cast, was skating right there,
along with them.

The two-hour show was about
three young ducks from “Duck
Tales” getting spirited away by a
time machine. Scrooge McDuck,
who had tried to save money with
the machine, is forced to travel the
world, past and present, with a
group of friends to find his
mephews. Among their travels,
they journeyed to exotic places
such as Egypt and India and the
deep sea, where they encountered
the Wicked Witch and the Little
Mermaid.

Originally from Hampton, Virgi-
nia, Lovett, 25 says he developed a
love for skating at age 3, when a

cousin took him to a skating rink. -

He didn't skate regularly at that
time but, by age 11, he had picked
up the sportagain. By 15, he was in
national competitions and was
already etching out a name for
himself.

At 16, he moved to New York and
went to live in Lake Placid, a small
suburban town, where he took up
modeling, but still continued with
his skating and education.

By then he wanted to drop out of
school and take up modeling full-
time, but his family — his father is
an architect, his motheris a school
supervisor and three of his uncles
are school principals — insisted
that he complete college.

Under pressure, he comprom-
ised and was sent to a finishing
school in Zurich, Switzerland for
five years. He continued with his
modeling career, jetsetted between
Italy and Paris, and finally gra-
duated as an architect.

Representing Italy with his Ita-
lian ice skating partner, Lovett had
already begun to win international
competitions, before returning to
America. When he returned home,
he wanted to change his life
around again.

“Unlike my identical twin
brother, who is also an architect, I
did not want to stay in the profes-
sion and work with my father. I felt
restricted by corporate America
because it hindered my ability to
express my creativity. I have
always been considered rebellious;
mainstream life just did not appeal
to me,” said Lovett.

Luis Lovett, lone Black skater in Walt Disney's World

On Ice.

Because of his connections in
the fashion industry, Lovett
decided to take up designing. He
opened his own clothing design
business and settled down. Until
Walt Disney's World on Ice tour
went to his home town.

“I met a lot of people that I had
known from my skating days and
decided to audition for the show.
When Jackie Cleaves, the perfor-

mance director, called and offered
me the job, I jumped at the
chance,” Lovett said.
He left his sister in charge of his
fashion business and went on tour.
“I continue to design while I'm

on the road and it's working out .

very well,” he said.

Lovett, who is the sole Black
skater in the show, says that, apart
from Bobby Beauchamp, Debbie

P

Thomas and a young French girl
who is the European Women's
Champion, there are not too many
world-class Black skaters around.
He says that there is definitely
room for more Blacks on ice and
that they stand a good chance of
succeeding.

“Skating is a wonderful sport. I
would like to see more people from
our community take it up. As a
pastime, it's something that the
children could do to keep off the
streets. It's not expensive to begin
with, but those who wish to take up
the profession will need to pay for
coaches to give them private les-
sons, travel expenses and sturdy

3619 N.W. 1

boots to enable them to compete,” kK"
he said. #44)
A new Disney production will RZ

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African-American Leaders Applaud Their Union's

Actions To Uphold Employee Rights

s African-American leaders of the United Feachers of Dade (UTD), we applaud the
actions of our union to protect the rights of its members at Campbell Drive Middle
school through the filing of an Unfair Labor Practice Charge (ULP).

Efforts to characterize UTD’s motives as racist are absurd. The United Teachers of Dade
has been a consistent leader in all aspects of civil and human rights. As members of
UTD, we are personally offended at any accusations of racism.

The issues at Campbell Drive Middle clearly focus around contractual rights of union
members and the individuals who represent them. We support the United Teachers of
Dade and urge our brothers and sisters in our community to join with us in
understanding the real issues at hand.

REGINA YOUNG,
Leisure City Elementary
LOUISE SMITH,
Florida City Elementary
PARRIS BATTLE,
Horace Mann Middle
MARY HORTON,
Richmond Heights Middle
ANNIEBELL MCINTOSH,
Dupuis Elementary
ODESSA ROLLE,
North Twin Lakes Elementary
PERCY TURNER,
Bunche Park Elementary
GERALDINE TISDOL,
Lakeview Elementary
JOHN BULLARD, 1V,
North County Elementary
LUCILLE HERNDON,

Caribbean Elementary -
ROBERTA FOSTER,
Caribbean Elementary
DORIS C. MARTIN,
Caribbean Elementary
GWENDOLYN WASHINGTON,
Caribbean Elementary
PETER HILL,
Caribbean Elementary
JOAN HARDY,
Caribbean Elementary
ESTHER REDDING,
Caribbean Elementary
BARBARA HARRIS,
Kensington Park Elementary
SHIRLEY JOHNSON,
United Teachers of Dade

SANDRA ANDREWS,
Comstock Elementary
PERRY LEE,
Miami Edison Middle
L.D. KENNEDY,
Highland Oaks Middle
EVELYN SERGEANT,
Brownsville Middle
FRANCES KEARSE,
COPE Center-North

ANNETTE BRANTLEY,
Citrus Grove Elementary
HENRIETTA JONES,
Miami Shores Elementary
JOHN MCARTHUR,
UTD Member
WILLETTE CRUSE,
Edison Park Elementary
BENJAMIN BROWN,
Kinloch Park Elementary

HERBERT HUGHES,
Miami Springs Middle
JOANNE MINNIS-FELDER,
Palm Springs Elementary
FRANCINE SCURRY,
Lillie C. Evans Elementary
BARBARA NICKERSON,
Richmond Heights Middle
THEILMA HOLMES,
Martin Luther King Elementary

In mid-June, the Public Employees Relations Commission (PERC) w
hearings on the ULP where testimony will be presented by the union
PERC is the governing state agency for public employees in Florida.

ill conduct
1 and management.

Since this is not a lawsuit, but a labor/management dispute, the PERC Hearing Officer

will issue recommendations within 30 working days after the hearing to both the

School Board of Dade County and the United Teachers of Dade.

We have fought too long to uphold employee rights in education to
of racism to be used to cloud the real facts.

United to keep our union strong:

BYRON WHITE,
Carol City Middle
BEN ADDISON,
Jose Marti Middle
NORMAN SANK,
Parkway Middle
BERTHA JONES,
Douglass Elementary
JANICE CRUSE,
Melrose Elementary

JOYCE COOK,

North Miami Middle
CLARE BROWN,
Biscayne Gardens Elementary
CARY ROLLE,

W.J. Bryan Elementary
CHRISTINE ALLEN,
Gratigny Elementary
JIM SCONIERS,
Miami Central Senior

allow false charges

YVONNE BROWN,
Bunche Park Elementary
VIAYMIE BAKER,
North Glade Elementary
KEITH PORTER,

R.R. Moton Elementary
CATHY SMITH,
Booker T. Washington Middle
SHIRLEE CUNNINGHAM -
CASSEUS,

WYLENE YOUNG,
Meadowlane Elementary
ELIZABETH WILSON,
Bay Harbor Elementary

JUDY BROWN,

H.H. Filer Middle
TERRY WIGGINS,
Hialeah Senior
NATHALEE POLLER,
Ben Franklin Elementary
YOLANDA DAVIS,
Joella Good Elementary
CAROLYN BETHEA,
Golden Glades Elementary
JERRILEE HARRIS,
Highland Oaks Middle
GLORIA COATS,
Miami Gardens Elementary
PATRICIA ANDERSON,
Miami Gardens Elementary
LOIS STIRLING,
Miami Gardens Elementary
VILLETTA HOWARD,

Biscayne Gardens Elementary

VERNON KEARNS,
Mae Walters Elementary

JANNET DENNARD,
Bay Harbor Elementary
WANDA HEWITT,
Howard Drive Elementary
TAMME WILLIAMS,
R.R. Moten Elementary
JEAN PEARSON,
West Miami Middle
TINYE FELTON,
Coral Terrace Elementary
ROSSIE JOHNSON,
Fairchild Elementary
JOHNNY ROUNDTREE,
Joe Hall Elementary
MARY NORRIS,
Tropical'Elementary
TERESA BETHEL,

Kensington Park Elementary

MARSHA SIMON,
Miramar Elementary
HENRY BAKER,
Meadowlane Elementary
SONIA MCCLOUD,
Bunche Park Elementary
EDNA THOMPKINS,
North Glade Elementary

SAMUEL TRICE,
Allapattah Elementary
ARLETTA YOUNG,
Dorsey Skill Center
BRENDA WALLACE,
Horace Mann Middle
JOHNNIE POOL,
Brownsville Middle
FRED BENDER,
North Miami Elementary
LARRY E. SOUTER, SR.,
United Teachers of Dade
LEOLA ADAMS,
Mae Walters Elementary
ISAAC MOBLEY,
Naranja Elementary
AARON BETHEL,
Arcola Lake Elementary
MICHAEL JONES,
United Teachers of Dade
ARTIE SINKFIELD,
Brownsville Middle
GEORGE BOOKER,
Thomas Jefferson Middle
CHERYL LOPEZ,
Madison Middle

MOZELLE ROBERTS,
Westview Elementary
THELMA MCKNIGHT,
Springview Elementary
RUDINE OLIVER,
Sweetwater Elementary
REGINALD SANDILANDS,
Van E. Blanton Elementary
CHEQUETA TRAYLOR,
United Teachers of Dade
MILDRED MOORER,
Broadmoor Elementary
JEANETTE TULLIS,
Norland Elementary
DONELLA MCINTEE,
Miami Northwestern Senior
KAREN GANT,

Lillie C. Evans Elementary
LOSSIE JORDAN,
Fulford Elementary
DOROTHY HUNIGAN,
\rvida Middle
LILLIAN TAYLOR,
Blue Lakes Elementary
MARGARET BROWN,
Colonial Drive Elementary

ROBERT GRIMES,
Booker T. Washington Middle
HENRY MOTT,
Parkway Middle
LOIS DENNIS,
Kenwood Elementary
TONYA DAWSON,
United Teachers of Dade
BERTHA ROSS,
Parkview Elementary
VALDA MCKINNEY,
Charles Hadley Elementary
FRED WALLACE,
United Teachers of Dade
ANDRE THOMPSON,
Kensington Park Elementary
JUANITA COLE,
Miami Northwestern Senior
MARY PINKNEY,
Miami Northwestern Senior
SHARON ANDERSON,
\rcola Lake Elementary
JUDGE ALEXANDER,
Scott Lake Elementary
BARBARA WALLS,
Silver Bluff Elementary

Twin Lakes Elementary
JUANITA STAFFORD,
Norland Middle
DELTHIA LITTLEJOHN,
Coral Gables Elementary
GENEVA LEWIS,
Liberty City Elementary
PAT FULLWOOD,
United Teachers of Dade
CHARLIE ANDERSON,
Ponce de Leon Middle
ANDREA GRAVES,
Shadowlawn Elementary
SANDRY BOWERS,
North Miami Middle
CLINTON LACEY,
Nathan Young Elementary
AGNES CRANE,
Santa Clara Elementary
ANTHONY DAVIS,
Shenandoah Elementary
SCHANDRA GERDES,
Highland Oaks Middle
\LICIA BROWN,
Horace Mann Middle

(Due to deadline time constraints. this listing is incomplete.) Paid for by the United Teachers of Dade at the request of the union leaders whose names appear in this advertisement.



6 THE MIAMI TIMES

Thursday, June 13, 1991

POPA In Benefit Concert

P.O.P.A. will perform in an
Anniversary Concert to benefit
Youth for Christ and Children’s
Home Society.

Kevin J. Rutledge (Founder/
Director) and the Power of Praise
Assemblage Choir (P.O.P.A.) invite
the community to attend their
upcoming 4th Anniversary
Concert.

The concert will be held on June
22, 1991, 6 p.m., at the Greater
New Bethel Missionary Baptist
Church, 17025 N.W. 22nd Ave.,
where Rev. G. David Horton is
president.

P.O.P.A.'s concerts benefit some
charitable cause or organization.

In the past, P.O.P.A. has given
financial donations to the following
organizations: Miami Herald Wish
Book, American Cancer Society,
Dade-Broward Lupus Foundation
of Florida Inc., Dade County Sickle
Anemia Foundation, AIDS Health
Crisis Network, Dade Partners for
Youth, Recording for the Blind
Inc., The Hospice Foundation, The

JOHNNIECE WILLIAMS

Johnniece Williams
Gets Guy Award

Congratulations to Johnniece
Williams ior receiving an outstand-
ing Jasmine Guy award at the
talent show this year at the Ara-
bian Nights Festival in Opa-locka.

Also, Johnniece received a
standing ovation at the Gospel Fest
which was held last year, when she
was the winner.

Johnniece will be performing
Saturday at 6 o'clock at Home-
stead Air Force Base, West Gate.

Her mother is Deniece Thomp-
son; Elizabeth Thompson is her
grandmother.

Bus Trip To
Marion Prison

Wake-Up Inc., a non-profit vol-
unteer organization, is sponsoring
abus trip to Marion prison on June
15, .

A donation will be required in
accordance with the length of the
trip and ability to pay.

For further information, call
Mrs. Lessie Mae Jackson, presi-
dent, at 696-1219 or Mr. Hepburn,
638-1738.

METRO-DADE

OFFICE OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

PUBLIC NOTICE

The Board of County
Commissioners of Metropolitan Dade
County approved Dade County's
Fiscal Year 1991 Community
Development Block Grant (CDBG)
Program Final Statement of
Objectives and Projected Use of
Funds, as well as its Fiscal Year
1991 CDBG Plan on April 16, 1991.

These documents are now
available for public review at the
Miami-Dade Public Library's Main
Library and Regional Libraries. They
are also available at the Metro-Dade
Office of Community Development,
which is located at 140 West Flagler
Street, Suite 1000.

For more information, contact Les

Green at 375-3448.

OFFICE OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

METRO-DADE

The Metro-Dade Office of
Community Development is holding
Public Meetings in Target Areas this
month with Neighborhood Advisory
Committees. The following meetings
have been scheduled and are open
to the public:

Model City
7:30 p.m., Wednesday, June 26
Joseph Caleb Center, Room 110
5400 N.W. 22nd Avenue

Leisure City
6 p.m., Wednesday, June 26
Biscayne Plaza Auditorium
15201 S.W. 288th Street

Opa-locka
6 p.m., Thursday, June 27
Crime Prevention Program Office
777 Sharazad Blvd., Bldg. "B"

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

375-3418
I —————————————

Business Computer
Electronics

Air Condition, Refrigeration
Auto Mechanic

Job Training

Call Today

573-1600

Rachel or Cassius

and College Scholarship Gifts, Sar-
ah Allen House for the Homeless,
Glory to God Drug Abuse Program.

This year, the gift recipients will
be the Youth for Christ organiza-
tion and the Children's Home Soci-
ety. The concert promises to be a
soul-stirring worship service.
Please make plans to attend this
glorious event.

Ticket prices are $10 in advance

and $12 at the door. Tickets may be

purchased from any P.O.P.A.
member. For further information,
call Patricia White, Chairperson
(624-0735), or Beverely Wilcox,
President (625-9872).

Bible Crusade
Draws To Close

Amazing Facts Bible Crusade
ends on high note.

The Amazing Facts Bible Cru-
sade is into its last week of teach-

Law Office of Ron Cordon
422 N.W. 54th St., Miami, Florida 33127
Telephone: 759-2446 Fax: 759-6190

Ron Cordon
Attorney At Law

Immigration e Bankruptcy e Real Estate
Divorce e Personal Injury e Firearm Licensing

Father's Day
Special

Ready For A Stacy? a

$5.00 OFF Any Shoe withis coupon
Plus FREE socks

Shoes Gallery Inc.

Phone 371-2063 240 N.E. 1st Avenue

/ Across from M.D.C.C
Mon - Sat 9-5pm/Sun 11-1pm Parking Lot

Expiration Date 6-19-91 All Major Credit Cards
Downtown’s Authorized Dealer For Stacy Adams

ing, worship and praise, on the cor-
ner of Northwest 54th Street and

12th Avenue. :

Services will be held on Friday,
June 14, starting at 7:30 p.m., and
will continue on Saturday, June
15, beginning at 9:15 a.m. and
ending with Baptism.

The Amazing Facts Crusade will
climax with a Praise Concert on
Saturday night at 7:30 o'clock.

The entire community is invited
to participate in the final nights of
The Amazing Facts Bible Crusade
with teacher M.M. Young, assisted
by Herman L. Davis Sr.

Free Bible studies outlining

NORTH'S BEST MEAT
12918 NW 7 AVE PEMBROKE PARK
681-0246 989-2744

Monday — Saturday 8 a.m til 8 p.m.

Closed on Sunday
WE CASH PAYROLL CHECKS

4051 SW 40 AVE

many of the topics covered
throughout the crusade will be
available to all for home study.

PORK BABY FISCHER BRAND

SPARE RIBS... 3 112 Down 30 LB. Box$43.95

Bus Service Fresh Pork Neckbones ..... 20 tbs box 7.50

The C.C. Smith Bus Service will
be taking bus trips to the following

PORK RIBLETS 10 bs $8.95

prisons: Raiford, Starke, Lake But-
ler, etc.
Ride in air-conditiohed and rest-

CHICKEN LEGS QTRS........ a0 18. Box 12.95

room comfort. Call about their FRESH

Saturday snd Sunday visit spe- | CHICKEN LEG QRS... 10 Les. $2.90
Pick-up stops are 12th Avenue

and 13th Street (n front of the CHICKEN WINGS udAseusavses siiesnsias 40 LB. BOX $24.95

Court House), Ft. Lauderdale,

Pompano Service Plaza and West PORK CHITTERLINGS senbinurymaeeivisieins 10 LBS. $2.99

Palm Beach Service Plaza.

Call Mr. Smith at 983-6428 or THIS SPECIAL WITH THIS AD ONLY. PRICES EFFECTIVE 06/13/91 - 06/19/91

983-1648 for more information.

Let Your Child

DANCE THIS SUMMER!

at the

Edwin Holland School of Dance
SATURDAY, JULY 6th — AUGUST 10, 1991

DANCE CLASSES FOR
BOYS && GIRLS AGES 3 & UP

Call between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. for price info or leave message
with our answering service and we will get in contact with you.

13631 N.W. 7th Avenue, North Miami, Florida 331 68
REGISTER NOW

685-0037

FINANCIAL PROBLEMS?

ATTORNEYS AT LAW DUNN & COREY

«Credit Cards, Judgments,
Medical Bills Over Your Head?

eLosing Your Home To

Foreclosure?
eBusiness Having Cash
Flow Problems?
—Chapter 7
Personal Bankruptcy
—Chapter 13
Individual Debt Adjustment
—Chapter 11
Business Reorganization

CALL FOR FREE CONSULTATION throughout Dade

557-1 750 Payment Plans

We also handle personal injury, divorce & criminal

EVENING- Locations

WEEKEND APPTS.

YNIVERSITY OFy :

141111

A GLOBAL UNIVERSITY
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

ADVISOR (ACADEMIC)/School of Business
Administration

Responsible for the academic advising and development of low
achieving students taking developmental and regular college
courses; develop and implement strategies with students to
improve their academic performance; use diagnostic
instruments to ascertain causes of learning disabilities and
prescribe courses of action to achieve satisfactory learning.
Excellent communication skills and a strong desire to be a
positive force in the development of poorly performing traditional
college age students a must. Qualifications include a Bachelor's
degree with at least four years of teaching or academic counseing
experience at the secondary or higher level (graduate degree in
Education may be substituted for two year's experience).
Position available after August 1. Respond with cover letter and
resume (no phone calls please) to: William T. McElrath, Assistant
Dean, School of Business Administration, University of Miami,
P.O. Box 248131, Coral Gables, FL 33124-2010.
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR I (ANNUAL GIVING)/Development
Seeking Assistant Director of Annual Giving to manage all
aspects of UM's Fall/Spring telephone campaigns, including
planning budgeting, staffing implementation and program
evaluation. Other responsibilities include coordination ofannual
giving direct mail, reunion gift mailing, department brochures
and alumni gift recognition. Bachelor's degree required with a
minimum of three years related experience. Knowledge of direct
marketing techniques, training, information systems, and
accounting principles. Must be a self-starter willing to work some
evenings. Send resume and letter of application to: Elinor A.
Arrabal, P.O. Box 8002, Coral Gables, FL 33124-1210.
MANAGER II/Orthopaedics & Rehabilitation

A position is available for a Manager in the Sports Medicine
Division of the Department of Orthopaedics & Rehabilitation.
Applicants must have a bachelor’s degree in business manage-
ment, accounting or health administration. Required, three
years managerial and administrative experience in the health
care related field, preferably in a high volume outpatient clinic
setting. Technically competent in accounting and budgeting and
personal computer. English skills (written/verbal) required.
Compensation includes an excellent fringe benefits package,
including dependent tuition remission. Send resume to: Thomas
S. Roberts, Department of Orthopaedics & Rehabilitation (D-27),
University of Miami School of Medicine, P.O. Box 016960, Miami,
FL 33101.

AUDITOR (STAFF)/Internal Audit

The University of Miami is seeking one qualified individual to filla
permanent full-time, entry-level staff audit position. This
individual should have a Bachelor's degree in accounting, 1-2
years public accounting/internal auditing experience and good
written and verbal communication skills. Salary: $28,500.

Excellent benefits including health, dental, 22 vacation days,

and tuition remission for self and dependents. To apply, send
resume to: University of Miami, Inernal Audit Department, P.O.
Box 248106, Coral Gables, FL 33124-1436.
COORDINATOR I/(ASSISTANT RECRUITING)/Athletics
The University of Miami invites applications for the position of
Assistant Recruiting Coordinator I for its Division I athletic
program. This individual will assist in the coordination of
recruiting student-athletes to the University. Qualifications:
Bachelor's degree required. Knowledge of Paciolan computer
system's recruiting package. Demonstrated knowledge of NCAA
rules. Must be able to evaluate athletic ability of prospective
student-athletes by viewing game films. One year experience in
athletic related field. Salary commensurate with experience and
qualifications. Applications deadline: June 21, 1991. Send letter
of application and resume to: David Scott, Asst. Athletic Director,
University of Miami, #1 Hurricane Drive, CoralGables, FL
33146-0820.
MANAGER II/Surgery
Bachelor's degree in Business, Health Administration or related
field. Three years experience in management/administration.
Experience in Dental and/or Health Care management including
Medicaid, Medicare, and other 3rd party reimbursement
programs preferred. Knowledge of database management sys-
tems, personal computer spreadsheet, and database applica-
tions. English skills (written/verbal) required. Salary: Negoti-
able. Contact: Eva Calderon, (305) 547-6486, Department of
Surgery (R-310), P.O. Box 016310, Miami, FL 33101.
PROGRAM SPECIALIST III (PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT) Neuro-
ogy
We are seeking an individual who can assist the attending
physician on the Neuro-rehab Service in patient care, and
research activities. The qualified candidate must be able to
participate and assist in research projects to include data
collection, analysis, publication and in house quality assurance
issues. To qualify for this position, individual will need the
following: Bachelor's degree in Health Sciences or related field,
Physician's Assistant with a minimum of four years experience in
a clinical setting including biomedical research and two years in
the Neurosciences. Florida license is required. Please send your
resume to: University of Miami, Dr. Kester Need, 1611 N.W. 12
Ave., Rehab. Bldg., Room 232, Miami, FL 33136.
NURSE II/Comprehensive AIDS Program
The University of Miami AIDS Clinical Research Unit is seeking
motivated, enthusiastic nurse to work in state of the art research
outpatient facility. Critical care, E.R., &/or HIV disease experi-
ence a plus. No weekends or shifts. Interested in joining the front
line? Apply in person at the Human Resources Department,
University of Miami Medical Campus, 901 N.W. 17th Street,
Miami, FL 33136.
PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT/NURSE PRACTITIONER/Com-
prehensive AIDS Program
Seeking physician assistant/nurse practitioner for nationally
leading AIDS care and treatment center to function as a member
of the special immunology team. Excellent opportunity to gain
advanced knowledge and expertise in AIDS care and treatment
and research. Florida P.A./A.R.N.P. licensure required. No
weekends, holidays, or shifts. Apply in person at the Human
Resources Department, University of Miami Medical Campus
901 N.W. 17 Street, Miami, FL 33138. :
EXCELLENT BENEFITS INCLUDING 100% TUITION REMISSION
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER
DRUG FREE WORKPLACE

Bi oA ho aca Wh kc Cin

1

17



rd

THE MIAMI TIMES
% Thursday, June 13, 1991 7C

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

n sanitary sewage system using 8-18" sewer
pipe and 6" laterals together with all necessary appurtenan
Street between NW 27-38 Avenues. ; oa nw 55

All interested persons affected by this improvement are invited to appear and may

be heard concerning this item. Should an

. ly person desire to a any decision of
the City Commission with respect to any matter meals A
person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all
testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based.

(8396)
Matty Hirai

City Clerk
Miami, Florida

NOTICE COVERING OPENING OF BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by The School Board of Dade County,
Florida, for the projects listed herein until 2:00 P.M. local time,
Tuesday, the 2nd day of July, 1991, Room 352, 1450 N.E. Second
Avenue, Miami, Florida, following which time and place, or as
soon thereinafter as the Board can attend to same, the said bids
will be publicly opened and read and tabulated in the Board
Auditorium, Dade County School Board Administrative Buil-
ding, by an authorized representative of the Board. The Board
will thereafter make the award of the contract, based upon the
result of the tabulations on the basis of the combined base bids
for both phases of the project as covered by applicable laws and
regulations.
Project No. C-0550
Reroofing
Highland Oaks Middle School
2375 NE 203 Street
Miami, FL 33180
A Pre-Bid Conference has been scheduled for Tuesday, June 18,
1991 at 10:00 A.M. at Harper Carreno Mateu, Inc. 4217 Ponce de
Leon Blvd., Coral Gables, FL 33146.
Prime Contractors and Subcontractors may obtain one or two
sets of bids and contract documents from the office of HARPER
CARRENO MATEU, INC., 4217 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral
Gables, FL 33146, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (305) 441-0888 on
and after June 10, 1991 with deposit of $50.00 per set, (Cashier's
Check or Company Check, Payable to The School Board of Dade
County, Florida). Deposit will be refunded when documents are
returned, in good condition, no more than 10 days after award or
rejection of bid. Deposits will be retained by the School Board of
Dade County, Florida, if documents are not returned within the
above stipulated time and/or condition.
The Board reserves the right to waive informalities and to reject
any and all bids.
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: Octavio J. Visiedo
Superintendent of Schools

CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami, Florida on
June 20, 1991 at 11:10 a.m. in the City Commission Chambers at City Hall, 3500
Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida to expand the Flagler/Core Special Assessment
Distiet for Security north to N.E./N.W. 3rd Street and south to the Miami
ver.
Allinterested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning this item.
Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with
respect to any matter considered at this hearing, that person shall ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all testimony and evidence
upon which any appeal may be based. :

(8396)

Matty Hirai
City Clerk
Miami, Florida

LEGAL ANNOUNCEMENT OF BIDS
METROPOLITAN DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Metropolitan Dade County, Florida is announcing the availabil-
ity of the following bids which can be obtined through the Dade
County G.S.A. Procurement Management Division, 111 N.W. 1st
Street, Suite 2350, Miami, Florida 33128-1989, (305) 375-5289.
Bid Proposals from prospective vendors must be received in the
Clerk of the Board Office located at 111 N.W. 1st Street, Suite 210
by no later than 1:00 p.m. on the Bid Opening Date in order to be

considered.

The following Bids will be opened at 1:00 p.m. on Wednesday,
July 3, 1991:

Bid # 0374-500 Butterfly Valve, One (1) 96 Inch

‘A Bid Deposit & Performance Bond are required

Bid # 0375-500 Valves, Pressure/Vacuum Relief
Bid # 1145-10/92-OTR Poles, Concrete Prestressed
Bid # 1528-8/92-CW Building Materials, Reinforcing Steel, Road
Mesh and Related Accessories
Bid # 1557-7/92-OTR Graphic Arts, Plate Materials, Printing
and Typesetting Supplies
Bid # 3165-9/92-OTR
Food Bag, Casings
The following Bids will be opened at 1:00 p.m. on Wednesday,
July 17, 1991:
Bid # 3166-7/92-OTR Refuse Packer Garbage Trucks
An Affirmative Action Plan is required.
Attendance at a Pre-Bid Conference is mandatory on Tuesday,
June 18, 1991 at 10:00 AM at the Metro Dade Center, GSA/
Procurement, 23rd Fl., Conference Rm.
Hal A. Johnson, Director
GSA Procurement Management

PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT

THE PUBLIC HEALTH TRUST OF DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA IS
SEEKING INDICATION OF INTEREST FORM PROFESSIONAL
FIRMS OR INDIVIDUALS TO PROVIDE CONSULTING SER-
VICES FOR STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING DESIGN AND
STRUCTURAL STUDIES OF MISCELLANEOUS PROJECTS
THROUGHOUT THE CAMPUS.

ALL DRAWINGS FOR THIS PRFOJECT WILL BE GENERATED
ON CADD.

INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT BROCHURES AND
SUPPLEMENTAL DATA, INCLUDING U.S. GOVERNMENT
ARCHITECTURE /ENGINEERING QUESTIONNAIRE FORM NO.
254, AFFIRMATIVE ACTION DATA INFORMATION AND LIST OF
COMPLETED PROJECTS IN THE LAST FIVE (5) YEARS.
THE SELECTION PROCEDURE WILL BE IN ACCORDANCE
WITH THE CONSULTANT'S COMPETITIVE NEGOTIATION ACT,
FLORIDA STATUTE, 287.055. RESPONSES MUST BE POST
MARKED OR HAND DELIVERED NO LATER THAN JUNE 24,
1991. RESPONSES SHOULD BE FORWARDED TO:

JACKSON MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
1611 N.W. 12TH AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33136

ATTN: ROLANDO GONZALEZ
ADMINISTRATOR
FACILITIES PLANNING & PROGRAMMING
PARK PLAZA WEST L—210

NOTICE COVERING OPENING OF BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by The School Board of Dade County,
Florida, for the projects listed herein until 2:00 P.M. local time,
Tuesday, the 2nd day of July, 1991, Room 352, 1450 N.E. Second
Avenue, Miami, Florida, following which time and place, or as
soon thereinafter as the Board can attend to same, the said bids
will be publicly opened and read and tabulated in the Board
Auditorium, Dade County School Board Administrative Buil-
ding, by an authorized representative of the Board. The Board
will thereafter make the award of the contract, based upon the
result of the tabulations on the basis of the combined base bids
for both phases of the project as covered by applicable laws and
regulations.
Project No. I-0031
Roof Repair/Replacement
Miami MacArthur South
11035 SW 84 Street
Miami, FL 33173
A Pre-Bid Conference has been scheduled for Thursday, June 27,
1991 at 9:00 A.M. at the School Site, Mia. MacArthur South,
11035 SW 84 Street, Miami, FL 33173.
PRE-BID CONFERENCE ATTENDANCE BY THE BIDDER OR
HIS QUALIFIED REPRESENTATIVE IS A MANDATORY PRE-
REQUISITE FOR THE ACCEPTANCE OF A BID FROM THE
CONTRACTOR.
Prime Contractors and Subcontractors may obtain one or two
sets of bids and contract documents from the office of
WOLFBERG/ ALVAREZ & ASSOCIATES, 5960 SW 57 Avenue,
Miami, FL 33143 (305) 666-5474 on and after June 10, 1991 with
deposit of $50.00 per set, (Cashier's Check or Company Check,
Payable to The School Board of Dade County, Florida). Deposit
will be refunded when documents are returned, in good
condition, no more than 10 days after award or rejection of bid.
Deposits will be retained by the School Board of Dade County,
Florida, if documents are not returned within the above
stipulated time and/or condition.
The Board reserves the right to waive informalities and to reject
any and all bids.
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: Octavio J. Visiedo
Superintendent of Schools

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The City of Miami will conduct a public hearing to discuss the
proposed amendment to the City's 17th Year Final Statement of
Community Development Objectives and Projected Use of
Funds. :
The proposed amendment to the City’s 17th Year Community
Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program involves the creation
of a Community Development (CD) Float loan which will enable
the City to utilize $5,000,000 of committed but unexpended
CDBG funds for a short term interim loan to N.B. Realty, a Florida
General Partnership comprised of N.B. Motors, Inc., and Braman
Cadillac, Inc., at an interest rate of three (3%) percent per year for
a period of two (2) years with funds being guaranteed by an
irrevocable letter of credit from a bank. The irrevocable letter of
credit would contain a forty-eight (48) hour call provision that
would permit the City to draw down the fullamount of the letter of
credit. There will not be any risk to the City funds, or to existing
projects being funded by the City.
This amendment will also increase program income by
$5,000,000 plus interest thereby not affecting any previously
allocated Community Development project.
CITY COMMISSION PUBLIC HEARING
DATE: Thursday, July 11, 1991
TIME: 11:10 A.M.
PLACE: City of Miami — City Hall
City Commission Chambers
3500 Pan American Drive
Allinterested persons will be given an opportunity to comment on
the proposed C.D. Float.
Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City
Commission with respect to any matter considered at the July
11, 1991, hearing before the City Commission, that person
should assure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made,
including all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may
be based.

I. PUBLIC NOTICE

The CITY OF MIAMI (“City”) is offering to sell a parcel of City
owned land of approximately 22,368 square feet, with a two
story, 7,767 square foot concrete block building. The property is
located at 7561 Northeast First Avenue, Miami, Florida, and is
presently zoned R-3, or City of Miami multiple family residential.
An independent appraisal of the property has been completed,
which has established the market value to be $240,000. The
current value of tenant improvements to the property is
$206,625. The property has been occupied since 1986 by the
Hope Pre-School which is currently on a month-to-month
tenancy. !
Invitation to Bid Documents may be obtained from the Property
and Lease Management Division, Department of Development,
Dupont Plaza Center, 300 Biscayne Blvd. Way, Miami, Florida
33131. Each Bidder will be required to submit a good-faith
deposit of $5,000. Non-successful bidders (“non-successful
bidder," for purpose of this Invitation to Bid, shall mean a bidder
who is not selected by the City for award of the agreement) will
have his deposit refunded in full. However, a bidder who
withdraws his bid for any cause whatsoever, at any time after
submission, forfeits his good-faith deposit to the City of Miami as
liquidated damages and not as a penalty and waives all claims
against such deposit. The $5,000 deposit submitted by the
Successful Bidder will be credited towards the purchase price
after payment of the City’s cost of conducting this
competiton.
Prospective bidders are alerted to the provisions of Ordinance No.
10538, Minority/Women Business Affairs & Procurement
Ordinance, and to Ordinance No. 10032, which implements the
First Source Hiring Agreement.”
Questions pertaining to this Invitation to Bid should be directed
to: Albert J. Armada, Property and Lease Manager, Property and
Lease Management Division of the Department of Development,
at the above noted address or by telephone: (305)
372-4640.
In response to the Invitation to Bid, bid documents must be
submitted to, and will be received by, the City Clerk of the City of
Miami, Florida at 10:00 a.m. on the 16th day of September, 1991,
at the City Clerk's Office, First Floor, Miami City Hall, 3500 Pan
American Drive, Dinner Key, Miami, Florida, 33133, at which
time and place they will be publicly opened and read. Late bids
and/or bids submitted to any other location will not be
accepted.
The City of Miami reserves the right to accept any bid deemed to
be in the best interest of the City, to waive any irregularities in any
bid, to reject any or all bids and/or to readvertise for bids.

Cesar H. Odio

City Manager

. Ad. No. 0654

NOTICE COVERING OPENING OF BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by The School Board of Dade County,
Florida, for the projects listed herein until 2:00 P.M. local time,
Tuesday, the 9th day of July, 1991, Room 352, 1450 N.E. Second
Avenue, Miami, Florida, following which time and place, or as
soon thereinafter as the Board can attend to same, the said bids
will be publicly opened and read and tabulated in the Board
Auditorium, Dade County School Board Administrative Build-
ing, by an authorized representative of the Board. The Board will
thereafter make the award of the contract, based upon the result
of the tabulations on the basis of the combined base bids for both
phases of the project as covered by applicable laws and
regulations.

Project No. A-0298

Renovations and Repairs
Silver Bluff Elementary School
2600 SW 25 Avenue
Miami, FL 33133
A Pre-Bid Conference has been scheduled for Wednesday, June
19, 1991 at 9:00 A.M. at DCPS, Omni Plaza Bldg., 35 NE 17
Street, Conference Room 218, Miami, FL 33132.
PRE-BID CONFERENCE ATTENDANCE BY THE BIDDER OR
HIS QUALIFIED REPRESENTATIVE IS A MANDATORY PRE-
REQUISITE FOR THE ACCEPTANCE OF A BID FROM THE
CONTRACTOR.
TWO-PART BID SUBMITTAL - 2nd Envelope due Thursday, July
11, 1991 until 2:00 P.M. local time.
The General Contractor shall make every good faith effort to
comply with M/WBE Subcontracting Goals as follows: 11.0%
Black, 7.0% Hispanic, 15.0% Women, 1.0% Other.
Prime Contractors and Subcontractors may obtain one or two
sets of bids and contract documents from the office of W.C.
MURPHY ARCHITECTS, P.A., 9655 So. Dixie Hwy., Ste. 311,
Miami, FL 33156 (305) 665-1840 on and afterJune 10, 1991 with
deposit of $50.00 per set, (Cashier's Check or Company Check,
Payable to The School Board of Dade County, Florida). Deposit
will be refunded when documents are returned, in good
condition, no more than 10 days after award or rejection of bid.
Deposits will be retained by the School Board of Dade County,
Florida, if documents are not returned within the above
stipulated time and/or condition.
The Board reserves the right to waive informalities and to reject
any and all bids.
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: Octavio J. Visiedo
Superintendent of Schools

NOTICE COVERING
OPENING OF BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by The School Board of Dade County,
Florida, for the projects listed herein until 2:00 P.M. local time,
Tuesday, the 25th day of June, 1991, Room 352, 1450 N.E.
Second Avenue, Miami, Florida, following which time and place,
or as soon thereinafter as the Board can attend to same, the said
bids will be publicly opened and read and tabulated in the Board
Auditorium, Dade County School Board Administrative Buil-
ding, by an authorized representative of the Board. The Board
will thereafter make the award of the contract, based upon the
result of the tabulations on the basis of the combined base bids
for both phases of the project as covered by applicable laws and
regulations.

ASBESTOS REMOVAL

ASB-07-91
AND
PROJECT NO. 1-0017
REROOFING
MYRTLE GROVE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
PRE-BID WALK THROUGH AND PRE-BID CONFERENCE
ATTENDANCE BY THE BIDDER OR HIS QUALIFIED REP-
RESENTATIVE IS A MANDATORY PRE-REQUISITE FOR THE
ACCEPTANCE OF A BID FROM THE CONTRACTOR.
THE PRE-BID CONFERENCE AND WALKTHROUGH IS SCHE-
DULED FOR JUNE 18, 1991 AT 2:00 P.M. AT THE SCHOOL
SITE, MYRTLE GROVE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, 3125 N.W. 176
STREET, MIAMI, FLORIDA, 33055.
Prime Bidders may obtain one or two sets of the asbestos
abatement /re-roofing bid, and contract documents from: THE
DEPARTMENT OF ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT, 35 NE 17
STREET, ROOM 120, MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132 (305) 995-4595
on and after June 11, 1991 without deposit, on condition that
said documents be returned in good condition and within 10
days after award or rejection of bids and if not so returned the
bidder shall pay to The School Board of Dade County, Florida, the
dollar value of said documents prior to obtaining bid and contract
documents for other projects.
All questions concerning the asbestos abatement portion of the
project should be directed to the Dade County Public Schools
Department of Asbestos Management at (305) 995-4595. All
questions concerning the re-roofing portion of the project should
be directed to Wolfberg, Alvarez, and Associates at (305)
666-5474.
The Board reserves the right to waive informalities and to reject
any and all bids.
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: Octavio J. Visiedo
Superintendent of Schools

LEGAL ADVERTISEMENT COVERING
OPENING OF BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by The School Board of Dade County,
Florida, for the projects listed herein until 2:00 P.M. local time,
Tuesday, the 25th day of June, 1991, Room 352, 1450 N.E.
Second Avenue, Miami, Florida, following which time and place,
or as soon thereinafter as the Board can attend to same, the said
bids will be publicly opened and read and tabulated in the Board
Auditorium, Dade County School Board Administrative Build-
ing, by an authorized representative of the Board. The Board will
thereafter make the award of the contract, based upon the result
of the tabulations on the basis of the combined base bids for both
phases of the project as covered by applicable laws and
regulations.
ASBESTOS REMOVAL
AND
TEMPORARY ROOF-REPAIR REPLACEMENT
ASB-08-91
ALLAPATTAH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
PRE-BID WALK THROUGH AND PRE-BID CONFERENCE
ATTENDANCE BY THE BIDDER OR HIS QUALIFIED REP-
RESENTATIVE IS A MANDATORY PRE-REQUISITE FOR THE
ACCEPTANCE OF A BID FROM THE CONTRACTOR.
THE PRE-BID CONFERENCE AND WALKTHROUGH IS SCHE-
DULED FOR TUESDAY, JUNE 18, 1991 AT 8:30 A.M. AT THE
SCHOOL SITE, ALLAPATTAH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, 4700
N.W. 12TH AVENUE, MIAMI, FLORIDA.
WOMAN OR BLACK OWNED AND OPERATED BUSINESS
PARTICIPATION: The asbestos removal project is limited to those
individuals and businesses classified as Woman or Black owned
and operated businesses which shall be so certified by Dade
County Public Schools prior to contract award.
Woman or Black owned and operated businesses not certified by
DCPS must complete and submit the attached M/WBE Certifi-
cation Application, with all required documents along with the
bid. Failure to be certified by DCPS at the time of Bid Opening, or
to submit required M/WBE Certification with the documents will
result in your bid being considered non-responsive.
Woman or Black owned firms certified by the City of Miami's
Minority/Woman Business Procurement Administration or
Metro Dade Minority Business Development Program must
submit a copy of their certification package, for consideration of
certification by DCPS. Award will be made to the low bidder
meeting this and other requirements.
Prime Bidders may obtain one or two sets of asbestos abatement
bid and contract documents from: THE DEPARTMENT OF
ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT, 35 NE 17 STREET, ROOM 120,
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132 (305) 995-4595 on and after June 11,
1991 with deposit of $25.00 per set (Cashier's Check or Money
Order). Deposit will be refunded when documents are returned,
in good condition, no more than 10 days after award or rejection
of Bid. Deposits will be retained by the School Board of Dade
County, Florida, if documents are not returned within the above
stipulated time and/or condition.
All questions concerning the asbestos abatement portion of the
project should be directed to the Dade County Public Schools
Department of Asbestos Management at (305) 995-4595.
The Board reserves the right to waive informalities and to reject
any and all bids.
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: Octavio J. Visiedo
Superintendent of Schools



BUY, SELL,

TRADE OR RENT THROUGH THE

CLASSIFIED

THE MIAMI TIMES Thursday, June 13, 1991

APA

Room for rent in nice home. All
conveniences of house.

STORE. 17ft. x 115ft. or larger.
5702 NW 7th Avenue. $350 mo.
854-6622.

681-8326.

Room for rent, working men
only. $110 to move in, $55
weekly. Call 621-7378.

$125 month. 133 sq.ft. or larger.
5386 Biscayne Blvd. 854-6622.

Large store front, 8640 N.W.
22nd Avenue. Call 688-6631.

Lease. Omni area office/retail +
- 600sq.ft. new carpet, central
air, ceiling fans. Real nice. $475
per month or offer formerly T.D.
Realty 666-2959.

STORE FOR RENT. Suitable
for church or small business.
696-3942 or 638-5981.

11 rms Downtown 277 NW 9 St.
Meals! Phones, Swimming pool
& Billiards, too! Cable TV! $35
wkly! Unable, free! 358-2387.

$45-365 weekly $25 dep.
Clean-Private-Secure
804 NW 108 Street
7429 NW 13 Avenue
1870 NW 67 Street
7110 NW 15 Court
464 NW 10 Street 255-4937

$50 weekly. Large fully furn-
ished 1 bedroom. Security bars.
Free utilities. Male Only. 13387
NW 30 Ave. 769-3027 or
623-3935.

Apartment also. Working peo-
ple only. Call 696-3651.

Room for rent. $215 a mo. +
$215 sec. 2045A N.W. 41 St.
Call 757-3913.

Beautiful furnished room for
rent. Close to fashion district.
$65 weekly. 142 NW 27 Street.
691-7847 or Bppr# 882-4071.

Beautiful furnished room for
rent with private bath. Close to
busline. $75 weekly. 9245 NW
25 Avenue. 691-7847 or Bppr#
882-4071.

Carol City Christian home for
female college student or single
working female. No drugs or
smokers. $70 624-8968.

Excellent room for rent with
security bars. 1341 N.W. 68
Terrace. Cooking facilities, $55
weekly. 638-1445.

Room for rent, working men
only. $110 to move in, $55
weekly. Call 621-7378.

Room for rent. Carol City area.
Use of kitchen, central air.
624-8387.

Rooms for rent, $60 wk, $120 to
move in. Please contact Mrs.
Daniels at 633-0207.

Rooms for rent. 3421 NW. 171
St. in Carol City. Men preferred.
625-8425.

Rooms for rent. 2453 NW 56
Street. 634-6251. No Drugs
Please!!

1 bedroom 1 bath efficiency.
$65 per week. $230 to move in.
All appliances furnished and all
utilities paid. 1492 NW 38
Street. Call Mr. Alexander
634-0439.

2 bedroom efficiency. No cook-
ing facility. First, last and securi-
ty required. 20821 NW 31
Avenue. 628-2738.

Efficiency. Stove, refrigerator,
utilities included. $285 per
month. 648 N.E. 80 Street.
255-2726.

Extra clean in a nice neighbor-
hood at a very nice price. 2552
NW 92 Street. 696-7423.

Extra large efficiency. Stove,
refrig. and carpet. Free gas &
water. Children Welcomed!
$275 month. $475 moves you
in. 421 NW 59 Terrace.
754-1183.

Furnished efficiency and rooms
close to everything. Utilities in-
cluded, $75 weekly and up.
769-9545 or bpr 399-1241.

LARGE EFFICIENCY. 2835
N.W. 170 St. 628-1412.

Large effic. $200 month, $400
to move in. 1190 N.W. 67 St.
Call 688-3461 See #12.

Large unfurn effic. a/c, stove &
refrig. $300 mo., $450 to move
in. 7090 NW 17 Ave. 759-9171.

FURNISHED clean hotel
rooms with A/C, frig, private
bath. One block to ocean, bus,
stores. $85 a week per person.
Call 865-5102 Hotel Atlantic,
7451 Harding Ave. NO RENT
DEPOSIT.

Furnised room for rent. $60 per
week, private bath d en-
trance. Call 621-3806.

Furnished rooms $45 and up.
Furnished efficiencies $75 and
up. Utilities included. 757-5277
or 573-6117.

Furnished large bedroom with
its own private bath. By the
month rate for working person.
769-1922.

Furnished room with complete
privacy. $65 per week. $230 to
move in. 621-1453 Debra.

Furnished
Room for rent
Call 687-8135

Furnished room for rent. Elderly
only. Cooking privileges. $60
wkly. $120 to move in.
696-7864.

Furn rm. AC, sec. bars, in pvt
home. Carol City, shopping,
transportation. $60 wkly.
620-5223.

Large front room with own
entrance, furnished. 621-5675.

Large furn. room adults only
$60 wk, $120 to move in. 1534
NW 71 St. & 1625 NW 66 St.
759-9171.

Man Only
8275 N.W. 18 AVE
No Drugs! 754-7776

Nice clean room for rent. Opa-
Locka area. 688-5204.

Nice clean room for rent. Newly
painted inside. Absolutely NO
DRUGS. Call 687-3016.

Person wanted to share a
christian home. Furnished.
756-5122.

Pop's Cleaners have lovely
rooms & effic. for rent in various
locations. $60 per week, $120
to move in. With cooking facili-
ties. 696-0774 or 691-1234.

RAINBOW SPECIAL
Lg. rooms with bath, $65.00
wk.; Eff. with bath, $80.00 wk.
$20.00 key deposit. 751-1028,
301 N.E. 62nd St.

Room for quiet working man.
Use of kitchen. $45 per week.
$90 to move in. 751-9739.

Room for rent in a quiet type
home. No teenagers, ask for
landlord. Call 625-4088.

Room for rent. Christian per-
son. N. Miami. Own entrance
and own bath. 653-0243
Day/685-9664 Eves.

Room for rent with use of home.
Female only. $75 per week.
620-2475 after 7pm.

ROOM FOR RENT
Working couple or single man.
696-5545

THANK YOU
for Advertising

in the “Award Winning"
Miami Times

Mature person wanted for effi-
ciency, furnished, appl. nice
area. $325 monthly. 621-2310.

Modern efficiency for rent with
parking facilities. $200 per
month. Working person pre-
ferred, contact Mr. William C.
Johnson, 635-9145.

Newly furn effic.in N. Miami.
Near bus, priv ent. $275 mo.,
$400 to move in. 687-4239.

Nice efficiency for rent. $100 a
week, includes lights. 2 weeks
in advance, man or woman, no
kids. Call 693-3943.

1 bdrm apt. 256 NW 59th Terr,
$260 mo. 9798 NW 25 Avenue,
$275 month, 5420 NW 5th Ave
$260 month, 756-7306 or
694-0329.

* kk

GRAND REOPENING
ARENA SQUARE

1 bedroom with bars and
appliances, fenced. 2478 NW
55 Street. 2460B NW 139
Street with air. 754-6514.

NORTH APARTMENTS. In-
cluding appl., a/c, carpeting.
Office at 2101 N.W. 3rd Ave.
Call 573-8505.

1 large bedroom plus major
appliances. Cable ready, sec-
urity bars. $340 per month plus
one month deposit. Section 8
Accepted. 13170 NW 30 Ave #1
625-7642 after 5pm Burgess.

Large 1 bedroom apartment

148 NE 55 Street. $250 per

month. Refrig and stove. Call
754-5100

Large 2 bedroom apartment for

2/1'% . $410 per month. 937 NW
7 Court. $950 to move in. Will
accept Section 8. 892-6006 or
620-9009. >

2 bdrm apartment, central a/c,
bars. 737 NW 12 Street. $400
mo. $800 to move in. 757-5536.

2 bedroom apt. 1342 N.W.
60th St. $385 per month, no
utilities. Call 757-5435.

2 bedroom apartment for rent.
5727 N. Miami Ave. plus big
efficiency. Call 835-0567.

2 bedroom 2 bath townhouse.
5405 NW 168 Terrace. $395.
Drive by then call 279-0062.

rent. located at 6821 N.W. 4th
Ave. $325 per month. Call
624-0300 or 757-8596.

NM Apts. Easy Terms. Quiet
residential area, pool, A/C,
laundry. 1 and 2 bedroom fron
$410. 13890 NE .3 Court.
891-1251.

NW 7th Ave-79 St. Area
Ideal Bachelor apt., small 4
rms., completely furnished. In-
formation, please call
693-2684.

ONLY $295 PER MONTHin
nice North Miami area. 1 and
2 bedroom apartments. Call
893-1793 or 685-6106.

3379 Oak Ave house $360
‘2 Bedroom Duplex $450
3465 Day Ave Apt $265

Coconut Grove 361-2112

3848 NW 213 Street
3 bedroom townhouse, Nice
street. $475 mo. First, last &
Security. Call Steve 935-6600
leave message & #.

3850 NW 213 Street
2 bedroom townhouse, nice
yard. $350 per month. One
month security. Call Steve
935-6600 leave message & #.

3 bedroom 1 bath apartment for
rent. 1800 NW 22 Avenue.
624-4759.

50 NE 84 Street
Lovely 1 bdrm apt. Refrig.,
range. A/C, carpet. Great loca-
tion, parking. $325. 893-6246.

540 N.W. 7th St. 1 bdrm & effics.
Free water/gas. $160-$185.
358-6814.

6021 N.W. 24 Court
$310 month
634-6251

ARENA SQUARE APTS.
NORTH AND SOUTH

Newly remodeled apts. one
block fron Downtown and
Miami Arena. Everything brand
new includes a/c, carpeting,
new kitchen with appliances.
Efficiency, 1 and 2 bedrooms
starting at $235. North office at
2101 N.W. 3rd Avenue.
573-8505. South Office at 1023
N.W. 3rd Avenue. 372-1383. |

ONLY 3 LEFT

Efficiencies for rent. Furnished
or unfurnished. Only $250 per
month water and light included.
Call Todd Leoni 756-1177.

427 NE 62 STREET

One bedroom apt. for rent. $350
mo. $300 deposit. Utilities in-
cluded. 1864 N.W. 84 St. Call
687-3127, 694-0837. Inquire at
Li's Coin Lau. 6001 NW. 17
Ave.

OPA-LOCKA
1 bedroom apts from $300
monthly. Nice area 360 Sharar
Ave. Phone 226-9990 or
beeper 939-0864.

ORCHARD VILLA APART-
MENTS

Free water, gas, security
bars and doors. 1 bedroom
$240 per month, $340 to
move in. Located at 1255
N.W. 58th Street and 1256
N.W. 58th Terrace. For more
information, contact 2651
N.W. 50 Street or call
638-3699.

* kk

RENT SPECIALS
For special no appliance rates.
Call 372-1383.

SILVER BLUE
LAKES APARTMENTS

1, 2 and 3 bedroom lakefront
apts. Manned security gate.
Section 8 Welcome. 693-0122.
1401 N.W. 103 Street.

Beautiful 1 bdrm apt. 2101 N.W.
104 Street. Contact John
654-8586.

Nice efficiency for rent in quiet
N. Dade neighborhood. For
more details, call 653-7269 af-
ter 5.

Utilities paid. 1756 N.W. 85 St.
$275 to move-in. Adults only.
624-6617.

100 NW 12 Street. Efficiency
$145 mo. 1 bedroom $175 mo.
2 bedroom $235 mo. See man-
ager at 1535 NW 1 PI #8 or call
573-4783.

1140 N.W. 79 St. 1 bdrm cot-
tages, security bars, private
parking. $225. Call 642-7080.

1, 2 & 3 BDRMS & EFFS.
BRAND NEW REHAB APTS
New Refrigerator & Stove
OVERTOWN, From $250 mo.
Office 541-2283 9-5

1245 NW 58 STREET #9
Large efficiency. One adult
only. $225 per month. $450 to
move in. Evans 371-3592 Ext.
357.

1281 NW 61 Street. 1 bedroom
$175 mo. See manager in
Apt. #27. 691-0737.

1: bedroom, appliances, cen-
tral a/h, security bars. 2300 E.
Superior St. 685-3061 4:30pm.

1524 NW 1 Avenue. 1 bdrm
duplex. Free water. $225. Call
642-7080.

1 bdrm apt. at 1895 NW 35 St.
$325 per mo. + $325 sec,
888-0380/634-3498.

1 bdrm apt. at 754 N.W. 70 St.
$265 per mo. plus $265 sec.
888-0380 or 385-9008.

Free 1st month (Limited Time).
1 bdrm apts for $210 per month
at 415, 423, 439 NW. 9 St.
(Fenced). Free water & gas.
Call Joe 445-8821 or see Mr.
Rolle at 423 N.W. 9 St. #9.

1 bdrm cottage apartment. A/C,
all utilities included. Call after
6pm 432-4378.

1 bedroom $300 mo. Nice, safe,
good management. Civic Cen-
ter or N. Side. 696-3154,

1,2 bedroom. $350 and $450.

' Central air, w/w carpet, laundry,

parking. 2605 NW 135 Street.
#101 769-9534.

1 bedroom $331. A/C, terrazzo
floors, security doors, parking.
880 NW 7th Avenue. 854-2467.

1 bedroom apartment for rent.
Wall to wall carpet. Refrig. &
stove, A/C. $410 month. For
info. call 620-1916.

CAREY'S RENTAL
4608 NW 7th AVENUE
Mon.-Fri. 8am-5pm
757-1633

1 BEDROOM
3658 Grand Avenue
1435-55-75 NW 61 Street
1530 NW 1 Place
1745 NW 1 Place
1606 NW 58 Terrace
2945 NW 46 Street
1990 NW 56 Street Dplx.
5835 NW 15 Avenue
1510 NW 68 Street
1818 NW 2 Court
1942 NW 2 Court
1155 NW 2 Avenue 381-8142
265 NW 82 Terrace (Rear)
365 NW 8 Street 381-8142
2190 NW 96 Terrace 381-8142
4408-10 NW 29 Avenue
1236 NW 60 Street

2 BEDROOMS
220-275 NW 11 Terrace
381-8142
3411 NW 11 Court 381-8142
Central air
1240 NW 51 Terrace Dplx.
338 NW 34 Street Dplx.
2790 NW 47 Street Dplx.
1620 NW 111 Street Dplx.

3 BEDROOMS
840 NW 76 Street House
15341 Railroad Drive House

COMMERCIAL
1543 NW 54 Street

Christian elderly man or wo-
man. 1 bedroom apartment for
rent. Call 754-9840 for
information.

CPG RENTALS

4240 NW 27 Avenue

Now renting 1 and 2 bedrooms
apartments. Clean, well man-
aged, best locations, priced
right.

CALL TODAY! 638-1475
Property Management
Since 1934

Efficiency and 1 bedroom
$291-$321. A/C. Free hot
water, terrazzo floors. 332/420
NW 35 Street. 854-2467.

Extra large 1 bedroom. Stove,
refrig. and carpet. Free water &
gas. Children Welcomed! $300
month. $500 moves you in. 421
NW 59 Terrace. 754-1183.

Furnished 1 bedroom apart-
ment. Lights and water
included. Located 26th Avenue
& 100 Street. 693-9486.

Furnished apartment. $325 mo.
utilities included. 74 N.W. 31 St.
Call 573-1351 after 5 p.m.

Spacious 1 bdrm. apt. a/c and
appliances with carpet. In good
location. 620-7222 or 828-4302
and ask for Joe.

SUGAR HILL APTS
14 Ave & 71 Street
836-4702

LARGE
One Bedroom Apartments
Ready To Move In
$260 PER MONTH
COURTEOUS
On Site Management

Two bdrm central a/c, bars, 737
N.W. 12 St. $400 mo. $800 to
move-in. 757-5536.

WHY RENT? HOMES FOR $1,
REPOS. GOV'T GIVEAWAY
PROGRAMS! FOR INFORMA-
TION. 504-641-8003 EXT.
R-9545.

1431 N.W. 40th St.
1 bedroom. 624-8387.

Brand new 2 bedroom duplex.
3845 NW 157 Street. Central
air and heat, refrig and stove,
security bars. $560 per month.
Call 754-5100

Extra Ig. 1 bdrm duplex, sec.
bars, Ig. porch $375 per mo.
First & last. Security negoc.
Info. 835-8667, after 4 p.m.
638-1519 No drugs please.

Very large 3 bedroom 1% bath-
room fenced in. Also have effi-
ciency. Call 754-6564.

WHY RENT? HOMES FOR $1,
REPOS. GOV'T GIVEAWAY
PROGRAMS! FOR INFORMA-
TION 504-641-8003. EXT.
R-95451.

Large 2 bdrm carpet & sec.
bars. $425 mo., $850 to move
in. 1743 N.W. 47th Terr.
759-9171.

1 br. 1 bth, a/c, laund, carp.
$370. 2335 NE 172 St. Call
687-9723.

Large 3 bedroom 2 bath
11334 NW 22 Avenue
693-6583

One bedroom duplex. All appl.
bars, close to Metro-rail. $315,
1732 N.W. 41 St. 621-8866.

2 bedroom townhouse. Cherry
Baye area. Call 770-6347.

One bedroom condo for rent.
Golden Glades Condo Assoc.
$400 a month. 759-6033 or
621-9216.

One bedroom condo for rent.
Golden Glades Condo Assoc.
$400 a month. 759-6033 or
621-9216.

Townhouse for sale. N. Dade. 2
bdrms 1% baths, central air, tile
and more. $3,000 down. Take
over payments. $600 mo. FHA
fully assum. 624-1387.

1 bdrm house, liv. rm, eatin Kit.,
with front & back yard. $275. util
not incl. Call 759-4215.

1 bedroom 1 bath. Stove,
refrigerator. $250 month. $500
to move in. 7722 NW 8 Avenue.
Call Mr. Alexander 634-0439.

2271 NW 66 Street
3 bedroom $375, fenced.
Option. 545-6485 or 538-7676.

2360 N.W. 140 St. 3 bedroom 1
bath, large kitchen. $550
month, first and last. 694-8041
or 688-7629.

2 bdr. 2 bth. Fla. Rm. N.W. Call
693-4252 after 9pm.

2 bedroom house with big yard.
A/C, carpet and appliances.
Call after 5pm 625-1243.

2 bedroom 1 bath house. A/C,
ceiling fan, wall to wall carpet-
ing, fenced yard, stove. Call Mr.
Adderly 836-1254.

3 BD 1 BATH HOUSE FOR
rent/lease option in Miami
Shores. $700. Sec. 8. Call
759-6857.

3 bdrm 1.5 bth, fenced yd, near
schools, shopping ctr. $625 mo.
4350 NW 191 Ter. 620-3650.

3 bdrm 2 bath home near Roll-
ing Oaks. $700 per month.
19301 NW 19 Ct. 625-9160 or
621-3836.

3 bed 2 bath dining room, new
paint. First, last & sec. $575 mo.
621-5328 Move In Now!

3 BEDROOM 1 BATH
CAROL CITY AREA
624-4395

3 bedroom 2 bath house for
rent. Good area. Opa-Locka,
near schools. Section 8 Wel-
comed! 1-731-2452 or
1-484-6792.

3 bedroom 1% bath. Handy-
man special. 4821 NW 16 Ave.
$425 mo. 382-4309 leave
message.

3 bedroom 2 bath, living, kitch-
en, dining room with washroom
area. $550 per month, 3361
N.W. 190 Street. Call 989-5256
or 652-7485.

1803 NW 93 Terrace
2 bedroom. $350
545-6485 or 538-7676

3 bedroom 1 bath. 16405 NW
37 Place. $500 per month.
892-8913.

1 BEDROOM
DUPLEX FOR RENT
CALL 573-7913

4 BDRMS, REASONABLE
FENCED YARD
634-0065

1 bed 9375 NW 30 Ct $350/mo.
Terry Dellerson, Bkr891-6776

1 bedroom a/c, carpet, security
bars. 1199 N.W. 105 Terrace.
$360 monthly, $1080 to move
in. Call 681-3236.

1 bedroom. A/C and carpet.
Adults Only. Apply at 2900 NW
92 Street.

1 bedroom. $325 mo. 1184 NW
30 Street. NO DRUGS!
754-7776.

2/1. $275 per month $550 to
move in. 1351 NW 45 Street
(Rear) 634-2112.

252 N.W. 73 Terr. 2 br 1 bath,
carpet, appliances $350 mo.
Call 635-6251.

1 bedroom & efficiecy duplex.
85 Street & N.E. 2nd Avenue
area. $365. References.
754-7776.

3 bedroom duplex, $475 per
month. 4714 NW 16 Avenue.
Call 621-8990.

Beautiful extra large 2 bedroom
duplex apartment, carpet, sec-
urity bars, quiet area. 6323 NW
1 Ct. $450 monthly. 541-2855.

CBS 2/1 duplex. 1431 NW 43
Street. Section 8. Call before
8:30 am or after 9pm.
691-0826.

Duplex for rent. Only $300 per
month. 576-5919. Dennis &
Associates.

4 bdrms, 3 baths, large home.
144 St. NW 16 Ave. area.
$900mo. No Drugs! 754-7776

Beautiful 1 bedroom house,
newly renovated, stove &
refrigerator, A/C. Section 8 Wel-
come. 757-2356.

CLEAN RENTAL HOMES
14160 NW 22 PI 2/1 $400/mo.
4021 NW 199 St 3/1 $625/mo.
3121 NW 165 St3/1 $600/mo.
Terry Dellerson 891-6776

For rent 3 bdrm. 1 bath house.
Edison Center area. Please call
274-3512.

Kendall/Perrine. 3/2. Immedi-
ate occupancy. Maria
886-1135.

Miramar. 3/2, fruit trees, over-
sized lot, pool. $700 monthly.
Maria 886-1135.

265 NW 59 STREET
121 NW 64 STREET
SECTION 8 ONLY
3 Bedrooms, 2 baths
New Appliances-Carpet
Call Richard 657-2462

SECTION 8 WELCOME!
2 bedroom 1 bath home N.W.
74 Street near 22 Avenue.
$460 plus seecurity. Available
7/12. Call 654-7659 or
251-3668.

Section-8 welcome, small

house shi renovated. Near
bus line, big fenced yard.
691-6621.

DON'T LOSE YOUR HOME
| can help solve your problems.
Call Mary Jean, 829-2424.

FOR SALE

ASSUME MORTGAGE
Handyman special. 6442 NE 1
Place. 1/1. Owner very flexible.
967-8334.

A-1 QUALITY HOMES

RENT WHILE
QUALIFYING TO BUY

FHA/VA

3894 NW 213 St - 3/1
Lease-option Plan, 3 bedrooom
townhouse, with Central Air,
includes appliances, security
guards. Excellent opportunity,
only $400 rent. $500 deposit
required. Easy to qualify.
CALL MR GEORGE - 821-6700

A-1 QUALITY HOMES
RENT WHILE
QUALIFYING TO BUY
FHA/VA
310 NW 44 St - 3/2
2255 NW 48 St - 3/2
Like brand new. 3 Bedroom
homes, excellent opportunity.
Remodeled, includes
appliances. Low down pay-
ment, easy to qualify. $500

deposit required.
CALL MR GEORGE - 821-6700

$10,000 Down
2 bdrm 1 bth + 3 effic.-
Assum $435 monthly mtg.
2154 NW 93 St. 255-4937

1131 NW 141 Street
2 bedroom. Large lot. Only
$45,000. FHA/VA terms.
Kant Realty 940-2121

1336 NW 71 Street
3/1, Seller will make down pay-
ment if you qualify. 651-9689.

1350 NE 150 STREET
Completely remodeled 3 bed-
room 2 bath, huge family room,
beautiful pool, fenced yard.
$65,000. 940-9174.

151 NW 187 STREET
Would you like to buy this
$89,000 home for $69,000? For
more info. call 651-9689.

GOVERNMENT HOMES
MOVE IN & FIX UP AMA—
ZING RECORDED MESSAGE

REVEALS DETAILS -

(305) 688-6602. Ext. 2A

2/1 Opa-Locka, $39,900. Big
2/1, FL room 114th St. Be the
first to call Sam Realty,
892-6411 ask for Dorothy.

2/1 wigarage. $468 mo. P&l.
Call Linda at Say Realty
652-7653.

2500 NW 170th Terrace 3/2
Fenced Yard. Corner Lot. (In
The 50's). DUPLEX FOR
SALE. NO QUALIFYING. LOW
DOWN PAYMENT. 576-5919.

2770 NW 211 STREET
4/2, $4,000 and you take over a
$38,000 mortgage. This is a
bargain. 651-9689.

2 bedroom 2 bath, Florida room,
central air & heat. 3091 N.W.
92nd Street, in $40's. Call
949-6867 to see.

$475 house, remodeled 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bath, family room,
fenced 1836 NW 51 Street.
Stan Barbour, Assoc.
MIDTOWN REALTY,
253-5600. Eves 378-0551.

650 NW 179 Ter: Splish,
Splash! 3 bd. fl. rm. Screened
carport. FHA/VA. Steve Agran.

ASSUME OR FHA/VA: 4040
NW 20 St: 3bd. in great Carol
City area. Flexible terms. Steve
Agran.

DUPLEX - HANDYMAN SPE-
CIAL:6220 NW 1 Ct: 3bd/2bth &
2bd/1bth. Built in '82 - needs
work. Try $4,500 down. Steve
Agran. :

2367 NW 103 St: New 3bd/2ba,
gorgeous. FHA/VA. Steve
Agran.

WELL KEPT: 3/1 and 3/2, cen.
a/c sprinkleers big back yard
fenced, fruit trees, veery clean
and nice.

MIRAMAR-SALE: 3bd/2ba, tile
roof, cen a/c, fenced, alarm, like
new. 8151 SW 24 PI.

CAROL CITY: Clean 3 bdrms,
huge fam. rm. inside laundry
rm., immaculate yard, spr. sys.
& fruit trees. Olivia Moraitis.

CENTURY 21 IDEAL REALTY
568-7855

725 NE 75 STREET
4 bedroom 5 baths. Ideal for an
ACLF or daycare. Low takeov-
er. For more info. 651-9689.

A-1 QUALITY HOMES
RENT WHILE
QUALIFYING TO BUY
FHA/VA
16211 NW 37 PI - 3/2
3741 NW 175 St - 3/2
Like brand new. 3 Bedroom
homes, excellent opportunity.
Remodeled, includes
appliances. Low down pay-
ment, easy to qualify. $500

deposit required.
CALL MR GEORGE - 821-6700

AFFORDABLE or
EXPENSIVE
*BOCA RATON
*BOYNTON BCH
*DEERFIELD BCH
*DELRAY

HOMES TOWNHOMES
VILLAS
Golfcourse, Lakes
Communities
CONV/FHANA OKAY

CALL THE EXPERTS
MIAMI OFFICE
940-4000

REALTY WORLD-

KAYE

A RENT TO OWN PLAN
20141 NW 15 Av 3/2 $650/mo.
14160 NW 22 PI 2/1 $400/mo.
3000 NW 94 St 2/1 $475/mo.
3010 NW 94 St 4/2 $650/mo.
Terry Dellerson, Bkr891-6776

ASSUMPTIONS
NO QUALIFYING! QUICK
CLOSING
3/1 $13,000 Needed
Pyramid Real Estate354-2299

BEST BUYS-FHA
$44,900 - 1079 NW 135 ST
$53,900 - 1090 NW 136 ST
$$55,500 - 10543 NW 6 AVE
$69,900 - 10930 NW 2 CT
ANCHELL REALTY 688-6671

BEST BUYS - FHA
$44,900 - 1079 NW 135 ST
$53,900 - 1090 NW 136 ST
$55,500 - 10543 NW 6 AVE
$59,900 - 10930 NW 2 CT
ANCHELL REALTY 688-6671

* kk

BEST BUYS
15620 NE 4 Ave 3/2
4510 NW 175 St 3/2

2985 NW 95 St
16901 NW 37 Ave
917 NW 146 St

3/2
3/2
3/2

19500 NW 23 Ct 3/2
880 NE 85 St 2/2
2176 NW 64 St 2/1
1887 NW 63 St 2/1
453 NW 81 St 21
3840 NW 213 St 4/2

15600 NW 7 AveCondo

1640 NE 143 St Dup.
110 NE 68 St Dup.
2315 NW 95 Ter Dup.
16901 NW 37 Ave 3/2
2315 NW 95 Ter Dup.

Life Realty, Realtor 685-7728

Beautiful 4/2 in Country Village,
jacuzzi, spanish tile, skylights,
vaulted ceiling, vertical blinds,
good schools and much more.
&ood credit and serious minded
only. $120,000. Must Sell. NO
AGENTS! 620-2577.

# ah

ESTATE SALE
970 N.E. 132 St. Excellent con-
dition, 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, Call
Milton. 651-4588.

DUPLEX
Assumable Mortgage. Call

. 651-4588 Milton.

LAKEFRONT
Misty lake condo 2 bedrooms 2
bath with den. Call Mary
651-4588 or 625-0707.

221 SPECIAL
Less than $1000 moves you in
FHA. Call Mary 651-4588 or
625-0707.

FREELY ASSUMABLE
Less than $15000 moves you
in. No Qualifying. 3 bedrooms 2
bath with In-Law Quarters. Call
Mary 651-4588 or 625-0707.

MIAMI SHORES BEAUTY
Two story townhouse 3 bed-
rooms 2% bath, Call Mary
651-4588 or 625-0707.

CENTRALLY LOCATED
AND PRICED RIGHT
3 bedroom home shows well. In
North Miami. Call Essie Mason.
654-6020.

EXTREMELY WELL KEPT
Carol City beauty. Priced right.
Call Essie Mason 654-6020.

TOWNHOUSE
NO QUALIFYING
3 bedroom 2 bath approx.
$7,000 down only $433 per mo.
Call Jessie at 654-6015.

BUSINESS FOR SALE
Lease-Option, night club in Hol-
lywood. Call Milton 651-4588.

BRING YOUR HAMMER

AND NAILS
Two homes can be purchased
at discount prices. Buyer com-
plete repairs. One of these
homes has very large family rm.
Call Jessie or Betty at
651-4588.

LOW PRICE
STARTER HOME
Small family just starting out. Be
a home owner for less than

$400 per mo. Call Jessie or Bet-

ty at 651-4588.

FHA-VA
Remodeled house.
269 N.W. 41st St.
4 bdrm 1 bath
CHEAPER THAN RENT.
Owner will help.
Realtor - 751-8343
Beeper - 549-0707

GOOD NEIGHBORHOOD
3/2 + Fl. Room
Pyramid Real Estate354-2229

BIGG NE 3 Bdrm 2 Bth
Fam. rm, POOL, Garage,
FHA $2556 dn Mgt.
P&l $757 mo. Call to See
this Beauty 940-4000!

Super Townhouse 2-Story
2 Bdrm 2 Bth, Fam. rm,
Private Yard TRY.;FHA
$1375 dn. Mgt. P&l $463

mo. Call to See 940-4000!

Save on Closing Costs! $6,000
Move You In! Assumme with
Qualifying! N.E. 3 Bdrm 2 Bth
Mgt $790 mo includes ALL!

California Club-Monterey
Condos STEAL! 2 & 3 Bdrms
Entry Security, Pool &
Playground Best Schools
Mgt. P&l $429 mo. Call to
See 940-4000 Won't Last!

Carol City. Lovely 3 bedroom,
Florida room, fireplace, central
air, fenced. Only $59,900. VA/
FHA.

Oolite Realty 651-5757

Clean 3 br. 2 ba. w/family room.
Large fenced yard. $59,900.
$4500 down. 3871 NW 171
Street. 576-5865.

DOLL HOUSE
2 br. beautiful fenced yard.
1160 NW 106 St. $42,900.
$4,000 down. 576-5865.

DON'T DREAM. YOU CAN
OWN!

N. Miami. $2500 Moves you in!

Completeley Nemodgied 2br.

ew
Roof, kitchen, bathroom, +

paint.
Large fenced yard. 895-6304.

HOMES FOR SALE
$500 Down FHA or
Veterans-Move In With Only
$200 Total Down Payment
Including Closing Costs.
Remodeled Homes
Carpet and appliances.

4310 NW 31 AVENUE
3 bdrms, $420 per mo.

17840 Myrtle Lake Drive
(179 St and 29 Ct)
3 bdrms, 2 baths, $560 per mo.

2454 NW 81 TERRACE
3 bdrms, 2 baths, $432 per mo.

3184 NW 132 TERRACE
3 bdrms, 2 baths, $390 per mo.

1216 SHARAZAD BLVD
(4 blks North 135 St.)
4 bdrms, 2 baths, $477 per mo.

CALL RICHARD
557-2462
Richard S. Astrom, Broker

Z-INCOME PROPERTY
Owner motivated - Duplexes, 3
units, houses - 576-5865.

Investor is now selling off
houses. Many good buys. Rent
while qualifying. If you have
good credit call 653-1889
Owner/agent.

| PAY CASH
FOR YOUR HOUSE
576-5865

LET US DO THE WORK
FOR YOU. WE WILL SELL,
LESE OR RENT ANY PROP-

ERTY
Pyramid Real Estate354-2299

DUPLEXXX & TRIPLEXXX
GOOD INCOME
LIVE LKIE A KING
Pyramid Real Estate354-2299

FAX YOUR
CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS
BEFORE 5 PM
TUESDAY
756-0771

FHA APPROVED
LENDER
OFFERS: - CONSTRUCTION/
PERM LOANS, FHA 203K
PROGRAM FOR INVESTORS

& OWNER OCCUPANTS.

MECCA MORTGAGE

5240 NW 7 AVENUE
759-6150

FORECLOSURES

WE HAVE THE KEYS TO ALL
CALL FOR A FREE LIST

Pyramid Real Estate354-2299

LOW DOWN FHA

20141 NW 15 Ave 3/2

15625 NW 157 St Rd 3Nn

14160 NW 22 PI 21

3000NW 94 St 21

3010 NW 94 St 4/2

Terry Dellerson, Bkr891-6776
MIRAMAR

3/2+DEN+POOL+2CAR

GARAGE

Pyramid Real Estate354-2299
MUST SELL NOW!

No reasonable offer refused.
3/1 on canal. Fully fenced,
ceentral a/c, tile floor, fruit trees.
$52,500. 2921 NW 154 Terr.
Sergio 688-1418 Appt.

N. Dade 4/2 has den, gar., eat-
in kit, dining rm, laundry rm,
atrium, skylights, fans. $68,800.
Owner 624-9837.

NEED TO SELL FAST??
CALL ust!
OOLITE REALTY 651-5757

Nice 2 br w/garage - new kitch-
en. $3500 down. 1886 NW 51
St. $45,900. 576-5865,

—~SO BTL



THE MIAMI TIMES
Thursday, June 13, 1991

aC

E

N. Miami 2 bdr. 1 bath
Must Sell Only $62,500.
Fenced backyard, carport.
ipod as-is). 949-5001.
agliari Realty99999949-5001

NO QUALIFYING
FAST OCCUPANCY
18810 NW 43 AVE
1422 NW 113 TERR

ANCHELL REALTY 688-6671

NORTH MIAMI BEACH
Prk like setting. Open Sunday
from 1pm-3pm. 1153 NE 158
Street. 2 bedroom with jacuzzi
and lots of land with fruit trees.

Call Regina L. Filko Realty, Inc.

947-7600.

NORWOOD SPECIAL $60's
3 Bedroom, Family Rm, fenced
yard. New carpet thruout. Great

Buy!
SALES/ALVIN ERA 652-8880

NORTH MIAMI BEACH $60's
Adorable 3 bedrm. Large yard.
2 screened patios. Central air.
Excellent condition. Priced to

sell.
SALES/ALVIN ERA 652-8880

NORTH MIAMI BEACH
POOL HOME

Rooms galor! 2 story. 5 Bedrm
4% baths. Complete in-law
quarters. Game room, indoor
sauna, office, workroom.
acre corner lot. Must See!
SALES/ALVIN ERA 652-8880

Norwood 3/2 Fla. Rm
20141 NW 15 Avenue
Terry Dellerson, Bkr891-6776

Norwood. Lovely 3 bedroom 2
bath, fenced. Only $65,000. VA/
FHA.

Oolite Realty 651-5757

N.W. 4 bed 2 bath, fenced yard.
$7,000 down. No credit check,
call 759-6857.

OPEN HOUSE
Sat. & Sun. (6/15, 6/16)
1:00pm - 4:00pm
1700 NW 179 Terrace
892-8913

POOL HOME!
SELLING BELOW EXTRAS
2625 N.W. 122 STREET
ANCHELL REALTY 688-6671

Priced to Sell!
Scott Lake rent while buying. 3
bdrm 2 bath, large family room.
829-2424.

$400 Monthly. 2 bedroom 1
bath. Move in today. Large liv-
ing room. A/C, bars, fenced,
new carpet. Call agent anytime.
653-1889.

“SOUTHERN BARGAINS"

10741 SW 221 St. $38,000
10255 SW 171 St. $40,000
8415 SW 107 Ave. $56,900

10695 SW 181 St. $59,900

RE/MAX ADVANCE REALTY
251-2127 JAMES, EVES.
2 3 8 5 3 5 9

SPORTS ENTHUSIAST
This 3 bedrooms, 2 bath, pool
home is ideal for the sports
enthusiast. Great condition,
screened patio, great location.
Check it out, you will like it. Call
Jim 624-6509.

OWNER FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Dreams are made of homes like
this, Norwood beauty 3 bed-
rooms, 2 bath, pool home is
loaded with upgrades. Call
624-6509.

HANDYMAN SPECIAL
2 bedroom, 1 bath, plus addi-
tional space, huge lot, great
potential. Motivated seller,
bring offers, in the $40's. Call
624-6509. .

BEAUTIFUL CORNER
PROPERTY
3 bedroom house, central air,
fully fenced yard, security bars
and lots more. Seller very moti-
vated, priced in the $60's. Call
624-6509.

OPEN HOUSE 1-5PM

SAT June 15, 1991
Beautiful Norwood home, 4
bedroom, 2 bath, $69,000.
Drive by 315 NW 190th Street or
call 624-6509.

OPEN HOUSE 3-5PM
SAT June 16,1991
Drive by 19540 NW 57 Place
This country lake beauty Is
ready to go, 4 bedroom, 2 bath,
screened patio, 1 car garage,
very spacious. Stop by, or call
624-6509.

C-21 Miami Gardens Realty,
: Inc.
18583 NW 27 Avenue
Miami, FL 33056
305-624-6509

S.W. Dade. 4/2. Assummable.

3/2 Assummable.
886-1135.

Maria

WE BUY HOMES
ALL CASH
ANY CONDITION
FREE INSPECTION
Life Realty, Realtor 685-7728

Equity Home Loans. Fast Clos-
ings. Call Michael, Lic. Mtg. Bkr.
2750 NE 187 St. 933-0131.

Equi

Need money, all you need is
equity. 1st & 2nd mortgages.
Home equity loans. Fast clos-
ing, Hakim A. Shaheed lic. mtg.
broker. 4381 N.W. 167th St.
625-3237.

BUILDING CBS. 1600 Square
Foot. $28,000. 1-912-529-3999
or 1-912-529-6545.

Building for sale $85,000 (suit-
able for daycare). Owner
finance or conv. loan. Call
Esther at 770-1129 or beeper
841-2016.

Commercial Space available,
9205 N.W. 22nd Ave. Ideal for
church setting or investor
owner. 858-1180/478-0917.

DRY CLEANER FOR SALE
LIC. DROP-OFF &
ALTERATION
Pyramid Real Estate354-2299

RESTAURANT FOR SALE
FULLY EQUIPPED
Pyramid Real Estate354-2299

SERVICES

ELECTRICIAN, GOOD, FAST,
CHEAP, Sen. Citz. Disc. same
day serv. cc12060 621-4046.

ELECTRICIAN, GOOD, FAST,
CHEAP, Sen. Citz. Disc. same
day serv. cc12060 621-4046.

EXTERMINATOR - All of your
pest control needs. Home or
business. Call Brown Pest Con-
trol Service 899-2844 or
Beeper# 326-3888. License
and Insured. :

For the Best in Cleaning
Free Estimates
751-7522 Bppri#543-7747

GRADUATES
GOOD NEWS! Money for col-
lege, NOW! Many sources
available. Call 829-2424 Mary.

HENRY'S WINDOW SERVICE
Install windows, screens, glass,
security bars, house repairs,
panels. Free Estimate.
635-9869

Moving and hauling, have 2
ton truck. Will move furniture,
boxes, tree limbs or anything
you have to move. Call
624-9444. The Hyman's Father
& Son.

Moving and Hauling. Low
prices, can’t believe it. Call Mr.
Jackson 693-1218.

RUSH RUSSELL MOVERS

24 Hrs. Fast, safe, reliable.
SENIOR CITIZEN DISCOUNT.
18 yrs. experience. 770-4007
Russell.

REPAIRS

24 Hour Plumbing, Maintenace
Services. You tried the rest,
now try the best. 769-2074.

Any kind of plumbing work.
Unplugging drains, new piping,
and repiping, fix leaks, repair
faucets, install water heaters
and fixtures. 620-1863,
688-5749. Beeper, 544-1098.

APPLIANCE REPAIRS
Experts stove, refrigerator, a/c
repair, also plumbing repair.
Reasonable, 624-0785.

T.V.,VCR,Stereo, micro-
waves, repair. 10461 N.W.
7th Ave. 758-8222.

Electric stove and water heater
repair, light plumbing and haul-
ing. 620-6126.

Fanes A/C Appl. Refig, Wash-
ing Machine, Dryers, Electric
Stoves. No service charge with
repair, 754-5060/688-6893.

GENE & SONS
CABINET SHOPS
8517 N.W. 22nd Avenue
Now you can have that new
kitchen you have always
wanted and at a price you can
afford. 6 feet of plywood formica
cabinets for only $370. Bath-
room vanity at a low price.
FREE ESTIMATE
Call 691-3327 696-8069

General construction, addi-
tions, roofs, windows, etc. Call
620-8007 beeper 352-5316.

SUPER DEAL!!!

1024 NW 43 Street
Spacious 3 bedroom 1% bath.
Wall to wall carpet, remodeled
kitchen with new appliances.
Regal Properties 696-0806

WORK AT HOME:
From your comfortable office in
lovely 3 br 2 bath home. Corner
location. 990 NE 132 Street.
Della 625-6831 or 948-3456.

WALK TO EVERYTHING
From your centrally located 3 br
2bath home & carport. Reason-
able Priced. 1915 NW 183 ST.
Della 625-6831 or 948-3456.

RENT OPTION ;
3 br 2 bath only $65,000 and will
rent $650 while you qualify for
mongage. 3031 NW 187 ST.
Lloyd 948-3456, 624-4602.

LET THEM ENVY YOU
Your lovely 4 br, possible 5, 2
bath with Sunken, fing Liga
and scree pa
only $89,900. 1711 NW 170
Ter. 948-3456 or 624-4602.

Lloyd Lewis Realty

Hall Maintenance Plumbing,
Painting etc. Call 681-3260.

Home improvements & repairs.
Electrical, plumbing, carpentry,
painting, tile, windows, etc.
Free est. 651-9670/770-5372.

KING'S APPLIANCE REPAIR
No service charge. Washer,
dryer, heater, stove, refrig., a/c,
plumbing. 620-9112.

SANDERS’ ELECTRIC

& 624-1003
*Complete House Rewiring
*Service Change & Upgrade
*Room Add. & A/C Hookup
*Fuse To C/B & Smoke Det.

Lic. and Inc. cc 17351

FINANCING AVAILABLE

AUTO

1981
Power.

'83 Oldsmobile Stationwagon. 4
Door. All Power. $2400. Leal
557-8282 or 822-5216.

1985 Volkswagen Jetta, A/C,
automatic, sunroof. 654-0017,

EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT § EMPLOYMENT § EMPLOYMENT | CHILDCARE

ADVERTISING SALES
New South Florida computer
publication seeks three organ-
ized, motivated, self-starters for
advertising sales dept. Great
opportunity for the right person.

Terrific commission. $$. Call.

893-0009 Ext. 301.
Appt. Setters Wanted. Must

have phone experience. Call
Warren, 836-7424.

ASSOCIATE DEAN
FOR:

* School of Arts &

Humanities
* School of Communi-
cations
* School of Languages
* School of Natural &
Physical Sciences
School of Social
Science

Miami-Dade
Community
College/Wolfson

Campus

is accepting applications,
nominations and resumes for
the above positions. Each posi-
tion reports directly to the Dean
of Instruction and will have
responsibility for overall plan-
ning for the School, especially in
the areas of program develop-
ment, program evaluation, cur-
riculum development, oversee-
ing faculty development, divi-
sion productivity and fiscal
issues, facilities and special
assignments.

Must display excellent human
relations and management
skills and have the ability to
work and communicate in a
multi-cultural, multi-ethnic envi-
ronment. Individuals will partici-
pate in major campus commit-
tees, activities and functions.

Requires: Master's degree in a
discipline appropriate to the
position applied for and 5 years
of progressively responsible
administration experience iin
higher education or related
field, with teaching experience
related to the School desired,
Doctorate degree preferred.
Salary: $45,197 minimum with
liberal employee benefit
program.

A skilled counselor to provide
counseling, case management
and support services to children
in foster care system. Creativity
and flexibility required. E.O.E.
Send resume to: Family
Counseling Services of Greater
Miami, 8900 SW 107 Ave,
Miami, FL 33176, Attn: M.
Serna.

Beautician And
Nail Tech Wanted
Call Wanda 687-2040

CASHIERING SUPERVI-
SOR

Dynamic public agency seeks
effective supervisor with prior
management and cashiering or
retail experience. Candidate
will supervise a staff of fifteen
inner city high school students
and assist the Special Events
Coordinator with parking func-
tions at the Miami Arena. Ideal
candidate will have excellent
communication skills, be detail-
oriented and “customer service
minded”. Bilingual a plus. Must
be able to work a flexible sche-
dule including evenings and
weekends and be able to work
in an outdoor environment. Sal-
ary mid to upper teens. We offer
a competitive benefits package
and salary commensurate with
experience. For consideration,
send resume te Leona Bodie,
Miami Parking System, 190 NE
3 Street, Miami, Florida 33132
by June 23rd, 1991.

Miami Parking System
EOE
MF/H/V

CLASSY BARTENDER - Top
adult soul bar. Exp. only: Excel-
lent pay. 624-8876.

Cocktail Server
Host/ess
2 hrs./day - 11am-1pm
(10 hrs.Awk.)
PBX Operator
(Midnight Shift - 2 eves. wk.)

Some positions may require
previous experience, however
for others we are willing to train
very friendly and people
oriented applicants. Please
apply in person. Personnel
Office. Mon./Fri. 9am-12noon
Only.
RADISSON MART
711 N.W. 72 Avenue
Miami, Florida
Equal Opportunity Employer
MWFHN

DATA ENTRY
CLERK

Miami-Dade
Community
College/Medical
Center Campus

Position involves typing and
clerical work in the financial aid
department. Requires: Two
years experience in skilled typ-
ing and general clerical work;
language skills desired. Salary:
$14,402 minimum. Liberral
benefits are included.

Apply to: Human Resources,
300 N.E. 2nd Avenue, Miami,
FL 33132 by June 20, 1991. EA/
EO Community College.

We're looking for an unusual bil-
ingual person for an unusual
job: academic coordinator of
the Central American Journal
ism Program (CAJP), based at
Florida International University
in North Miami.

He or she will join a small, highly
motivated team whose goal is to
strengthen journalism and jour-
nalism education in Central
America under a seven-year
grant from the U.S. Agency for
International Development. The
CAJP is a professional program
for working journalists, journal-
ism educators and media own-
ers in Central America.

The person selected will be a
member of the faculty of FIU’s
School of Journalism and Mass
Communication. The person
will coordinate the mid-career
master's program of the CAJP
and supervise, evaluate and
monitor the 22 annual seminars
given in Miami and Central
America. He or she will be
expected to lecture in the mas-
ter's program and some
seminars.

All of the instruction is carried
outin Spanish. Thatmustbe the
first language of the candidate.
Writing skill in Spanish is
essential.

A PhD. is preferred, but a Mas-
ter's degree is acceptable.
Teaching experience on the
university level is required, pre-
ferably at the graduate level.
Special weight will be given to
experience with adult education
programs.

Research skills, especially in
quantitative research, are
important.

The candidate must have
experience as a working jour-
nalist, preferably in broadcast.
The position carries a minimum
salary $35,000 and is negoti-
able according to qualifications.
But, more importantly, it is a
position rich in challenges, job
satisfaction and interesting
level.

If you meet the above qualifica-
tions, please send your resume
and three letters of recommen-
dation to Charles H. Green,
Executive Director, CAJP,
Room 134, Academic ll, Florida
International University, Niorth
Miami Campus, North Miami,
FL 33181.

Application deadline is July 5,
1991.

MIAMI - DADE
COMMUNITY
COLLEGE

Wolfson Campus

Director of Campus
Audio-Visual Services
Administrates and supervises
A-V Distribution and Services.
Requires: Bachelor's degree in
an appropriate field. Six years of
experience in A-V communica-
tions systems with some man-
agement experience. Salary:
$29,590 minimum.

Director of Galleries
Responsible for visual prog-
rams: Frances Wolfson Art Gal-
lery, the Interamerican Art Gal-
lery and Centre Gallery.
Requires: Master's degree and
three to five years of profession-
al gallery or museum experi-
ence. Must be able to plan exhi-
bits which reflect a variety of
techniques and art mediums.
Salary: $31,881 minimum.

Engineer II
Responsible for supervisory,
tehnical and operational activi-
ties of the A-V Engineering
Department. Requires: Five
years of practical experience in
the maintenance, operation and
repair of broadcast, or educa-
tional T.V. systems and two
years of college coursework or
technical school training; or
equivalent combination of edu-
cation and experience. Flexible
schedule is required. Salary:
$24,230 minimum.

Art Computer Graphics

Supervisor
Chief Graphic Designer is
responsible for concept,
design, layout, paste-up,
typesetting and mechanical
preparation of graphic art
materials. Executes, directs
designs and produces printed
materials using computer
assisted techniques. Requires:
Bachelor's degree in Fine Arts,
Graphic Arts or related field, 3
years of professional experi-
ence and knowledge of state-
of-the-art computer graphic
equipment sand supervisory
experience. Salary: $23,410
minimum.

Program Support
Specialist
Coordinates and implements
the Owner Building Center's
non-credit program which
teaches lay people to build,
contract, remodel and repair
their own homes. Requires:
Bachelor's degree in an appro-
priate field with one to two years
work experience in administra-
tion and instruction, building,
contracting and use of Florida
building codes. Flexible sche-
dule and travel required. Salary:

$22,783 minimum.

Submit two copies of resume,
transcripts and references to:
Human Resources, 300 NE 2nd
Avenue, Miami, FL 33132-2297
by June 20, 1991. EA/EO Com-

munity College.

Nail Technicians Wanted. Nail
Expressions. 1300 N.W. 119
Street. 769-0020 Ask for
Stephanie.

FACULTY

CHAIRPERSON
Social Science/History
Political Science

Miami-Dade Community
College/North Campus

Individual will teach general
Social Science education
courses and will be responsible
for course scheduling, faculty
assignments, faculty perfor-
mance review and develop-
ment, program administration
curriculum development and
advisement of students. Flexx-
iblle schedule and possible on
and off campus assignments.

Requires: Master's degree in
one of the Social Sciences and
two years in community college
teaching. Two years admi-
nistration experience preferred.
Salary/academic rank is based
upon education and
experience.

Liberal employee benefit prog-
ram is included. Submit
application/resume, transcripts
and two work-related refer-
ences to: Human Resourcees,
11380 NW 27th Avenue, Miami,
FL 33156-3495 by June 27,
1991. EA/EO Community
College.

D.E.V.O.N. Childcare Plus.
Now interviewing for teaching
and clerical staff. References
and resume please. 161 NE
183 Street. Call
829-2337/Beeper 990-9094.

EASY WORK! EXCELLENT
PAY! ASSEMBLE PRODUCTS
AT HOME. CALL FOR INFOR-
MATION. 504-641-8003.
EXT.0645—

TWO BARBERS WANTED!
Central Barber Shop. 9455
N.W. 17th Ave. 693-5600.

FIELD NURSES

A DIFFERENT KIND OF
NURSING...PUBLIC
HEALTH
Where the Community is your
Patient

No bedside - no shift work. Two
positions are available at our
new Southside Field Center.
Florida RN license and Bache-
lor's degree in Nursing or
related field is required.

We offer excellent working
hours and fringe benefits,
including retirement, tuition-
free education and more. Sub-
mit State of Florida employment
application to: Personnel, 1350
N.W. 14 Street, Miami, FL
33125 or all 324-2424 by
6/21/91.

HRS DADE COUNTY
PUBLIC HEALTH UNIT

An Equal Opportunity
Employer

Start your own business.
Booths for rent Hair stylist and
facialist. Martina 576-4441.

GOVERNMENT JOBS! Now
hiring in your area, both skilled
and unskilled. For a current list
of jobs and application, call

+ 1-800-800-1993 Ext. M186.

GOVERNMENT JOBS! Now
hiring in your area, both skilled
and unskilled. For a current list
of jobs and application, call
1-800-800-1993 Ext. M811.

IF YOU HAVE AN ACTIVE OR
INACTIVE REAL ESTATE
LICENSE AND DON'T HAVE
TIME TO MAKE IT WORK FOR
YOU, MAKE $$$ WITH LITTLE
EFFORT. LEAVE A MESSAGE
FOR DONNA AT REAL
ESTATE CONSULTANTS,
INC. 285-0070.

Helen Miller Is

Helen L. Miller, present commis-
sioner and former mayor of

Opa-locka, will be insta

lled on board.

June 22 as an officer of the Dade

League of Cities.

Miller has served as a board
member for the League since 1982

LIFTER HOMES

Quick Qualification
and Move In

LOW PRICES
LOW MONTHLY
PAYMENTS
BEST LOCATIONS

No better financing any-

LET CR HCI E GE |
(07H

JOHN
GREER

$2900 CASH DOWN
$590 CLOSING COSTS

N.W. Second Avenue
and 177th Street

League Officer

and is the first African American to
be elected as an officer to the

Cloverleaf
Apartments

MONTHLY
Efficiencies From $350
1 Bedroom From $360
2 Bedrooms From $460

House & Townhouses
Low Rents
Low Sales Prices
Little Cash To Move In
Rental Office Open
Daily 10 AM-7 PM
A Sat-Sun. 9 AM-5 PM
652-5506
ET CHS

651-6565

FOR INFORMATION
AND APPOINTMENT

651-

DANCERS

MAKE MONEY $$$
Classiest adult soul club in
Miami needs top talent. Tips,
bonus. We train. The Mint
Lounge. 624-8876 after 2 p.m.

Educational Representatives.
Need to earn $400 per week or
more, must be sharp and clean.
Men and women, must have
car. Call Warren, 836-7424.

Lady blood donors needed.
Instant cash. No appointment.
Bring |.D. 1300 NW 36 St
Mon.-Fr. 8am-4pm. 634-9728.
Free gift to lady donors with this
ad.

MACHINE OPERATOR - Tak-
ing applications only. Work in
dark room environment loading
and unloading photographic
machines, must be able to
change shifts and work over-
time. Individual should be a self-
starter and highly motivated.
435-6300.

Need an assertive individual to
work for the Health Edge Maga-
zine. Job entails selling adver-
tising and interviewing health
facilities. Must have car. Call
Dell, 895-6822.

POSTAL JOBS. $11.41 to
$14.90 hr. For exam and appli-
cation information call 1 (219)
769-6649 ext. FL-168 9am -
9pm.

Telephone Sales. Experienced
only. Salary plus commission.
Part time. Call 638-7887.

Kims Perfect Image needs two
Lic. Cosmotologists and a Nail
Tech. Call 691-6999 or
353-1518 ask for Kim.

CHILDCARE |

BNT's Daycare, free breakfast,
lunch & snacks. 18mo to 5 yrs.
635-8071 7am to 7pm.

Childcare in my home. $35 per
wk. Call anytime 694-0194 Ms.
Fyffe.

Childcare in my home. Ages 1
mo. - 5 yrs. HRS Licensed/
754-5779.

MISCELLANEOUS

Be your own boss. Make up to
50% earnings selling Avon. For
more information, please call
Mrs. Tony, 691-2454.

CHURCH AVAILABLE.
SEATS 200
691-8277.

Start your own business.
Booths for rent Hair stylist and
facialist. Martina 576-4441.

STUDENTS
GOOD NEWS! Money for col-
lege, NOW! Many sources
available. Call 829-2424 Mary.

MERCHANDISE

WALL UNIT/BREAK FRONT.
Exc. cond. Must Sell! Moving.
$325. 866-8044.

ADVERTISE 13 WEEKS
ONLY $110
YOU CAN ADVERTISE
EVERY WEEK FOR
3 MONTHS FOR AS
LITTLE AS $110
IN OUR
CLASSIFIED SECTION
CALL LYNN
758-8538
FOR COMPLETE
DETAILS

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

Midwest Business Travel
Duplex for sale in Kansas City,
MO Ideal for traving sales per-
son. Now rented, income $540
mo. Use as bus. outlet, storage
or invest. Quick sale, senior
owner ill. Disc. for cash, call
899-1974.

THANK YOU
for Advertising

in the “Award Winning”
Miami Times

BID INF. LINE

(305) 348-3431.

Florida
International
University

‘Solicits Bid and
welcomes minori-
ties vendors to

phone the

4108

Company Picnics

p.m.

Weddings
Church Buffets

Northside Shopping Center
179 South Court , Miami, Florida 33147

OLD FARM BOY CATERING

Now serving fresh garlic crabs 3lb for $9.99 save $8.00
We would like to help every Father celebrate his Father's Day by
giving 5 free chicken wings on June 15th from 1:00 p.m. to 7:00

You must clip this ad and bring it with you

Reunions

AN EXCITING CAREER

Can be yours FREE in 4 months!
ACCOUNTING CLERK

SYS SIN To] o 13 (oJ gl od {oTo [ (=I [1g [08

DATA ENTRY

CLERICAL with COMPUTERS

*Classes are FREE If you qualify”
Monday-Friday 8 am-1 pm
*Job Placement Assistance*
You Must Work After Graduation
*No Student Loans*

649-7500

VT Te [=e BN IVR oN = I OF. To HO

$25.00 OFF ON ALL
APARTMENTS TO NURSES,
TEACHERS, FIREMEN & LAW
ENFORCEMENT OIFFICERS

Efficiencies from $300
1 Bedroom from $325
2 Bedrooms from $440
Houses and Townhouses
Low Rents Low Sales Prices
Little Cash To Move In
Rental office open dally

Sat. & Sun. 10 am to 6 pm

Lake Lucerne
LEEDS]

N.W. 207th Street
and 27th Avenue

JUNE SPECIAL

MONTHLY

9 am. to 7 pm.

FOR INFORMATION

625-6586

BID NO.

BID NO.
20-M-10M/WBE
309-L-10M/WBE

NOTICE TO BIDDERS

THE SCHOOL BOARD OF DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA

1450 N.E. SECOND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132

BIDS FOR CATEGORIES OF ITEMS LISTED BELOW WILL BE RECEIVED, AT THE ADDRESS LISTED
ON THE DESIGNATED DATE. BIDS ARE TO BE PLACED IN THE “BID BOX", IN ROOM #352, BY 2:00
P.M. BID FORMS ON WHICH THE BIDS MUST BE SUBMITTED ARE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST TO
THE BUREAU OF PROCUREMENT AND MATERIALS MANAGEMENT, ROOM #352, ADDRESS
ABOVE, TELEPHONE 995-1380. THE RESULTS OF BIDS AWARDED AT THE OFFICIAL SCHOOL
BOARD MEETINGS WILL BE AVAILABLE IN THE BUREAU OF PROCUREMENT AND MATERIALS
MANAGEMENT ON THE MONDAY FOLLOWING THE MEETINGS.

BID TITLE

RFP:11-M-2 REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL: CHAPTER I EDUCATIONAL SERVICES FOR NON-PUBLIC

SCHOOL STUDENTS 6/18/91
RFP:31-M-1 REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL: SPORTS MEDICINE PROGRAM 6/18/91
25-M-6 SCIENCE EQUIPMENT/ELECTRONIC ANALYTICAL BALANCES 6/25/91
17-M-3 FRESH GLAZED DOUGHNUTS 6/25/91

RFP:25-M-7 REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL: TO PROVIDE TRAVEL AGENCY SERVICE 6/27/91
MINORITY OWNED AND OPERATED BUSINESS PARTICIPATION: THE FOLLOWING BIDS ARE
LIMITED TO THOSE INDIVIDUALS AND BUSINESSES CLASSIFIED AS MINORITY-OWNED AND
OPERATED WHICH SHALL BE SO CERTIFIED EITHER BY THE SCHOOL BOARD OF DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA OR BY THE METRO-DADE COUNTY, PRIOR TO CONTRACT AWARD.

BID TITLE
AIR CONDITIONING COMPONENTS
EPOXY FLOORING REPLACEMENT

)

OPENING DATE

OPENING DATE
6/18/91
6/25/91



100 Bias: on

Greenberg Construction Corporation
Is soliciting bids from DGS Certified Minority
Contractors for Student Health/Wellness Cen-
ter, Project # BR-880/FIU bidding June 20, 1991
at 2:00 P.M. Subcontractors may review the
plans and specifications in our office located at

7333 Coral Way, Miami, FL.

Editorial Assistant

A Business Opportunity
Must Have Management Experience
Ownership of a
FAST FOOD RESTAURANT CHAIN
in Liberty City

Call TOOLS FOR CHANGE
305/751-8934/FAX# 751-1619

The Miami Times is accepting applicatons for the
post of Editorial Assistant. The successful candidate
will be a college graduate, preferably with a major in
journalism or communication, have excellent com-
mand of English as well as some editing, writing and
typing experience. Computer skill is desirable but not
essential as training will be provided. The Editorial
Assistant works very closely with the Managing
Editor and the job allows much scope for learning
several facets of newspaper operations and produc-
tion. Send detailed resumes to “Editorial Assistant,”
The Miami Times, 900 N.W. 54th St., Miami, FL
33127. The fax number is 756-0771.

LEGAL ANNOUNCEMENT OF BIDS

METROPOLITAN DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Metropolitan Dade County, Florida is announcing the availabil-
ity of the following bids which can be obtained through the Dade
County, G.S.A. Procurement Management Division, 111 N.W.
1st Street, Suite 2350, Miami, Florida 33128-1989, (305)
375-5289. Bid Proposals from prospective vendors must be
received in the Clerk of the Board Office located at 111 N.W. 1st
Street, Suite 210 by no later than 1:00 p.m. on the Bid Opening
Date in order to be considered.

The following Bids will be opened at 1:00 p.m. on Wednesday,
July 10, 1991:

Bid # 3180-7/92-OTR Mulching Services

An Affirmative Action Plan is required.

Attendance at a Pre-Bid Conference is mandatory on Tuesday,
June 18, at 10:00 AM at the Koger Center, 8675 NW 53rd St., Ste.
201, Conference Rm. No. A.

STOP FORECLOSURES

STOP CREDITOR HARASSMENT
STOP IRS SEIZURES

“FREE CONSULTATION
BANKRUPTCY 7, 11, 13
Dade 945-7444
Evenings: 996-9624

Rozalyn Landisbourg, Esq.

13899 Biscayne Boulevard Ste. 124
North Miami Beach, FL 33181

Qualifications available upon request.

CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami, Florida on
June 20, 1991 at 5:30 p.m. in the City Commission Chambers at City Hall, 3500 Pan
American Drive, Miami, Florida, in connection with the proposed codesignation of a
street in honor of Alice Wainwright.

All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning this item.
Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with
respect to any matter considered at this hearing, that person shall ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all testimony and evidence

(#8394)
City of Miami
Miami, Florida

Chief of Agricultural Programs — LES (00641)
Salary Range — $3,033.33 - $5,290.13 monthly

Selected Exempt Service position responsible for planning,
developing and coordinating a statewide Agricultural Program
for the Department; assists with the formulation, interpretation,
and implementation of policies, operational procedures, and
standards regarding Florida's agricultural and labor laws.
Submit a State of Florida employment application to:

Sandra Brooks
303 Hartman Building
2012 Capital Circle, Southeast
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2152
(904) 488-4398 or SUNCOM 278-4398
by Monday, June 24, 1991

“Preference will be given to certain veterans and spouses of
veterans as required by Florida Statutes.” EOE/AA Employer. “
We hire only U.S. Citizens and lawfully authorized alien
workers.” Minorities are strongly encouraged to apply.

Vacancy For Proofreader

If you hate to see typo errors in your newspaper, have a good
command of English, can type, have some computer skill and want to
join a dynamic work team, you may be the person we are looking for
urgently as our Proofreader. Previous experience is desirable but not
essential since we shall train the successful applicant. Call Mr.
Hamaludin at 757-1147 or stop by our office today, tomorrow or

The Miami Times

900 NW 54th St.

ST. JOHN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION
Acct. 3031501
DISPLAY ADVERTISEMENT

SPECIAL PROJECTS COORDINATOR

The St. John Community Development Corporation, a not-
for-profit community based organization is seeking a Special
Project Coordinator.
The selected applicant will be responsible to the Executive
Director and will assist with the coordination and implementa-
tion of projects in housing and economic development in the
Overtown community. Other responsibilities include technical
assistance to area merchants, property management, program
and project development and other duties as assigned.
Qualifications: B.S. degree in Business or Public Administration,
Economics or arelated field. Experience at the management level
in a CDC, local development corporation or as a commercial loan
officer will be an asset. Excellent written and oral communication
skills required. The ideal candidate will be familiar with the City
of Miami, Metropolitan Dade County, the State of Florida and
Federal Government programs.
Reply with letter of application and detailed resume and salary
requirements.
Deadline for applying: June 28, 1991.
Reply to: Special Projects Coordinator
St. John CDC
P.O. Box 015344
Miami, Florida 33101-6344
No calls please.

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Sealed bids for furnishing all labor, materials and equipment for
the following project will be received in the Office of the Clerk of
the Board of County Commissioners, Room 210, Dade County
Administration Building, 111 N.W. 1st Street, Miami, up to 1:00
p.m., Local Time, June 26, 1991, where they will be publicly
opened and read aloud by the clerk.
PROJECT NUMBER 662186 (SECONDARY GAS TAX
FUNDING)
LOCATION: NW 119 STREET — FROM 57 AVENUE TO 42
AVENUE
DESCRIPTION: Construction of a 4-lane divided roadway
including sidewalk, curb & gutter, storm drainage, pavement
markings, signalization, tree planting, roadway lighting and
other miscellaneous roadway work.
DADE COUNTY CONTRACTOR'S CERTIFICATION IS
REQUIRED IN ONE OF THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES:
General Engineering, General Building and/or Paving or other
categories as applicable to Chapter 10 of the Code of Metropolitan
Dade County.
This project includes goals for the participation of Black owned
subcontractor firms in accordance with Ordinance No.
82-67.
Ordinance 90-143, The Responsible Wages and Benefits Ordi-
nance applies to this project. The requirements are spelled out in
the Supplemental General Conditions.
All bids must be submitted in sealed envelopes bearing on the
outside the name of the Bidder, his address, the number of the
project for which the bid is submitted, and the date of
opening.
Specifications and Contract Documents are open to public
inspection and may be obtained from the Contracts and
Specifications Section, Public Works Department, Telephone No.
(805) 375-2930 at Metro-Dade Center, 111 N.W. First Street,
Suite 1510, Miami, Florida 33128-1970 upon deposit of $50.00
in check or money order payable to the Board of County
Commissioners of Dade County, Florida for the first set of
documents. The full amount of the deposit will be refunded
within thirty (30) days after the date of opening of bids upon
request of the Bidder and return of the documents, if any, in good
condition, to the above address after which time all remaining
checks will be deposited in the General Fund of Dade County,
Florida. All additional sets of plans and/or documents will

require a separate deposit by check of $50.00 per set, which is not
refundable.

reject any or all bids. Bids from any person, firm or corporation in
default upon any agreement with the County will be
rejected.
Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or acceptable
bid bond in the amount of five (5) percent of the base bid as
guarantee that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract, will within
ten (10) consecutive calendar days after being presented with the
prescribed contract forms, enter into a written contract with the
Board of County Commissioners of Dade County, Florida in
accordance with the accepted bid, and give a performance bond
satisfactory to the Board of County Commissioners, Dade
County, Florida, equal to one hundred (100%) percent of the base
Conract price.
No bidder may withdraw his bid within ninety (90) days after date
set for the opening thereof.
JOAQUIN G. AVINO, COUNTY MANAGER
METROPOLITAN DADE COUNTY
MARSHALL ADER, CLERK
RAYMOND REED, DEPUTY CLERK

The County reserves the right to waive any informalities in, or to |

PARK AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT
DESIGN, SURVEY & INSPECTION DIVISION
SECTION 00020

INVITATION TO BID

SEALED BIDS for the project designated below will be received
for and on behalf of Metro-Dade County, by the Clerk of the Board
of County Commissioners Suite 210, Metro-Dade 111 N.W. First
St., Miami, FL. 33128, UNTIL 1:00 PM LOCAL TIME, ON: JULY
24, 1991 when they will be transferred to the Commission
Chamber, where they will be publicly opened and read
aloud.

PROJECT NAME: SEABIRD STATION AT PELICAN HARBOR
North Bay Village, Miami, Florida

PROJECT NO. 8954

Recreation Dept.
IN GENERAL THE WORK COMPRISES: Construction of a 940
sq.ft. one story building to be used as a Seabird Hospital. The
work includes concrete foundations, concrete slab on ground,
concrete masonry walls with concrete columns & tie beams,
stucco, wood girder & truss roof structure, plywood roof
sheathing, metal roofing, metal stud & gypsum board partitions,
plumbing, electrical and mechanical systems. Exterior screened
bird area with six bird wading pools.
YOUR ATTENDANCE IS REQUESTED at the Pre-Bid Meeting to
be held at the Pelican Harbor Marina proposed construction site
located at 1275 N.E. 79 St. ON: JULY 9, 1991 AT: 10:00
AM.
This project includes a goal for the participation of Black-owned
contractor & subcontractor firms as a percentage of the contract
amount as noted on the Proposal-Agreement Form, in accor-
dance with the Supplementary Conditions. Locally funded
projects of $100,000 and above are also subject to the Equal
Employment Opportunity Requirements, as set forth in the
Supplementary Cond. Ordinance 90-143, The Responsible
Wages and Benefits Ordinance applies to this project. The
requirements are spelled out in the Supplemental General
Conditions.
DOCUMENTS MAY BE PURCHASED: Peter F. Kerwin, Assistant
Director, Const. Mgmt. Metro-Dade Park & Rec. Dept. 11025
S.W. 84 St., Bldg #8, Miami, FL., 33173, or may be seen at Miami
Builders Exchange, 46 N.E. 6 St., or at F.W. Dodge Corp. 3700
West Flagler Street, Miami, FL.
BID DOCUMENTS MAY BE PURCHASED STARTING: JUNE 18,
1991
On a non-refundable basis for $35.00 per set. Checks or money
orders shall be made payable to Metro Dade County Board of
County Commissioners. Bidders requesting Bid Documents
shall identify themselves as Prime Contractors or Subcontrac-
tors and kind of work being considered. CASH WILL NOT BE
ACCEPTED.
A BID SECURITY in the amount of 5% of the Base Bid must
accompany each bid in accordance with the Instructions to
Bidders. No bidder may withdraw his bid within ninety (90) days
after date set for the opening thereof.
THE COUNTY RESERVES THE RIGHT to waive any informalities
or irregularities in any bid or to reject any or all bids. Bids from
any person, firm or corp. ever in default upon any agreement with
the County or against whom Dade County has filed a lawsuit
which is presently pending, will be rejected.
The estimated cost of construction for this project is $220,000
(Base Bid)

MARSHALL ADER

Clerk of the Court

Joaquin G. Avino, P.E., P.L.S.

County Manager

JACKSON MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
PUBLIC HEALTH TRUST
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33136

NOTICE TO BIDDERS

Sealed Bids will be received on behalf of the Public Health Trust of
Dade County Florida in the Office of the Purchasing Manager,
Jackson Memorial Hospital, 1611 N.W. 12th Avenue, Miami,
Florida 33136 until 1:00 P.M. Wednesday on the date indicated
below. Minority vendors are encouraged to participate.
The following Bids will open: July 3, 1991:
1. Bid#91-3137 9/30/92 Gas; steriliztion for the Respiratory
Therapy Dept. for a one year period with option to renew.
2. Bid#91-4382 8/31/92 Trays; various (acute hemodialysis,
biopsy, exchange transfusion, gastric lavage, myleogram, and
periotoneal lavage) for the Stores Dept. for a one year period with
option to renew.
3. Bid#91-4383 9/30/92 Cardiac catheterization items for the
Cardiac Cath Lab. for a one year period with option to
renew.
4. Bid#91-2817 9/30/92 Printing of form; patient billing, for the
Stores Dept. for a one year period with option to renew.
5. Bid#91-3155 9/30/92 Trocars; disposable and laporoscopic
instruments for the Operating Room for a one year period with
option to renew.
6. Bid#91-2804 8/31 /92 Slippers for the Stores Dept. for a one
year period with option to renew.
7.Bid#91-3001 8/31 /92 Tiles; ceiling and floor and other related
parts, supplies, and tools for the Maintenance Dept. for a one
year with option to renew.
8. Bid #91-2695 8/31/92 Blood processing sets for the Stores
Dept. for a one year period with option to renew.
9. Bid#91-3087 8/31/92 Disposables for the performance of
therapeutic exchange transfusion on IBM-2997 processor for the
Transfusion Services Dept. for a one year period with option to
renew.
10. Bid#91-3148 8/31/92 Office supplies for the Stores Dept. for
a one year period with option to renew. This Contract is a
Set-Aside for competitive bidding among Certified Black-Owned
Vendor and Sub-Vendor firms only. A pre bid conference will be
held at:
Jackson Memorial Hospital
1611 N.W. 12th Avenue
Miami, FL 33136
PLACE: Dialysis Conference Room, UCC 2nd Floor
DATEL June 27, 1991

TIME: 10:00 A.M.
Failure to attend this mandatory conference at the time stated
shall result in your bid being considered non-responsive.
CERTIFICATION
Bidder or Sub-vendor must have current vendor certification on
file with the Dade County Office of Minority Business Develop-
ment prior to the bid opening date to be considered for
this bid.

Peter Tomson
Purchasing Manager
Purchasing Services

The Bid Documents were prepared by Metro-Dade CountyPark &

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Sealed bids for a Project known and identified as “Sanitary Sewer
Rehabilitation in Area of Pump Station No. 407, Contract No.
S-418, will be received by the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer
Authority Department, Room 211 Main Office, 3575 South
LeJeune Road, Miami, Florida 33133, until 2:00 P.M. Local Time,
July 11, 1991, at which time the bids will be transferred to Room
100 (Meeting Room, First Floor) where they will be publicly
opened and read aloud. Any bid received after 2:00 P.M. will not
be considered. The mailing address of the Miami-Dade Water and
Sewer Authority Department is P.O. Box 330316, Miami, Florida
33233-0316.
The Project consists of furnishing all labor, material and
equipment for restoring a total of approximately 4,015 feet of
8-inch vitrified clay pipe sanitary sewers in the vicinity of Miami
Gardens Drive and West Oakmont Drive (approximately N.-W. 75
Avenue), Dade County, Florida.
The work includes cleaning the existing sewers and lining them
by the inversion liner or deformed pipe liner method, or approved
equal by which the rehabilitation of the sewer is accomplished
through the manholes, and laterals are reconnected to the sewer
without disturbing the street surface.
Work also includes televising, spot repairs, cleaning and surface
preparation of the interior of the existing pipeline, bypass
pumping and dewatering, testing for leaks, and all other
appurtenant and miscellaneous related items and work for a
completed Project.
The Responsible Wages and Benefits Ordinance 90-1443 may
apply to this Project. The requirements are set forth in the
Instructions to Bidder, and the Supplemental General Condi-
tions.
Sets of Contract Documents are open to public inspection and
may be obtained at the Specifications Section of the Miami-Dade
Water and Sewer Authority Department at 3575 South LeJeune
Road (2 blocks south of U.S. Highway 1), Miami, Florida. A
deposit of Twenty-Five Dollars ($25.00), in the form of check or
money order made payable to the Miami Dade Water and Sewer
Authority Department, will be required for each set of Contract
Documents. A refund of such deposit will be made to the
successful bidder and to others upon the return of all documents
in good condition, to the above address, within thirty (30) days
after the bid opening date, after which time all remaining checks
and money orders will be deposited in the General Fund of the
Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Authority Department.
All bids must be ‘submitted in sealed envelopes bearing on the
outside the name of the Bidder, his address, the name and
number of the project for which the bid is submitted, and the
date of opening. :
The Proposal shall be accompanied by bid security in an amount
not less than five percent (5%) of the bid amount. Said security
shall be in the form of a cerrtified check or cashier's check on a

solvent national or state bank; or a Bid Bond executed by the -

Bidder and a qualified Surety, satisfactory and payable to the
Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Authority Department.

No Bidder may withdraw his bid within ninety (90) days after date
set for the opening thereof.

The Board of County Commissioners, Dade County, Florida,
reserves the right to reject any or all bids, to waive any informality
in any bid or to readvertise for bids. Bids from any person, firm or
Corporation in default on other contracts or agreements with the
Count may be rejected. Failure by the Bidder to satisfy claims on
Pistons contracts with the County may be cause for rejection of

s bid.
Garrett Sloan, Director
Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Authority Department
Metropolitan Dade County

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Many of today’s leading rhythm
& blues artists will take center
stage when the 1991 Budweiser

| Superfest Concert tour stops in

Miami on Sunday, June 186, at the
Orange Bowl.

Soul Train Award winners Bell
Biv DeVoe and L.L. Cool J will join

| chart-toppers Keith Sweat, Ralph
¢ Tresvant and Pebbles, with a spe-

cial guest appearance by Babyface,

¢ for a one-of-a-kind performance in

Miami.
In its 12th year, the Budweiser

. Tickets for the Miami stop are
currently on sale at area ticket

: outlets.

Superfest tour will entertain more

Budweiser Superfest Star-Studded
Concert At Orange Bowl Sunday

than halfa million musictansin 15
cities across the country. While
performing in only two cities dur-
ing its first season in 1980, the
Budweiser Superfest has grown to
become the largest rhythm & blues
event of its kind.

Again this year, the Budweiser
Superfest will feature a revolving
stage that permits one group to set
up while another is performing,
thus reducing downtime between
acts.

As part of Budweiser's salute to
the successful tour, the company
is also offering consumers a
chance to win over $25,000 in
prizes in the Budweiser Superfest
Sweepstakes.

Scheduled to coincide with the
tour, the Budweiser Superfest
Sweepstakes offers as grand prize
a 1991 Camaro RS, valued at over
$19,000. In addition, 20 Budweis-
er “Rock Boxes,” a unique combi-
nation cooler with built-in AM/FM
stereo radio, will be given away as
second prizes. Two hundred third
prize winners will receive Budweis-
er Superfest T-shirts and hats.

Entry forms, complete with
sweepstakes details, can be found
on Budweiser Superfest point-of-
sale displays at all participating
retail outlets. Participants must be
at least 21 years of age or older to
enter.

Theta Nu Sigma Sorority Hosts Luncheon

Mu Chapter of Theta Nu Sigma
Sorority held its Founders Day
Luncheon recently at Universal

Truth Center.
The theme was “Pursuing Our
Legacy For The Future Genera-

Sorors Harriet Hawkins, Dory Lingo and basileus Juanita

Johnson

2

Star Gazing

With Lisa Collins

Altovise Davis

Altovise Davis fights for her
survival: Altovise Davis denies
rumors that she attempted suicide
but will admit to her share of bad
times. Davis is still in the midst ofa
financial crisis surrounding a huge
IRS debt left by her late husband,
entertainer Sam- 7
my Davis Jr.

Altovise Davis
says that her hus-
band did more
than his share for
others and she is
hoping that they
remember as she
reaches out for J
help. The
widowed ex- COLLINS
dancer is presently appealing to
those in the industry for assis-
tance. She is asking for help to get
back on her feet, with the assur-
ance that they will be paid back in
full.

Astowhat the late Sammy Davis
Jr. would have thought of her situ-
ation, she says: “I am sure that he
wouldn't have wanted it this way.”

Speaking of big IRS debts, Redd
Foxx just might be able to pay off
the IRS now that CBS has given the
go-ahead on his new series, “The
Royal Family.” It's about an elderly
couple whose plans for retirement
are all but nixed when their
daughter and her children return
home. The series, which also stars
Della Reese and has Eddie Murphy
as its producer, is set to debut on
Wednesdays this fall.

® % kx % % % ® *

And, come September, James
Earl Jones will be sporting a new
look in a series that is intended to
be a revamping of “Gabriel's Fire,”
though the show will be called
“Bird & Katt.” The revamped ver-
sion teams Jones with veteran
actor Richard Crenna. Missing
altogether from the fall lineup are
“Equal Justice,” “Amen,” and “Dis-
ney Presents: The 100 Lives of
Black Jack Savage.” So, too, are
pilots starring Debbie Allen and
Jackee.

However, the new season has a
half-dozen Black-oriented shows
featuring both relatively undiscov-
ered talent like Phill Lewis, who will
star as Teech in a CBS series cen-
tering on a Black teacher hired at
an all-White, upper-crust board-

Deep In Debt

ing school and Robert Guilliame

tions.” Guest speaker for this occa-
sion was Mr. Otis Pitts of Tacolcy-
Belafonte Center.

Mr. Pitts stated that Mu Chapter
is one of the best examples of a sor-
ority in seting the pace for involve-
ment in community activities.
Also, that the Chapter's spirituali-
ty and morality as being its main
concern for passing on in the lega-
cy is to be admired.

Presentations for the day were
made to Soror Olga Cooper for out-
standing member; Businesswo-
man of the year award went to Sor-
or Dory Lingo. Woman of the Year
award was presented to Soror Har-
riet Hawkins.

The sorority will join other mem-
bers of the National Beauty Cultur-
ist League Inc. in New Orleans, LA,
for its 72nd Annual Convention
Institute Trade Show on July 27
through Aug. 3.

Ivy Leaf reporter Soror Harriet
Hawkins.

Che Miami Times

The

times are changed

J

Section D

and we are changed with them

Thursday, June 13, 1991

‘Stevie Wonder’s Album For ‘J ungle
Fever’ Is His First In 4 Years

BURBANK, Calif. (AP) — Stevie not appreciate each other because
Wonder says director Spike Lee's ofracial difference as far as color,”
new movie, “Jungle Fever,” about he said.

an inter-racial love affair, and the

“I'm still optimistic, but I feel

tensions that surround it inspired that something drastic is going to

him to record his first album in
four years.

The blind singer listens to films
and has friends describe non-
speaking sequences. He did so for
“Jungle Fever” and produced an
11-song soundtrack.

“I have a reading machine so I
could read the script, but I wanted
to see the film and get a sense of the
different voices and feel the motion
of the picture,” Wonder said.

“In fact, when I saw (it), I
thought it worked so well that I told
(Lee), ‘You don't need any music for
the film. Just leave it the way it is.â„¢

Much of the music addresses
race relations and social condi-
tions that Wonder says haven't
improved significantly since he
wrote “You Ain't Done Nothin’
and “Higher Ground" in the 1970s.

“It's kind of like things have
changed, but you look around and
there is still so much to be done,”
he said.

“It's sad to think we are still in
this state of affairs where we can-

Randles Pushes WTVJ]

Into Ratings Heaven

By HANNAH RASSU

It's time for a double celebration
for Tom Randles, news anchor on
WTVJ-Channel 4. As he makes
ready for his first anniversary with
the station, he is also pulling in the
viewers.

Despite the fact that he is now
busier than ever, he anchors
“News at 6” with Kelly Craig and
“News at 11" with Susan Lichtman.
Randles is pleased that, in addi-
tion, he will be taking over “News at
5,” which is not doing as well as it
could be, from his good friend Bob
Meyers.

“This makes me the only anchor
at the station to anchor three
prime news slots. The move shows
that the producers have confi-
dence in me. I am looking forward
to the challenge,” he told The
Times.

When he replaced John Ham-
brick last year, Randles became

(“Benson”), who will return to star the first Black to join the station as

in “Pacific Station.” Guilliame will
play a veteran detective “whose
beat is Venice Beach.”

Prince sidekicks Morris Day and
Jerome Benton portray hotel
detectives in a new sitcom from
Fox, “Hotel Dicks,” which just
might air this summer as a tryout.
Charles Dutton, who has gotten
raves (and a Tony award) for his
work on Broadway, will turn his
attention to TV as the star of “Roc.”
In the show that has been

. described as “The Black Honey-

mooners,” he plays a blue-collar
garbage collector.

Among ABC's new series is
“Homefront,” a period piece about
soldiers coming home from the war
in 1945, starring Dick Anthony
Williams and Hattie Winston.
Although I've heard nothing but
good things about it, I'm putting
my money on “The Royal Family.”

In other TV news, REginald Vel-
Johnson, co-star of ABC's top-
rated weekley series “Family Mat-
ters,” is set to co-star with Corbin
Bernsen and Mel Harris in the NBC
four-hour miniseries, “Grass
Roots,” currently filming on loca-
tion in Atlanta . . . Ata U.S. Senate
panel probing the problems of
Black males, former Secretary of
the Army Clifford Alexander testi-
fied that negative images of Blacks
are fed in movies, television and
elsewhere. “L.A. Law” co-star Blair
Underwood cited the controversial
Rodney King beating by the LAPD
as proof “that African American
males have no protectors.”

® % % % % * Xk ¥%

By the way: Radioscope recen-
tly celebrated its eighth anniver-
sary as the number-one entertain-
ment magazine of the year, with an
airing of its most memorable seg-
ments, including the bitter Spike
Lee/Arsenio Hall feud. Listeners
who called in received Coca Cola
gift packs as part of the celebraton.
The event led into Black Music
Month with the annual Black Mus-
ic Moments” and “The Black Music
Experience.” I'm telling you if you
really want to know of the struggles
and monumentous achievements
of Blacks in music, you won't miss
it. Check your local radio for air-
times. You won't be sorry.

main anchor and the second in the
South Florida market, after WPLG
Channel 10's Dwight Lauderdale.

In less than a year, he has
accomplished much. “News at 11”
is now the number-one news
broadcast.

“WTVJ is now a 24-hour news
operation, which means apart
from anchoring the news being
prepared to meet deadlines on the
hour every hour. I am also respon-
sible for writing and producing
news stories,” he said.

“I know that I am receiving a
great deal of support from the
Black community. I can gauge this
on the calls and requests I receive
to make personal appearances,” he
said.

TOM RANDLES

He tries to accommodate invita-
tions whenever he can and is also

involved with “The More You
Know”, a campaign targeted to
helping encourage parents to
become more involved with their
children.

Randles said that it has always
been his intention to address
issues that are important to the
different ethnic groups in the
community.

“Obviously, the news station
must try to appeal to everyone. But
I would like to see more ethnic
issues tackled,” he said.

Randles and his wife, “Big” Mee-
ka, and children, “Little” Meeka
and Shareena, have settled down
very well in South Florida. He has
had several offers from stations
anxious to snap up his raw talent.
But, for the moment, he is staying
put.

fn dw

Birthday Blessings To Timothy

Timothy Nathaniel Benyard celebrates his 2nd birthday
today, June 13. The proud parents are Robin and Nathaniel

Benyard.

}

a ro ?
‘Jungle Fever’ Explores Mixed Relations

happen before people understand
the need to change. ... It's very
unfortunate.”

“Jungle Fever” opened in thea-
ters last weekend.

Acclaimed filmmaker Spike Lee (“Do The Right Thing,”
“Mo’ Better Blues”) directs “Jungle Fever,” a provocative
story about a successful Black architect whose affair with his
Italian American secretary forces them to confront the
harsh realities of race relations in America. Set in New York
City, the film also examines the myriad pressures facing
families today — from the generation gap to drug abuse. The
film, which stars Wesley Snipes, Annabella Sciorra, Spike
Lee, Ossie Davis, Ruby Dee, Samuel L. Jackson, Lonette
McKee, John Turturro, Frank Vincent and Anthony Quinn,
opened last weekend. It is written and directed by Lee
through his 40 Acrea and AMule Filmworks Production Com-
pany. Photo shows Annabella Sciorra and Wesley Snipes ina

tender scene.

NW,

DONDREA SMITH

RICKY CRAWFORD

Dondrea, Ricky Queen And King

Dondrea Smith, granddaughter
of Geneva Hadley, and Ricky Craw-
ford, son of Henrietta D. Walker
and Ricky Crawford Sr., were
crowned Queen and Kingon May 5,
1991 at Wanza and Braxton's Pink
and Blue Daycare Centre, 1840

CLIFFORD MITCHELL

Clifford Mitchell
In BOSS Show

On May 11, 1991, at the Philip
Michael Thomas Miami Way
Theatre, BOSS (Brothers Of Super-
jor Status) held one of this year's
most spectacular musical perfor-
mances featuring one of this
nation's top recording artists, Clif-
ford Mitchell, and the Masters of
Music Quintet “Insight”.

This electrifying performance
was held in front of a standing-

room-only crowd.
’

N.W. 152nd Terr., Opa-locka; FL
33054, phone: 681-0616. The
Princesses are Sequoyah Robinson
and Ty'neshia Adams. Princes are
Jheremie White and Lerren C. °
Wilson.

More Goombay
At Calder Tracks

By DELICIA HICKS
Reporter Intern

The 15th Annual Miami/
Bahamas Goombay Festival did
not end in Coconut Grove. It is now
moving north to Calder Race
Course, 21001 N.W. 27th Ave.
(right next to Joe Robbie Stadium)
this weekend, June 15-16, at
12:30 p.m.

Paul Jowdy, organizer, said this
event will highlight the Miami Sun-
shineJunkanoo Band, a free givea-
way cruise to the Bahamas, live
calypso music, hair braiding,
booths selling straw products,
authentic Bahamian cuisine, trop-
ical drinks and desserts and also
Thoroughbred racing action.

Some of the Bahamian cuisine
consists of jerk chicken, curried
goat, pepper-pot soup, Bahamian
beef patties, curried shrimp, conch
fritters, and codfish balls. The
drinks include Calder colada,
Bahamian rum runner, sea breeze
and red stripe beer. The desserts
are tropical fruit cup, coconut
cream pie, and pastries.

All events are open to the public.
|] 1



2 THE MIAMI TIMES

Thursday, June 13, 1991

The Poet’s Pen

Trapped

By RASHANA DABNEY
Alone
In the darkness
Stranded
Blind
Can't see
Can't touch
Can't sense
Can't taste
Waiting
No one comes
Crying
Aloud
Emptiness everywhere
Can't see
Can't touch
Can't sense
Can't taste
Hunger
Thirst
Anger
Oppression
Can't see
Can't touch
Can't sense
Can't taste
Help
See a light
Fall forward
Walk toward
Don't reach
Can't see
Can't ‘touch
Can't sense
Can't taste
Numb
All over
Paralyzed
Heal
Can't see
Can't touch
Can't sense
Can't taste
No hope
No sign
No life
Dead

My Father

By ERVIN D. LIGHTSEY
Some folks count their riches
In houses, land, money, silver
and gold.

This is their wealth, all earthly
possesions,

That can be stolen bought and
sold.

To them I couldn't be considered
wealthy

For the things that I own are very
few.

If these folks only knew,

Father, it's you.

Yes, Father, I still have you

And I will always love you

For I know that you love me,

And sometimes I know that it'sa
difficult task

But you're doing it without being
asked.

Father, you're also a wonderful
sort of companion,

Devoted and faithful and true.

To me wealth doesn't matter.

My only concern is you.

Father, you gave comfort and
pleasure

To me when I was young

And now when I am old,

You are my precious treasure.

Worth more than money, silver
and any amount of weight in gold.

Missing Grand Dad

By SHARON L. WILLIAMS

Missing you is something that
really makes me wonder.

I miss you even more when

there's rain, lightning and.

thunder.

Missing you so dearly when
you're holding me tight,

Thinking about how far you are
every morning, day and night.

Missing you day by day can
make a person love you even more,

Especially when you used to
come to my house and knock on
the door.

Missing you is the most impor-
tant part of my life, and making my
dreams come true.

Grand Dad, I've been missing
you for so long until I want to say I
love you.

Grand Dad, it's hard for a per-
son to live without the one they
love,

Action speaks louder than
words and only He knows up
above.

Missing you stopped me from
laughing, smiling and having fun,
too.

Grand Dad, there's nothing I'd
rather do without you.

Just take life one step at a time
and maybe you'll come back home.

And when you're ready to leave,

We'll be standing by you, your
side and at your grave-stone.

Missing you now that I know
you're in your bed getting all your
rest.

The ones who miss you love you
the best.

Another Miracle

By CELESTE D. FITZPATRICK
Yes, Lord, you did it, yet again.
You came through, my best friend.
When | prayed my little prayer,
You heard, and let me know you
care.

I knew all the time in my mind
You would come through right on
time.

I didn't know how, when or where,
But I knew you would be there.
I have to pray there's more than me
For another miracle, I'll pray you
see.

Surprise

By Victim of Abuse

Into our lives come many things

To break your happy routine,

The things you had not planned
on

That happen so unforeseen.

The unexpected sadness

That is scattered along the way,

Sadness you didn't count on,

On a rare fulfilling day.

The unplanned sudden meeting

That comes from Tallahassee by
surprise

And darkens the heart with
sadness, ;

Like a dark cloud in skies.

As every unhappy happening
and every unlucky break

Are only a few little gifts from
God above

That are yours to take.

Now it's a new job you might
seek.

Remember the Lord's now in
control.

A Perfect Woman

By E.C.B.

I saw her upon nearer view,

A spirit, yet a woman too!

Her household motions light and
free

And step of virgin liberty;

A countenance in which did meet
Sweet records, promises as sweet;
A creature not too bright or good
For human nature's daily food,
For transient sorrows, simple
wiles,

Praise, blame, love, kisses, tears
and smiles.

And now I see with eyes serene
The very pulse of the machine;
A being breathing thoughtful
breath,

A traveller 'twixt life and death;
The reason firm, the temperate
will,

Endurance, foresight, strength
and skill;

A perfect woman, nobly planned,
Towarn, to comfort and command;
And yet a spirit still, and bright
With something of angelic light.

Liberty For All

by BOB SINQUEFIELD

Now that the war is over, and
most of our troops are home

It's time for our representatives
in Washington

To take care of business of their
own.

If Congress can bring law and
order

In countries so far away,

Then why not solve these many
problems

That're facing us today?

Such as hungry homeless peo-
ple on the street,

And sleeping in the park,

Retired and elderly people,
afraid to go outside at dark

Because of crime, rape, and
drugs.

With three and four locks on
their door.

Unfair job discrimination in so
many public places.

Even at the employment offices,
people there are racist.

I don’t care about their foolish
prejudices,

With me that's good and well.

If they think they are better than

They can proudly step to hell.

What I am concerned about

Is the color whether Black or
White.

If I am qualified to do the job,

Then give me my equal right.

Don't put one at the end of the
line and ordering me to wait.

The Constitution of the United
States

Has already set that record
straight.

So, if we all confess to being
American citizens

Then why is it so hard for all of
us

To live in harmony instead of so
far apart? \

Please pray with me for our
politicians

To heed my beckoned call

And that they will enforce this
law of justice and liberty for all.

On The Waves

By JEROME HARRIS

Someone told me to stand on the
shore

And say the words that will open
Love's door.

With the sand beneath my feet,

I thought of words that would
sound so sweet.

I said words that shine by the
moon,

And if any woman heard this
she'd really be swooned.

The stars were there with the
waves on the sea,

God put them there for you and
me.

The beach, the stars and the
moon,

By them, I promise, you will be
mine soon.

On the waves is all I can say,

Because you were there even if
you couldn't stay.

If I miss this Love and you go
away,
On the waves you will come back
to me someday.
\

Chapter I Students Are Urged
To Make Success Their Goal

The Region III Chapter 1 Satel-
lite Parent Education Resource
Center of Dade County Public
Schools held its fourth and final
brunch for the year for several fifth
and sixth-grade minority boys who
attend Poinciana Park, Charles R.
Drew and Holmes elementary
schools, of which Cynthia Clarke,
Fred Morley and Jeannette Goa are
the respective principals, at the
North Miami Beach Howard John-
son's Restaurant on May 31.

The cost for these special activi-
ties has been underwritten by Rev.
Bernard C. Poitier, Dade Partner,
Region III SPERC.

“I believe very profoundly in
sharing with the community and
doing whatever is humanly possi-
ble to make a positive impace on
minority boys,” he said.

“The focus of this special prog-
ram has to work compassionately
with and for minority boys in an
effort to show these children that
they are indeed worthwhile indivi-

duals,” added Annie Richardson,
Parent Education Specialist.

The speaker at the recent activi-
ty was Martin L. King, a recent gra-
duate of the University of Florida
and an example of what these little
boys can become. Eleanor Leaks,
one of King's former teachers at
Martin L. King Elementary, said
that he exhibited “a certain kind of
determination” even as a second
grader.

He was introduced by a beaming
and proud sister, Mercia King,
whose exhuberance was matched
only by that of her mother, Mercia
King Mason, who has worked hard
as a Chapter 1 parent for years.

King encouraged the young boys
to take them one day at a time and
never allow anyone to tell them
taht they cannot be successful in
life.

In attendance were Della R. Wil-
son, Supervisor of Parent
Outreach/Community Resources,
and Johnnie McMillian, Project

Lorin Purcell Aiming
At Big Achievements

Lorin Purcell is an Edison High
student who is blazing a trial for
himself. He was a participant in the
recent 1991 Men of Towmorrow
Program at the James L. Knight
Center, winning third place in the
Talent category and Honorable
Mention in the Black History Pro-
ject category.

His guest was Maslyn Denise
Reyes.

Lorin is an Honor Roll student
and so is his guest. Earlier this
year, he won the “Do The Right
Thing” award, from the Miami
Police Chief Perry Anderson. He
also won the University of Miami
Book Award entitled “Caribean”,
and the 11th-grade Pre-Calculus
trophy May 29 at Miami Edison
Senior High Awards Night. He was
Mr. NAACP 1990 (Miami-Dade
Branch chapter) and placed sec-
ond in the nationals. He was also
finalist in the 1990 Oratorical ACT-
SO competitions in Los Angeles,
California, at the national conven-
tion for the NAACP. ;

He met and heard the Rev. Jesse
Jackson, saw and heard Esther
Rolle, Fred Williamson, Marla
Gibbs, Oprah Winfrey and Dr.
Jawanza Kunjufu.

Lorin is the 1991 ACT-SO Final-
ist this year in the Chemistry
category.

He is also all-around athlete,

LORIN PURCELL

member of the NAACP, a McKnight
Achiever, member of the National
Honor Society, Who's Who Among
Sr. High School Students and a
dedicated member of Greater St.
James Church.

Lorin is also President of the
youth chapter of the NAACP and
will be at the NAACP convention in
Houston, Texas,

A junior at Edison, he is the
great-grandson of Mrs. M. Mallory
and the late S. Mallory, grandson
of Vera D. Purcell and the late B.J.
Purcell and Mr. and Mrs. Dave Hil-
ton, son of Ofc. D. Purcell and the
late J.D. Plair and nephew of Mr.
and Mrs. Mark and Stephenia G.
Willis.

" Important Dates In History

June 12: Medgar Evers, civil-
rights leader, murdered in Jack-
son, Miss. (1963) ® Nelson Mande-
la sentenced to life imprisonment
after conviction for “sabotaging”
the South African government
(1964).

June 13: Thurgood Marshall
appointed to the U.S. Supreme
Court by President Johnson (1967)
® Fourteenth Amendment prop-
osed by Congress (1866) ® Oscard.
Dunn elected Lt. Gov. of Louisiana
(1868) ® Dr. Walter Rodney, histo-
rian and political leader of Guyana,
killed in suspicious bomb blast
(1980).

June 14: Chris Dickerson, body
builder, became first Black Mr.
America (1970) ® Harriet Beecher
Stowe, abolitionist and author of
“Uncle Tom's Cabin, born (1811) ®
Congress ruled that Black soldiers
must receive equal pay (1864) ®
Dr. Harold D. West, educator,
became the first Black president of
Meharry Medical College, Nashvil-
le, Tennesee (1952).

June 15: Henry O. Fliper, first
Black to graduate from West Point
(1877) ® Congress of Racial Equal-
ity (CORE) established (1943).

June 16: Howard Jenkins Jr.
became first Black member of the
National Labor Relations Board
(1963) ® Black soldiers distin-
guished themelves in assault upon
Peterburg, Virginia (1804) @
Anniversary of Soweto student
riots in South Africa (1976).

June 17: James Weldon Johnson,
author of Black national anthem

“Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing,” born
(1871) ® Benjamin Banneker,
astronomer, helped survey and
plan the City of Washington, D.C.
(1793) ® Sandra Farmer-Patrick
and David Patrick (husband and
wife) both win national track-and-
field titles in the 400 meter hurdles
(1989).

June 18: W.H. Richardson
patented children's carriages
(1889) ® Nannie Burroughts
founded National Training School
for Women (1909) ® Egypt became
a republic (1953).

PEACE CORPS WORLD WISE PuZZzLE

For further information about Peace Corps, write Box 896, Washington DC 20526

Supervisor, Region III, Chapter 1
Administration. Both encouraged
the children to do well.

As a means of showing apprecia-
tion for the support rendered to the
Region III SPERC, Lead teachers
and parent outreach personnel
were invited to participate.
Richardson stated that only with
the support of such people could
their efforts succeed.

Parents who wish to become
part of the group in Region III may
contact Annie Richardson at
691-8424.

Fon INT e ME acn!

BOTTOMS UP!!!

Now that the weather is getting warmer, ice cream will
be in big demand by everyone. One of the best ways to eat
ice cream is in a cone and you can make a game of eating
your ice cream cone by following these simple directions.

You and your friends each purchase an ice cream cone
with a sugar or waffle cone of the same size. Bite the bot-
toms off all of the cones at the same time and suck the ice
cream from the bottom.

The first person to eat all the ice cream from the bottom
wins. Just be sure to have plenty of napkins ready; you may

MARTIN L. KING

need them!
ACROSS 10 Entirety j
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3 Spoiled CROSSWORD 18 Moses’ brother
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15 oon = 21 Fold in cloth
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15 Toward the center ANSWER .~ Ohi cy
17 Fondly J
26 Old-fashioned
19 Essay ON PAGE 28 Foot, comb. form
20 Structure for 5 Aly
rituals D
21 Scheme 31 Deserve
23 Deplore 32 Silent ____
24 Interpret 35 Spanish city
27 ____ Chaney 40 Grit 37 Tangoss
28 By means of 41 ___ Sawyer DOWN 2 ingstive
29 Lively dance 43 Decade 1 Biblical lion gean

30 East Indies, init 44 Shiny evergreens 2 Charged particle 42 Wee Is ne!

31 Native of Acapulco 46 Vestiges 3 English scientist 44 Wife's title

33 Right, abbr. 49 King, Fr. 4 Extremely

34 Equipped 50 Contend 5 Shrew pi Pronoun |
36 Container 52 Night before 6 Nay 47 ee, aie
37 Female deer 53 Sudan, abbr. 7 Confuse 48 Jap. yeton
38: Rip 54 Hard seed 8 Candidates list 51 D pn y
39 Sick 55 Seamarker 9 Cask ep

1 2 8 10 11
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DPUDMY = SOM *p DPUDS[) *F SOUDUDY 7 YOUU * | SUOUNIOS

INSTRUCTIONS: The Peace Corps has volunteers serving in more than 70 nations around the
world. By solving this puzzle, you will learn about one of these countries.

Solve the four numbered puzzle words and then unscramble the letters in the squares to produce
the name of the country darkened on the map at the right.

East Central African
nation, slightly smaller
than Maryland, which is
surrounded by Zaire,
Uganda, Tanzania and
Burundi. ad

. European language which is second
J] language in this nation.

2. An elongated, tapering tropical fruit grown
in this country.

EEE EE EEE EE

3. Adjacent nation once ruled by Idi Amin.
4. To cleanse by the action of liquid.

CATCHING
ANY FISH,
Roscoe”?

NO, AND | DON'T KNOW “WHY.
|'VE BEEN HERE TWO HOURS
AND HAVEN'T HAD A NIBBLEf

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SYNDICATED WRITERS & ARTISTS, INC.

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2

orm

THE MIAMI TIMES 3D

Thursday, June 13, 1991

Black-On-Black Crime Just As Serious As Police Brutality Cases

By VALERIE WOOTEN

Black male cri is the
step-child of White male criminali-
ty. The White male, in order to
enhance and protect his self image,
enjoy the material wealth, power,
and political advantages of his
criminality, must deny truth and
reality: he must not experience the
guilty conscience which would
result from an acknowledgement
and acceptance of his own criminal-
ity and psychopathy.

Recently the nation was
shocked at the reality presented
via television of the brutal beating
of an African American male by
several White police officers in Los

Books & Things

By Earl & Eursla Wells

Angeles, Calif.
This incident trig-
gered reactions of
anger and dismay
among citizens
(Black i
White), who saw it
as a microcosm of
similiar incidents ~~ 3
of mass propor-
tion throughout

our country.

and

Carol City Students
Sweep Essay Awards

By TAWNICIA FERGUSON
Reporter Intern

“I've never won a trophy or any-
thing like that. All though high
school my sister got these big tro-
phies. I wanted to win something
too.”

That's the explanation by Carish
Seymour for entering the Com-
munity Crusade Against Drugs
Second Annual Essay Contest.

Seymour, who enjoys creative
writing and has had numerous
poems, essays and plays pub-
lished in her school’s literary
magazine, figured that this contest
was her chance. And she was right.
At a reception last Wednesday
afternoon in Miami-Dade Com-
munity College's North Campus
cafeteria, Seymour was declared
first-place winner and presented a
$1,000 scholarship. the money will
go directly to Florida A&M Univer-
sity, where she has been accepted
for the fall term.

The essay topic was “Born to Be
Drug-Free.” Seymour's essay, “The
Grave Digger,” incorporated all of
the traits of a drug-abuser into one
personified character, whom she
called the “grave digger.”

Angela Knowles, also a student
at Carol City, won second place
with her essay, “Why Me?”", and
Albert Luis Dominguez of Ameri-
can Senior High came in third with
“Is Anyone Actually Born Drug
Free?”. They won $500 and $250,
respectively.

Honorable mention went to
Marysue James, Ebony M. John-
son and Gregory Knowles of Miami
Carol City Sr. High and Tania Mari-
a Naranjo of American Senior High.

Community Crusade Against
Drugs, whose focus is the preven-
tion of substance abuse and the
creation of a positive lifestyle,

sponsored the contest with the
intention of “focusing the attention
of high school seniors in Region 1
of Dade County Public Schools on
the effects of drugs and alcohol
abuse and give them the opportun-
ity to share with their communities
the dangers of drug use and its
effects on society.”

The organization, headed by
Tyrone Backers, was established
in 1982 and, since then, has taken
on the task of training teachers
and counselors in Region One's 45
schools to emphasize to students
the importance of understanding
the effects of using drugs. The
senior high magazine, Listen, and
the elementary magazine, Winner,
come with teachers’ guides. These
are the manuals from which parti-
cipating schools study. The CCAD
also sponsors parent education
seminars.

The CCAD receives funding from
diverse sources. Said Executive
Director Backers, “We ask for cor-
porate contributions for each indi-
vidual project and we got an HRS
block grant.”

The CCAD was awarded a
$50,000 government grant over a
nine-month period ending Sep-
tember. It also receives major
funding from the Metro-Dade
Police Department Law Enforce-
ment Trust Fund. Said Backer,
“Gene Hitchens, our project direc-
tor, plays an important role in
acquiring funding.”

Future plans include establish-
ment of a community service cen-
ter, an office complex near the Joe
Robbie Stadium, a day-care cen-
ter, a multi-purpose community
banquet hall and a health-food
restaurant. According to Backers,
arrangements are currently being
made with a general contractor.

Miami Students Score Big
At Bethune-Cookman College

Several Miami students have
been scoring high marks at
Bethune-Cookman College in Day-
tona Beach.

Those who made the President's
Honor Roll with a GPA of at least
3.75 are Nikkii J. Eckles, a mass
communication major and gradu-
ate of American High School; and
Valecia L. Emmons, an accounting
major and a graduate of Miami
Northwestern Senior High; Ste-
phanie S. Rolle, a psychology
major and graduate of Miami Nor-
land High School; Willie C. McGill,
a religion and philosophy major
and graduate of Irwin County High
School, and who had also received
a Dean's Award; Timi Alare Ekiyor,
a general studies major and gradu-
ate of Greater Tomorrow Higher
Institution.

Students maintaining a GPA of
at least 3.5 were given the Dean's
Award. They are Kim Robinson, an
English education major; and Son-
ja A. Thompson, an accounting
major and graduate of St. Anne's
High School.

Students who made the Honor
Roll with a GPA of at least 3.25 are

Sheryl Evans, a business admi-
nistration major and graduate of

Miami Jackson Senior High-

School; Michelle T. Herrington, a
mass communications major and
graduate of North Miami Senior
High School; Susan A. Chang, a
political science major and gradu-
ate of Miami Carol City High
School, who also received a Dean's
Award; Barbara L. Davis, a mass
communications major and gradu-
ate of South Miami Senior High
School; Marlene E. Young, a che-
mistry major and graduate of
Miami Norland Senior High
School; and Sophia L. Johnson, an
accounting major and graduate of
Hialeah-Miami Lakes High School.

Bethune-Cookman College is a
private ,co-educational college
which offers Bachelor's degrees in
26 majors. In 1990-91, the college
awarded over $12 million in
grants, work study and
scholarships.

Admissions information may be
obtained by calling the B-CC
admissions office at
1-800-448-0228.

Youth Show At Jackson High

The American Black Communi-
ty Center of the Christian
Community Service Agency and
Miami Jackson School will present
a year-end performance of the
Youth Challenge Achievers Tutor-
jal Program in prose, poetry, dra-
ma and dance, Thursday, June 13,
at the Miami Jackson auditorium
at 7 p.m. :

The show will also feature sci-

ence projects, art work and other
exhibits by the students.

The program is sponsored by the
Center and the Dade County Publ-
ic Schools Office of Adult and Com-
munity Education through Miami
Jackson Adult School and Allapat-
tah Middle School.

The community is invited to
attend the performance. For more
information, call 635-5122.

HEEL TO TOE

787 N.E. 125th Street
N. Miami,

(305) 895 - 7415
BETTER SHOES AT LOWER PRICES.

FL

Although there have been mar-
ches, rallies, and demands for pro-
secution and dismissal of partici-
pating officers, inclusive of cries for
the resignation of the police chief,
Black American males and other
minorities continue to be abused,

jailed, and killed on a daily basis.

Local and state authorities (com-
missions, mayors, boards, gover-

. nors) seemingly have all adopted

an attitude of indifference as if this
behavior is normal (for the African
American) and, therefore, justifies
whatever action is deemed
appropriate.

Add to this dilemma the double
standard of Black-on-Black crime,
which many, particularly Blacks,
seem to feel is different. The basis
for this belief erroneously is rooted
in cause as opposed to effect. The
question is, however: Is Black-on-
Black violence a direct result of
racism or should we share the
blame?

Acording to Amos N. Wilson, the
author of “Black on Black Vio-
lence,” Afrikan World Info-
Systems, Brooklyn, New York,
($15.00 pp). “Black-on-Black
violence /crime is a direct result of
slavery and racism.” Although

there appears to be some validity to
this statement, African Americans
must learn to not only share the
blame but also take responsibility
for its eradication. It is a well-
known fact that the previous con-
dition of servitude (slavery) and
racism are factors fueling this
problem, but it is by no means for
the acceptance/tolerance of
Black-on-Black violence/crime.

Historically, Western society
and White America are indifferent
to the plights of Africans and Afri-
cans in the Diaspora when it comes
to morality. When one dies, the
attitude is: “That's one less N-----
to deal with.”

On the matter of process, Wilson
points out in his book that the
response time for police in African
American neighborhoods is con-
siderably longer than in non-
African American neighborhoods.
Although the bulk of Amos's book
discusses and describes the
causes of Black-on-Black crime/
violence, the final chapter,
entitled, “The Neutralization of
Black on Black Violence,” provides
an excellent guideline for citizen
participation in ending the prob-
lem. It refers to “Respect” as the
key: Respect by others begins with
respect for self.

African Americans mustlearn to
police their own neighborhoods. In
New York City, and Washington,
D.C., organizations like the Guar-
dian Angels and Muslims have
trained young African American
men and women to patrol their

“This product contains no more than 20% fat which is

neighborhoods (unarmed). Thes
groups and others like them have
significantly reduced criminal
activities in their communities.
Activities of ths nature teach orga-
nizational skills and instill pride in
self and community.

Prevention of Black-on-Black
criminality and violence through
more rational law enforcement,
through the unbiased execution of
appropriate cirminal justice proce-
dures and the provision of effective
counseling and rehabilitation ser-
vices, is not the same as the preven-
tion of Black-on-Black criminality
and violence through the Afrocentr-
lcorganization of the African Ameri-
can community.

Essentially, the book is about
the creation of Black-on-Black
violence/crime by White America
through slavery, racism, and their
own criminality — the systematic
destruction of the African Ameri-
can male by providing very few pro-
ductive alternatives for them to
take care of themselves and their
families.

This book does not merely place
blame in White America’s lap, it
also tells Black America to stop
crying, stop waiting for Whites to
solve their pblems, and stand up
and take their communities back
ough organization and pride in
self.

The author believes, wiuth good
reason, that when communities

and neighborhoods are retaken by:

residents, young men and women
will then develop what is needed to

e

34 less fat than the USDA standard

© 1991 Oscar Mayer Foods Corp

3)

Sometimes you can't. |

Oscar Mayer” Light Hot Dogs have a third less fat* But
since they taste so great, you'll never know what's missing.

stem the tide: discipline, good work

habits, appropriate attitudes and
more positive relationships with
authority.

The criminal justice system is
successful when its comes to
supressing criminal activity or
diverting it from one neighborhood
to another, rather than dealing,
with crime proactively. Black-on-
Black violence can be eradicated
with proper socialization, provid-
ing Afrocentric education and
training and the re-direction of
possible tendencies.

What do you think?

Other Books

HM “The Mugging of Black America”
Hl “Black Men Single/Obsolete
and Danderous”

HM “Brothers”

Valerie Wooten is pinch-hitting
this week for Earl and Eursla Wells.

Matthew: “Why did the turtle cross
theroad?”’

Andrew: ‘“‘I don’t know. Why?”’
Matthew: ‘“To get to the Shell Sta-
non.’

HOT DOGS



THE MIAMI TIMES

4

Thursday, June 13, 1991

Tools For Change Is Seeking Funds To Push Local Development Plan

By TAWNICIA FERGUSON
Reporter Intern

Tools for Change, an economic
development coalition of con-
cerned Black citizens, has set itself
the task of stimulating economic
development in Dade County's
Black communities. Its goals are to
increase the number of Black-
owned businesses in Dade County
to 10,000 by 1994, to reduce the

Black dropout rate of over 30 per-
cent to 10 percent and increase the
number of Black MBA graduates to
100 per year by 1994. Also, the
group aims to add 5,000 units of
affordable housing by 1993, raise
$500,000 from Black investors for
a venture capital fund and
increase the amount of loans avail-
able to Black businesses through
special programs from $5.5 million

Real Estate Facts

By Charles Benson

A Matter Of Personal Taste

Have you ever walked past a department store and stopped to admire
the merchandise attractively displayed in the window? You can almost
taste the charbroiled steaks prepared on the gas grill being exhibited.
You imagine yourself relaxing in the hammock or lounging on the lawn
furniture, alongside the resident mannequin family. The merchandise

seems to have nagnetic appeal, pulling you into the

store for an unplanned purchase.

When selling your home, it is important to make it
attractive to buyers. The home should sparkle and be
inviting to all buyers who enter. As with the depart-
ment store window, however, the way your home is
merchandised can encourage buyers to become inter-
ested in your personal property too.

A cozy fire in the family room might draw attention to
your free-standing ornamental fire screen and heavy
brass fireplace tools. A porch which displays your |
wrought iron outdoor furniture may excite buyers to

CHARLES

the point of including it in their purchase offer on your home at no extra

charge.

Decisions about personal property should be made before offering the
home for sale. Some owners feel it is wise to pick several items of person-
al property to be included in the sale which lends a “value added” climate
to the home. It is important to highlight those items, calling attention to

their value and benefits.

On the other hand, if certain eye-catching items of personal property
will not be included in the sale, the best advice is “out-of-sight, out-of-
mind.” Pack and store those items which will not remain with the home.
Once an item catches the attention of buyers, it may be too late to pre-
vent them from including the item in their purchase offer at your

expense.

Although personal property does not convey with real estate, it can
easily become a negotiable item. A Realtor can explain the best approach
to take with regard to personal property when selling your home.

Today's woman
needs more
to fall back on
than brains,
brawn and beauty.

to $20 million.

Target areas include Opa-
locka/North Dade, Model Cities/
Liberty City, Overtown, Coconut
Grove, West Perrine /Goulds and
Florida City/Homestead.

Tools for Change was developed
in 1989 following a year-long plan-
ning study by some 40 local Black
community leaders. Members of
the steering committee include
Miami Times publisher Garth
Reeves, who serves as the chair-

person, attorney George Knox, =

president of the Urban League T.
Willard Fair, former Miami city
manager Howard Gary, former
chairperson of People’s National
Bank Arthur Hill and attorney and
former Florida Secretary of State
Jesse McCrary Jr.

Tools for Change attributes the
economic deterioration of Black
communities to escalating high-
school dropout rates, a thriving
drug trade in commercially zoned
areas and rising unemployment.
To confront these problems,
explains executive director Elaine
Black, “we are reaching out into
the community, letting people
know we exist, and informing them
about the services we provide.”

Those services include business
loan packaging, structure financ-
ing for business ventures, work-
shops on investment opportunities
and serving as liaison between

° businesses and targeted commun-

ities. It also helps businesses and
entrepreneurs implement goals
and comprehensive plans and
identify appropriate contracts.

“Economic development growth
will produce jobs for people in our
community,” theorizes Black, “but
there are certain deficits in the sys-
tem that do not allow economic
growth in Black communities. The
bottom-line is a lack of exposure to
how business works. Blacks can-
not get that exposure unless the
Anglo and Hispanic populations
allow us to.”

Tools for Change is not funded
specifically by any one source but,

MRC

TOOLS FOR CHANGE
Elaine Black
Executive Director

VENTURES

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in 1989, the City of Miami voted to
provide $625,000 over a five-year
period. TFC is currently seeking $3
million per year to implement the
Planned Process to Stimulate
Black Economic Development in
Dade County, which is its blue-
print to transform Black Miami.

According to the project plan,
the funds will be used for admi-
nistration and financial leverage
“to attract private financing to the
inner city.” TFC does receive
money from banks and agencies
such as the Business Assistance
Center, which receives money for
on-lending to business ventures at
soft rates.

“We are constantly out there try-
ing to make sure we have funding
available,” said Black. “In my opin-
ion, I think we have been success-
ful . . . we're at 80 percent of where
I'd like to see us go, but it takes

time. We've only been fully staffed
since January.”

A business person who seeks
assistance from Tools for Change
must first be assessed and inter-
viewed. The applicant will be
immediately notified after the first
meeting as to whether help will be
forthcoming.

Tools for Change, which is
located at 6265 N.W. 7th Ave., wel-
comes input and ideas from the
community, says Black.

“Information must flow,” she
says. “We are informed only when
we find information. We must take
advantage of the opportunities
that are given to us, and opportun-
jties don't exist unless we know
about them. It's a Catch 22 situa-
tion, and that's what life is like.”

Tools for Change chairperson
Reeves said the organization is not
social-service oriented and is not

ELAINE BLACK, executive direc-
tor of Tools for Change.

intended to absorb any existing
groups.

“We are about the business of
business,” Reeves said.

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THE MIAMI TIMES 5 D
Thursday, June 13, 1991

Agriculture School Celebrates
Birth Of Filly Named Prancer

By DELICIA HICKS
Reporter Intern

The Miami Agricultural School .
at 10200N.W. 17th Ave., hasanew
addition to its family. Prancer, a fil-

ly, came into the world last week.

Jossie Torres, president of Wood
Chapter, Dolores Hemmings, vol-
unteer, Lauren Ash and Nancy and
Sonia Santiago are all caretakers of
the horses.

Torres, who has been riding
horses since age 3, said that when
the school first received the horses,
they were in horrible condition.
After a special diet for only a few
months, the animals grew
healthier.

Hemmings said the school is
soliciting donations from the com-
munity of serviceable, docile, and
manageable horses for its prog-
ram; all donations are tax-
deductible.

“The students’ appetites have
really been whetted since the
horses arrived,” she added.

The agriculture school is part of
the network of Dade County Public
Schools vocational centers.

Clifton Lewis, who has been
president of the school for three
years, has initiated a summer
program between his school, the
inner-city schools and those in
other areas. The program will be

§

‘3% : 1 “ : : %
CLIFFORD LEWIS, agriculture
school principal

geared toward students interested
in agriculture so they can get the
hands-on-experience by working
with plants and animals. He
said that the students come from
their schools and stay for two
hours to take part in the program.

A Future Farmers of America
chapter started by Lewis and Shea
Mahan, a senior at Miami Norland
and a Silver Knight winner in the
category of vocational education,
promotes leadership skills and
inter-curriculum activities, and
also encourages enterpreneur-
ship. The club allows each student

School Chess Champs

CHICAGO (AP) — A high school
on the city’s gritty West Side is out
to shed its image as academic
wasteland by proving it can win the
Illinois state chess championship.

Orr Community Academy High
School already pulled off a big
upset by taking the city title recen-
tly. In the final matchup, the
school defeated Whitney Young
High School, a top-notched
academic center.

“This is supposed to be a dumb
school on the West Side," said Sed-
rick Jones, a team member. “Well,
we proved to be great thinkers."

About 40 percent of Orr stu-
dents drop out of school, 10 per-
cent of the girls become pregnant
and the students usually score
poorly on college entrance exams

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and other tests, according to assis-
tant principal Carl Kristen.

He estimated that 60 percent of
Orr students come from families
with incomes at or below the pover-
ty line.

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to have a project.

The school, founded in 1915,
attracts persons from as young as
5 to senior citizens. The primary
purpose is to develop a com-
prehensive approach to increasing
the awareness of the public about
agriculture, with great emphasis
on perserving the environment.

The school, in conjunction with
the In-School Student Chamber,
provides field trips to expose stu-
dents to the other topics such as
livestock production, ornamental
horticulture, nursery operations
and landscape operations.

The second phase introduces
the upper-grade students to the
world of work as apprentices under
the guardianship of a mentor.

The third phase is job placement
of students as they complete high
school.

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THE MIAMI TIMES
Thursday, June 13, 1991

6

J

\

Congrats To Rainbow King And Queen

Congratulations to the 1991-92 King and Queen of Rainb-

gow Preparatory School, Terrance Carver and Sharonda
Bennett.

Caldonia

(June 13-19)
09-11-32-43-16-10 687

GEMINI— May 21-June 20 —A younger person with less experience
is likely to frustrate you. Be but patient but guide him in the right direc-
tion. Do not plan to borrow money now.

37-45-07-16-35-10
CANCER — June 21-July 22 — Exercise extensively. Walk, job,
workout. Your body is in need of a vacation from stress. Stay home and
give it a rest.
40-29-13-11-38-16
LEO — July 23-Aug. 22 — Look to your creativity for extra financial

rewards. Expect disappointment at first. Be realistic as well as optimis-
tic in your endeavors.

08-01-47-14-17-18
VIRGO — Aug. 23-Sept. 22 — Your priorities need re-examining. Do

not allow an older person to make you feel uncomfortable. Stick to your
guns.

14-30-12-05-27-38
LIBRA — Sept. 23-Oct. 22 — Co-workers admire your efforts. Help
them to contribute toward more teamwork by setting the example.
48-02-21-26-34-33
SCORPIO — Oct. 23-Nov. 21 — Give more of your time to fund-

raising needs. A friend will need help from you to solve a major problem.
Be tactful.

24-32-40-08-19-22 :
SAGITTARIUS — Nov. 22-Dec. 21 — Romance is possible if you
open your eyes to one who has alway been there. Make that important
decision based on your intuition — it won't let you down.
10-03-13-21-43-06
CAPRICORN — Dec. 22-Jan. 19 — Good time for taking chances. If
you invest in yourself you will come out ahead. Be wary of newcomer and
his promises.
22-14-09-02-30-12
AQUARIUS — Jan. 20-Feb. 18 — Communication is the key to suc-
cessful business venture. Deal with costly details yourself. Work closely
with those you trust, avoid those you do not.
11-28-46-16-07-10
PISCES — Feb. 19-Mar. 20 — Romance should be working out better
than expected. Do not be afraid to show your emotions. Career move
may be your next step.
04-17-12-29-48-25

ARIES — Mar. 21-Apr. 19 — That planned trip may go awry if impor-
tant details are not carefully checked. New information on old colleague
is unfounded.

16-08-27-39-04-19
TAURUS — Apr. 20-May 20 — Spouse will be more gracious if you
admit to making a previous mistake. Allow your good nature free reign
and accept the gentle ribbing.

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CALL TODAY
(305) 836-7541

9751 N.W. 27 Ave. Miami, Fla. 33147

\ a Woman, 61, Graduates

From Florida Memorial

By DELICIA HICKS
Reporter Intern

Bettye Jean Hicks had a rare
chance when she started college in
1946 at age 16.

But she was unable to continue
through her degree and it was only
this year, 45 years later, that she
graduated at age 61.

Hicks, of 1270 N.W. 95th St.,
was born and}
raised in Camilla,
Georgia. She fin- |
ished high school
and went on to
Spelman College
in Atlanta, Geor-
gia, where she
never had the
chance to finish
because her
parents could no
longer afford to send her.

Later, she went to Albany State,
where she completed three years in
ewlementary education, but she
still did not finish.

Yet, she inspired her three sons
Clyde, 33, Charlie, 26, and Javis,
25, to graduate from high school
and continue on to college.

Hicks has been living in Miami
for 35 years. She has worked as a
proofreader, a housekeeper, a
nurse's aide and she has been a
Head Start teacher for the past 25
years at Bethune Headstart, 2900
N.W. 43 Terr., and also an intern at
the Belafonte Talcocy.

She had been going to college
periodically, but she decided to
start all over because graduating
from college was a life-long ambi-

AIDS Day Set

By DELICIA HICKS
Reporter Intern

The Belafonte Tacolcy Center,
6161 N.W. 62nd St., will hold its
annual “AIDS Awareness Day” on
Saturday, June 22, noon - 5 p.m.

More than 300 people will
gather for the annual event from
five church choirs: Voice of Victory,
Miami Mission Rescue, Jordan
Grove, Royal Crusade, and Sing
out Miami Mass choir. Their mem-
bership total over 1,000 members.

The main purpose is to make the
churches and the community
aware of how AIDS is destroying
youths, said Brian Brown, health
educator. The event is made possi-
ble by sponsorship by Cure AIDS
Now, HRS, the Family Health Cen-
ter and South Florida AIDS
Network.

Other supporters include chur-
ches such as St. Paul AME,
Apostolic Revival Center, Youth
Crusade, Greater Bethel AM.E.,
New Shiloh M.B.C., Believers Life,
Drake Memorial Baptist Church,
Ebenezer Baptist Church, Christ-
jan Fellowship Baptist Church,
Little River Baptist Church, Bright
Morning Star Baptist Church, St.
Mark M.B.C., Miami Christian
Center, and the Camillus House.

It is free and open to the public.

tion of hers.

On Sunday, May 5, she reached
a high point in her life when she
graduated from Florida Memorial
College with a Bachelor's degree in
public administration.

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THE PEOPLE FOR TRUTH

Yahweh Ben Yahweh denied bond

because He quoted th

Since November 7, 1990, wicked people
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paign of overt persecution against Yahweh
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In a unprecedented motion which is totally
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based upon two taped classes given by
Yahweh Ben Yahweh. On the first tape, Judge
Roettger condemns Yahweh Ben Yahweh for
quoting Luke 19:27. Anyone with a red-letter
edition of the Bible can clearly see that these
were the same words spoken by Jesus almost
2,000 years ago. In order for Judge Roettger
to rule that Yahweh Ben Yahweh is a threat to
the community because he quoted Jesus,
means that Roettger, had he been around
2,000 years ago, would have likewise ruled
that Jesus was a threat to the community.
Thus, Roettger's decision means that hun-
dreds of thousands of Christian ministers who
teach from the Holy Bible, as well as hundreds
of millions of Christians worldwide, are a threat
to the community.

On the second tape, we hear Yahweh Ben
Yahweh quoting Leviticus 24:16. Leviticus
24:13 lets us know that these are the words
which the Lord spoke unto Moses. Would
Roettger have us to believe that Moses, or
even the Lord Himself, is a threat to the com-
munity? Not only does this affect all Christians,
but since Leviticus is one of the first five books
of the Bible, also known as the Torah, then all
Jews worldwide are likewise condemned by
Roettger's decision.

Other than these two taped sermons, no
other evidence was brought forth against
Yahweh Ben Yahweh. Thus, it becomes appar-
ent that the charges against Yahweh Ben
Yahweh are not the real issue. The real issue

is His Teachings.

This is the type of decision we could expect
if this were a communist state, or a totalitarian
dictatorship, especially one where worship of
Godisillegal. But this is America. The founding
fathers of this country set up constitutional
guarantees to insure that not only could you
worship God as you please, but you could also
express that belief. If nowhere else on earth,
you should be able to expect that in America
you could quote the Bible without being thrown
in prison.
This is the same Bible that the president
puts his hand on to be sworn into office. This
is the same Bible that each witness in court
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whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help
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over the radio or TV stations every week.
Now all of a sudden, it has become a crime
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ple can open up shops which sell pomographic
books and magazines; though anti-semitic and
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dle of any city in this country espousing their
hatred openly — all in the name of the First
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e Bib

now become a major crime to speak the holy
words that are found in the Bible.

Only an evil, wicked, corrupt, profane, per-
son would condemn the words of God. Only a
hypocrite of the worst kind, can sit in a seat of
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turn around and imprison a man because he

speaks the words of this God that we trust in.

Perhaps Yahweh Ben Yahweh is shedding
new light on these old scriptures by introducing
original interpretations. But is this any reason
to condemn him.

Remember that 2,000 years ago, Jesus
quoted the Old Testament and introduced new,
radical interpretations. If the world would have
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Remember that Jesus was persecuted for his
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But what if Yahweh Ben Yahweh really is
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THE MIAMI TIMES
Thursday, June 13, 1991

/D

Today’s Athletes Are Proving That They Are
Businessmen First Of All, Gladiators Second

More and more, African Ameri-
can athletes are considering
themselves businessmen first, gla-
diators second. When football star
Rocket Ismail announced he was
headed to the Canadian Football
League for some $23 million over
four years, ESPN football analyst
Fred Edelstein had the audacity to
suggest that the Rocket, by spurn-
ing offers from the NFL, would “rue
the day he left America.”

Come on, Freddie, get a life.
With his fully guaranteed deal and
$4 million signing bonus, the
Rocket is set for life. And isn’t that
why today’s youngsters battle the
long odds to
become sports, -
stars? #
If a Donald 4
Trump, Carl?
Ichan or some
other deep-:
pocketed busi
ness magnate
pulls off a mega-*
bucks deal, then COOPER
America stands
up and applauds. But if an athlete
makes a shrewd move that will
rake in millions, then folks cry out
about greed.

Folks have to realize that it's a
new day in sports. Sports is big
business. Television networks are
paying billions for rights fees.
Team owners are taking in count-
less other millions from conces-
sions, novelty sales and tickets. All
the owners are eagerly anticipating
pay-per-view, salivating over the
countless millions they potentially
may rake in by charging you, say,
$14.95 to see the Lakers vs. Cel-
tics, Yankees vs. Red Sox or some
other marquee matchup.

Itonly stands to reason the play-
ers should share in this booty and
that is why players like the Rocket
: are demanding very large slices of

8 this big pie.

E They are businesmen first, gla-
¢ diators second.
F It's about time the jocks became

aa § wise — and there are encouraging

| signs all over.
Robin Givens may not have been
the perfect match for Mike Tyson

The Sport Column

figured Magic would drop by, say,
once or twice a year.
The day after the sale, Magic was

By Barry Cooper

on the phone, scheduling what
would be the first of many trips to
D.C. He's a businessman first, a

MIKE TYSON: fired manager who
was taking 33 percent.

as a wife (and he as a husband) but
she sure had some business
smarts. Sne convinced Tyson, who
then was the heavyweight champ-
ion, that no manager deserved 33
percent of his purses. So Tyson
went into court and fought mana-
ger Bill Clayton — and won. On
that occasion, Tyson really took
care of businss, and the move will
save him millions.

When NBA center Benoit Benja-
min realized he was in the last year
of his contract and about to
become one hot commodity, he put
together “Team Benjamin”, an
entourage of lawyers, accountants
and advisers headed up by African
American boxing promoter Don
King.

It was one of the first times that a
top Black sports star had turned
his financial matters over to Black
advisers, and Benjamin wound up
with a five-year, $20 million con-
tract with the Seattle SuperSonics.

When Black Enterprise maga-
zine publisher Earl Graves and Los
Angeles Lakers star Earvin “Magic”

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make sure his new employees
knew it.

When New York Knicks star Pat-
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his own. Patrick Ewing and Detroit
Pistons star John Salley, both
businessmen first, gladiators sec-
ond, struck deals for part owner-
ship in their own line of shoes.

Once Michael Jordan retires
from the NBA, he plans to play fora
year or two in Europe — on a team
that he will own.

You may be saying that these
are all isolated cases, that we will
continue to read about overpaid

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money. Maybe so. But what we're
seeing right now — athletes who
realize they have got to take care of
business on the field as well as off
— is very, very promising indeed.

Johnson took over a huge soft-
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8 THE MIAMI TIMES
Thursday, June 13, 199

1

Canes Head Coach Kim Sands
Blazed Trail On Tennis Circuit

Call it a homecoming of sorts for
Kim Sands, a Coconut Grove
native and graduate of the Univer-
sity of Miami. The first Black tennis
coach at UM is in her inaugural
campaign as head coach of the
Lady 'Canes and has led Miami to
an impressive 7-1 start.

Sands on Saturday won the
Babe Didrickson Zaharias Award
from the Sports Society during the
Delta Psi Kappa and Sports Society
Luncheon at the Miami Lakes Inn.
The award is made to the year's top
pro-am female athlete and was one
of the highlights of the luncheon.

As a senior in 1977, Sands
became the first Black to receive a
women's tennis scholarship at UM.
That year, she was the team cap-
tain and compiled a 16-0 dual
match record and won her division
at the Florida AIAW state tourna-
ment. She also received UM's
Catherine Sample Tennis Award,
given on the basis of scholarship.
attitude, improvement, coopera-
tion and contribution to team spir-
it. In May 1978, she graduated
with a Bachelor's degree in educa-
tion and began touring on the ten-
nis circuit.

Sands got her start in profes
sional tennis in 1978 with the help
of another prominent Black ath
lete, Leon Spinks, the former
heavyweight champion. The cir-
cuit is expensive and Sands, the
oldest of four children, could not

cover the necessary expenses on
her own. She wrote top Black ath-
letes and companies trying to soli-
cit a sponsor. Edward Bell, Spinks’

All-Black Team Of Forties Recall
The Exploits Of Their Baseball Era

By STEVE KOEHLER

The Springfield News-Leader

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. — Baseball
is—Carl Thompson's youth elixir.

Bring up the subject and 50
years disappear from Thompson's
face. His eyes are alive. He giggles
as he thumbs through his tattered
scrapbook, the pages worn and
coming loose from the book's
binding.

Every photograph taped to a
page has a story. Each yellowed
newspaper clipping carries a mem-
ory, a record of his team — the
Hyde Park Stars, Springfield's all-
Black semi-pro baseball team from
1945 to 1952.

Thompson, 75, of Springfield,
sounds more like a father than the
team manager when he talks about
those who made up the Stars. Peo-
ple like catcher Howard Duncan
Jr., who could sit on the ground at
home plate and throw a runner out
at second. Or Herman Horn, who
once hit aball out of Municipal Sta-
dium in Kansas City. Or the Loo-
ney brothers who “could really lay
the wood on the ball and run like
rabbits.”

To many fans, the Stars were

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KIM SANDS, UM girls’ head ten-
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lawyer happened to read one of her
letters while Spinks was in his
office. After learning that Sands
had a 16-0 record that season,
Spinks said, “She must be good.
Get in touch with her and say I'll
sponsor her.” Spinks then gave
Bell instructions to wire Kim
money whenever she called.

Spinks’ career took a downturn
five months later and he withdrew
his sponsorship. However, Sands
had established herself on the cir-
cuit in less than five months and
was able to remain there for 10
years. She had lived up to her early
promise.

In high school, Sands led Miami

more than a group of teen-agers,
railroad workers, hospital atten-
dants and laundry house workers
who got together on warm summer
weekends to play against White
teams for a few dollars.

In seven years and several
hundred games, the team lost
about 25 contests, Thompson
recalls.

Whether they knew it or not, the
Stars went from being a group of
athletes playing for a percentage of
the gate receipts to a source of deep
pride to Springfield's Black
community.

During those seven years, the
team gave Blacks a chance to be
spectators at a sport that was
barred to them. It gave them a
place to find heroes.

“I loved the team,” said Chester
A. Shipps of Springfield, who
watched the Stars from age 7.
“We'd get on our bikes and run to
the park. We'd help out as bat boys.
Many of them could have played in
the majors.”

But in 1945, Blacks in profes-
sional baseball were unheard of.

The Stars challenged and beat
White teams at their own game,

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Edison to the Dade County girls’
basketball title and did not begin
playing tennis until she was 15. At
that time, she became involved
with the revitalized youth program
at Moore Park Tennis Center and
met Dee Moore, a long-time friend
of Arthur Ashe and an avid player
at Moore Park. After watching
Sands practice, Moore said he
would help her with equipment if
she continued to play.

Moore went a step further in
1975 and introduced her to Ashe,
the 1975 Wimbledon champion.
The professional player taught the
collegiate star quite abit during the
times they practiced together.
However, she credits Theodosis
Balafas, a former Olympic pole
vaulter who competed for his
native Greece in the 1948 and
1952 Olympic Games with most of
her tennis success.

While at Edison High School,
Balafas gave Sands complimen-
tary lessons when she began play-
ing at Moore Park and exposed her
to several college coaches. During

her senior year, Balafas took her to ya

the UM-Rollins College tennis
match so the Rollins College coach
could watch her play. But when
former UM Women's athletic direc-
tor and tennis coach Isabella
Hutchinson saw her, she asked
Sands if she would be interested in
playing for Miami.

“I was more than happy to stay
in Miami,” Sands said in a 1978
interview. “My family is here, the
tennis is good and the weather is
the best.”

even though they knew winning
could mean threats, racial slurs
and even jail.

For Thompson and the team, the
dangers and problems were just
obstacles to overcome to play
baseball.

“We got off the bus in Arkansas
once and an old man said, ‘You
darkies coming here to play?”
Thompson recalled. “The fans
would touch us to see if the color
came off. I would just smile and
say, ‘It's just like yours. Take the
skin off and I'm the same color you
are.”

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