Citation
The news-leader

Material Information

Title:
The news-leader
Uniform Title:
News-leader (Fernandina Beach, Fla.)
Portion of title:
News leader
Place of Publication:
Fernandina Beach, FL
Publisher:
Fernandina Beach News-Leader, Foy R. Maloy Jr. - Publisher
Creation Date:
January 4, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Fernandina Beach (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Nassau County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Nassau -- Fernandina Beach
Coordinates:
30.669906 x -81.461028

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 124, no. 9 (Feb. 27, 1980)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The News Leader. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000366799 ( ALEPH )
04377055 ( OCLC )
ACA5658 ( NOTIS )
sn 78002171 ( LCCN )
0163-4011 ( ISSN )

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Fernandina Beach news-leader

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r r r n n Irina Spirlea defeated Mary Pierce in the Bausch & Lomb Championship women’s tennis tour-nament at Amelia Island Plantation. Spirlea won $79,000 with the vic-tory.April 14, 1996 r n n Fernandina Beach Attorney Tammi Bach said she thinks some recently dis-covered documents might be a “smok-ing gun” that will convince a judge the Ocean Highway and Port Authority is beholden to make annual payments to the city instead of paying property taxes. However, OHPA Chairman Danny Fullwood maintains the position the port is not obligated to make those payments. While the Port of Fernandina is within city limits of Fernandina Beach, when the port was created in 1989, OHPA agreed that, in lieu of paying property taxes, it would make Payments In Lieu Of Taxes (PILOT) of at least $50,000 annually. Over the years since then, various OHPA commis-sioners, includ-ing the currently seated board, have insisted the port is not obli-gated to make the annual payment in perpetuity. Current OHPA board members have said the port would make the 2019 and 2020 payments if the city ends what some would call a practice and others an obligation. After the city and port completed a mediation process that did not result in an agreement, the city filed a lawsuit last year. That complaint was dismissed, and the city was given the opportunity to file an amended complaint, which it did April 9. That complaint included the newly discovered documents that were found in boxes of paperwork obtained by City Commissioner Chip Ross. In the amended complaint, the city stated that when the port was built, OHPA agreed to start making PILOT payments on July 1, 1989. At about that same time, the Nassau County Property Appraiser began taxing the port; the port maintained it was tax exempt. In 1992, the First District Court of Appeal issued an opinion against the port. During this litigation, the complaint said, OHPA acknowledged it agreed to make the annual PILOT payment, but still did not do so. That resulted in a dispute between the city and OHPA. The city maintained OHPA was in default of its PILOT payments from 1989. In 1993, the city and OHPA held at least one joint workshop about the matter, and the city made an offer to the port, which OHPA voted to accept Sept. 27, 1993, and sent to the city Oct. 5, 1993. In that letter, OHPA tells the city, “The payment in the future will begin on Fernandina Beach City Manager Dale Martin asked city commissioners to be cautious when apologizing to residents for interactions with city staff, such as police officers, but two commissioners said they were apologizing because of city policy. On April 6, Fernandina Beach commissioners heard complaints from the public about alleged unjust enforcement of city building codes and the city’s noise ordinance. Commissioners listened to the comments, and in at least one instance, apologized to the complainant. Alex Delfs spoke to commissioners during a discussion of the city’s noise ordinance and how it affects live music being played downtown. Delfs said she has a permit to perform in the down-town “pocket park” on Centre Street and Main Beach and Central parks. Despite having permits, Delfs said, she was asked by the Fernandina Beach Police Department twice in a week to stop playing in the pocket park. According to emails to and from the police department, Delfs’ mother and City Commissioner Chip Ross, the police department responded to a complaint April 5 by a downtown busi-ness owner. The business owner said he could not hear his customers, as Delfs had been joined by other musicians – “a snare drummer, a trombone player, a sax player and a trumpeter” – who did not have a permit. The email from Sgt. Tracy Hamilton said Delfs “was not made to leave; she chose to stop playing at 7 p.m.” Body camera footage shows the officer explaining to Delfs the ordinance prohibits noise that can be heard from 100 feet away during the day. The officer suggests Delfs play without amplifica-tion, and she agrees to stop playing after one more song. Before City Manager Dale Martin gave a brief description of the inci-dent at the City Commission meeting, Commissioner Bradley Bean apologized to Delfs. “Alex, I just want to say I am sorry, on behalf of the city, that this hap-pened to you,” Bean said. After hear-ing Martin’s description of the incident, Mayor Mike Lednovich also apologized, “Again, Alex, I’m sorry this happened.” Nassau County’s longtime health director is retiring, and the Nassau County Board of County Commissioners approved her replacement Monday dur-ing their meeting. After 30 years in public health, Dr. Eugenia Ngo-Seidel is retiring as director of the Florida Department of Health – Nassau County. Ngo-Seidel’s retire-ment comes 13 months after the COVID-19 pan-demic hit Nassau County, resulting in 121 deaths and more than 7,600 residents testing positive for the novel coronavirus. Her last day is May 13, she said. Replacing Ngo-Seidel is Dr. Prince Danso-Odei, who currently serves as an epidemiologist and manager of Disease Prevention and Control for Florida Department of Health – Clay County. Danso-Odei’s appointment was recom-mended by Florida Surgeon General, Dr. Scott Rivkees. “Dr. Seidel is representative of what you’re seeing in your community, and I’m very comfortable that her legacy of public health will be passed on to Prince,” Florida Association of County Health Officers President Mark Lander said. Ngo-Seidel told county commissioners Danso-Odei is “extremely qualified” and the state health department was “very fortunate to find” him. Danso-Odei’s LinkedIn profile details his involvement in the AIDS Drug Assistance Program for HIV-positive clients in Clay County and says he “directs the immunization (including hepatitis) and all sexually transmitted diseases programs.” His additional qualifications were presented at the meeting by Ngo-Seidel, which included his experience as a med-ical officer, medical epidemiologist, doc-tor of public health and his experience with international public health-care overseas. “I think you’re getting a fantastic individual that will lead your health department in future days,” Lander said. According to LinkedIn, Danso-Odei attended medical school at Zaporizhzhya State Medical University in Ukraine, and earned a master’s degree in public health from Walden University and a doctorate in public health from Capella University. Ngo-Seidel declined to comment when reached by cellphone Monday, and calls to Danso-Odei were not returned by press time. rn Lt. Gov. Jeanette Nuñez spoke at a Federated Republican Women of Nassau meeting Friday at the Fernandina Beach Golf Club. She was greeted with applause upon entering the room, and those attending provided words of encouragement as she discussed her family’s journey to the U.S. from Cuba, censorship and the role Gov. Ron DeSantis played during the COVID-19 pandemic. rn “My parents came to this country in 1961, fleeing communist Cuba. And they were looking for an opportu-nity. They were looking for freedom. They were looking for a place to raise their family where they could wor-ship their creator and not be stifled in the way that the oppressive dictator Fidel Castro was leading that country at that time. So, they clearly were searching for a better life. And honestly, they came here with nothing more than the clothes on their back, barely knowing the lan-guage. They often said they could never ever repay this country for the opportunities it gave them, and in turn, gave us.” r “We took office with the promise of what we have pledged to do. I think we’ve honored that pledge, putting Floridians first. We focused on things that are important to everyday Floridians. Education, the environment, making sure our business climate continues to be wel-coming so that people can come to this great state, mak-ing sure we hold the line on taxes, but we never really quite expected a global pandemic.” r “We have been focused on our seniors-first strategy from the beginning of the pandemic. As we started to learn more about the virus, we started to understand that the highest risk was formed by the senior population. So, that’s why he made decisions, unlike a certain governor from up in the Northeast. He made policy decisions that literally sent seniors to their death, (while Gov. DeSantis) made sure that hospitals were not required to send COVID-positive seniors back to nursing homes. We made sure that we had COVID-only nursing homes to take care of seniors in a way that other governors just didn’t seem to care about.” r “The governor pushed to make sure we had our kids back at school. The parents that chose – we didn’t force them – but if you chose to send your kids back in school, they could have a place to learn. The damage that we’ve done to our kids, I assure you, is irreparable. Some places in this country, they are still not in the classroom because they can’t stand up to the unions. They refuse to fight back.” r “We also make sure that we continue to focus on  n­rnrrn Bean Lednovich Later in the meeting, during the “City Manager comments” item on the agenda, Martin cautioned commission-ers against apologizing on behalf of city CITY Continued on 8A r€‚ ƒ Bach Ross OHPA Continued on 8A ƒr„ Seidel    nn­n€‚ƒ„n € NIKKI MAIN/NEWS-LEADER Lt. Gov. Jeanette Nuñez speaks Friday to the Federated Republican Women of Nassau at the Fernandina Beach Golf Club. NUNEZ Continued on 8A W …€ †rr‡†€ˆ„‰ How do you think Gov. Ron DeSantis and Lt. Gov. Jeanette Nuñez are performing leading the state? Email Letters to the Editor to sjbryan@fbnewsleader.com. Letters must LQFOXGHWKHZULWHU·VQDPHDGGUHVV and daytime phone number. ‰

PAGE 2

NEWS DEADLINESCommunity News: Wednesday, Noon Letters to the editor: Monday, Noon Wednesday, NoonChurch Notes: Tuesday, 5 p.m. People and Places: Wednesday, 3 p.m. AD DEADLINES .................. WEDNESDAY EDITION ........ FRIDAY EDITION Classified Ads: .................. Monday, 5:00 p.m.* ................ Wednesday, 5:00 p.m. Classified Display: ............ Friday, 3 p.m. ......................... Tuesday, 5 p.m. Legal Notices: ................... Friday, noon ...........................N/A Retail Advertising: ............ Friday, 3 p.m. ......................... Tuesday, 3 p.m. * Monday holidays the Classified deadline will be Friday at 5 p.m. MAIL SUBSCRIPTION RATES In Nassau County: $47.99 Out of Nassau County: $78.99 rr nrn n  ­€ r nr The News-Leader is published every Wednesday and Friday by The Fernandina Beach News-Leader, 1235 South 10th Street, P.O. Box 16766, Fernandina Beach, FL 32034. Periodicals postage paid at Fernandina Beach, Fla. (USPS 189-900) ISSN# 0163-4011. Reproductions of the contents of this publication in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher are prohibited. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: News-Leader, P.O. Box 16766, Fernandina Beach, FL 32035. The News-Leader may only be sold by persons or businesses authorized by the publisher or circulation director. NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS: The News-Leader assumes no financial responsibility for typographi cal errors in advertising. When notified promptly, the part of the advertisement in which the typographical error appears will be reprinted. All advertising is subject to the approval of the publisher. The News-Leader reserves the right to correctly classify, edit or delete any objectionable wording or reject the advertisement in its entirety at any time prior to scheduled publication if it is determined that the advertisement or any part thereof is contrary to the general standard of advertising acceptance. © Copyright 2021 The r. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any manner without specific written permission of the publisher. All rights reserved‚ƒ„r€ Deacon Vincent Abrahams, 85, passed away April 8, 2021, in Jacksonville, Fla. Vincent grew up in Queens, N.Y., raised by devout parents and grandparents in Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary Church. Vin attended Bishop Loughlin High School, and Queens College, Fordham University and New York University, where he received his Bachelor of Arts, Master of Arts and supervisory certificates. He professed in the Third Order of St. Francis while studying at St. Joseph’s Seraphic Seminary in Callicoon, N.Y., in the 1950s. Vincent served in the U.S. Army Reserves in the 1960s. Vincent and his wife, Valentina, raised their fam ily of three children in Smithtown, N.Y. Vincent and his wife cherished their participation in sev eral spiritual groups: Teams of Our Lady, Small Christian Communities, Cursillo Movement and Handicap Encounter Christ. They also enjoyed their time at Woodloch Resort in the Poconos. Vincent arranged an annual week for busloads of family and friends for more than 15 years. A priest was always invited, so daily mass was assured! For 33 years, Vincent taught public high school both in the city of New York and Commack, Long Island. While at Commack High School, he coached track and field and cross country for 25 years. Thereafter, Vincent became a track official for 12 years. An active runner, he was still running mara thons at age 65, alongside his beloved Long Island River Rats community. After retiring in 1994, Vincent went on to com plete his lay and diaconate studies and was ordained a permanent deacon to the diocese of Rockville Center in 1999. He served at St. Patrick Church in Smithtown, N.Y. After the death of his wife, Vincent moved to Florida in 2007, where he served at St. Patrick Church in Jacksonville and St. Francis of Assisi Mission Church in Yulee. He was a con-templative in action – praying, preaching, form ing others in the faith, and caring for the sick and homebound. An avid fisherman, Vincent felt at home on and near the water from an early age. Vincent’s love of a good laugh and sunny smile helped bring levity wherever he went. “Life is too important to take seriously,” and “You’re doing a great job!” were two statements frequently on his lips. Deacon Vincent is survived by his children, Elizabeth (Alan) Kuhn, John and Dorothy (Derek Stewart); grandchildren, Kateri and Maria Kuhn; sister, Marian Licameli; sister-in-law, Elizabeth Flynn; brother-in-law and sister-in-law, John and Diane Flynn; nieces and nephews; cousins; and the seeds he planted in the hearts of all who knew him. He is predeceased by his wife, Valentina; parents, John and Dorothy; brother, Father Pius (John); and sister, Pat Healy. Visitation is 5:30-7:30 p.m. Thursday at OxleyHeard Funeral Home in Fernandina Beach, with a vigil at 6:30 p.m. Funeral mass is 11 a.m. Friday at St. Francis of Assisi Mission Church in Yulee. In lieu of flowers, memorials sent to the St. Vincent de Paul Society (chapter of your choosing) or Mayo Clinic will be appreciated. r …r †r Garth Leland Burghard, 84, of Yulee, Fla., died peacefully in his sleep at home Sunday, April 11, 2021. He was born Aug. 8, 1936, in Tiffin, Ohio, and was the son of the late Gillman and Katherine (Hafley) Burghard. On June 8, 1956, he married the love of his life, the former Shirley L. Lape, in Somerset, Pa. Mr. Burghard was a graduate of Somerset High School and continued his education, graduating from Bethany College with a doctorate in chemistry. Being a chemist by trade, in 1975, he founded Quality Chemicals (now Albemarle) in Tyrone, Pa., with Melvin Miller. He is survived by his wife and children, Cindy (David) Whitby of Tyrone, Pa., Katherine (Galen) McWilliams of State College, Pa., Shawn (Laura) Burghard of Tyrone, Pa., and Jennifer (Bob) Mertiff of Yulee, Fla. He is also survived by eight grandchildren, 10 great-grandchildren and one great-great grandchild. He was preceded in death by five brothers and sis ters, Melba Benedek, Jacque Burghard, LaDonna Smith, Roberta Litoff and Bruce Burghard. Services to celebrate his life will be 2 p.m. Thursday, April 15, 2021, in the Burgess Chapel of Oxley-Heard. r ‡ ˆ€‚ Ronald James Dionne, 63, of Fernandina Beach, Fla., passed away Thursday, April 8, 2021, at his home. He was born in Grand Falls, New Brunswick, Canada, a son of Marie Carmelita Belanger Dionne and the late Joseph Camille Dionne. At a young age, his family moved to Meriden, Conn., where he attended Maloney High School. Ronald was a retired union panel mechanic for Connecticut Locals #40, #15 and #326. In 2019, he relocated to Fernandina Beach from Barkhamsted, Conn., and he enjoyed the beach, working in his yard and observing the beautiful flora and fauna of Amelia Island. Ronald was well known for his sense of humor and for giving people a hard time in good fun. He leaves behind his mother, Carmelita Dionne of Grand Falls, New Brunswick, Canada; son, Jeremy Brown and his wife, Brandi, of Winsted, Conn.; daughter, Jennifer Thibault and her husband, Jeffery, of Torrington, Conn.; and siblings, Patricia Dionne and her husband, Dave Roberts, of Ottawa Ontario, Canada, Ginette Dionne of Fernandina Beach, Marcel Dionne and his wife, Robin, of Perth-Andover, New Brunswick, Canada, Lynne Dionne and her husband, John Warring, of Cedar Key, Fla., Renee Dionne and her husband, Thomas Gerstenecker, of Merrickville, Ontario, Canada. He also leaves behind his grandchildren, Connor Fenn, Miranda Thibault, Alexander Thibault, and many nieces and nephews. Donations in his memory may be made to White Oak Conservation, 581705 White Oak Road, Yulee, FL 32097, donate@white-oak.org or www.whiteo akwildlife.org/give-in-memory. r ‰rŠˆn Kathryn Jones Fender, 80, of Douglas, Ga., passed away Saturday, April 10, 2021, following an extended illness. Mrs. Fender was born Aug. 15, 1940, in Brooks County, Ga., the daughter of the late Robert M. Jones and Ola Annis Norris Jones. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her hus band, Robert Fender, and sister, Linda Nesbit. Mrs. Fender was a homemaker and a member of the Church of Christ. Survivors include three sons, Rusty Fender (Carol) of Douglas, Ga., Dana Fender (Hope) of Fernandina Beach, Fla., and Jeff Fender (Kathy) of Tifton, Ga.; eight grandchildren, Dale Fender, Ansley Fender, Caroline Hand (Chris), Will Fender (Ivey), Austin Fender, Russ Fender (Caitlyn), Andrew Fender (Kelsea) and Evan Fender; eight great-grandchildren, Trenton Fender, Ava Hand, Robert Fender, Aiden Fender, Chapel Fender, Ace Hand, Hudson Fender and Dax Barnwell; two sisters, Margaret Delk of Quitman, Ga., and Ann Davidson of Clarksville, Tenn.; and several nieces and nephews. The family received friends 10-11 a.m. Tuesday, April 13, 2021, at Covenant Church in Douglas, Ga. Funeral services were 11 a.m. Tuesday, April 13, 2021, at Covenant Church with Pastor Gregory Pope officiating. Private committal services were at Douglas City Cemetery. Pallbearers were Chris Hand, Dale Fender, Trenton Fender, Will Fender, Austin Fender, Russ Fender, Andrew Fender and Evan Fender. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Canaan Land Ministries, via/ Covenant Church, 3255 U.S. Highway 441 S., Douglas, GA 31535. Sympathy may be expressed by signing the online registry at www.simsfuneralhome.org. Sims Funeral Home of Douglas, Ga., is in charge of arrangements.‰Š… Louise Kaney Guerra, 73, lifelong resident of Fernandina Beach, Fla., was escorted by angels to our Lord’s loving arms on the eve of Thursday, April 8, 2021, at the Warner Center for Caring. As one who loved to interact with others, Louise enjoyed her banking career, choir and fam ily events. Soft spoken, twinkling eyes, melodic voice and a smile for all, her light and laughter is sin cerely our loss. She leaves behind her husband of 42 years, Louis (Tony) Guerra; daughter, Mary Ann; and sister, Linda. The family will receive friends 5-7 p.m. Friday, April 16, 2021, at Oxley-Heard Funeral Directors. She will be laid to rest in a graveside funeral service 3:30 p.m. Saturday, April 17, 2021, at Homeward Cemetery near Waverly, Ga. r ‡r  ‹€ŒŽˆ­ Richard Weller Tompkins Jr. was born May 5, 1934, to Jean Cameron Ford and Richard W. Tompkins in Newburgh, N.Y. He passed away April 10, 2021, after a long struggle with Alzheimer’s and a short battle with a rare form of lymphoma. He attended Lawrenceville Preparatory School and the University of Pennsylvania, before a long, successful career in adver tising. He was renowned in the art of account management, recruit ment, mergers and acquisitions, as well as management consulting for restructuring agencies. He loved both the business and people of advertising, and retired from Saatchi & Saatchi in 1994. Arriving on Amelia Island, Fla., from Westchester County, New York, 17 years ago, Dick could be found on a tennis court or golf course, even until he was 83. As a youth, he participated in all kinds of sports – from track to soccer – and contin ued his love of sports throughout his life. Over the years, Dick wove himself into the fab ric of many lives, with his good counsel, famously outrageous sense of humor and story-telling. He was a one-of-a-kind character and will be sorely missed by his family and friends. He leaves behind his wife of 36 years, Amy; and children, Tiffany Tompkins (with Gerald Moyles) of Bradenton, Fla., Richard Tompkins III (with wife Sandy) of Pleasant Hill, Calif., Ashley Devery (with husband Mike) of Boulder, Colo., and Jimmy Tompkins (with wife Brianna) of Ocala, Fla. Predeceased by his parents; half-brother, Fred Easman; stepbrother, William Easman; and many canine companions, he leaves behind his brother, Ken Tompkins (with wife Jan); half-sister, Linda Olson (with husband Warren); sisters-in-law, Cathy Saypol and Nancy Easman; beloved grandchildren, Daniel Craft, Erin Jones (with husband Reese), Emily Devery, Conor Devery, Madelina Tompkins and Harper Lily Tompkins; great-grandchildren, Cameron Craft, Brendon Craft and Emelia Jones; lifelong friend and cousin, William Scott; many nieces, nephews, friends, mentees and mentors; and best feline friend, Clarence the cat. His favorite song, “Please don’t talk about me when I’m gone,” sung by Arlo Guthrie, will not be heeded, as family and friends will continue tell ing stories about Dick Tompkins, his creatively embellished stories and his antics for generations to come. A graveside service will be 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, April 14, at Bosque Bello Cemetery on Amelia Island, and a memorial service will be planned for a future date. In lieu of flowers, please support those things closest to Dick’s heart: kids, trees, animals or youth sports. r ‘ŠŠƒ Mary Susan Sinyai Vasas, 79, of Fernandina Beach, Fla., entered into eternal peace surrounded by loved ones Monday April 5, 2021, after a long illness. She joins her husband, George J. Vasas, formerly of Seymour, Conn. Sue was born in Stamford, Conn., the daughter of the late Albert J. and Margaret MacCaffrey Sinyai. After marrying, Sue made her home in Seymour, Conn., for the next 30 years before retiring to Fernandina Beach. She loved her work in Connecticut as a licensed practical nurse in the burn unit at Bridgeport Hospital in Bridgeport, Conn., and her volunteer work with Birthright. In retirement, she continued her volunteer work at Baptist Medical Center Nassau, working in the gift shop. Sue touched many lives in almost 80 years, and we all thank God we had her. Her greatest plea sures were living near the beach, strolling from time to time when her health allowed, and spending treasured time with family and friends. In addition to her husband and her parents, she was predeceased by her beautiful sister, Fran Flomberg. She leaves behind six children, Theresa Elliott of Litchfield, Conn., Mary Demchak of Fernandina Beach, Albert and Lisa Vasas of Milford N.H., George Vasas Jr. of Fernandina Beach, Stephen and Charlene Vasas of Ansonia, Conn., and Thomas and Jennifer Vasas of Gainesville, Fla. Sue also leaves behind the siblings she loved so dearly, Kathryn White of Fernandina Beach, Jim and Laurie Sinyai of Mandeville La., Al and Sue Sinyai of Asheville, N.C., Margie and Bob Fallon of Brandon, Fla., Elliott Flomberg of Valrico, Fla., and Cindy Sheffer of Fairfield, Conn. Grandma Sue also leaves behind 12 grandchildren and five great-grandchildren that she cherished dearly, as well as 20 nieces and nephews who adored her. There will be memorial service for Sue at 11 a.m. Saturday, April 17, 2021, at St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Mission, followed by a luncheon remem brance. There will also be a memorial mass at noon Saturday, May 1, 2021, at St. Mary’s Church, 212 Elizabeth St. in Derby, Conn. This mass will be followed by interment at St. Michaels Cemetery on Silver Hill Road in Derby. In lieu of flowers, please feel free to donate to mom’s favorite charity, St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital, in her name. Oxley-Heard Funeral Directors ˆ’“††  Joanne Levesque Weggeland, 71, of Fernandina Beach, Fla., passed away April 7, 2021, at the Warner Center of Community Hospice. Born Aug. 31, 1949, in Newburyport, Mass., to Claude George Levesque and Dorothy Hagan. She grew up in Newburyport and graduated from Newburyport High School in 1967. Shortly after high school, she met her first husband, Bill, with whom she had two daughters. Joanne’s early interest included sailing with her Dad and horseback riding. Later on, she loved to travel, cross-stitching and cheering for the New England Patriots. Joanne was accomplished as a retail mer chandiser, first owning a number of retail stores in New England and the Atlanta, Ga., area. Then in 1988, she met her husband, Rich, and followed him to Northeast Florida when the USS Pennsylvania relocated to Kings Bay, Ga. Joanne then became the retail buyer for the Amelia Island Plantation Golf and Tennis shops. Joanne was predeceased by her parents.Joanne leaves behind her husband of 33 years, Rich, of Fernandina Beach; daughters, Jessica Greene of Fernandina Beach and Melissa Partridge of Milford, Mass.; and granddaughters, Chandler Braddock and Kendall Greene of Fernandina Beach. There will be a memorial service at 11 a.m. April 22, 2021, in the Burgess Chapel of Oxley-Heard Funeral Home. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in her memory to the Nassau Humane Society or the American Cancer Society. r B & B Monuments Donna Byrd 904-277-2742 16 N. 13th St. State Licensed &LW\6FRRS The City of Fernandina Beach is currently hiring for multiple full and part-time jobs, including positions in Streets Maintenance, Public Safety, Building, Utilities, and at the Golf Course. Apply online at: www.fbfl.us/jobs.aspx Or, come to the second floor of City Hall (204 Ash Street) to pick up and submit an application. Work with the City n rr The Barnabas Center will host food distribu tion events throughout the month of April. Barnabas helps residents in need and offers services to Nassau County residents with low to moderate incomes. The food assistance is a three-day supply of food per household that might include produce, dairy, meat and nonper ishable items. ‡%DUQDEDV&HQWHU·V)RRG3DQWU\ Jasmine St., Suite 101, in Fernandina Beach, is open 10 a.m.-noon Tuesday through Friday. %DUQDEDV&HQWHU·VPRELOHIRRGGLVWULEXWLRQ are: 9-11 a.m. April 17 – Greater Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church, 45031 Historical Lane in Callahan 1-3 p.m. April 19 – Northeast Florida Fairgrounds, 543378 U.S. Highway 1 in Callahan 9-11 a.m. April 22 – Mt. Olive Baptist Church, 49167 Mt. Olive Road in Kings Ferry For information about available assistance from Barnabas, call 904-261-7000, visit www.%DUQDEDV1DVVDXRUJRUIROORZ%DUQDEDV· Facebook page. ­  Baptist Medical Center Nassau Auxiliary is sponsoring an online Sterling Silver Jewelry Sale from April 16-23. The sale features an extensive line of ster ling silver and boutique fashion jewelry, and all items are 20% off. Visit www.YourSilverConnection.com, and at checkout, type “BMCN” to ensure funds go to the local hospital. All profits go toward support of the Baptist Medical Center Nassau.€‚ƒ„…†r Chapter 2273 of the National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association is meeting 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, April 20. The meeting will be at The Pig Bar-B-Q, 450102 State Road 200 in Callahan. Guest speaker will be Momi Malspeis, director of constituent services for U.S. John Rutherford (R-Fla.). UPDATE Continued on 6A

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M ay is Skin Cancer Awareness Month, so let’s get a jump-start on awareness. We all love the sun. Let’s face it, most people feel healthier when the sun is shining. As a teenager in the 1970s, baby oil and iodine turned my pale skin bronze. Though a ginger, I never sunburned until one night when I did a really stupid thing. Growing up in Maine, my tanning time was limited, so the promise of a tan with a “sunlamp” was appeal-ing. I followed the directions, laid on the floor with the lamp 5 feet up for three minutes each night. Patience was not my strong suit, so after a few nights with little change, I decided to sit with my face directly in front of the lamp, close my eyes and wait 20 minutes. There was no immediate result, but during the night, I awoke with nightmares of fire only to discover my face was scarlet red and swollen. Just walking to the car at sunrise to go to the emergency room was agony as the sunrays felt like needles piercing my skin. Fortunately, my retinas weren’t destroyed, but my face peeled many times, and it took a long time to heal. While I have yet to be diagnosed with skin cancer, in my mind, it’s “when” not “if,” since one of the biggest risk factors is a blistering sun-burn. One would think that would’ve taught me to avoid the sun, but I was convinced there was nothing better than a golden tan. It made me feel healthier and thinner. My moth-er warned me it would age my skin, but I didn’t care. We really should listen to our mothers. In recent years, several people close to me have suf-fered from skin cancer. I’ve lost two dear friends to melanoma who were only in their 40s. It is tragic. We can enjoy life out-doors, but we need to keep safe in the sun. Since 1979, the Skin Cancer Foundation has set the stan-dard for educating the public about skin cancer. The facts are sobering: Since 1994, the diagnosis and treatment of non-melanoma skin cancers in the U.S. has increased by 77%. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, one of five Americans will develop skin cancer by the age of 70, and more than two people die of skin cancer in the U.S. every hour. There are three types of skin cancer. The most common is basal cell carcinoma (BCC). This type looks like a raised, smooth, pearly bump on sun-exposed skin that often appears as a sore that doesn’t heal. The second most common is squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The latest data estimates that more than 15,000 people die of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin. An SCC is a well-defined, red, scaling and thick bump also found on sun-exposed skin. It may bleed, and left untreated can develop into a large mass. The third type of skin cancer is melanoma, and it’s serious. It develops in the cells that pro-duce melanin, the pigment that gives skin its color. Melanoma is increasing in people under age 40, especially women. My 30-year-old daughter-in-law was recently diagnosed with melanoma after discovering a small mole on her back that looked different than the oth-ers. She immediately saw a dermatologist, who biopsied and confirmed it. Melanoma is a frightening diagnosis. Fortunately, she caught it early, and it hadn’t spread. She has a big scar on her back, but a good prognosis. She now sees her dermatologist every three months. We are so grateful she knew the “ABCDE” guidelines, recognized a mole that looked different and went to the der-matologist immediately. Here are the guidelines used to identify malignant mela-noma: Asymmetry – One side of the lesion does not look like the other. Border irregularity – Margins may be notched or irregular. Color – Melanomas are often a mixture of black, tan, brown, blue, red or white. Diameter – Cancerous lesions can be larger than 6 mm across, which is about the size of a pencil eraser. With early detection they will not reach this size, as was my daughter-in-law’s case. Her mole was small, but had some unusual colors in it. Evolution – Has a mole changed over time? My younger sister recently had melanoma on her eyelid and was very fortunate to not lose the entire lid. A skilled surgeon removed it, but it was close with little skin to spare. She has gone from sun worshiper to totally covering up in the sun. She uses a daily self-tanner for a bit of color, but no more tan-ning. Is there any such thing as a safe tan? Dermatologists say no. Tanned skin is damaged skin. There are two types of UV rays causing the damage: UVA and UVB. Sunburn and skin cancer are caused by UVB rays. UVA rays don’t burn, but penetrate deeply, causing skin damage that prematurely ages the skin and causes wrinkles. Simply sitting near a window can cause your skin to age dra-matically. The Skin Cancer Foundation recommends a water-resistant broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher for any outdoor activity. Broadspec-trum means it protects from both UVA and UVB rays. My dermatologist, Kristen Stewart, of Total Dermatology, has the palest skin I’ve ever seen. She practices what she preaches and is serious about the dangers of skin cancer. She taught me that unless you are living in a windowless base-ment, sunscreen should be applied every morning as rou-tinely as brushing your teeth. Every day. Rain or shine. No exceptions. Sunscreens needs to be applied liberally, (about 2 tablespoons) 30 minutes before you go outside. If you wait to get to the pool or beach before applying, you’ve already been exposed to harmful rays. It needs to be reapplied every two hours and immediately after swim-ming or sweating. She advises wearing a blouse or a covering with additional SPF protection. You can even add SPF to your clothes by adding SunGard to the laundry. Sunglasses and a wide brim hat are essential, and it’s best to avoid the sun dur-ing the peak hours between 10 a.m.-4 pm. My esthetician, Lucia Palenik, won’t let me out of her office after a facial without applying sunscreen, even if it’s almost dark. She takes SPF protection very seriously and has beautiful skin to show for it. She introduced me to some of today’s best self-tanners that don’t smell bad or turn you orange. Her passion for skin care is contagious, and she chal-lenges me to think about the best way to protect and appreci-ate the body’s largest organ. Then, there are tanning beds. You may want to stay away from them when you con-sider these statistics: In 2014, tanning beds were upgraded from group 1 to group 2 risk for devices that are cancer-causing to humans. In addition, indoor tanning devices emit UV radia-tion in amounts 10-15 times higher than the sun at its peak intensity. Currently, 18 states prohibit anyone younger than 18 from using them unless prescribed by their physi-cian. Brazil and Australia have banned indoor tanning altogeth-er, and more people develop r Full-time, part-time, on-call, and seasonal opportunities are avail able in Recreation, Food & Beverage, %WNKPCT[*WOCP4GUQWTEGU*QWUGMGGRKPI'PIKPGGTKPI(TQPV1H'E G)WGUV5GTXKEGU5RCCPFOQTG New hires receive a $250 sign on incentive Omni Hotels & Resorts is an equal opportunity employer. To view available job openings and to apply online, visit bit.ly/OmniAmeliaJobs or scan QR code using your smartphone camera. * bit.ly addresses are case sensitive 5VGYCTFKPI5VCTVKPICVJQWT 4GUVCWTCPV*QUV5VCTVKPICVJQWT %QPEKGTIG5VCTVKPICVJQWT )WGUV4QQO#VVGPFCPV5VCTVKPICVJQWT *QWUGRGTUQPQT2WDNKE#TGCU5VCTVKPICVJQWT *QWTN[4CVGU2NWU$GPG'VU %WNKPCT[rJQWT'PIKPGGTKPIJQWT4GETGCVKQP5WRGTXKUQT5VCTVKPICVJQWT(TQPV&GUM#IGPV5VCTVKPICVJQWT(TQPV&GUM5WRGTXKUQT5VCTVKPICVJQWT $GPG'VUKPENWFGOGFKECNFGPVCNXKUKQPFKUCDKNKV[n k OCVEJKPIJQVGNFKUEQWPVUCPFOQTG skin cancer from indoor tanning than lung cancer from smoking. People will still spend hours baking in the sun, but slowly the trend is changing as younger people are embrac-ing their natural skin color. My 7-year-old and 9-year-old grandsons have never swum in a pool or ocean without their swim shirt. My Latin American granddaughter, a former sun worshiper but newlylicensed esthetician, now reminds everyone, regardless of ethnic-ity, to wear sunscreen. So stay safe, examine your body and do monthly skin checks. Ask a loved one to look at the places you can’t see, and schedule an annual skin check with your dermatologist. Famous singer Bob Marley died from melanoma under his toe-nail. If in doubt, always check it out. Kym Dunton is a registered nurse, certified health coach and fitness instructor who lives on Amelia Island. For questions or comments, email kym.dunton@comcast.net. METRO CREATIVE CONNECTION

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r SUBMITTED PHOTO The Nassau County Chamber of Commerce recently hosted ribbon-cutting ceremonies for A Janet Lynne Salon & Spa, left, and Island Vintage Market, right. The salon is reopening at 2134 Sadler Square in Fernandina Beach, next to the Island Vintage Market, 2136 Sadler Square. The businesses are owned by Janet Rogers, who is holding the scissors. Starting Point Behavioral Healthcare is now an approved site through the National Health Service Corps and offers all eligible employees up to $100,000 of student loan forgiveness. The corps’ mission is to build healthy communi ties by supporting qualified health care providers dedicated to working in areas of the U.S. with lim ited access to care. “One of the things I believe we do well as a company is offering a robust benefits package,” Starting Point CEO Laureen Pagel said. “In order to care for the individuals we serve, it is my per sonal belief that we must extend a similar level of care to our staff. Providing student loan for giveness is a strategy to both recruit and retain excellent health care professionals. We are thrilled about this opportunity because it enhances the benefits for our amazing employees and elevates the care we are bringing to our Nassau County neighbors.” Starting Point is an approved site for three different types of National Health Service Corps forgiveness: the Loan Repayment Program, the Rural Community Loan Repayment Program, and the Substance Use Disorder Workforce Loan Repayment Program. Each type of loan forgiveness has distinct award amounts, requires different levels of service com mitments and has specific eligibility criteria. For information, visit Starting Point’s careers page https://www.spbh.org/careers/ or the NHSC Loan Repayment site https://nhsc.hrsa.gov/loan-repay ment/index.html. Starting Point Behavioral Healthcare provides mental health and substance abuse treatment ser vices to children, teens and adults in Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia. The nonprofit agency serves more than 3,000 individuals each year and has been serving the region for more than 28 years rrnrr r Contact Your News-LeaderAdvertising Salesperson for Details On Including Your Business On the Business Card BillBoard261-3696 Nassau Fence & Deck, Inc.INSTALL AND REPAIR(904) 261-6577 www.fencenassau.com Deer Walk Shopping Center next to Dave Turner Plumbing 474378 East State Road 200 (A1A) 904.310.6915BEST FLAVORS & BEST PRICES PREMIUM VAPEE-CIGSMODSCOILSE-JUICEWARNING: This product contains nicotine. Nicotine is an addictive chemical. Preserving and Protecting the Public Trust VETERANS ASSISTANCEBob Sullivan1DVVDX&RXQW\9HWHUDQV·6HUYLFH2IÀFHU76347 Veterans Way, Yulee, FL 32097 904-548-4670 | 800-958-3496 | 904-548-4539bsullivan@nassauclerk.com | www.nassauclerk.com FIND THE RIGHT BUSINESS FOR THE JOB RIGHT HERE! LOCAL BUSINESS BILLBOARD LIMITED SPACES Open 6:00 AM 5:OO PM Monday Friday 96382 Mt. Zion Loop, O’Neal/Yulee FL Bishop Thomas Coleman, CEO Laurie Holmes, Director littlelambsccc1@gmail.com LIC#C04NA00 ONLINE APPLICATIONS AT : www.littlelambschildcarecenter.com or www.familyservices.floridaearlylearning.com FREE VPK & SCHOOL READINESS 2021 2022rn  CLICK & SAVE Only at fbnewsleader.com For more information call 904-261-3696. Search LocalBusinesses at Nassau’snewest online directory SUBMITTED PHOTO Pelican Therapy Partners, 463155 State Road 200, Unit 12, in Yulee, hosted its ribbon-cutting ceremony recent. Holding the scissors are co-owners Larry Rutland and Christy Miller.  ­ 

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r Nassau County’s Final Four team had one final celebration Thursday night. During the Nassau County School District board meeting, Superintendent Kathy Burns, school board members and dis trict employees celebrated the West Nassau High School boys basketball team, which advanced to the Final Four in the Class 4A playoffs. The Warriors started the season with a 6-11 record before catching fire and reeling off 14 consecutive victories. “In case you haven’t heard – and I can’t imagine you haven’t heard about this fabulous bas ketball team from West Nassau High School going to the Final Four,” Burns said. “We wanted to recognize them at our school board meeting. “They did a fabulous job. These are some outstanding young people, and we wanted to formally congratulate them.” West Nassau’s success included the school’s first region title, Final Four appearance and 20-win season in history. The playoffs also included some close games. In the open ing round, West Nassau won 66-65 against Ribault before comfortable wins against Paxon School and Bishop Kenny. The Warriors edged Paxon 53-51 later in the playoffs, then narrow ly defeated Marianna, 72-70. The season ultimately ended with a one-point loss to Santa Fe, 64-63. “Those were some nail-bit ers,” Burns said. Coach Ran Coleman said he was proud of the team. “There are a lot of firsts for this group of guys,” he said. “They’re a great group of guys.” The team was led by Dallan “Deebo” Coleman, who won the school’s first-ever Mr. Basketball award, a statewide honor given to the top prep basketball player in Florida. Coleman, a 6-foot-6, Georgia Tech-bound guard, aver aged 24.7 points, nine rebounds, 4.2 assists and 2.2 steals per game. “I’m going to have to be a little selfish and let him go to col lege and to actually not coach him anymore,” the elder Coleman said. “Words can’t even express how I feel.” In other business: The school board voted unanimously to not join the Florida School Board Association. Individual board members can join the association if they desire. Board members agreed to sign a memorandum of under standing with The Journey Church, 95707 Amelia Concourse in Fernandina Beach, to serve as the school district’s reunification site east of Interstate 95 in the event of an evacuation of schools. According to school board docu ments, the church can accommo date up to 1,000 people. The board unanimously approved hiring R. Dean Scott Architect to provide “profes sional services” for the reno vation and remodeling of the Yulee Primary School cafeteria, which will include the addition of two classrooms. The cost of the services is expected to be $643,026.91, according to school board documents. The school district received a clean audit from the Florida Auditor General, and the audi tors had no findings of concern. Food & Craft Vendors, Music, Trains 9AM-4PMSponsor Appreciation 10: 55AMClassic Car Show 10AM-2PM45383 Dixie Avenue, Callahan Fl 32011 Kids Area Hosted by Joel Pace Piano rrnr PHOTOS BY SCOTT J. BRYAN/NEWS-LEADER West Nassau High’s boys basketball team poses with certificates it received from the Nassau County School District board, above. West Nassau High boys basketball coach Ran Coleman talks about his basketball team during Thursday’s school board meeting, below. The school board increased its salary schedule for occupa tional physical therapists. First-year hires received a $5,242 pay increase to $49,789, while lon ger-serving therapists received smaller increases. r SATURDAY, April 17th St. Johns River Bartram Frolic April 17th & 18th 10 a.m. 4 p.m. Downtown Palatka Riverfront Living History on the Riverfront Meet William Bartram, the Long Warrior “King of the Seminoles”, Bartram’s guide and European trader Job Wiggins, Ft. Mose’ militia and families, and 18th Century residents of FloridaPassport-to-the-Past – The St. Johns River Center will host an educational activity for school-aged youth visiting ten education stations and living historians to learn about our river and its history. Those completing the activity will be rewarded. This is great for the whole family. Register near the St. Johns River Center.Food Trucks on St. Johns Avenue 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM Nature-based Vendors, Demonstrations and Environmental Groups – booths along the riverfront and St. Johns Avenue. Tales and Songs of the St. Johns River 10 AM 7 lbs of Bacon Bluegrass Band11 AM Storytelling Sims12 PM Sunni Krantz12:30 PM Lee Pinkerson & Bill Snyder1 PM Sam Wimberly, Chuck Hardwick and Lee Kelly 2 PM Lonesome Bert and the Thick & Thin Band 3 PM 7 lbs of Bacon Bluegrass BandPontoon boat tours 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM: NORTHSTAR CHARTERS will provide tours from the Riverfront. Bartram Birthday Party7:00 PM – 10:00 PM: Azalea City Brewery will host Bartram’s 282nd birthday party. Bartram Trail Equestrian Ride at Dunns Creek State Park – 8:00 AM – 3:00 PM: Friends of Dunns Creek State Park will host equestrians for trail rides in the park (one Bartram site). Reservations are required and limited. Bartram Historic Rollestown Kayaking Tour– 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM: A guided paddle from Palatka’s Riverfront Park to Rollestown and return. See website and Facebook for reservations and details. Bartram Historic Tour at Mount Royal – 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM: National Historic Mount Royal guided tour and stroll in Welaka. A Quaker Friend will share information. Reservations are recommended. Pride of Palatka Guided River Boat Tours – 1:00 PM St. Johns Riverkeeper Cruise; 3:00 PM Bartram National Recreation Trail St. Johns River Cruise; Bartram Sunset Wine Cruise 5:00PM – 7:00 PM Reservations for all cruises are requiredBicycling Tour Historic, Homes, Murals and Ravine Gardens 2:30 PM 4:00 PM: A guided bicycle tour of historic home and murals from the riverfront (includes ¿YH%DUWUDPVLWHV±5HVHUYDWLRQVDUHrecommended. Palatka Riverfront and Murals Walk 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM: Guided walk through historic downtown Palatka including three Bartram sites. Reservations recommended. Puc Puggy Trail Hike / Water Works / Ravine Gardens State Park10:30 AM – 12:00 PM: A guided hike from the Ravine Gardens State Park to the Water Work Environmental Education Center and the Puc Puggy nature trail. Reservations are required and limited. Spalding’s Lower Store Paddle9:30 AM – 11:30 AM: Guided historic paddle through Seven Sisters Islands to Bartram’s home while on the St. Johns River in 1774. Reservations required. Palatka Riverfront to Ravines Bicycle Ride 9:30 AM – 11:00 AM: Guided ride from the riverfront through Ravine Gardens State Park. Reservations are recommended.Palatka Historic Homes and Murals Bicycle Ride 10:00 AM – 11:30 AM: Guided casual ride through downtown Palatka’s historic homes, historic sites and murals. The Symposium in the Jim Pignato Theater will feature six Bartram scholars and experts – Dr. Kathryn Braund will discuss her new edition on southeastern Indians; Dr. Dorinda Dallmeyer will talk about her book “Bartram’s Living Legacy” DVWKHLQVSLUDWLRQIRUWKH3%6¿OP&8/7,9$7,1*7+(:,/''U&KULVWRSKHURobinson will describe his quest to locate Bartram Trail markers across the southeast and his unique style of presenting travel presentations; Bartram Trail Conference president Sam Carr will explain the status of the Bartram Trail Society of Florida and the Bartram Trail National Heritage Area. Jim Sawgrass and Eric Breitenbach will introduce CULTIVATING THE WILD. SUNDAY, April 18th Bartram Symposium April 18th 2 PM – 5 PM FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO REGISTER go to https://bartramtrailsociety.com or Facebook@ St Johns River Bartram Frolic

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NOTICE OF INTENTION TO CONSIDER ENACTMENT OF ORDINANCE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Nassau County Board of County Commissioners will conduct a public hearing to consider the adoption of the ordinance captioned below on Monday, April 26 begin ning at 6:00 p.m. or soon thereafter as the matter may be heard at the James S. Page Governmental Complex, 96135 Nassau Place, Yulee, Florida 32097. ORDINANCE 2021-___ AN ORDINANCE OF NASSAU COUNTY, FLORIDA AMENDING THE FUTURE LAND USE MAP OF THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING FOR THE RECLASSIFICATION OF APPROXIMATELY 114.86 ACRES OF REAL PROPERTY LOCATED ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF WILLIAM BURGESS BOULEVARD, BETWEEN HARVESTER STREET AND I-95, FROM AGRICULTURE (AGR) TO TRANSECT DISTRICTS DEFINED IN THE WILLIAM BURGESS DISTRICT CONTEXT AND CONNECTIVITY BLUEPRINT AS T-3 SUB-URBAN ZONE, AND T-1 CONSERVATION ZONE; ADOPTING A UNIFIED DEVELOPMENT PLAN; PROVIDING FOR FINDINGS; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.Rezoning application R20-013, which will rezone this property to transect districts defined in the William Burgess District Context and Connectivity Blueprint as T-3 Sub-Urban Zone, and T-1 Conservation Zone was previously advertised to be heard on April 26, 2021 and will be heard concurrently with this application.The William Burgess District Context and Connectivity Blueprint is available for viewing on the County website at https://www.nassaucountyfl.com/860/William-Burgess-Overlay-District.All interested parties are invited to attend the public hearings and to be heard. Copies of the proposed Ordinance and supporting information are available for inspection in the Department of Planning and Economic Opportunity, 96161 Nassau Place, Yulee, FL 32097. Comments may also be directed in writing to the Department of Planning and Economic Opportunity, e-mailed to planninginfo@nassaucountyfl.com, or received by telephone at (904) 530-6300. All comments will become part of the record in this matter and subject to Florida’s public records law. Individuals with disabilities needing a reasonable accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the office of the County Manager at least two days prior to the proceeding at (904) 530-6010 or, if the hearing impaired, Florida Relay Service at 1-800-955-8770 (v) or 1-800-955-8771 (TDD).THE PUBLIC IS INVITED TO BE PRESENT AND BE HEARD. IF A PERSON DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE BOARD, AGENCY OR COMMISSION WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT SUCH MEETING OR HEARING HE/SHE WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS AND FOR THAT PURPOSE, MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.The Board of County Commissioners may continue hearings on this matter. Thomas Ford, ChairBoard of County Commissioners John A. Crawford, Ex-Officio Clerk NL/PSA There will be a discussion of legislation and other issues affecting the federal community and what NARFE is doing to help. All active and retired federal and postal employees, and their families, are welcome to attend. Attendees start arriving after 11 a.m. and have lunch on their own. The program will start about noon. Chapter 2273 has regular luncheon meetings the third Tuesday of the month, except in December. For additional LQIRUPDWLRQFRQWDFW*UHJ'·$OHVVLRDWRUJUHJ dale713@gmail.com.r Nassau County Council on Aging will relaunch its Hearing /RVV6XSSRUW*URXSIURPQRRQSP7XHVGD\0D\DWWKH)HUQDQGLQD%HDFK/LIH&HQWHU,VODQG:DON:D\LQFernandina Beach. 'XHWR&29,'UHODWHG&HQWHUVIRU'LVHDVH&RQWURODQG 3UHYHQWLRQSURWRFROVWKHPHHWLQJLVOLPLWHGWRSDUWLFLSDQWVand will follow social distancing guidelines. All participants are UHTXLUHGWRZHDUDPDVNFOHDUIDFHVKLHOGVZLOOEHDYDLODEOHat no charge. Participants are also required to complete two IRUPVDQGKDYHWKHLUWHPSHUDWXUHWDNHQEHIRUHHQWHULQJWKH/LIHCenter. Contact Nassau County Council on Aging Volunteer &RRUGLQDWRU)UDQFHV%DUWHOWDWRUIEDUWHOW#QDV saucountycoa.org to obtain the forms in advance and reserve a seat. The meeting will include a discussion about coping during the pandemic, new phone hearing assistance devices and other KHDULQJUHODWHGWRSLFV7KH+HDULQJ/RVV6XSSRUW*URXSZLOOmeet the first Tuesday of every month.nrrr The Nassau County Council on Aging is relaunching its &DUHJLYHU6XSSRUW*URXSZKLFKZLOOPHHWDP7XHVGD\$SULOYLD=RRPDWKWWSVELWO\X\H:EZ 5HJLVWHUIRUWKHPHHWLQJDWKWWSVFRQWDFFF;M51 Registration is not required, but encouraged. Future meet LQJGDWHVDQGWLPHVZLOOEHEDVHGRQSDUWLFLSDQWV·VFKHGXOHV,QSHUVRQPHHWLQJVZLOOEHRIIHUHGDWDODWHUGDWH )RULQIRUPDWLRQFRQWDFW(PLO\.XQ]HOPDQQDW RUHNXQ]HOPDQQ#QDVVDXFRXQW\FRDRUJrr )HUVW5HDGHUVRI1DVVDX&RXQW\LVVHHNLQJSHRSOHWR DGRSWDUHDGHUIRUGXULQJWKHPRQWKRI$SULO Ferst Readers of Nassau County is part of a national orga QL]DWLRQWKDWPDLOVDJHDSSURSULDWHERRNVWR1DVVDX&RXQW\Continued from 2ABeth Jones of the News-Leader compiled this report from records at the Nassau County Clerk of the Circuit Court. Arrest indicates suspicion of a crime, not guilt. To report information about a crime, contact the Fernandina Beach Police Department at 277-7342 or the Nassau County Sheriff’s Office at 225-5174. The “We Tip” program – 1-800-78Crime – also allows callers to leave anonymous tips. Q Tracey Christopher Kelley, 46, 2064 Friendly Road, B, Fernandina Beach, April 1, depriving 911 communications and domestic violence battery. Q Makayla Cheree Thomas, 20, 95320 Creekstone Drive, Fernandina Beach, April 2, possession of a controlled substance. Q Roy Edison Sink, 53, 27179 Garth Lane, Hilliard, April 3, two counts of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. Q Thomas Leonard Brazell, 77, 2020 Marlin Court, Fernandina Beach, April 6, four counts of sale of marijuana and one count of possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell. Q William Andrew Ross III, 30, 1005 South 14th St., Fernandina Beach, April 6, burglary of an unoccupied vehicle or conveyance and petit theft. Q Charles Leonard Wagers, 56, 86275 Callaway Drive, Yulee, April 8, burglary of an unoccupied dwelling and dealing in stolen property. Q James Allen Anderson, 37, 56105 Nassau Oaks Drive, Callahan, April 9, theft of a motor vehicle.  FKLOGUHQXQGHUWKHDJHRI0RUHWKDQIDPLOLHVUHFHLYHERRNVWKURXJKWKHSURJUDP7RGRQDWHRUOHDUQPRUHYLVLWZZZIHUVWUHDGHUVRUJ6HOHFW1DVVDX&RXQW\LQWKHGURSGRZQPHQX&KHFNVFDQDOVREHPDLOHGWR)HUVW5HDGHUV32%R[+LOOLDUG)/3XW1DVVDXLQWKHPHPROLQH ­ &DQ·WVZLQJDKDPPHU"1DVVDX+DELWDWIRU+XPDQLW\LV VHHNLQJYROXQWHHUVIRUDGPLQLVWUDWLYHRIILFHZRUNILOLQJVFDQ QLQJVWXIILQJHQYHORSHVHWF9ROXQWHHUVDUHQHHGHGIRUWZRKRXUWLPHVORWVRQ0RQGD\VDQG7KXUVGD\V ,ILQWHUHVWHGHPDLOQDVVDXKIK#JPDLOFRPDQGDUHSUHVHQWD WLYHZLOOVHQGDOLQNIRUWKHRUJDQL]DWLRQ·VVLJQXSIRUPV 7KH1DVVDX+DELWDWIRU+XPDQLW\LVORFDWHGDWWKH3HFN Center. To learn more about the organization, visit nassauhabi tatforhumanity.org.r€ The Nassau County Road Department has begun construc tion on a retaining wall on the south side of Simmons Road at WKH$PHOLD5LYHUWR6HD7UDLO6LPPRQV5RDG0XOWL8VH7UDLODFURVVIURP:LOO+DUGHH5RDG A small portion of the trail will be closed to pedestrians and ELF\FOHVIRUIHHWZHVWDQGHDVWRI:LOO+DUGHH5RDGEHWZHHQDPSP0RQGD\WKURXJK)ULGD\XQWLO$SULO For information, contact the Nassau County Road and Bridge 'HSDUWPHQWDW‚rr  Local photographers are invited to submit photos of beautiful, H[FLWLQJDQGXQLTXHIHDWXUHVRI$PHOLD,VODQGIRUDQHZERRN´$PHOLD,VODQG·V+DSS\3ODFHV7KH,QVLGHU·V*XLGHµWREHSXE OLVKHGWKLVVXPPHUE\6WRU\6RQJ%RRNVWRUH%LVWUR 7RKLJKOLJKWWKHPDQ\GHOLJKWVRIRXUFRPPXQLW\WKHERRN ZLOOLQFOXGHDERXWWHUULILFFRORUSKRWRV,WZLOOVKRZFDVH$PHOLD,VODQG·VPDQ\´+DSS\3ODFHVµDQGWKHZRQGHUIXOSKRWRJUDSKHUVZKRHQMR\WKHP 7RKDYHDSKRWRFRQVLGHUHGHPDLOKLJKUHVROXWLRQ-3*RU 3')SKRWRVWRGRQQD#6WRU\DQG6RQJERRNVWRUHFRPE\$SULO,QFOXGHWKHSKRWRJUDSKHU·VQDPHDGGUHVVDQGZKHQDQGZKHUHWKHSKRWRZDVWDNHQ There will be no payment but photographers will be named LQWKHERRN,IDSKRWRLVFKRVHQIRUWKHFRYHUWKHSKRWRJUDSKHUZLOOUHFHLYHDJLIWFDUGDW6WRU\6RQJDQGHYHU\SKRWRJUD SKHUZKRHQWHUVWKHFRQWHVWHYHQLIWKHLUSKRWRLVQRWVHOHFWHGIRUWKHERRNZLOOEHHOLJLEOHIRUDGUDZLQJWRZLQDJLIWFDUGat Story & Song. ƒrrƒ The Fernandina Beach Branch Library is celebrating National Passport Awareness Day by extending its passport application SURFHVVLQJKRXUVIURPDPSP6DWXUGD\$SULO $SSRLQWPHQWVDUHHQFRXUDJHGEXWZDONLQVDUHZHOFRPH)RULQIRUPDWLRQYLVLWZZZQDVVDXUHDGVFRP,QIRUPDWLRQLV DOVRDYDLODEOHE\FDOOLQJRUHPDLOLQJOLEUDU\LQIR#nassaucountyfl.com.nƒƒ­„­ The city of Fernandina Beach is hosting a recycle event and IRRGGULYHIURPDPQRRQ6DWXUGD\$SULODWWKH3XEOLF:RUNV&RPSOH[6)LIWK6WLQ)HUQDQGLQD%HDFK The event is for residential use only.Paper shredding will be available, and recyclables will be DFFHSWHG5HVLGHQWVDUHDVNHGWREULQJQRQSHULVKDEOHLWHPVWRGRQDWHWRWKH%DUQDEDV&HQWHU·VIRRGSDQWU\7KHUHZLOOEHDIUHHWUHHJLYHDZD\DQGUHVLGHQWVFDQUHJLVWHUDWZZZIEIEXVWUHHV)RULQIRUPDWLRQFDOO… ƒ­  7KH1DVVDX&RXQW\3XEOLF/LEUDU\6\VWHP·V
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rnn The Plantation Artists’ Guild Gallery show, “2020 – A Look Back,” just opened. The cre ators, Karen Bowden, Barbara Hopkins, Dickie Anderson, and Sarah Edwards, have curated a show of 100 photographs depicting our island’s response to the pandemic. The images are well displayed and range from documentary to emotionally moving scenes of the impact of the virus on everyday life. Accompanying the exhibit is a beautifully pro duced book with a descriptive text and poignant poem by Nola Perez. This is an example of some thing positive coming out of this difficult year and well worth a visit. Our island is fortunate to have such creative people living here. The display is set up for socially distanced viewing. Bill Birdsong Fernandina Beach n It takes some effort to prepare for a day at the beach. You might have a cooler to stock, chairs to load in the car and beach bags to pack with towels, sunscreen and toys. Sadly, not as much effort is always devoted to repacking those items and preparing to leave the beach after a lovely, sun-filled day. Beach Ambassadors is a volunteer organization focusing on keeping Amelia Island’s beaches clean and trash out of the ocean. Our program is simple. Our volunteers sign up to pick up trash one eve ning a week, on whatever day and whatever beach they choose, during the summer months. Our message is even simpler. We care about marine life and the health and safety of our beaches, and want to prevent trash left at the end of the day from being swept out to sea. A growing body of scientific research shows our oceans are in serious trouble due to the growing collection of manmade garbage. We can’t solve this problem for planet Earth. But we can try our best to care for the 13 miles of beaches on Amelia Island. In addition to helping keep trash out of the ocean, we model responsible behavior for our thousands of tourists and day-trip visitors. We hope to grow our volunteer ranks this summer. To join us or for more information, contact ameliabeachambassadors@gmail.com. The more volunteers we have, the greater our impact. As you enjoy the sand and surf this summer, please remember a day at the beach involves a two-part plan: Carrying in your supplies and carry ing out everything you brought that day, including bottle caps, tiny plastic juice straws and cigarette butts. The smallest bits of trash can do the most harm to sensitive sea life. Leave only your footprints behind. Shari Roan Fernandina Beach  n­ Given the tremendous efforts made by the Allies to cross the relatively narrow English Channel on D-Day in 1944, and reinforcing and resupplying their armies afterward, I rather think that the massive width of the Pacific Ocean and the difference in size of Japan and the United States of America was what deterred any possible invasion of the lower 48 states by the Japanese Empire, not the presence of an armed citizenry “behind every bush” as James Hicks claimed in the April 9 edition of the News-Leader. Martin Wilson Fernandina Beach n r­r The essential obstacle to efforts aimed at reducing, if not eliminated, the repeated killings of Americans with firearms is the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution enacted in 1792. The obvious intent of this amendment was to preserve the right of Americans to bear arms as part of a “well-regulated Militia.” In the centuries since, the “militia” reference has been ignored. Laws that establish obviously needed limits on handgun possession and semi-automatic firearms run against the opposition of the gun industry and misguided citizens’ beliefs in individual liberty – and such laws are overturned. Thus, we Americans will continue to experi ence the unrestricted slaughter of innocents by gun-toting individuals until we awake to the essen tial need to repeal the Second Amendment. Well-intentioned attempts to control guns ownership otherwise are doomed to failure. Alan Donaldson Amelia Island€‚ƒ‚„ƒ…†‡ˆLetters must include writer’s name, address and telephone number for veri fication. Writers are normally limited to one letter in a 30-day period. No political endorse ments the week before an election. No poems will be published. Letters should be typed or printed. Not all letters are published. Send let ters to: Letters to the Editor, P.O. Box 16766, Fernandina Beach, FL, 32035 Email: sjbryan@fbnewsleader.com. Visit us online at fbnewsleader.comR ecently, the U.S. Constitution Scholarship Foundation Speakers Forum announced David Azzerad, who was well received a few years back, was returning to the Amelia Island Club on April 23 to speak about “The Cultural Contradiction of Woke Capitalism.” I felt better once realizing neither my contemporaries nor members of the next generation had a clue what “woke capitalism,” “woke corpora tions” or even what “woke” meant. So, I did some research and spoke with Azzerad, and hopefully now I under stand the concept. “Woke,” I discovered, is not a totally new concept. Merriam-Webster states it and the Oxford English Dictionary added “woke” in 2017, as it increasingly became a byword for social awareness. Merriam-Webster believes woke’s transformation into a byword of social awareness likely started in 2008, with the release of Erykah Badu’s song “Master Teacher,” which used “I stay woke” in a number of lines including, “Even though you go through struggle and strife, to keep a healthy life, I stay woke.” Stay woke became a watchword in parts of the Black community for those who were self-aware and striving for something better. But stay woke and woke became part of a larger discus sion in 2014 following the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. The word “woke” became entwined with the Black Lives Matter move ment. Instead of just being a word that signaled awareness of injustice or racial tension, it became a word of action. Activists were woke and called on others to stay woke. However, the term “woke” is gain ing broader usage and has now entered the corporate and educational arenas. As always happens, defenders and dis paragers began speaking out. Jennifer Graham, in a recent article, “America’s Great Awokening,” explained the concept was seen as vir tuous and aspirational, not only among Blacks but also young Americans and progressives. She quoted Elizabeth Wright, a Ph.D candidate in sociolin guistics at the University of Michigan, who said Black people “don’t choose to be Woke, we must be Woke to stay alive. We must take this to companies that claim the mantle of ‘Wokeness’ without meaningful changes.” On the other side, Graham cites Tesla CEO Elon Musk, who in a tweet mocked “Wokeness” and Woketopia. He, like other older conservative Americans, began to view wokeness as a joke or a societal evil akin to cancel culture. William Briggs, a conservative writer, said the biggest conceptual change stems from corpora tions, afraid of being sued, becoming woke. Briggs claims lawsuits became too costly to bear, so corporations, espe cially larger ones that could afford it, began to preemp tively institute race quotas, which he said was the beginning of wokeness. In simple factory jobs, finding bodies to meet quotas was rela tively easy. In more complex positions that required experience, ability and education, it was not as easy. So, Briggs said, standards had to be lowered, and of course, lowering stan dards is costly. Larger corporations could absorb the costs, but smaller cor porations could not. But the real issue, he writes, is the premise of equality. “The premise of equality has changed from all people should be treated the same under the law to all people are ‘really’ the same at the base. It’s only the circum stances that are different,” he wrote. “Appeasement has won corporations breathing room from lawsuits, saving them money at least originally. But appeasement will cost them more in the end. Get woke; became broke.” I have problems with some of Briggs’ assertions because I was around in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s when discrimination was still rampant. Since then, there have been massive changes in opportunity for anyone who works hard and obtains an education. America is about all being treated equally under the law, providing equal opportunity for all people to succeed. However, imposing concepts that all people are really the same but only the circumstances are different, is very dangerous. Having said this, I am looking for ward to hearing David Azzerad explore the current situation and provide solu tions to solving the cultural contradic tion of woke capitalism. Amelia Island resident Howard Pines has more than 30 years experi ence as CEO, chairman and founder of BeamPines, a premier firm in the executive coaching business. He also co-founded the BeamPines/Middlesex University Master’s Program in Executive Coaching. Prior to that, he served as senior VP of human resources for a Fortune 100 corporation. He is the author of The Case for Wasting Time and Other Management Heresies. r ‰Š…‹ƒ€……… r The stated goals of the Amelia Island Foundation – a nonprofit registered with the state of Florida in April 2020 – were worthy and important to our community. The strategic approach and implementation of its primary funding mechanism were troubling and lacked transparency. So, it’s a good thing the foundation has announced it is ceasing operations. For a nonprofit – any business, really – to be successful there must be trust. And before the foundation got its footing, the sands of trust had washed out from underneath. The foundation was the brainchild of Amelia Island Convention and Visitors Bureau President and CEO Gil Langley. The bureau is essentially the management arm of the Amelia Island Tourist Development Council. Every time someone stays in a hotel on Amelia Island, a “bed tax” is included on the bill. The money derived from this bed tax is managed by the Tourist Development Council, which has hired Langley and his operation to manage much of the tourism-related objectives set by the council. In addition to the Amelia Island Convention and Visitors Bureau, Langley launched the Amelia Island Foundation with goals of helping out-of-work restaurant and hotel employees, creating educational opportunities for future tourism-related workers and funding other proj ects the Tourist Development Council and AICVB can’t complete with “bed tax” money. The challenge the Amelia Island Foundation faced was how to raise money. Most nonprofits operate through traditional means. They ask the public for something – whether it is money, food for pantries, cat litter for pet shelters, blankets for homeless shelters. All of us have been in the checkout line at a grocery store when the little screen asks if we’d like to donate to one cause or another. The key element? They ask.Amelia Island Foundation and a local restaurant, serv ing as the “pilot program” partner, did not ask. They sim ply took. And it was incumbent on the customer to notice on their bill an additional charge, ask about it and request that it be removed. This upset people, and rightfully so. Visitors to restaurant were donating without being asked. What’s the big deal? What if the 1% donation was to support Black Lives Matter or Donald Trump’s Super PAC? Would you be interested in donating to both causes without being asked? We didn’t think so. According to a statement by the Amelia Island Foundation, the program operated for six months, but there was no grand announcement by the foundation or Langley about the new nonprofit. Its Facebook page was created Oct. 9, 2020, but didn’t add a website address until December. The foundation’s Twitter account launched in January 2021. The lack of transparency was troubling. It caused such consternation that the Nassau County Board of County Commissioners released a statement distancing itself from the nonprofit. Less than a week after the News-Leader ’s front-page story about the nonprofit, it announced it was ceasing operations. A news release stated it was shuttering due “in part to the ongoing effects of COVID-19.” “Among the impacts cited is the shortage of hospitality industry workers and the stresses it places on customer service with limited staff,” the release said. The real reason was the public outcry about the foun dation. Yes, there was a lot of misinformation on social media about the foundation, but the foundation’s lack of transparency and forthrightness created a vacuum of criticism it could not escape. That trustworthiness is now something Langley, the creator of the foundation, must restore. The way to do that is simple: Account for the money. The Amelia Island Foundation should release its finances – how much money it took in, what it spent money on and where the remainder of the money is going and has gone – to ensure the community can close the book on this endeavor. We don’t assign malicious intent to those who launched, backed and supported this foundation. We do, however, believe the nonprofit’s lack of transparency and poor communication is inexcusable in such a big-hearted and generous community. We hope everyone has learned a lesson, and we can begin to focus on solving problems instead of creating new ones. n W …Œƒ„ r r n The News-Leader is published with pride weekly for the people of Nassau County by Community Newspapers, Inc., Athens, Georgia. We believe that strong newspapers build strong communi ties – “Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to the truth, integrity, quality and hard work. r r r r r r r r   r   n r rr n n

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The Leader in Real Estate on Amelia Island rrnrn rn rr  ­ Accepting Agent Applications rrrnrrnrrrnrrrrrnrrn €  ‚ Contact Lou Izzo, CEO/Owner or Joe Cutajar, Broker/Owner.There are 4 additional openings on our team. Let’s have a conversation about how the Sotheby’s International Realty brand can help you take your business to the next level. r ƒ„…†„†‡ˆ…ˆ n ‰Š‹ƒˆŒŠŒ…ˆ ­­Ž‘‘Ž r rnn Œ11<<-7SXLIF]´W-RXIVREXMSREP6IEPX]%J½PMEXIW00'%PPVMKLXWVIWIVZIH7SXLIF]´W-RXIVREXMSREP6IEPX]%J½PMEXIW00'JYPP]WYTTSVXWXLITVMRGMTPIWSJ XLI*EMV,SYWMRK%GXERHXLI)UYEP3TTSVXYRMX]%GX)EGLSJ½GIMWMRHITIRHIRXP]S[RIHERHSTIVEXIH r Robert Burk III, MD | Dr. Chris Bates, MD Amy Kadlubowski, ARNP | Kim Lindsey, Aesthetician staff. “I want to add a small word of caution on behalf of city staff,” Martin said. “When city com-missioners apologize for city staff doing their job, that sends a wrong message to city staff. When the police issue a noise ordinance or code enforcement officer issues a citation, to apolo-gize for city staff doing what you, as city commissioners, have passed as policy, sends a wrong message to city staff. Just please proceed cautiously.” During his comments, Bean addressed Martin’s caution. “When I apologize to our residents, I’m not apologizing on behalf of city staff,” Bean said. “I am apologizing on behalf of this board. There are things we need to fix, and when I see a bad law, and when I see a citizen that is unjustly affected by it, I will apologize for government steamrolling our citizens. I will continue to do that, because I believe our citizens deserve the best quality government we can muster. In emails to the News-Leader , Lednovich and Bean said the noise ordinance, which was changed later during the City Commission meeting, led to con-fusion and needs to be addressed. “I was sympathetic to the plight of this young woman who was playing music to earn money for her college educa-tion,” Lednovich wrote. “Miss Delfs, unfortunately, found herself in a matrix of obfusive (sic) city regulations when she was noticed by local police to stop performing. After obtaining a permit to perform, she believed she was adhering to all city requirements. Miss Delfs was obviously unaware that the city noise ordinance was also in force, and her permit did not supersede the restrictions of the noise ordi-nance. She was abruptly shut down because I believe Miss Delfs was not fully cognizant of the noise ordinance restrictions when obtaining the permit. Citizens should never find them-selves in the crossfire of puzzling permits and ordinances. We need to end such confusion by provid-ing clear/concise information to those we serve.” “I absolutely stand by apologizing to a young woman who was affected by a bad and over-bearing city law,” Bean wrote. “That is why we need to update and simplify our confusing code of ordinances every chance we get, in this case our noise ordinance. I don’t want any city employee to have to enforce a law that isn’t right for the people of Fernandina Beach, and there is always room to improve our customer service at the city.” Martin declined to further comment on the matter. The commission passed, on first read-ing, a new noise ordinance that will use decibel meter readings to determine the volume level allowed in the city, dependent on the time of day and day of the week. July 1, 1994, and will be based on the previous years tonnage, but pursuant to the agreement, will not be less than $50,000 per year. We will continue to make these payments as required under the terms and conditions as set out in the pre-development agreement and development order. The Port Authority maintains its position that if it pays taxes in the future, the fees will not be required.” The letter is signed by Thomas Williams of the Ocean Highway and Port Authority. At the April 6 City Commission meeting, City Attorney Tammi Bach said the letter, dis-covered in one of several boxes of documents received by Ross, is one of two documents she thinks will change the direction of the legal action. “They definitely are the smoking gun, so to speak, in terms of whether or not OHPA, at the time, agreed to pay the city the $50,000 PILOT forever, in perpetuity, as long as that development and that port is there,” Bach said. “Those two documents have been extremely helpful and will, I think, convince the judge that we will move on this step and at least get past the step, that we do have a contract, and then we will have a few other things to argue over. But, not much, I will say. It really came down to OHPA said we had no contract, they were voluntarily paying the city, and we have found documents that showed that the port authority, not in these (City Hall) chambers, but in their own public meeting, did approve this agreement and the payment of at least $50,000 annu-ally to the city.” However, Fullwood told the News-Leader the documents found by Ross “are no smoking gun,” and that while the port did agree to make those payments, it did not agree to make them forever. “It was an opportunity (for the city) to collect taxes they otherwise wouldn’t be able to collect,” Fullwood said. “It was not a contract between the port and the city; it was an agree-ment to get the port developed. Development agreements only last 20 years, according to state law. We offered them a settle-ment and some type of future payments, and they rejected it. We have tried to work with them, to do something we should or could do. Other documents show it was supposed to be renegoti-ated.” OHPA attorney Patrick Krechowski declined to com-ment. The matter is on the agenda for the OHPA meeting at 6 p.m. today in the Nassau County Board of County Commissioners’ chambers at the James S. Page Government Complex in Yulee. keeping our residents safe. I’m sure you watched in horror over the last several months, how our nation’s streets were lit up with rage, violence, anger, rioting, looting. That in some places it is still ravaging com-munities. Our governor from the very beginning denounced those heinous acts of violence and said, here in Florida, we will not tolerate it. We will not allow for the violence and the rioting and the looting to take hold. And he was strong about that. And thankfully for the most part, you did not see what you saw in Seattle and other places. So we’re going to stand by law enforcement, and for those of you that have served, thank you. On censorship: “Conservative voices are being silenced and they’re being de-platformed and they’re being censored. ... They will continue to censor this governor because he is an assault to their liberal political agenda. This governor is someone that’s willing to fight back on this assault on free speech. They will not win. They will not prevail.”Continued from 1A Continued from 1A Continued from 1A In addition to nding out the latest news, sports and events happening in Nassau County you can also:Visit www.fbnewsleader.com today! Renew your subscription online! Browse back issues....and more! Place classi ed ads online! DO YOU KNOW? rnDON’T LITTERSPAY~NEUTER ttenn

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TALLAHASSEE – Murmurs, and at times shouts, of a renewed gambling deal between the state and the Seminole Tribe of Florida have bubbled during legislative sessions stretching back nearly a decade. But, as legislative leaders and governors come and go, finaliz-ing an agreement – repeatedly likened to a “three-dimensional game of chess” – has proven to be just out of reach year after year after year. The House, the Senate, the governor and the Seminoles are the central figures in trying to reach a deal, known as a “com-pact.” But the talks also include the state’s pari-mutuel operators and global casino giants willing to drop big bucks on the possibil-ity of planting roots in Florida, a vacation destination with a growing population that’s home to some of the nation’s most affluent citizens. After repeated stabs at a compact fell through, specula-tion about an agreement involv-ing Gov. Ron DeSantis, the Legislature and the tribe is roil-ing Tallahassee during the sec-ond half of the 2021 legislative session. As negotiations simmer in secret, a Senate committee Monday approved two gambling-related measures unrelated to tribal casinos. But even those efforts could be a long shot. Senate President Wilton Simpson (R-Trilby) has taken the reins on a prospective deal with the Seminoles, as he has for the past three years. Simpson is trying to advance a deal designed to recapture tens of millions of dollars a year that evaporated after the state conceded that hugely popu-lar “designated player” games conducted at many pari-mutuel cardrooms violated a 2010 com-pact with the Seminoles. That compact, struck by former Gov. Charlie Crist and state lawmak-ers, gave the tribe “exclusive” rights to operate banked card games such as blackjack in exchange for a minimum annual payment of $150 million to the state. Simpson has worked with the Seminoles to nail down a 30-year compact, but he was unable to convince DeSantis and House leaders to endorse a plan during the past two legislative sessions. But this year, Simpson holds a powerful post as Senate presi-dent, and the compact could be part of horse-trading as the gov-ernor and House Speaker Chris Sprowls (R-Palm Harbor) seek to cement their legislative pri-orities. After weeks without public movement on gambling issues, the Senate Regulated Industries Committee on Monday approved a bill (SPB 7076) that would cre-ate a five-member “Gaming Control Commission” to over-see gambling operations in the state. It also approved a bill (SPB 7080) that would do away with a requirement that many pari-mutuel facilities conduct live horse racing or jai alai games to offer more-lucrative card rooms, a process known as “decoupling.” The decoupling proposal, however, could face hurdles dur-ing the final three weeks of the legislative session. 96382 Mt. Zion Loop, O’Neal/Yulee FL Bishop Thomas Coleman, CEO Laurie Holmes, Director littlelambsccc1@gmail.com LIC#C04NA00 Accepting applications for two teachers with CDA certification. Serious and experienced applicants with a passion for children contact 904.229.9064 r The Nassau County Sheriff’s Office celebrated a longtime employee’s retirement and a host of promotions recently Nassau County Sheriff Bill Leeper said Undersheriff Roy Henderson has retired after more than eight years in administration. Henderson first served as director or operations and then as under-sheriff. “I am very thankful that he agreed to join me after my election as sheriff in 2012 and grateful for his commitment, service and dedication to our agency and community and what he has done to make NCSO better,” Leeper said. Henderson served in law enforcement for more than 43 years with the Nassau County and Jacksonville sheriff’s offices. Leeper said after “much thought, consideration and prayer,” he promoted Lt. Jon Hooper to under-sheriff. Hooper started his career with the sheriff’s office in 1998 as a 911 dispatcher and served in a variety of areas, including patrol, narcotics and criminal inves-tigations. Hooper was Communications Officer of the Year in 1998, Investigator of the Year in 2007 and Supervisor of the Year in 2016. Hooper is a graduate of the Florida Department of Law Enforcement Academy, Department of Homeland Security Leadership Academy and FBI National Academy Session. “Jon has been shadowing Undersheriff Henderson for the last few weeks to provide for a smooth transition as we continue to improve our organization to provide the best services possible to our citizens,” Leeper said. nn rnrrr SUBMITTED PHOTOS Left photo, Roy Henderson, left, and Nassau County Sheriff Bill Leeper. Right, Undersheriff Jon Hooper, left, and Nassau County Sheriff Bill Leeper. rrr rn r With all Florida residents over the age of 16 eligible for the coronavirus vaccination and the number of cases declining in Nassau County, two Fernandina Beach commissioners said it is time the city lifts its mask man-date. “If not now, when? Right now is the time that seems the most logical, because we now have the vaccine available to everyone,” Commissioner Bradley Bean said at the April 6 commission meet-ing. “By all measurable things, we are succeeding and pushing and doing great.” Mayor Mike Lednovich noted only 23% of the county’s popula-tion is fully vaccinated. “That means one out of four people are vaccinated.” Lednovich said. “That means three out of four can spread the disease. Really? You want to take masks off? My neighbor caught COVID and almost died. Six months later, he’s learning to walk.” Commissioner David Sturges agreed with Bean, not-ing Jacksonville has lifted its mask requirement and Gov. Ron DeSantis has prohibited munici-palities from enforcing the ordi-nance. However, Commissioners Len Kreger and Chip Ross were in favor of keeping the require-ment. “For me, when the CDC stops recommending masks is when I’ll consider it,” Kreger said. “There are people dying; there are still some serious (numbers of) people dying. This is not the time to me that I think we should stop. Our per-thousand numbers are lower than some other states and I will suggest that that may be because we continue to … to wear a mask. Even if you are vac-cinated, there’s no guarantee. So, I think it behooves us to protect the citizens.” The mask ordinance extension was approved by a 3-2 vote, with Bean and Sturges voting against it. The commission heard good news when Barbara Boyd, a part-ner with CPA firm Purvis, Gray and Co., told the commission the city received an “unmodified” report on its financial statements for the fiscal year ending Sept. 30, 2020. “An unmodified opinion means that your financial state-ments … are fairly stated in all material respects,” Boyd said. “That’s the highest level that we, as auditors, can find. I am pleased to say the audit disclosed no sig-nificant deficiencies or material weaknesses.” The audit materials showed total assets of the general fund of $9,891,217 for 2020, down $3.3 million from $13,225,458 in 2019. The total fund balance grew, however, from $7,796,610 in 2019 to $9,109,870 in 2020. Boyd said the city has a proper amount of money put aside in case of emergency. “One of the things we look at is if you have a minimum of two months’ expenses in your fund balance,” she told the com-mission. “Your assigned and unassigned fund balance as a percentage of total expenditures and your normal operating trans-fers out is 16%, but then you also had your committed emergency reserve at 19%. Both of those combined is 35%. So, you are in a very good position.” Boyd said the sum of the city’s enterprise funds are in exceptionally good financial shape, while others have a defi-cit. The audit also studied the grants received from FEMA with a single audit, which Boyd said goes into more detail. “We look at the actual compliance requirements with the grant and look at the internal controls over compliance, not necessar-ily just the financial statements,” Boyd said. “I am pleased to give you an unmodified, clean opin-ion on the audit of the major program. The audit disclosed no significant deficiencies or mate-rial weaknesses.” In other business, the City Commission: Recognized the military achievements of U.S. Army Command Sgt. Major Teresa King; Proclaimed April 2021 as Water Conservation Month; Proclaimed May 2-8 as Municipal Clerks Week; Heard a presentation from Bill Warner about the 2021 Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance; Established revenue and expense accounts for the Public, Education and Government (PEG) channel; Approved a budget amendment for the utilities department, moving funds that were miscat-egorized into the proper account; Approved an amendment to the sanitation department budget to support costs associated with assuming residential yard waste collection; Approved a budget transfer of $50,000 from the contingency account to the legal department; Approved large-scale Future Land Use Map and Zoning assignments for the Baptist Medical Center proper-ties at 1250 S. 18th Street, 1367 S. 18th Street and vacant lands (totaling 31.39 acres) for FLUM assignment and zoning of Public and Institutional; Amended the General Employee and Fire and Police pension plans to comply with the SECURE Act; Established a fee schedule for yard waste disposal and amended the contract with Advanced waste disposal to remove yard waste collection, by a 4-1 vote, with Bean casting the dissenting vote; Reappointed Kimberly Richo to the Housing Authority. nn rrrrr Amelia Island & Nassau County’s #1 Property Management Company! ATTENTION PROPERTY OWNERS AND INVESTORSWe presently have major demand for potential tenants seeking housing on Amelia Island & Nassau County. This is an opportunity to sign leases with quality tenants at top rental rates! CALL US WE CAN HELP! Justin Miller Senior Property Manager, Broker Associate, Realtor® 904-277-6597 As your Property Manager we will....t Eectively market your vacant property t Thoroughly screen each prospective tenant t Enforce the collection of rents t Manage maintenance & emergency repairs 24/7 t Provide you with paperless monthly statements & rent distributionst Perform routine inspections of your property t Give you the peace of mind & personal attention you deserve! Sales Rentals Property & Association Management 1880 South 14th St, Suite 103, Amelia Island, FL 32034 galphinre.com We continue to have major demands for potential tenants seeking housing on Amelia Island & Nassau County. This is an opportunity to sign leases with quality tenants at top rental rates! CALL US – WE CAN HELP!Nip Galphin 904-277-6597

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© Baptist Health baptistnassau.com rnnnrn nnrrrnrnrnr rnr rrrrrnnrrnr + + + + + rn rr r LARGE BUSINESS OF THE YEAR TopGeneralHospital Houston Mooney, MD, Cardiologist at Baptist Nassau T his time of year, rap-tors (birds of prey) are more evident around our island than usual. Some hawks are migrating through on their way to breed-ing grounds up north and can often be seen atop utility poles along our roads. And some folk here have even been fortunate to view some of those birds of prey that breed right in our midst. This season, Fort Clinch State Park has been a hotbed of raptor breeding activity this year. Some of these birds have been very visible recently. For a week or so in March, two great horned owlets hung out on a thick live oak branch near the lighthouse overlook parking lot in the park. For a few days, this parking lot was full of photographers and birdwatchers aiming to capture their best images of these large and still fluffy owls. By now they have developed their flight feathers and drifted invisibly into the woods, where they will eventually, one hopes, find their own large tree to nest in. Watching the baby owls was fun while it lasted. But if you join the Facebook groups, “Our Town Photography Fernandina” and “Fort Clinch Photography,” there are a number of professional level photos, far better than mine, which you can admire indefi-nitely. For the past few years, bald eagles have also raised their chicks in a nest only viewable from a distance near the back gate, at the edge of the salt marsh deep in the park. Again this year, an eagle pair has been successful, with a fledgling flight captured by Beach Junki (Amy Wade) and posted on her Facebook page. Last year, there was also a successful eagle family raised in this nest, and maybe even the year before. The presence of this eagle nest, though, has been prob-lematic for the ospreys that also rule the skies in these parts. For the past couple of years, the osprey nest on a pole on North 14th Street near the back gate to Fort Clinch State Park has been bereft of the osprey families that have raised fami-lies there regularly for years. Quite possibly the presence of predatory eagles nesting nearby forced the ospreys to find safer digs. In the years that ospreys have been missing here, the nest platform has become overgrown with living shrubs, and tainted by a large brown garbage bag and no doubt other debris, as well. Thanks to a call from Beach Junki, the Florida Public Utilities people came out with their lift and removed the shrub and plastic garbage. And now, the ospreys are back, eagles notwithstanding. Recently, Bucko and I observed two ospreys in the nest, most likely mating. If you want to see the ospreys on this nesting plat-form, be very careful not to dis-turb them. This pair seems to be wary of people outside their cars or of too many cars parked near them. There are other osprey nests around the area to watch, too. A pair of ospreys has nested for a few years running on a pole provided for them near RaceTrac gas station just beyond Flora Park on State Road 200. Recently, the pair of ospreys there, named “Flora” and “Parker” by avid osprey watchers, has also been seen mating. You can learn more about Flora and Parker and other ospreys in our area if you join the Osprey of Amelia Island Facebook group. So, the bald eagle and great horned owl nesting season may be over for us, but the osprey show is just beginning. Other raptors, various hawks, are also breeding here this time of year. There is even a pair of red-shouldered hawks in the woods near my house that are screaming at each other, a sign of “love,” as their breeding sea-son is just starting now. So, keep your eyes and ears open now, and you too might enjoy the raptor spring. It’s another fine nature experience presented to us here in Nassau County. Wonders never cease. Pat Foster-Turley is a zoologist on Amelia Island. She wel-comes your nature questions and observations. SUBMITTED PHOTOS Top photos, two great horned owlets were visible for a week in Fort Clinch State Park. Above, a pair of ospreys is setting up shop in the nest on a 14th Street pole. Left, bald eagles have fledged at least one offspring from a nest in Fort Clinch State Park. rnr

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r n n n n All four Nassau County flag football teams converged on Pirate Field Thursday night, and the host Fernandina Beach High School Lady Pirates and the Yulee Lady Hornets were victorious over their cross-county foes. In the first matchup, Yulee beat West Nassau 33-6 to improve to 6-1 overall on the season. “We’ve only given up 54 points all season, so I’m very proud of the way we are playing defense,” said D.J. Ford, head coach for Yulee. “We’re play ing outside of the county. I’m preparing the girls for eventual play in a district. “We’ve submitted paper work to join one in the future. Tougher competition, more games and a chance at district and state championships. I per sonally think it’s time Nassau County takes the sport as seri ously as our neighbors in other counties do.” In the nightcap, the Lady Pirates defeated Hilliard 32-7. Gretchen Harding caught r PHOTOS BY BETH JONES/NEWS-LEADER Fernandina Beach High School’s Elizabeth Ramshaw rips a flag from a Hilliard ball carrier Thursday at Pirate Field. Also pictured is Ramshaw’s team-mate Kamryn Williams. More photos, 6B . rnrr two touchdowns from quarter back Riley Talbert, and Megan Laffey caught a third. Betty Elliot and Talbert each added a rushing touchdown for the Lady Pirates. The FBHS defense was led by senior safety and team captain Maddie Powell, who had two interceptions. The Lady Pirates (2-0) head to Yulee Thursday to take on the Lady Hornets in the county championship. Game time is 6:30 p.m. Yulee quarterback Chelsea Cooner, left, scores in the third quarter to put the Lady Hornets up 27-6. FBHS quarterback Riley Talbert, right, scored for the Lady Pirates. Yulee running back and team captain Allijah Cortez, left, heads for the end zone in the first quarter. Her TD put Yulee up 14-0. Above, FBHS’s Megan Laffey runs the ball for the Pirates after catching a pass from quarterback Talbert.

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rnr )r rrnr ).''nr /'+$*('$*(-, "! # !!!$ $ rnr )r rrnr ).''nr /'+$*('$*(-, "! # !!!$ $ rnr )r rrnr ).''nr /'+$*('$*(-, "! # !!!$ $ rnr )r rrnr ).''nr /'+$*('$*(-, "! # !!!$ $ NOW OPEN ONLY AT YOUR FERNANDINA BEACH GOLF CLUB 2800 BILL MELTON ROAD 904-310-3175 To learn more, download the Toptracer App or go to: www.toptracer.com YULEE HIGH SCHOOL Varsity Baseball April 16 FERNANDINA BEACH 6:30April 19 at Wolfson 6:00April 20 at Ridgeview 6:00April 23 UNIVERSITY CHRIST.** 6:30** Senior night YULEE HIGH SCHOOL Varsity Softball April 15 at Hilliard 7:00April 16 at Trinity Christian 6:30April 20 at Bishop Kenny* 5:00* District FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL Boys and Girls Tennis April 14-15 DISTRICT TOURNEY 7:30 FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL Junior Varsity Baseball April 16 YULEE 6:00 FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL Varsity Baseball April 16 at Yulee 6:30April 20 at Camden County 6:00April 22 FLETCHER 6:00 April 26-29 District 4-3A at TBA FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL Softball April 15 at Christ Church Academy 4:00April 16 at Bishop Snyder 6:00April 20 ED WHITE 5:30April 22 at Terry Parker FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL Boys and Girls Track & Field April 16 Region 1-3A at RainesApril 30 Region 1-2A at BollesMay 13 2A state at University of Florida NASSAU COUNTY Girls Flag Football April 15 West Nassau-Hilliard 5:30 Fernandina-host Yulee 6:30 YULEE HIGH SCHOOL Girls Flag Football April 15 FERNANDINA BEACH 6:30 FERNANDINA BEACH MIDDLE SCHOOL Baseball April 14 COUNTY SEMIS 5/7:00April 17 County finals at YMS 11:00 SUBMITTED PHOTOS The Ladies Golf Association of the Golf Club of Amelia Island held its two-day Championship Tournament, and win-ners included, from left, Sue Lansdell, Cathy West, Bette Kontio, Sue Riegler, Bernie Carroll, Carol Scavotto and Nancy Carpenter. The Ladies Golf Association of the Golf Club of Amelia Island held its two-day Championship Tournament recently. Sue Riegler was crowned the overall champi on. The ladies played in beauti ful weather. Flight winners were Bernie Carroll, first place, first flight; Cathy West, second place; Bette Kontio, first place, sec ond flight; Sue Lansdell, sec ond; Carol Scavotto, first place, third flight, Nancy Carpenter, second. The Ladies Golf Association plays every Thursday at 9 a.m. Contact the pro shop at 904-277-8015.n On a beautiful, April Saturday, 62 players participated in the Golf Club of Amelia Island’s April individual Stableford tournament. The Men’s Golf Association players were divided into six flights according to handicap and tee box. Players individually com pleted each hole, then recorded their Stableford score. In the first flight from the blue tees, Doug Ritter won the day with 40 points. Mark Rosenthal and John Salciccioli tied for second with 38 points. In the second flight from the blue tees, Brian Boyer came out victorious with 45 points, followed closely by Michael Beasley. From the black tees, the first flight finished in a first-place tie between Barry Doggett and Charlie Morris, who both finished with 37 points. Second place was cap tured by Greg Matthews with 34, and third place went to Mike Williams with 33. The second flight was won by Joe Kotopka with 40 points. James Winegeart and Ray Whitehead tied for second with 38 points, Steve Ritter finished third with 32, and Terry Eberle fourth with 31. In the third flight from the black tees, Bob Evans finished first with 36 points, and John McClure and Jim Peisel finished tied for sec ond with 32 points. In the single flight from the white tees, Rich Blazek won the day with 39 points, with Howard Tarlow coming in sec ond with 34. The players enjoyed the event and the competition and are already looking forward to next month’s tournament.n The Fernandina Beach Golf Club’s nine-hole ladies group plays on Mondays and is open to new members. Anyone interested in joining the group may email Carla Foreman at ckforeman20@gmail.com. ­€‚ n r Sue Riegler captured the overall title for the Ladies Golf Association at the Golf Club of Amelia Island’s two-day Championship Tournament.  ­rr The city of Fernandina Beach Parks & Recreation Department offers the follow ing programs and activities. Visit www.fbfl.us for informa tion on the following programs or activities. ‡3HFN*\PLVQRZIXOO\ open. The cardio area, weight room and basketball/volleyball court opened Friday, and all sports activities are restored to their normal days and times. ‡2SHQDGXOWYROOH\EDOO at Peck Gym Tuesdays and Fridays from 7-9 p.m. Informal team games on two courts. Teams selected each night. Ages 16 and up (16-17 must have parental consent form signed by parents and nota rized before participating). Cost is $3/day for city resi dents, $5 non-city. ‡
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rr Fernandina Beach Youth Football will hold a car wash from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. April DW%R0LNH·V'HWDLOShop, 1224 S. Eighth St., in Fernandina Beach. Cost is $15 per wash. Visit the league on its Facebook page.nrr Register through April 16 at the MLK Jr. Center on Elm Street for the city of Fernandina Beach Parks and 5HFUHDWLRQ'HSDUWPHQW·VVXPPHUPHQ·VEDVNHWEDOOOHDJXHTeam registration fee is $425. 7KHUHLVDSHUVRQURVWHUOLPLWSHUWHDP0DWFKLQJXQLform shirts with numbers on backs required. Games will be played on Mondays and Thursdays at Peck Gym beginning May 3, ZLWKWLSRIIDWSPIRUthe first game. Contact John Coverdell at jcoverdell@fbfl.RUJRUn The Nassau Sport Fishing Association holds its monthly business meetings on the second Wednesday of each PRQWK7KHPRQWKO\VRFLDOJHWtogether is held on the fourth Wednesday of each month. The location for both meetings is Kraft Ten Acres, %XFFDQHHU7UDLOFernandina Beach, Florida &DOORUHPDLOLQIR#QVIDILVKQHWIRULQIRUPDtion.n The 32nd annual Wolfson &KLOGUHQ·V+RVSLWDO%DVV7RXUQDPHQWUHWXUQVLQSHUVRQ0D\DWWKH&LW\'RFNVLQPalatka. This year, more than LQFDVKSUL]HVZLOOEHawarded. Now in its 32nd year, WKHWRXUQDPHQWLVUHFRJQL]HGDVRQHRIWKHODUJHVWEDVVILVKing tournaments in Florida. The public may enter a drawing for a chance to win DIRRW%XOOHW%RDWPRGHO6'&ZLWKPDWFKLQJtandem Boatmate trailer and 0HUFXU\3UR;6RXWERDUGmotor, courtesy of Bullet Boats and Mercury Marine, valued DW$OOSURFHHGVfrom the drawing benefit the :ROIVRQ&KLOGUHQ·V&+HUPDQDQG0DU\9LUJLQLD7HUU\+HDUWInstitute. To enter the drawing, visit wolfsonbasstournament.com. Ticket sales close at 8 DP0D\7KLV\HDU·VJUDQGSUL]HGUDZLQJZLOOEHEURDGFDVWon Facebook Live at 11 a.m. May 22. Since its inception, the tournament has raised more than $5 million for Wolfson &KLOGUHQ·V+RVSLWDORIJacksonville. 7KH/DGV/DVVHV7RXUQ ament (one male, one female boater) is May 13 at the 3DODWND&LW\'RFNV:HLJKLQbegins at 3 p.m. The VIP & Friends Tournament (sponsor ERDWVSUHILVKLV0D\DWWKH3DODWND&LW\'RFNV:HLJKLQbegins at 3 p.m. The 32nd Annual Wolfson &KLOGUHQ·V+RVSLWDO%DVVTournament is May 15. Late registration opens at 2 a.m. Boats launch from the Palatka &LW\'RFNVDWVDIHOLJKW:HLJKLQEHJLQVDWSP 5HJLVWHURQOLQHRUDSSOLFD tions will be accepted at the 3DODWND&LW\'RFNVIURPSP0D\DQGIURPDP0D\7KH3DODWND&LW\'RFNVDUHORFDWHGDW5LYHU6W:HLJKLQVFRQWLQXHLQPLQXWHLQFUHPHQWVVWDJgered by boat number. In 1989, the director of WKH3ODQW)DFLOLWLHVGHSDUWment of Baptist Medical Center Jacksonville, along with several others, came up with the tournament as a vehicle to help fund capital improvements and acquisition of advanced technology at :ROIVRQ&KLOGUHQ·V+RVSLWDODQRWIRUSURILWSHGLDWULFKRVSLWDOSURYLGLQJZRUOGFODVVFDUHIRUchildren and families in North Florida, South Georgia and beyond. 9LVLWZROIVRQEDVVWRXUQD ment.com.rnr The Amelia Island Sailing Club meets the first Tuesday of the month at the Kraft Athletic Club at Ten Acres, located off Buccaneer Trail. 6RFLDOKRXUVWDUWVDWSPfollowed by a potluck dinner, business meeting and guest speaker presentation. Guests are welcome. &XUUHQWERDWRZQHUVKLSRUVDLOing skills are not prerequisites to joining. Club activities throughout the year may include day/overnight excursions by water and/or land, sailboat racing and social activities as well as DVVLVWLQJZLWKORFDOFRQVHUYDtion and environmental efforts in waters surrounding Amelia ,VODQG9LVLWZZZDPHOLDLVODQGsailingclub.wildapricot.org. rrrr Scheduled play at the pickleball courts at Central Park in Fernandina Beach has resumed. Beginner play (levels LVSP6XQGD\VRFLDOSOD\SOXVZLWKFKDOOHQJHFRXUWLVIURPSPSunday. :RPHQ·VRSHQSOD\DOOOHY HOVRQFRXUWVLVIURPa.m. Monday, and level 3.5 on FRXUWVDQGIURPSP0RQGD\ZLWKUDWLQJOHYHOSOXVRQFRXUWV/HYHOVDQGSOXVSOD\IURPDP7XHVGD\DQGOHYHOVDQGIURPDPWRQRRQ/HYHOVDQGSOXVwith challenge court is from SP:HGQHVGD\0HQ·Vopen play (all levels) on courts LVIURPDP1LJKWWLPHsocial play (all levels) is from SP7KXUVGD\/HYHOVDQGSOXVLVIURPDP)ULGD\DQGOHYHOVDQGIURPDPWRQRRQ2Q6DWXUGD\QLJKWtime social play (all levels) is IURPSP Visit www.fbpickleball.com, )HUQDQGLQD%HDFK3LFNOHEDOO3LUDWHVRQ)DFHERRNRUHPDLOfbpbpirates@gmail.com.rr The Amelia Island Boules Club holds pétanque pickup games on the pétanque courts DWWKHVRXWKHQGRIWKHGRZQtown Marina, Saturdays at DPDQGPRVWDIWHUQRRQVon weekdays. 3pWDQTXHSD\WRQNLVD cousin of both horseshoes and bocce, the Italian bowling game. The public is always ZHOFRPH&DOOIRUinformation. n The North Florida Bicycle &OXERIIHUVVHYHUDORUJDQL]HGbicycle rides each week at various times and locations on Amelia Island and in Nassau County. Cyclists of all abilities DUHZHOFRPH+HOPHWVDQGDELF\FOHLQJRRGZRUNLQJFRQdition are required. Bicycle VDIHW\ZLOOEHHPSKDVL]HGDWthe start of each ride. Cyclists typically split into groups, depending on pace and skill level, and there are options to cut the ride short. Lunch is optional. &DOORUYLVLWZZZ ameliaislandcycling.com, www.ameliaislandtrail.org or www.nfbc.us.n Amelia Island Guides $VVRFLDWLRQ·V6XSSRUW2XU9HWHUDQV)LVKLQJ7RXUQDment on Nov. 13 is open to all anglers fishing from powered boat, kayak, canoe, shore, bridge or pier. The event will be held from the Amelia Island Marina, formerly the Amelia Island Yacht Basin. Anglers can enter and win in the redfish spot tournament, the biggest trout tournament or both. Early entry fees are SHUDGXOWDQJOHUIRUWKHUHGILVKVSRWWRXUQDPHQWDWWKHFDSWDLQVPHHWLQJper adult angler for the biggest VHDWURXWWRXUQDPHQWDWWKHFDSWDLQVPHHWLQJDQGSHUDGXOWDQJOHUIRUERWKWRXUQDPHQWVDWWKHFDSWDLQVmeeting). (DUO\HQWU\IHHLVSHU \RXWKDQJOHUIRUHDFKWRXUQDPHQWDWFDSWDLQVPHHWLQJRUIRUERWKWRXUQDPHQWVDWWKHFDSWDLQVmeeting). Youth anglers are boys and girls under 16 years of age. Corporate team fee is SHUERDWZLWKHDUO\HQWU\IHHIRUWKHUHGILVKVSRWWRXUQD   AT NEED CREMATION . PRE-NEED PLANNING NO COST CREMATION OPTIONS Lowest Price for cremation in Nassau County GUARANT EED! ##!&'$&' %!&'$)"&%. ( 904 ) 348-5579 We’ve Moved! CREMATIONS OF NASSAU www.eternityfh.com r n FERNANDINA BEACH 2110 Sadler Square | 904-261-6333 lottsfurniture.com INTRODUCING NOW IN STORE! EVENT 10% OFF LEXINGTON COLLECTIONS FROM + ADDITIONAL PHOTO BY AMANDA REAM/COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS Ryan Hepler, left, of Fernandina Beach High School placed sixth in the 139-pound weight class at the regional weightlifting meet Saturday at West Nassau High School. He had a total of 340 pounds. ROUNDUP Continued on 3B

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S port fishing boats have been hooking up to excellent sheepshead action while fishing some of the nearshore bottom structures when weather con-ditions allow. One of the more popular offshore fish havens has been the popular KBY artificial reef, where the bottom includes old, broken con-crete. KBY artificial reef encompasses a huge area, including two square miles of broken concrete and rubble from the old Kings Bay Naval Station. There have been a few small barges placed there on the bottom as well. Sheepshead fishermen will typically look for areas of the bottom that have scattered rub-ble and concrete to harbor the best concentrations of sheeps-head. The cracks in the rocks and debris seem to hold a lot of marine and shellfish, which is the big attraction for offshore sheepshead. A spinning reel with 20-pound green-colored braided fishing line is the fishing tackle of choice when targeting off-shore sheepshead. A 12-inch section of 30-pound fluoro-carbon leader is attached to the braided fishing line using back-to-back uni knots. Next, a 4-ounce egg sinker is threaded onto the fluorocarbon leader, and then a 30-pound black bar-rel swivel is attached to the tag end of the leader. A 2-foot sec-tion of 30-pound fluorocarbon shock leader is then attached to the remaining side of the black barrel swivel. Finally, a size-one kahle hook is attached to the business end of the shock leader. A small piece of fresh clam is then barbed and fished dead on the bottom while occasion-ally raising and lowering the rod tip. Sheepshead fishing has also been at the St. Marys inlet, where jetty rocks hold the best F ERNANDINA B EACH T IDES T ides, Sun & Moo n : April 14, April 21, 2021 Sat. 4/17 Sun. 4/18 Mon. 4/19 Tues. 4/20Fri.4/16Thur.4/15 Wed.4/21 Sunrise 6:59AMoonrise 8:31A Sunset 7:53P Moonset 10:21PWed.4/14 Low 4:52A 1.68’ High 11:10A 7.17’Low 4:54P 1.65’ High 11:22P 7.86’ Sunrise 6:58AMoonrise 9:05A Sunset 7:53P Moonset 11:16P Sunrise 6:56AMoonrise 9:44A Sunset 7:54P Moonset -P Low 5:28A 1.82’ High 11:46A 6.91’Low 5:26P 1.84’High 11:58P 7.67’ High -A -’ Low 6:05A 2.01’ High 12:23P 6.68’Low 6:02P 2.04’ High 12:36A 7.49’Low 6:05A 2.01’ High 1:03P 6.51’Low 6:42P 2.23’ Moonset 1:06ASunrise 6:54AMoonrise 11:16A Sunset 7:55P High 1:18A 7.34’ Low 7:32A 2.42’ High 1:46P 6.41’Low 7:31P 2.39’ Moonset 1:57ASunrise 6:53AMoonrise 12:11P Sunset 7:56P High 2:06A 7.24’ Low 8:28A 2.55’ High 2:37P 6.40’Low 8:32P 2.48’ Moonset 2:45AFirst Qtr. 3:00A Sunrise 6:52AMoonrise 1:09P Sunset 7:57P Tide calculations are for Amelia River, Fernandina Beach. No corrections are necessary. Sun & Moon events are also calculated for Fernandina Beach, although actual times may vary because of land masses.High 4:05A 7.30’ Low 10:28A 2.39’ High 4:40P 6.77’Low 10:43P 2.27’ High 3:03A 7.22’ Low 9:28A 2.55’ High 3:36P 6.51’Low 9:38P 2.44’ Moonset 3:29ASunrise 6:51AMoonrise 2:11P Sunset 7:57P Moonset 12:11ASunrise 6:55AMoonrise 10:27A Sunset 7:55P Paying too much money for your business insurance? Simpler, smarter business insurance. We come to your business for personalized service to save you both time and money. We make insurance easy. 904-388-6446 Andres Cofre and sons Ernesto and Max, far left, are pictured with a nice Amelia Island sheepshead. Sheepshead fish-ing in the back-waters and at off-shore structures has been excel-lent. Black drum fishing continues to be excellent in Cumberland Sound and at the tip of the St. Marys south jetty rocks. Left, pictured are Fredrick Elarbee, right, with two sons Rache and Robert with a nice catch of black drum. Also pictured is Capt. Steve Hair and his charter boat Ye Ole Pirate . concentrations of these jail-like fish. Amelia Island’s Capt. Danny Flynn offers excellent advice on angling techniques when target-ing jetty sheepshead. “My favorite sheepshead waters include the St. Marys jetty rocks,” Flynn said. “Here, sheepshead will congregate close to the low areas of the jetty rocks during the low tide periods. My favorite tides to catch sheepshead include the last few hours of the falling tide and the first few hours of the incoming tide.” Fishing tackle is key when targeting jetty sheepshead, which at times can be very tricky in their feeding habits. “I typically use 20-pound spinning tackle, with spinning reels spooled with 20-pound braided fishing line,” Flynn said. “A 1to 4-ounce egg sink-er is threaded onto the braided line, using just enough weight to keep fiddler crab bait down on the bottom and next to the rocks. A 20-pound barrel swivel is then tied to the tag end of the braided fishing line. Next, a 12-inch section of 20-pound fluorocarbon shock leader is tied to the remaining side of the barrel swivel. Finally, a size-four kahle hook is tied to the business end of the shock leader.” Excellent reasoning for employing a small size-four Kahle hook is it produces more strikes from spooky sheeps-head that often mistake the small saltwater hook for a fid-dler crab leg. “Sheepshead strikes are often difficult to detect,” Flynn explains. “Keeping a tight fish-ing line, while raising and low-ering the rod tip, is a good tip for detecting sheepshead that are trying to sneak off with my barbed fiddler crab.” Current Florida fishing regulations for sheepshead includes a 12-inch minimum size limit and a bag limit of eight per day per angler. For information, go to www.myfwc.com. The Nassau Sport fishing Association will hold a fish club meeting at 7 p.m. today at Kraft Athletic Club. Local fisher-men are encouraged to come and find out what is happening in the local fishing waters of Amelia Island and to meet other local fishermen. The popular local fishing club holds several competitive fishing events through the year, including the annual Fernandina Beach Kingfish Tournament and Rodeo. Members also compete for Fish of the Month honors and NSFA Angler of the Year honors. For information, visit www.nsfafish.com. n r PHOTOS BY TERRY LACOSS/SPECIAL Jackie and Dean Swihart recently caught and released this 32-inch redfish while fishing some of Amelia Island’s shallow water bays. Swihart is a con-gresswoman representing the the Second District of Indiana. ment ($300 per boat at the captains meeting). Early entries must be submitted before 6 p.m. Nov. 12. Final registration begins at 6 p.m., and entries will be accepted up until 7 p.m. The captains meeting and prize drawings begin at 6:45 p.m. In the redfish spot tourney, the most spots on a legal red drum (redfish) will win the tour-nament with first through third places, based on the most spots. The first live “no spot”entry brought to the check in table will be awarded a fourth prize. All entry fee money will be award-ed in prizes. Youth prizes and trophies will be presented to the top three places. If there are no youth winners, entry fee money will be donated to the American Legion Post 54. In the biggest sea trout tournament, the single biggest sea trout by weight will win the tournament, with firstthrough third-place prizes. All effort should be made to bring these fish in alive, but there will be no penalty for a dead entry. All entry fee money will be awarded in prizes. All Anglers should follow Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission rules; just one sea trout over 19 inches is allowed per boat. In the cor-porate redfish spot tournament, the winning boat takes home the trophy. Anglers are required to attend the captains meeting on Nov. 12 to receive their entry number. Registration begins at 6 p.m. Check-out begins at the captains meeting. This is an open-launch format. Participants can fish in any waters in North Florida starting at safe light on Nov. 13. Check-LQZLOOEHJLQDWDPDWWKHVSRWPDVWHU·Vcheck-in table at the Amelia Island Marina. Anglers must be in standing in line with their fish no later than 4 p.m. The line will close at 4 p.m. Anyone getting to the line after 4 p.m. will be disqualified. Time will be based on the 6SRWPDVWHU·VFHOOSKRQHFORFN Rain date will be Nov. 14. The tournament director will make the call to move the date from Saturday to Sunday in the event of bad weather. A storm date will be Dec. 4. If the tour-nament needs to be canceled, a full refund will be made, upon request. Make sure all contact information on registration/entry form is com-plete and correct. All fish must be caught by hook, line, rod and reel and must be caught by the angler who entered the tournament. Anglers may use live, dead or artificial baits. Every possible means should be made to ensure a live release. All entries must obey Florida fishing and boating regulations. In the event of a tie, the entry checked in earliest will be the winner. All anglers on a boat must have paid for tourna-ment entry. Contact Capt. Matt Harrelson at 904-206-9527 or spartinatailscharterfishing@yahoo.com. r Continued from 3B

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PUBLIC NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES CONTINUED ON THE NEXT PAGE. SE CT IO N 00 11 13 ADV ER TI SE ME NT FO R BI DS FR OM : 1. 01 Th e Ow ne r (h ereina fte r re fe rr ed to as Na ss au C oun ty Sc ho ol Bo ard) : A. Th e Sc ho ol Bo ard of Na ssa u Co un ty 12 01 At l ant ic Av enue Fe rn andi na Be ac h, FL 3203 4 1. 02 An d th e En gi nee r (h er ein a fte r re fe rr ed to as En gi n eer ): A. M. V. Cu mmi ng s E ngi ne ers, In c. 65 01 Ar li ngton Ex pres sw ay , SB2 11 Ja ckso nville, FL 3221 1 1. 03 DA TE : MA RCH 19 , 20 21 A. Pub lic Ad ve rtisem en t Da tes: Ap ril 7, 2021 Ap ril 14 , 20 21 Ap ril 21 , 20 21 1. 04 TO : PO TE NT IA L BI DDE RS A. Pr equa lifie d firm s ar e invite d to s ubm it an of fe r unde r se al to Th e Na ss au Co un ty Sc ho ol Bo ar d fo r co nstr uc ti on of HV AC an d Co nt ro l S yst em s Re plac em ent fo r th e fo ll ow i ng proj ect: FE RN A NDI NA B EAC H HI GH SC H OOL HV AC SYS TE M ME CH AN IC AL RE TR OF IT . Th e projec t is lo ca te d at Fe rna nd in a Be ac h Hi gh Sc ho ol 43 5 Ci tr ona Dr ive, Fe rn andi na Be ach, FL 32034 . Bi dd in g wi ll be lo ca te d at Th e Sc hool Bo ar d of Na ss au Co un ty , Bo ar d Ro om , 1201 At la nt ic Av enue , Fe rn andi na Be ac h, FL 3203 4 be fo re 1: 00 pm lo ca l da y lig ht ti me on TU ES DA Y, th e 4t h da y of MA Y 2021 . Al l Bi ds re ce iv ed at su ch pl ace, da te an d ti me wi ll be pu b lic ly opene d an d re ad aloud. Bi ds re ce iv ed af te r su ch ti me w ill be retu rn ed to th e re sp ec tive Bi dder , un op ened . B. Al l bi dder s we re re qu ir ed to pr equa lif y as to th e app ro va l of th e ow ne r pr io r to 2: 00 pm on Fe bruary 4, 2021 . C. A Ma ndator y Pr eBi d Co nfe re nc e w ill be he ld on th e sch ool site at 1:00 PM on Th ur s day , t he 22nd da y of Ap ri l 20 21 . Al l Pr equa lifie d Co nt ra cto rs mu st a tte nd th is Pr eBi d Co nfer en ce in orde r to ha ve th ei r Bid co nsid er ed . D. Pr oject De scrip tion: 1. Th is projec t in cl ude s HV AC Sy stem s de mo litio n and re pl acem en t an d HV AC Co nt ro ls re mo val, mo di ficati on an d re in sta llati on at th e va ri ou s Bu ild in gs of th e sc hool ca m pus . Th e pr ojec t w ill in cl ude wo rk of other tr ade s in su ppor t of th e H VAC re pl acement an d Co ntrol s re mo val, mo di ficati on an d re in sta llati on . E. Do cu me nts ma y be ob ta in ed on ly by Ge ner al Co nt ra ct or an d Me ch an ical , El ec tric al an d Pl umbi ng Su bcon trac t Bi dder s. Ot her s ma y vi ew th e Bi d Do cu m ent s at th e fo llo wi ng Pl an Ro om : 1. AR C Do cu me nt So luti ons , 46 13 Ph illi ps Hi gh wa y, Su it e 20 2, Ja cks onv il le , FL 32207. Co mp le te se ts of Bi dd in g Do cu m ents mu st be obt ained by Bi dde rs on or a fte r Ap ri l 7, 20 21 from AR C Do cu me nt So luti ons . Co ntac t AR C Do cu me nt So lu ti on s at 9043 99-8946 or by em ai l to : jac kso nville.pro duc ti on @e -a rc .c om an d re ques t in stru ct io ns to orde r or vi ew th e Bi dding Do cu m ent s. 2. Bi dder s mu st ma in ta in st at us as a re gistered pl an ho ld er wi th AR C Do cu me nt So luti ons . An y A ddend a w ill be di stri bu te d el ectr on ically to plan ho ld er s of re co rd . F. Bi d der s w ill be re qu ired to pr ovid e Bi d se cu rity in th e fo rm of a Bi d Bo nd of a su m no le ss of a Bi d Bo nd of a su m no le ss th an 5 pe rc en t of th e Bi d Am o unt . G. Re fe r to othe r bidd in g re qu irem en ts de sc ribe d in Do cu m ent 00 21 13 In stru ctio ns to Bi dders. H. Su bm it yo ur of fe r on th e Bi d Fo rm provided . Bi d der s ma y su pplemen t th is fo rm as app ro pr ia te . I. Yo ur o ffe r will be re qu ired to be su bm itte d unde r a co nd itio n of ir re vo ca b ilit y fo r a pe ri od of 60 da ys af te r su bm i ssi on . J. T he Ow ne r re serv es th e ri gh t to a cce pt or re je ct an y or al l of fe rs . 1. 05 SI GN AT UR E A. Fo r: Na ss au Co un ty Sc ho ol Bo ar d B. By : Je ffrey L. Bu nch, Di re ct or of Fa c ilitie s EN D OF BI D SO LI CI TATI ON FN L 3T 04 -0 714 -2 12021 #63331 4 NO TI CE U NDE R FI CT ITIO US NA ME LA W PU RS UANT TO SE CT IO N 865.09 , FL OR ID A ST AT UT ES NO TI CE IS HE RE BY GI VE N th at th e unde rs ign ed, de siri ng to e ngage in bu si ne ss unde r th e fict itio us na me of Ab stractive Me di a lo ca te d at 7702 2 Cr o ssc ut Wa y, in th e Co unt y of Na ssa u, in th e Ci ty of Yu le e, Fl orid a 32097 in te nd s to re gi ste r th e sa id na me wi th th e Di vi si on of Co rp or at io ns of th e Fl orid a De pa rt me nt of St at e, Ta lla ha sse e, Fl or i da. Da te d at Yu le e, Fl orid a 3209 7 th is 6t h da y of Ap ril, 2021 . Da rre n Co ok Ab stra ctive Medi a FN L 1T 04 -1 42021 #63418 2 NO TI CE U NDE R FI CT ITIO US NA ME LA W PU RS UANT TO SE CT IO N 865.09 , FL OR ID A ST AT UT ES NO TI CE IS HE RE BY GI VE N th at th e unde rs ign ed, de siri ng to e ngage in bu si ne ss unde r th e fict itio us na me of AJ s En te rp rise s lo ca te d at 9512 1 Ka re n Wa lk , in th e Co un ty of Na ssa u, in th e City of Fe rn a ndi na Be ach, Fl orid a 3203 4 in te nd s to r egi ster th e sa id na me wi th th e Di vi si on of Co rp or ati on s of th e Fl or id a De pa rt me nt of St at e, Ta lla ha sse e, Fl or i da. Da te d at Fe rn andi na Be ac h, Fl orid a 3203 4 th is 5t h da y of Ap ril, 2021 . Al an Sc ot t We ll s AJ s En te rp ri se s FN L 1T 04 -1 42021 #63375 7 NO TI CE U NDE R FI CT ITIO US NA ME LA W PU RS UANT TO SE CT IO N 865.09 , FL OR ID A ST AT UT ES NO TI CE IS HE RE BY GI VE N th at th e unde rs ign ed, de siri ng to e ngage in bu si ne ss unde r th e fict itious na me of Oa k Ma rs h La wn an d Leaf lo ca te d at 205 1 Oa k Ma rs h Dr ive, in th e Co un ty of Na ss au, in th e Ci ty of Fe rn andi na Be ac h, Fl orid a 32034 in te nd s to re gi ste r th e sa id na me wi th th e Di vi si on of Co rp or at io ns of th e Fl orid a De pa rt me nt of St at e, Ta lla ha sse e, Fl or i da. Da te d at Fe rn andi na Be ac h, Fl orid a 3203 4 th is 2n d da y of Ap ril, 2021 . Ro ge r Jas on Or r Oa k Ma rsh La wn and Leaf FN L 1T 04 -1 42021 #63349 0 NO TI CE U NDE R FI CT ITIO US NA ME LA W PU RS UANT TO SE CT IO N 865.09 , FL OR ID A ST AT UT ES FL OR ID A ST AT UT ES NO TI CE IS HE RE BY GI VE N th at th e unde rs ign ed, de siri ng to e ngage in bu si ne ss unde r th e fi ctitio us na me of So ut he rn Ch ar m Sc ape s lo ca te d at P. O. Bo x 3191 , in th e Co un ty of Co lu mb ia , in th e Ci ty of La ke Ci ty , Fl or id a 32056 in te nd s to re gister th e sa id na me wi th th e Di vi sion of Co rp or atio ns of th e Fl orid a De pa rt me nt of St at e, Ta lla ha sse e, Fl or i da. Da te d at Fe rn andi na Be ac h, Fl orid a 3203 4 th is 5t h da y of Ap ril, 2021 . Ca rol Co mb s S out her n Ch ar m Sc apes FN L 1T 04 -1 42021 #63414 8 BO ARD OF COUN TY CO MMI SS IO NERS NA SS AU COUNT Y, FL OR ID A IN VI TATI ON TO BI D NO TI CE IS HE RE BY GI VE N th at th e Bo ar d of Co un ty Co mmi ssio ner s of Na ss au Co un ty , Fl orida in vi tes se al ed bi ds for: FI LL MA TE RI AL S (A 3, A24, CL AY ) SO LI CI TATI ON NO . NC 21 -0 05 Fo r de ta ile d in fo rm at i on re ga rd in g th e bi d d ue da te a nd bi d re qu irem en ts in cl uding ob ta in in g th e so licitatio n do cu me nt s fr ee of-c harge go to www .d eman dst ar .com or th e Co un ty 's we bsite at w ww. nas sa uc ou ntyfl. co m. A TTE ST : JO HN A. CR AW FO RD EX -O FFI CI O CL ER K TH OM AS R. FO RD CH AI RM AN BO A RD OF CO UN TY CO MM IS SI ON ER S N AS SAU CO UN TY , FL OR ID A FN L 4T 03 -3 1 & 04 -0 714 -2 12021 #63128 1 BO ARD OF COUN TY CO MMI SS IO NERS NA SS AU COUNT Y, FL OR ID A IN VI TATI ON TO BID (I TB ) NO TI CE IS HE RE BY GI VE N th at th e Bo ar d of Co un ty Co mmi ssio ner s of Na ss au Co un ty , Fl orida in vi tes se al ed bi ds for: FI RE -R ES CU E ME TA L BU IL DI NG SO LI CI TATI ON NO . NC 21 -0 09 Fo r de ta ile d in fo rm at i on re ga rd in g th e bi d d ue da te a nd bi d re qu irem en ts fo r this so licit at i on, pl eas e visi t th e Na ssa u Co un ty s we bs it e at h ttp s ://w ww. nas sa ucount yfl.co m or co ntac t th e Pr oc ur emen t Di visi on at pr ocu re me nt @nassa ucou ntyfl. co m. Bi d in fo rm atio n an d do cum en ts ca n be ob ta in ed fr om ht tp s :// www .d emands tar. co m/ . A TTE ST : JO HN A. CR AW FO RD EX -O FFI CI O CL ER K TH OM AS R. FO RD CH AI RM AN BO A RD OF CO UN TY CO MM IS SI ON ER S N AS SAU CO UN TY , FL OR ID A FN L 4T 03 -3 1 & 04 -0 714 -2 12021 #63199 2 BO ARD OF COUN TY CO MMI SS IO NERS NA SS AU COUNT Y, FL OR ID A IN VI TATI ON TO BID (I TB ) NO TI CE IS HE RE BY GI VE N th at th e Bo ar d of Co un ty Co mmi ssio ner s of Na ss au Co un ty , Fl orida in vi tes se al ed bi ds for: RO AD DE PAR TM EN T ME TA L CU LV ER TS SO LI CI TATI ON NO . NC 21 -0 11 Fo r de ta ile d in fo rm at i on re ga rd in g th e bi d d ue da te a nd bi d re qu irem en ts fo r this so licit at i on, pl eas e visi t th e Na ssa u Co un ty's we bs it e at h ttp s ://w ww. nas sa ucount yfl.co m or co ntac t th e Pr oc ur emen t Di visi on at pr ocu re me nt @nassa ucou ntyfl. co m. Bi d in fo rm atio n an d do cco m. Bi d in fo rm atio n an d do cum en ts ca n be ob ta in ed fr ee of ch ar ge from h ttp s ://w ww . dema nd st ar .com /. A TTE ST : JO HN A. CR AW FO RD EX -O FFI CI O CL ER K TH OM AS R. FO RD CH AI RM AN BO A RD OF CO UN TY CO MM IS SI ON ER S N AS SAU CO UN TY , FL OR ID A FN L 4T 04 -0 714 -2 128 -2 02 1 #63230 1 BO ARD OF COUN TY CO MMI SS IO NERS NA SS AU COUNT Y, FL OR ID A IN VI TATI ON TO BID (I TB ) NO TI CE IS HE RE BY GI VE N th at th e Bo ar d of Co un ty Co mmi ssio ner s of Na ss au Co un ty , Fl orid a in vi te s se al ed re sp on ses fo r: COUNT YWIDE MO WI NG CONT RACT (R EBI D) SO LI CI TATI ON NO . NC 21 -0 15 Fo r de ta ile d in fo rm at i on re ga rd in g th e du e da te an d re qu ir em ent s fo r th is so licit at i on, pl eas e visi t th e Na ss au Co un ty we bs it e at www. na ssa uco untyfl.c om or co nt ac t th e Pr oc urem ent Di visi on at pr ocur emen t@ na ss aucoun tyfl.com . So licita ti on in fo rm atio n an d do cu m ent s ca n be ob ta in ed fr ee of ch ar ge fr om w ww. de ma ndstar .co m. A TTE ST : JO HN A. CR AW FO RD EX -O FFI CI O CL ER K TH OM AS R. FO RD CH AI RM AN BO AR DO F CO UNT Y CO MM IS SI ON ER S N AS SAU CO UN TY , FL OR ID A FN L 4T 04 -1 421 -2 8 & 05 -0 52021 #63381 6 NO TI CE OF AP PL IC AT IO N FO R TA X DE ED NO TI CE IS HE REBY GI VE N Th at FR ANK T IL ES Th e hol de r of th e fo llo wi ng ce rtifica te(s ) ha s file d sa id ce rt if ica te(s ) fo r a ta x deed to be is su ed t her eon. Th e ce rt ificat e nu mb e r(s ) and ye ar of is su ance, th e de sc ri pt io n of th e pr op erty , an d th e na me (s ) in wh ic h it is a ssesse d ar e as fo llo ws : Pa rc el Nu mb er: 25 -2 N27 -1 4750001 -0 69 0 Ce rtific at e Nu m ber : 1158 Fi le Nu mb er : 21 TD 000005 A XYX De scr iption of Pr op erty: BL OC K 1 LO T 69 IN OR 79 1 PG 1107 N AS SAU VI LL E WO OD S PB 5/12 6 As sess ed To : Wi ll ia m O Du bber ly Cy nt hi a J Du bber ly Al l of th e abov e pr ope rt y is lo ca te d in Na ss au Co un ty , in th e St ate of Fl or id a. Un le ss such ce rt ificat e( s) sh al l be re deemed a cco rdin g to la w, th e proper ty de sc ribe d in su ch ce rtific at e or ce rtif ic ates wi ll be so ld el ectr on ic a lly at www .n as sa u.re alta xd eed. co m on th e 4t h DA Y OF MA Y, 2021 , be tw ee n th e hour s of 11 :0 0 a. m. an d 2: 00 p. m. Th e Cl er k of Co ur ts Offi ce Po lic y is to ho ld th e sa le at 11 :3 0 a. m. JO HN A. CR AW FO RD N AS SAU CO UN TY CL ER K OF CO UR T BY : DE BO RA H WA TS ON D EPU TY CL ER K FN L 4T 03 -3 1 & 04 -0 714 -2 12021 #63184 0 NO TI CE OF AP PL IC AT IO N FO R TA X DE ED NO TI CE IS HE REBY GI VE N Th at BU FF AL O BI LL LL C Th e hol de r of th e fo llo wi ng ce rTh e hol de r of th e fo llo wi ng ce rtifica te(s ) ha s file d sa id ce rt if ica te(s ) fo r a ta x deed to be is su ed t her eon. Th e ce rt ificat e nu mb e r(s ) and ye ar of is su ance, th e de sc ri pt io n of th e prop erty , an d th e na me (s ) in wh ic h it is a ssesse d ar e as fo llo ws : Pa rc el Nu mb er: 04 -2 N27 -4 290000A -0 04 0 Ce rtific at e Nu m ber : 1042 Fi le Nu mb er : 21 TD 000004 A XYX De scr iption of Pr op erty: PT OF TR AC T A IN OR 2134 /3 00 FL OO D AC RE S #1 PBK 4/ 20 As sess ed To : WI LL IA M TI MO TH Y WH IS ENAN T Al l of th e abov e pr ope rt y is lo ca te d in Na ss au Co un ty , in th e St ate of Fl or id a. Un le ss such ce rt ificat e( s) sh al l be re deemed a cco rdin g to la w, th e proper ty de sc ribe d in su ch ce rtific at e or ce rtif ic ates wi ll be so ld el ectr on ic a lly at www .n as sa u.re alta xd eed. co m on th e 4t h DA Y OF MA Y, 2021 , be tw ee n th e hour s of 11 :0 0 a. m. an d 2: 00 p. m. Th e Cl er k of Co ur ts Offi ce Po lic y is to ho ld th e sa le at 11 :3 0 a. m. JO HN A. CR AW FO RD N AS SAU CO UN TY CL ER K OF CO UR T BY : DE BO RA H WA TS ON D EPU TY CL ER K FN L 4T 03 -3 1 & 04 -0 714 -2 12021 #63184 9 NO TI CE OF AP PL IC AT IO N FO R TA X DE ED NO TI CE IS HE REBY GI VE N Th at PA TR ICIA JO NE S Th e hol de r of th e fo llo wi ng ce rtifica te(s ) ha s file d sa id ce rt if ica te(s ) fo r a ta x deed to be is su ed t her eon. Th e ce rt ificat e nu mb e r(s ) and ye ar of is su ance, th e de sc ri pt io n of th e prop erty , an d th e na me (s ) in wh ic h it is a ssesse d ar e as fo llo ws : Pa rc el Nu mb er: 14 -1 N24 -2 1800749 -0 00 0 Ce rtific at e Nu m ber : 23 9 Fi le Nu mb er : 21 TD 000003 A XYX De scr iption of Pr op erty: LO T 74 9 TO WN OF CR AW FO RD SU B As sess ed To : WA LT ER F KU NT Z KE NN ET H J KU NT Z Al l of th e abov e pr ope rt y is lo ca te d in Na ss au Co un ty , in th e St ate of Fl or id a. Un le ss such ce rt ificat e( s) sh al l be re deemed a cco rdin g to la w, th e proper ty de sc ribe d in su ch ce rtific at e or ce rtif ic ates wi ll be so ld el ectr on ic a lly at www .n as sa u.re alta xd eed. co m on th e 27 th DA Y OF AP RI L, 2 021 , betw ee n th e hour s of 11 :0 0 a. m. an d 2:00 p. m. Th e Cl er k of Co ur ts O ffice Po lic y is to ho ld th e sa le at 11 :3 0 a. m. JO HN A. CR AW FO RD N AS SAU CO UN TY CL ER K OF CO UR T BY : RH OD A GOOD WI N, D EPU TY CL ER K FN L 4T 03 -2 431 & 04 -0 714 -2 02 1 #63046 3 NO TI CE OF AP PL IC AT IO N FO R TA X DE ED NO TI CE IS HE R EBY GI VE N Th at LI EG E TA X LI ENS LL C 18 US BA NK Th e hol de r of th e fo llo wi ng ce rtifica te(s ) ha s file d sa id ce rt if ica te(s ) fo r a ta x deed to be is su ed t her eon. Th e ce rt ificat e nu mb e r(s ) and ye ar of is su ance, th e de sc ri pt io n of th e prop erty , an d th e na me (s ) in wh ic h it is a ssesse d ar e as fo lwh ic h it is a ssesse d ar e as fo llo ws : Pa rc el Nu mb er: 00 -0 030 -0 1740036 -0 00 0 Ce rtific at e Nu m ber : 1753 Fi le Nu mb er : 21 TD 000007 A XYX De scr iption of Pr op erty: LO T 36 OR 5 75/ 1 005 PR OBA TE FI LE 96 -9 0CP CA SH EN WO OD SUB PB 5/22 1 As sess ed To : TA MM Y B QU IN N Al l of th e abov e pr ope rt y is lo ca te d in Na ss au Co un ty , in th e St ate of Fl or id a Un le ss such ce rt ificat e( s) sh al l be re deemed a cco rdin g to la w, th e proper ty de sc ribe d in su ch ce rtific at e or ce rtif ic ates wi ll be so ld el ectr on ic a lly at www .n as sa u.re alta xd eed. co m on th e 18 th DA Y OF Ma y, 2021 , be tw ee n th e hour s of 11 :0 0 a. m. an d 2:00 p. m. Th e Cl er k of Co ur ts O ffice Po lic y is to ho ld th e sa le at 11 :3 0 a. m. JO HN A. CR AW FO RD N AS SAU CO UN TY CL ER K OF CO UR T BY : DE BO RA H WA TS ON , D EPU TY CL ER K FN L 4T 04 -1 421 -2 8 & 05 -0 52021 #63387 1 NO TI CE OF AP PL IC AT IO N FO R TA X DE ED NO TI CE IS HE R EBY GI VE N Th at FC AP CU ST FO R FT CF IM T LL C FL TA X CE RT FU ND I MU NI Th e hol de r of th e fo llo wi ng ce rtifica te(s ) ha s file d sa id ce rt if ica te(s ) fo r a ta x deed to be is su ed t her eon. Th e ce rt ificat e nu mb e r(s ) and ye ar of is su ance, th e de sc ri pt io n of th e pr op erty , an d th e na me (s ) in wh ic h it is a ssesse d ar e as fo llo ws : Pa rc el Nu mb er: 37 -1 N25 -2 99 C0014 -0 00 0 Ce rtific at e Nu m ber : 64 7 Fi le Nu mb er : 21 TD 000006 A XYX De scr iption of Pr op erty: LO T 14 IN OR 1328 /1 34 5 R6 7 374 1 & R6 7374 2 NA SS AU VI LL AG E 3 UNR As sess ed To : NA TH AN IE L O MA BR Y Al l of th e abov e pr ope rt y is lo ca te d in Na ss au Co un ty , in th e St ate of Fl or id a Un le ss such ce rt ificat e( s) sh al l be re deemed a cco rdin g to la w, th e proper ty de sc ribe d in su ch ce rtific at e or ce rtif ic ates wi ll be so ld el ectr on ic a lly at www .n as sa u.re alta xd eed. co m on th e 18 th DA Y OF MA Y, 2021 , be tw ee n th e hour s of 11 :0 0 a. m. an d 2:00 p. m. Th e Cl er k of Co ur ts O ffice Po lic y is to ho ld th e sa le at 11 :3 0 a. m. JO HN A. CR AW FO RD N AS SAU CO UN TY CL ER K OF CO UR T BY : DE BO RA H WA TS ON , D EPU TY CL ER K FN L 4T 04 -1 421 -2 8 & 05 -0 52021 #63387 6 NO TI CE OF PU BL IC HE AR IN G NO TI CE IS HE RE BY GI VE N th at on T hur sd ay , th e 22 th da y of Ap ri l 2021 , at 6:30 P. M. th e Co nd itio nal Us e an d Va ri an ce Bo ar d of Na ssa u Co un ty w ill ho ld a publ ic h ear in g at th e Co mm is si on C ham ber s, Ja me s S. Pa ge Go ve rn me nt al Co mpl ex , 9613 5 Na ssa u Pl ac e, Yu le e, Fl or id a, 3209 7 to co nsid er an ap p lic at io n fo r a Co nd itio nal Us e, CU 2021 -0 08 . Th e P ubl ic is in vite d to at te nd th e m eet in g co nc er ning th e fo llo win g de scr ib ed prop erty in Na ssa u Co un ty : The host Callahan Middle School softball team defeated Fernandina Beach 5-1 Thursday night in the Nassau County champi-onship at West Nassau High School. The baseball semi-finals are at 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. today at FBMS. The champion-ship is at 11 a.m. Saturday at Yulee Middle School.PHOTOS BY AMANDA REAM/COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS INC.

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PUBLIC NOTICES LEGALS CONTINUED FROM THE PREVIOUS PAGE. sa u Co un ty : S ubj ec t Pr oper ty Lo ca ti on : 1854 Cl inch Dr , Fe rn andi na Be ac h, FL 32034. Pa rc el ID # 00 -0 030 -0 8000023 -0 02 0 Ac tion Re ques te d: CU 2021 -0 08 is a r eq ues t fo r a co nditi onal us e pe rm it pu rsu ant to Se ctio n 28 .1 4(I) of th e Na ssa u Co un ty Land De ve l opm en t Co de to a llo w for a re placem ent mo b ile ho me in th e Re si de ntia l Si ngl e-Fa mi ly 2 zo ni ng dist ri ct . Th is app lic atio n is f ile d by : Je re my Mc Al ee (O wn er/A ppl ican t) , 1350 Ta ngerine Dr iv e, Fr uit Co ve, FL 3 225 9 Th e pu b lic is invi te d to be pres en t an d be heard. Co pi es of th e app li cati on a nd co pi es of th e crit er ia th at ar e appl ic ab le to th e ap p lic atio n ar e ava ila bl e at th e De pa rt me nt of Pl anni ng & Ec onom ic Op po rt un it y lo cated at 9616 1 Na ssa u Pl ace, Yu le e, FL 3 2097, or (9 04 ) 530 6300 . I ndi vi dual s wh o ca nn ot at te nd th e publ ic hear in g ma y pr ovid e wr itte n co mm ent s to th is add re ss or by ema il to : planni ng in fo@n assaucoun tyfl .co m. Wr itte n co mm ent s be co me a pa rt of th e re cord an d ar e su bj ec t to Fl or id a' s Pu b lic Re co rd s la w, C hap te r 119. 07 (1)( a), F. S. Th is hear in g mu st be co nduc ted as a quas iju di ci al hear in g. An y ques tion s as to pr ocedur es ma y be ob ta in ed fr om th e De pa rtm ent of Pl anni ng & Ec ono mi c Op po rt un ity. Inte rest ed pa rtie s sh ou ld limit co nt ac t wi th Co nd itio nal Us e an d Va ri an ce Bo ard Me mb ers an d wi th Co un ty Co mm i ssio ner s on th is to pi c to pr ope rl y no ti ce d pu b lic hear in g or to wr itte n co mm un ic at io n in ca re of th e Na ssa u Co un ty De pa rtm ent of Pl anni ng & Ec ono mi c Op po rt un ity, 96161 Na ssa u Pl ace, Yu le e, FL 32097. Pe rs on s wi th di sab ilitie s re qu ir in g ac co mmo da ti on s in orde r to pa rticip at e in this program or ac tivity sh ou ld co nt ac t th e As sist an t Co un ty Ma nage rs Of fi ce (9 04) 530 -6 010 , or Fl or id a Re lay Se rvice (1 -8 00-9558771 ) at le as t tw en ty-fou r (2 4) hour s in ad va nc e to re ques t such ac co mm od atio n. IF A PE RS ON WI SHES TO A PPEAL AN Y DE CI SI ON MA DE BY TH E BOAR D, AG EN CY OR CO MM IS SI ON WI TH R ESPEC T TO AN Y MA TT ER CO NS ID ERED AT SU CH M EET IN G OR HE AR IN G, HE WI LL NE ED A RECO RD OF TH E PR OC EE DIN GS AN D FO R TH AT PU RPO SE , MA Y NE ED TO EN S URE TH AT A VERBA TI M RECO RD OF TH E PR OC EE DIN GS IS MA DE , WH IC H RECO RD IN CLUD ES TH E T EST IM ON Y AN D EVI DENC E UP ON WHIC H TH E APPEA L IS TO BE BASE D. Th e Co nd itio nal Us e an d Va ri an ce Bo ar d ma y co ntin ue hear in g on this ma tter. COND ITIO NA L US E AN D VA RI AN CE BO AR D OF N AS SAU CO UN TY , FL OR ID A /s/ Jo hn Va nDe lin de r Its: C hai rm an FN L 2T 04 -0 714 -2 02 1 #63275 4 NO TI CE OF PU BL IC HE AR IN G NO TI CE IS HE RE BY GI VE N th at on T hur sd ay , th e 22 th da y of Ap ri l 2021 , at 6:30 P. M. th e Co nd itio nal Us e an d Va ri an ce Bo ar d of Na ssa u Co un ty w ill ho ld a publ ic h ear in g at th e Co mm is si on C ham ber s, Ja me s S. Pa ge Go ve rn me nt al Co mS. Pa ge Go ve rn me nt al Co mplex , 9613 5 Na ssa u Pl ac e, Yu le e, Fl or id a, 3209 7 to co nsid er an ap p lic at io n fo r a Co nd itio nal Us e, CU 2021 -0 09 . Th e P ubl ic is in vite d to at te nd th e m eet in g co nc er ning th e fo llo win g de scr ib ed prop erty in Na ssa u Co un ty : S ubj ec t Pr oper ty Lo ca ti on : 96159 On e ilSc o tt Rd , Fe rn andi na Be ac h, FL 32034. Pa rc el ID # 39 -2 N28 -0 0000021 -0 00 0 Ac tion Re ques te d: CU 2021 -0 09 is a r eq ues t fo r a co nditi onal us e pe rm it pu rsu ant to Se ctio n 28 .1 4( L) of th e Na ssa u Co un ty Land De ve l opm en t Co de to al lo w fo r a dupl ex dwel lin g in th e Op en Ru ra l zo nin g di st rict . Th is app lic atio n is f ile d by : Ra me sh we r Pe rs aud (O wn er/A ppl ican t) , 9638 Pa cific Pi ne Ct , Or la ndo, FL 3283 2 Th e pu b lic is invi te d to be pres en t an d be heard. Co pi es of th e app li cati on a nd co pi es of th e crit er ia th at ar e appl ic ab le to th e ap p lic atio n ar e ava ila bl e at th e De pa rt me nt of Pl anni ng & Ec onom ic Op po rt un it y lo cated at 9616 1 Na ssa u Pl ace, Yu le e, FL 3 2097, or (9 04 ) 530 6300 . I ndi vi dual s wh o ca nn ot at te nd th e publ ic hear in g ma y pr ovid e wr itte n co mm ent s to th is add re ss or by ema il to : planni ng in fo@n assaucoun tyfl .co m. Wr itte n co mm ent s be co me a pa rt of th e re cord an d ar e su bj ec t to Fl or id as Pub lic Re co rd s la w, C hap te r 119. 07 (1)( a), F. S. Th is hear in g mu st be co nduc ted as a quas iju di ci al hear in g. An y ques tion s as to pr ocedur es ma y be ob ta in ed fr om th e De pa rtm ent of Pl anni ng & Ec ono mi c Op po rt un ity. Inte rest ed pa rtie s sh ou ld limit co nt ac t wi th Co nd itio nal Us e an d Va ri an ce Bo ard Me mb ers an d wi th Co un ty Co mm i ssio ner s on th is to pi c to pr ope rl y no ti ce d pu b lic hear in g or to wr itte n co mm un ic at io n in ca re of th e Na ssa u Co un ty De pa rtm ent of Pl anni ng & Ec ono mi c Op po rt un ity, 96161 Na ssa u Pl ace, Yu le e, FL 32097. Pe rs on s wi th di sab ilitie s re qu ir in g ac co mmo da ti on s in orde r to pa rticip at e in this program or ac tivity sh ou ld co nt ac t th e As sist an t Co un ty Ma nage rs Of fi ce (9 04) 530 -6 010 , or Fl or id a Re lay Se rvice (1 -8 00-9558771 ) at le as t tw en ty-fou r (2 4) hour s in ad va nc e to re ques t such ac co mm od atio n. IF A PE RS ON WI SHES TO A PPEAL AN Y DE CI SI ON MA DE BY TH E BOAR D, AG EN CY OR CO MM IS SI ON WI TH R ESPEC T TO AN Y MA TT ER CO NS ID ERED AT SU CH M EET IN G OR HE AR IN G, HE WI LL NE ED A RECO RD OF TH E PR OC EE DIN GS AN D FO R TH AT PU RPO SE , MA Y NE ED TO EN S URE TH AT A VERBA TI M RECO RD OF TH E PR OC EE DIN GS IS MA DE , WH IC H RECO RD IN CLUD ES TH E T EST IM ON Y AN D EVI DENC E UP ON WHIC H TH E APPEA L IS TO BE BASE D. Th e Co nd itio nal Us e an d Va ri an ce Bo ar d ma y co ntin ue hear in g on this ma tter. COND ITIO NA L US E AN D VA RI AN CE BO AR D OF N AS SAU CO UN TY , FL OR ID A /s/ Jo hn Va nDe lin de r Its: C hai rm an FN L 2T 04 -0 714 -2 02 1 #63275 7 IN TH E CIRCUI T CO UR T, FO UR TH JU DI CIAL CIRCUI T, IN AND FO R NA SS AU COUNT Y, FL OR ID A CA SE NU MB ER : 2021 -C P11 4 PR OB AT E DI VI SI ON : IN RE : Th e Es tate Of : JA ME S E. SH EF FI EL D, De ce as ed . NO TI CE TO CREDI TO RS Th e adm in istr at io n of th e es tate of JA ME S E. SH EF FI EL D, dece as ed , Ca se Nu mb er 21 -C P11 4 is p end in g in th e Ci rc ui t Co ur t fo r Na ssa u Co un ty , Fl or ida , Pr obat e Di visi on , th e ad dres s of wh ic h is 7634 7 Ve teran s Wa y, Yu le e, Fl or i da 3209 7. Th e na me s and addr e sse s of t he pe rs onal re pr esent ative an d th e pe rso nal re pr es en ta tive 's at to rn ey ar e se t fo rth be lo w. Al l cr edi tors of th e de ce d ent an d ot he r pe rs on s ha vi ng cl ai ms or de ma nds agai ns t de ce de nt's es tate , in cl udi ng un ma tur ed, co ntin gent or un liq ui da te d cl ai ms , on w hom a co py of th is no ti ce is se rved mu st file th ei r clai ms wi th th is co ur t WI TH IN TH E LA TE R OF 3 MO NTHS AF TE R TH E DA TE OF TH E FI RS T PU BL IC AT IO N OF TH IS NO TI CE OR 30 D AYS A FTE R TH E DA TE OF SE RV IC E OF A CO PY OF TH IS NO TI CE ON TH EM . Al l othe r cr ed itor s of th e de ce dent an d othe r pe rs on s ha vi ng cl ai ms or de ma nds agai ns t de ce de nt's es tate , in cl udi ng un ma tur ed, co ntin gent or un liq ui da te d cl ai ms , mu st f ile th ei r cl ai ms wi th this co ur t WI TH IN 3 MO NTHS AF TE R TH E DA TE OF TH E FI RS T PU BL IC AT IO N OF TH IS NO TI CE . AL L CL AI MS NO T FI LE D WI TH IN TH E TI ME PE RI OD S SE T FO RTH IN FL OR ID A ST AT UT ES SE CT IO N 733 .7 02 WI LL BE FO RE VER BA RR ED . NO TW IT HS TA ND IN G TH E TI ME PE RI OD S SE T FO RT H AB OV E, AN Y CL AI M FI LE D TW O (2 ) YEAR S OR MO RE A FTE R DE CEDENT 'S DA TE OF D EAT H IS BA RR ED . Th e dat e of fi rs t pu b lic atio n of th is No tice is Ap ril 07 , 20 21 . CL YD E W. DA VI S At to rn ey for Pe rs onal Re pres en ta tive Fl orid a Ba r No . 27 7266 960185 Ga te wa y Bl vd ., St e. 10 4 Fe rn andi na Be ac h, Fl orid a 3203 4 Te le phon e: (9 04) 2612848 cw d@ ne fl aw .c om DONA LD SH E FFI EL D Pe rs onal Re pr esen tative FN L 2T 04 -0 714 -2 02 1 #63312 3 IN TH E CIRCUI T CO UR T FO UR TH JU DI CIAL CIRCUI T IN AND FO R NA SS AU COUNT Y, FL OR ID A PRO BAT E DI VISI ON A FI LE NO : 21CP -9 7 IN RE : ES TA TE OF RO BE RT E. CA MP BE LL, SR ., a/ k/ a RO BE RT EU GE NE CA M PBE LL , SR . De ce as ed NO TI CE TO CREDI TO RS Th e adm in istr at io n of th e es tate of RO BE RT E. CA MP BE LL , SR ., de ce as ed , w hos e da te of deat h wa s Ju ly 27 , 2020 , is pend in g in th e Ci rcui t Co ur t fo r Na ssa u Co un ty , Fl or id a, Pr oba te Di visi on , th e addres s of wh ic h is Na ss au Co un ty Ci rc ui t Co ur t, Pr obat e Di visi on , 7634 7 Ve te r ans Wa y, Yu le e, Fl orid a, 32097. Th e na me an d a ddr es s of th e Pe rs ona l Re pr es en ta tive an d th e Pe rson al Re pres en ta tive 's a ttorn ey ar e se t fo rt h be lo w. Al l cr edi tors of th e de ce d ent an d ot he r pe rs on s ha vi ng an d ot he r pe rs on s ha vi ng cl ai ms or de ma nds agai ns t de ce de nt's es tate on wh om a co py of th is no tice is re qu ir ed to be se rv ed mu st f ile th ei r cl ai ms wi th th is c our t WI TH IN TH E LA TE R OF TH RE E (3 ) MO NTHS AF TE R TH E DA TE OF TH E FI RS T PU BL IC AT IO N OF TH IS NO TI CE OR TH IR TY (3 0) DA YS AF TE R TH E DA TE OF SE RV IC E OF A CO PY OF TH IS NO TI CE ON TH EM . Al l othe r cr ed itor s of th e de ce dent an d othe r pe rs on s ha vi ng cl ai ms or de ma nds agai ns t de ce de nt's es tate mu st file th ei r cl ai ms wi th th is co ur t WI TH IN T HRE E (3 ) MO NTHS AF TE R TH E DA TE OF TH E FI RS T PU BL IC AT IO N OF TH IS NO TI CE . AL L CL AI MS AN D DE MA ND S NO T SO FI LE D WI TH IN TH E TI ME PE RI OD S SE T FO RT H IN SE CT IO N 733.70 2 OF TH E FL OR ID A PR OB AT E CO DE WI LL BE FO RE VER BA RR ED . NO TW IT HS TA ND IN G TH E TI ME PE RI OD S SE T FO RT H AB OV E, AN Y CL AI M FI LE D TW O (2 ) YEAR S OR MO RE A FTE R TH E DECEDE NT 'S DA TE OF DE AT H IS BA RR ED . Th e dat e of th e fi rs t publ ic atio n of th is No tice is Ap ril 07 , 2021 . At to rn ey for Pe rs onaI Re pres en ta tive : Fl orid a Ba r 15 20 1 3168 Hi gh wa y 17 , Su it e A Fl emi ng Is la nd , FL 3200 3 9042783888 ge ra ld in e. ha rtin @g ma il. co m Pe rs onal Re pr esen tative : PA TR ICIA D. WO LF 1170 Ha milt on St re et Jackso nville, Fl or id a 3220 5 FN L 2T 04 -1 421 -2 02 1 #63313 2 IN TH E CIRCUI T CO UR T, FO UR TH JU DI CIAL CIRCUI T, IN AND FO R NA SS AU COUNT Y, FL OR ID A CA SE NU MB ER : 21 -C P99 PR OB AT E DI VI SI ON : IN RE : Th e Es tate Of : JO SEPH N. SM IT H, De ce as ed . NO TI CE TO CREDI TO RS Th e adm in istr at io n of th e es tate of JO SEP H N. SM IT H, de ce as ed , Ca se Nu mb er 21 -C P99 , is p end in g in th e Ci rc ui t Co ur t fo r Na ssa u Co un ty , Fl or ida , Pr obat e Di visi on , th e ad dres s of wh ic h is 7634 7 Ve teran s Wa y, Yu le e, Fl or i da 3209 7. Th e na me s and addr e sse s of t he pe rs onal re pr esent ative an d th e pe rso nal re pr es en ta tive 's at to rn ey ar e se t fo rth be lo w. Al l cr edi tors of th e de ce d ent an d ot he r pe rs on s ha vi ng cl ai ms or de ma nds agai ns t de ce dent s es tate , in cl udi ng un ma tur ed, co ntin gent or un liq ui da te d cl ai ms , on w hom a co py of th is no ti ce is se rved mu st file th ei r clai ms wi th th is co ur t WI TH IN TH E LA TE R OF 3 MO NTHS AF TE R TH E DA TE OF TH E FI RS T PU BL IC AT IO N OF TH IS NO TI CE OR 30 D AYS A FTE R TH E DA TE OF SE RV IC E OF A CO PY OF TH IS NO TI CE ON TH EM . Al l othe r cr ed itor s of th e de ce dent an d othe r pe rs on s ha vi ng cl ai ms or de ma nds agai ns t de ce dent s es tate , in cl udi ng un ma tur ed, co ntin gent or un liq ui da te d cl ai ms , mu st f ile th ei r cl ai ms wi th this co ur t WI TH IN 3 MO NTHS AF TE R TH E DA TE OF TH E FI RS T PU BL IC AT IO N OF TH IS NO TI CE . AL L CL AI MS NO T FI LE D WI TH IN TH E TI ME PE RI OD S SE T FO RTH IN FL OR ID A ST AT UT ES SE CT IO N 733 .7 02 WI LL BE FO RE VER BA RR ED . NO TW IT HS TA ND IN G TH E TI ME PE RI OD S SE T FO RT H AB OV E, AN Y CL AI M FI LE D AB OV E, AN Y CL AI M FI LE D TW O (2 ) YEAR S OR MO RE A FTE R DECEDENT S DA TE OF D EAT H IS BA RR ED . Th e dat e of fi rs t pu b lic atio n of th is No tice is Ap ril 07 , 20 21 . CL YD E W. DA VI S At to rn ey for Pe rs onal Re pres en ta tive Fl orid a Ba r No . 27 7266 960185 Ga te wa y Bl vd ., St e. 10 4 Fe rn andi na Be ac h, Fl orid a 3203 4 Te le phon e: (9 04) 2612848 cw d@ ne fl aw .c om RE N EE MI LL ER Pe rs onal Re pr esen tative FN L 2T 04 -0 714 -2 02 1 #63163 3 IN TH E CIRCUI T COUR T FO R NA SS AU COUNT Y, FL OR ID A PR OB AT E DI VI SI ON FI LE NO .: 21C P0 0011 1 DI VI SI ON : A IN RE : ES TA TE OF EL IZ ABET H PR ID E BA RTHO LO MA EI , De ce as ed . NO TI CE TO CREDI TO RS Th e ad mi ni stration of th e Es ta te of E liza bet h Pr id e Ba rt ho lo ma ei , de ce as ed , wh os e da te of deat h wa s Oc to be r 20 , 2018 , is pend in g in th e Ci rc ui t Co ur t fo r Na ss au Co un ty , Fl or i da, Pr oba te Di vi si on, th e addres s of wh ic h is 7634 7 Ve te r ans Wa y, Yul ee, FL 32097. Th e na me an d ad dres se s of th e Pe rs onal Re pr ese nt at iv e an d th e Pe rs onal Re pres en ta tive's at torn ey ar e se t fo rth be lo w. Al l cr ed itor s of th e De ce d ent an d ot he r pe rs on s ha vi ng cl ai ms or de ma nds agai ns t De ce de nt's Es ta te on wh om a co py of th is no tice is re qu ir ed to be se rv ed mu st f ile th ei r cl ai ms wi th th is Co ur t WI TH IN TH E LA TE R OF 3 MO NTHS AF TE R TH E TI ME OF TH E FI RS T PU BL IC AT IO N OF TH IS NO TI CE OR 30 DA YS AF TE R TH E DA TE OF SE RV IC E OF A CO PY OF TH IS NO TI CE ON TH EM . Al l othe r cr ed it or s of th e De ce dent an d othe r pe rs on s ha vi ng cl ai ms or de ma nds agai ns t De ce de nt's Es ta te mu st f ile th ei r cl ai ms wi th th is Co ur t WI TH IN 3 MO NTHS AF TE R TH E DA TE OF TH E FI RS T PU BL IC AT IO N OF TH IS NO TI CE . AL L CL AI MS NO T FI LE D WI TH IN TH E TI ME PE RI OD S SE T FO RT H IN SE CT IO N 733.70 2 OF TH E FL OR ID A PR O BAT E CODE WI LL BE FO RE VE R BA RRE D. NO TW IT HS TA ND IN G TH E TI ME PE RI OD S SE T FO RT H AB OV E, AN Y CL AI M FI LE D TW O (2 ) YEAR S OR MO RE A FTE R TH E DECEDE NT 'S DA TE OF DE AT H IS BA RR ED . Th e dat e of fi rs t pu b lic atio n of th is no ti ce is Ap ril 14 , 20 21 . At to rn ey for Pe rs onal Re pres en ta tive : /s/ Pa me la A. Mi ll er, Es q. Pa me la A. Mi ll er, Es q. Fl orid a Ba r No . 01 0409 8 Pa me la A. Mi ll er, PL C 2338 S. 8t h St re et Fe rn andi na Be ac h, FL 3203 4 Te l: 90 4-7 755147 Fa x: 9042122306 pm ille r@pa mm illerl aw .c om Pe rs onal Re pr esen tative : /s/ Su za nn e Pr i de Hu ghes Su za nn e Pr i de Hu ghes 1918 Hi gh la nd Dr iv e Fe rn andi na Be ac h, FL 3203 4 FN L 2T 04 -1 421 -2 02 1 #63375 1 IN TH E CIRCUI T COUR T FO R NA SS AU COUNT Y, FL OR ID A PR OB AT E DI VI SI ON F ile No . 45 -2 021CP 12 9 Di vi si on IN RE : ES TA TE OF EL IZ ABET H F. BE LO NS OF F De ce as ed . NO TI CE TO CREDI TO RS Th e adm in istr at io n of th e es tate of El iza bet h F. Be lo ns of f, de ce as ed , w hos e da te of deat h wa s Ja n uar y 10 , 2021 , is pe ndin g in th e Ci rc ui t C our t fo r Na ssa u Co un ty , Fl orid a, Pr o bat e Di vi sion , th e a ddr es s of wh ic h is 416 Ce nt re St re et , Fl or id a 32034. Th e na me s an d addres se s of th e pe rs onal re pr ese nt at iv e an d th e pe rs onal re pres ent ativ e' s a tto r ney ar e se t fo rt h be lo w. Al l cr edi tors of th e de ce d ent an d ot he r pe rs on s ha vi ng cl ai ms or de ma nds agai ns t de ce de nt's es tate on wh om a co py of th is no tice is re qu ir ed to be se rv ed mu st f ile th ei r cl ai ms wi th th is co urt ON OR BE FO RE TH E LA TE R OF 3 MO NT HS A FTE R TH E TI ME OF TH E FI RS T PU BL IC AT IO N OF TH IS NO TI CE OR 30 DA YS AF TE R TH E DA TE OF SE RV IC E OF A CO PY OF TH IS NO TI CE ON TH EM . Al l othe r cr ed itor s of th e de ce dent an d othe r pe rs on s ha vi ng cl ai ms or de ma nds agai ns t de ce de nt's es tate mu st file th ei r cl ai ms wi th this co ur t WI TH IN 3 MO NTHS AF TE R TH E DA TE OF TH E FI RS T PU BL IC AT IO N OF TH IS NO TI CE . AL L CL AI MS NO T FI LE D WI TH IN TH E TI ME PE RI OD S SE T FO RT H IN FL OR ID A ST AT UT ES SE CT IO N 733 .7 02 WI LL BE FO RE VER BA RR ED . NO TW IT HS TA ND IN G TH E TI ME PE RI OD S SE T FO RT H AB OV E, AN Y CL AI M FI LE D TW O (2 ) YEAR S OR MO RE A FTE R TH E DECEDE NT 'S DA TE OF DE AT H IS BA RR ED . Th e dat e of fi rs t pu b lic atio n of th is no ti ce is Ap ril 14 , 20 21 . At to rn ey for Pe rs onal Re pres en ta tive : Ja me s Pr a tt O' Co nner , Es q. Fl orid a Ba r No . 12 4435 501 Ce nt re St re e t, Su ite 10 6 Po st Of fi ce Bo x 47 1 Fe rn andi na Be ac h, Fl orid a 3203 5 Te le phon e: (9 04) 2612628 pr a tt@jp oc onne r.co m pleadi ng s@ j poconn er.c om Pe rs onal Re pr esen tative : S han n on M. Fi ga lo ra 3 Lenape Tr ai l St ew artsv ille , New Jers ey 0888 6 FN L 2T 04 -1 421 -2 02 1 #63382 1 LE GA L NOTI CE We w ill se ll or ot he rw is e dispo se of th e co nten ts of th e follo wi ng un it s to sa tisf y th e de li nquen t st or ag e lie n pl aced in ac co rd an ce wi th t he st at e of Fl or ida St at ue 83 .8 06 . Un it 30 65 Ch ar lotte K Wa rd Ho usehold Go od s Un it 30 70 Ch ar lotte K Wa rd Ho usehold Go od s Un it 30 90 Lind a Ba rt on Ho us e Go od s Op en Do or Pu b lic Au ct io n Sa le wi ll be co nd ucte d at A1 A St ow AWa y St orage, 9628 0 Da vi d Ha llm an Pa rk wa y, Yu le e, Fl orida 3209 7 at 10 :0 0 am on Fr ida y Ap ri l 23 , 2021 . Op en doo r sa le, cash on ly . Im me di ate pa ym ent r equ ir ed . A cl eani ng de po si t w ill be ta ke n. (9 04 ) 49 11866 . Th is sa le is open to th e pu b lic . FN L 2T 04 -0 714 -2 02 1 #63302 5 LEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISING DEADLINE IS NOON THE FRIDAY BEFORE THE NEXT WEDNESDAY PUBLICATION. CALL 261-3696 FOR INFORMATION. Saturday from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily/monthly fitness area fees: City residents $3 a day; $25 a month; $75 for four months; $188 for 12 months. Non-city residents $5 a day; $31 a month; $94 for four months; $235 for 12 months. Daily fees and passes are valid at both fitness areas. Visit the Atlantic Recreation Center for information. ‡3HUVRQDOWUDLQLQJDYDLO able at the Atlantic Fitness Room with certified trainer and fitness nutrition specialist Charity Ross. Contact Ross at 729-7965 or visit www.URVVSHUVRQDOWUDLQLQJFRP ‡7DNHSDUWLQLQVWUXFWRU &KDULW\5RVV·VGD\ERRWFDPSDW0DLQ%HDFK7KHVHRXWGRRUZRUNRXWVZLOOFKDO OHQJHDHURELFDQGDQDHURELFFDSDFLWLHVDQGFRUHVWUHQJWKwith sprint drills, plyometric H[HUFLVHVDQGFRQGLWLRQLQJFLU FXLWV1XWULWLRQDOFRDFKLQJDQGmeal plans are included. Cost LVSHUSDUWLFLSDQW:HHNO\FODVVHVDUHKHOG7XHVGD\VDQG7KXUVGD\VIURPDP7-8 a.m. and 5:30-6:30 p.m. and Saturdays from 7-8 a.m. Visit www.rosspersonaltrain LQJFRP3ODQVDQG6FKHGXOHCall Ross at 729-7965. ‡/LWWOH)LWQHVV)HUQDQGLQD FODVVHVDWWKH3HFN&HQWHUDUHsuspended until further notice. Contact Shari Riepe at medi XPWUHH#JPDLOFRP ‡$HULDO\RJDDHULDOGDQFH and Bodybarre classes at the Atlantic Center. Adult and FKLOGUHQ·VFODVVHVRIIHUHG2QHFODVVSHUZHHNLVDPRQWKWZRFODVVHVSHUZHHNcost $116 a month; three FODVVHVSHUZHHNFRVWPRQWKIRXUFODVVHVSHUZHHNcost $216 a month; and there is an $18 drop-in rate. Contact LQVWUXFWRU3DPHOD.DWRDW0415 or visit www.floridabody ZRUNVFRP From 2B PHOTOS BY BETH JONES/NEWS-LEADER Maggie Lascell catches a pass for the Lady Pirates, above left. Yulee team captain and wide receiver Allie Seay carries the ball, above right. Seay scored the opening touchdown of the game on a long pass from quarterback Chelsea Cooner. FBHS’s Amelia Cutshaw hauls in a pass for the Lady Pirates, below left. Katie McAbee congratulates FBHS quarterback Riley Talbert after scoring a touchdown, below right.

PAGE 17

r n n r n A melia Island Plantation has been certified as a sustainable community, benefitting Nassau County through its environmen tal efforts. The certificate was received through Audubon International, a not-for-profit organization that focuses on “finding a sustainable balance among environmental, economic and social systems,” according to its website. The process can take several years to meet the requirements, which includes adhering to a list of 15 objectives prior to approval. Audubon International’s main focus areas are agriculture, education, public health, housing and transporta tion. Other objectives include economic develop ment, open space and land use, and volunteerism and civic engagement. Amelia Island Plantation Foundation President Bob Schmonsees learned about Audubon International in June 2018 and applied for the certification within a month, beginning the two-year process of becoming a sustainable community. Schmonsees said the plantation is rich in his tory and the founder, Ian McHarg, envisioned it to be a “leading community in environmental progress.” The Amelia Island Plantation will celebrate its 50-year anniversary in 2022 and has a rich back ground of advancing environmental sustainability since its inception. The Amelia Island Plantation Foundation had already implemented many of the Audubon requirements and received the Green Community Award in 2019. After receiving the award, Schmonsees said it was time to “put together a long-range plan for some projects” that include an extensive community garden, a multi-year vine mitigation program and a beach replenishment program. Audubon International Environmental Program Manager Kim Hill said Schmonsees was professional, responsive and quick to follow through with proposed plans. She referenced his file that indicated the plantation was already in a good place when it began the certification process and said they are typically unsure of C atching up with a son and his family after a long period of COVID-19 distancing, we set off on a family kayaking adventure. We knew just who to call – Amelia Adventures, which offered a perfect option for our group. Lofton Creek was an easy commitment – the pro tected makeup of Lofton Creek means paddling there is “weath er resistant,” so no worry about unpredictable coastal conditions. The creek experiences a mild tide, but it is easy to paddle against. The meeting spot and launch site for this trip is the Melton O. Nelson boat ramp in Yulee – located on A1A, mid way between I-95 and Amelia Island. The protected hardwood creek is a popular spot for kay akers and fishermen. Paddling along the creek, turtles and alli gators can be spotted soaking up the sun. A variety of birds make the creek their home, including kingfishers, herons, anahinga, woodpeckers and hawks. The landscape is lush, and at differ ent times of the year, colorful wild flowers show their colors. My 11-year-old and nearly 13-year-old grandchildren and their parents joined our guides for the morning, Catherine Oliver (owner and guide) and Rachel Fedlmayer, by the dock. They gave each of us a dark bur gundy life vest and our official paddle. We reviewed the basics. The guides shared tips on safe paddling. They reassured not to be concerned about alligators – they are small, mostly, and more afraid of us than we are of them. One by one, we climbed into our kayaks and were pushed out into the inky dark water. We gathered like water bugs, waiting for the entire group to assemble. Once the last kayak was in the water we were off. We paddled under the busy A1A bridge, where families of swallows were building their spring nests. Traveling up the nar row creek, we passed homes and cabins tucked in the woods. The dark tan nin-colored water appeared dense, and we had to be alert to roots and trees that had fallen into the creek. The creek twisted and turned as it got wider and wider. We experienced quite a surprise as we rounded a corner, came upon a railroad bridge and heard the whistle of an approaching train. We stopped paddling to watch the train click-clack past us, offering an amazing variety of graffiti messages. Our guides shared informa tion about the creek and the flora and fauna that can be found while kayaking. Soon, it was time to turn back, and before long, we heard highway traf fic and knew it would soon be time to pull our kayaks out of the creek and end our morning adventure. We thanked Oliver and asked about other possible paddling options. She shared that Amelia Adventures offers a wide variety of on-the-water opportunities, including custom boat tours, private sunset tours, guided kayak tours, paddleboard tours and lessons, kids and teen adventure camps, and kayak and paddleboard rentals. Amelia Adventures enjoyed a great surge in business when pandemic restrictions eased in the spring. Adhering to strict rn SUBMITTED PHOTOS Above, two small alligators hang out on the shore. Below, a train full of graffiti traverses a bridge above Lofton Creek. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, the business hit the ground running. People were eager to get out of the house and were ready to play! Our family certainly enjoyed our morning on the water and look forward to future outings with the Oliver family and their successful island business – Amelia Adventures. To learn more about Amelia Adventures, visit ameliaadven tures.com. To receive her weekly newslet ter or get information about her books including her four From the Porch books contact Dickie at dickie.anderson@gmail.com. nn r nnrnrnrrr PHOTOS BY NIKKI MAIN/NEWS-LEADER A demonstration garden is managed by the Amelia Island Plantation Foundation. Amelia Island Plantation Community Association Director of Facilities and Maintenance Kenny Walczak, from left, AIPCA Executive Director Tim Digby and Amelia Island Plantation Foundation President Bob Schmonsees pose with the AIP’s Audubon International Sustainable Community Certificate. SUSTAINABLE Continued on 9B

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where an applicant stands, but Schmonsees was able to “make really great strides with the program.” The plantation went through multiple reviews by first filling out a survey and then discussing each long-term objective to see if it was feasible environmentally and financially. The survey included 368 questions to see where the focus areas were for the application, 109 of which Schmonsees says didn’t apply to the plantation. The final assessment determined that 73.7% of the qualifications were met, resulting in an approval for the Sustainable Community Certification. Schmonsees was “very determined to get the certifica tion and put in the hard time to get it done,” Hill said. The foundation was a small piece of the overall group of people in the community that contrib uted to the application efforts and he said, “It’s really all about the community coming together.” The creation of the Amelia Island Guide app contributed to the approval process and is an interactive map for residents. The app includes plant and ani mal information for the Willow Conservancy and nature cen ter, as well as maps of nine miles of walking trails. “It was super cool what they did,” Hill said. “It was really great to see a more interactive site.” Audubon International pro vided the sustainable commu nity certification in December 2020 that says, “This com munity’s multi-stage, staff-led effort will help to preserve their unique setting and enhance quality of life for all residents over the long run.” NIKKI MAIN/NEWS-LEADER Legacy trees are a signature feature of the maritime forest and the Amelia Island Plantation. Continued from 7B r rn The Railroad Day Festival returns 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, back on track for its spring run ning at the Callahan Depot. “We’re excited, and people are ready to get outside and enjoy themselves,” said Jerry Peterson, West Nassau Historical Society vice president and event chair man. Society members resched uled the April event to Nov. 7 in 2020 after the pandemic hit. Since then, the society lost its guiding force and co-founder, historian Jan Johannes. He attended last year’s festival before his death Dec. 3. “We’re missing him already,” said John Hendricks, event co-chairman and society president. “Daily, we come across some thing he’s done or written. His jacket, cigarettes and coffee cup that he used as props for the FAA radar display are still there.” Like an Easter egg for people to find, Johannes’ likeness can be seen from the train engine’s conductor seat within a poster announcing the 16th annual event. His son, Thomas Johannes, suggested having his dad’s image included in the artwork. The rendering is an updated version from the 2017 poster created by Fernandina Beach artist William Maurer. He has created 11 of 15 posters for the festival. A tree will be dedicated in Johannes’ memory with his family in attendance at 10 a.m. Saturday. “Without him, it’s going to be different,” said Emily Baumgartner, event co-chair woman and treasurer. In keeping with the festival’s tradition, Cochrane’s Collision Center hosts a classic car show from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Entries will be judged and winners announced after 2 p.m. A special flag presentation will highlight the 200th anniversary of Florida’s 1821 designation as a U.S. territory. Numerous ven dors will be on hand, serving up a varied food menu. Arts and crafts booths are also planned. Game enthusiasts can partici pate in a hobo scavenger hunt. Winners will receive treats for their finds. Brandon Yantis will sculpt woodcarvings with a chainsaw. Blacksmith Jacob Underhill will have items available, adding another rustic element to the fes tival. Various engines will also be on display. Live entertainment returns to the Liz Mobley Stage, featuring country, 1950s rock ’n roll, clas sic rock and island music. Emcee Buck Lucontro returns to wel come guests and performers. The musical lineup includes Liz and Randall Smith, the Dale Wingo Band, the Michael Ward Band and The Backtracks. Mark Harrell, formerly of Hilliard Stills Band, will perform with Gary and David Williams of the Harley Huff Band. Line Dance Fever from Jesup, Ga., will also perform. The West Nassau Chiefs of Swing, led by Edwin Hernandez, headline the concert with a vari ety of classic and modern swing and jazz music at 3:20 p.m. Proceeds from the festival go toward the Callahan Depot’s W ho would have thought there’d be a shortage of sewage? But there might be for this special sewage, or so I read. So my wife and I hurried to the store and bought three bags of special sewage and brought them home. It’s not that we need more sew age at our house – we just had our septic tank pumped out, and we’re not hankering to fill it up again real soon. We’re not even big proponents of preserving sewage. We bought this special stuff, which really comes in the form of fertilizer, for the deer, not that the deer need fertilizer. They furnish their own in little pellets, which they deposit wherev er they happen to be standing at the time, which is usually in our hosta bed, eating. The real reason we bought this stuff is, deer don’t like to smell it. Now, I must explain this special sewage is not as repulsive as it sounds. It actually comes in little black pellets, about a tenth the size of the deer’s little black pellets. It doesn’t look bad, really, not that I’ve ever seen any fertilizer that looked good. And, frankly, it doesn’t smell ter rible, although deer apparently detect a funny odor. It’s called Milorganite. It’s composed of heatdried microbes, so technically, it’s not sewage anymore. I don’t want to get too deep here, but these little microbes are added to wastewater to digest the nutrients, and then they’re dried in a kiln. So what we brought home are three bags of dried microbes, which spent their short lives eating nutrients in sewage. Mercifully, they die after they’ve consumed the nutrients. Milorganite is manufactured by the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District, which captures wastewater from the area, per forms its magic conversion and returns clean water to Lake Michigan. What I don’t understand is what is so special about sew age from the Milwaukee area? Does it have properties that sewage from other parts of the country don’t have? I doubt it, really. Sewage is sewage, my uncle used to say, but not nec essarily in those words. Researchers came up with this ingenious process in the early 1900s. Milwaukee couldn’t make a silk purse from a sow’s ear or chicken salad from chicken manure, but it was enterprising enough to turn sewage into a slop jar full of money – and clean up nasty water, too. Is Milorganite guaranteed to repel deer? Well, no, that’s not even one of its stated pur poses. It’s an unintended use, I guess. I hope. But we’re going to give it a try. Nothing else has kept the deer away at mealtime. They pen etrated a plastic net, and those motion-actuated lights, well, all they did was create a delightful ambiance for fine dining. A study by the University of Georgia says, “Milorganite has potential as a deer repellent for ornamental plants.” It reduced the overall impact, the study says. I hope that study is right. We’ve been com peting against white-tailed rascals for years, and so far they’re winning. Phil Hudgins is the former senior editor for Community Newspapers Inc., the media company that owns the News-Leader. SUBMITTED PHOTO rrnrSheriff Bill Leeper promoted 11 individuals within the Nassau County Sheriff’s Office. These promotions are a result of several recent or upcoming retirements. Front row, from left, are Sgt. Jeremy Hyers, Sgt. Mark Murdock, Sgt. Mark Murphy, Sgt. Josh Courchene. Back row: Lt. Charlie Lucas, Capt. Tim Cooper, Director Robin Patterson, Undersheriff Jon Hooper, Lt. Bubba Rhoden, Lt. Jonathan McCracken and Lt. Chauncey Mason. SUBMITTED PHOTO The Wild Amelia Highway Cleanup Crew will celebrate the outdoors on Amelia Island with an Earth Day Weekend Walk on April 25. According to Wild Amelia, it is a “brisk morning walk while picking up litter.” The walk will cover a 2.6-mile stretch of South Fletcher Avenue in Fernandina Beach. Participants will meet at Peters Point Beachfront Park’s parking lot at 8 a.m. Masks are required for the meeting prior to the walk. The walk is estimated to last one to two hours, depending on the number of volunteers. Disposable gloves, orange safety vests and litter bags and buckets will be provided. Participants are encouraged to bring medium-weight garden gloves, hats, sunglasses and closed-toe shoes. For information, contact pam@a1abeachrentals.net. nn Families can enjoy looking at several model train displays and more at the Railroad Day Festival in Callahan Saturday. PHOTOS BY KATHIE SCIULLO/COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS INC. West Nassau Historical Society members Jerry Peterson, from left, Emily Baumgartner and John Hendricks take a break at the Callahan Depot on one of two restored bench-es that were once part of the Jacksonville Union Terminal waiting area in 1919. Dorothy Higginbotham donated the benches. maintenance. “We’re hoping to get the youth more involved because they’re the future of the histori cal society and the community,” Peterson said. A kids zone will feature per formances and activities from Joel Pace Piano and Music. “We will have face painting, a hands-on instrument zoo, stu dents performing, fire trucks from the Callahan Volunteer Fire Department and Costumers with a Cause,” Pace said. Callahan Boy Scout Troop 351 will assist with children’s games. Callahan’s Florida Rainmakers will provide children’s craft proj ects. Pete the Cat will also make an appearance. Pace plans to have a cake and other surprises to mark a mile stone in his career. “I am blessed to be celebrating 30 years of doing something I’m passionate about,” he said. “Not everyone gets to follow their dreams, so I feel very fortunate. And I look forward to many more years of sharing music with the community.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines will be observed inside buildings, includ ing requiring temperature checks and face coverings before enter ing the Callahan Depot and West Nassau Museum of History. Most activities will be held outdoors. Hand sanitizing stations will be available. rrr SUBMITTED PHOTOS rrnSt. Francis of Assisi Catholic Mission recently hosted its most recent blood drive. The church collected 26 units of blood, which could save up to 78 lives. The next drive is scheduled for June 6 at the church, 86000 St. Francis Way in Yulee. The church has been conducting the blood dives since June 2016.

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rnn The Nassau Humane Society’s first Hound Hike is underway. The Hound Hike is a virtual dog-walking fundraiser designed to aid the humane society’s life-saving mission and bring the com munity together to celebrate furry family members. The event runs through Tuesday, April 20, and it’s easy to get involved and show support for homeless animals. Simply visit NassauHumane. org, click on the Hound Hike logo, fill out the online registra tion form and pay the $20 partici pation fee. Then, enlist friends, colleagues and family members to sponsor a pet and hike around your neighborhood! If you don’t have a hound to hike with, no problem! The event is all-inclusive, so cats walking on leashes, rabbits hopping around your yard, or even hamsters run ning on their exercise wheels can participate. If you love animals, but don’t currently have one yourself, don’t worry – you can still help the humane society save hundreds of lives by sponsoring a shelter dog during Hound Hike week. Simply register and choose an adoptable dog, and our dedicated volun teers will walk the dog on your behalf. Who knows, your gener osity could also result in finding a forever home for the shelter dog you’ve chosen, since he or she might be spotted while on a walk. The hike began April 13, and the first 100 participants to register will receive a special-edition superhero Funko board game. There will also be prizes for the most money raised, the most creative video and more. So, make sure to take some fun vid eos and photos of you and your pet(s) on a walk, get creative with your campaign and share your videos and details on social media, and encourage others to donate to your fundraiser for the animals of the Nassau Humane Society. Nassau Humane hopes to make the Hound Hike an annual event, in the tradition of our Pasta 4 Paws spaghetti supper, and looks forward to seeing the community and their pets strut ting their stuff. For information, call the shel ter at 904-321-1647. r nr Must present coupon. Not valid with other offers. Expires 5/11/21 MP $250 OFF When you spend $2,500 or more Must present coupon. Not valid with other offers. Expires 5/11/21 MP $500 OFF When you spend $5,000 or more Must present coupon. Not valid with other offers. Expires 5/11/21 MP $800 OFF When you spend $8,000 or more Must present coupon. Not valid with other offers. Expires 5/11/21 MP $1000 OFF When you spend $10,000 or more 277-3942 CFC 1426558 FL CFC 057478–GA MPR 006661 474390 E. S.R. 200 Fernandina Beach, FL 32034 DEERTRACKS The grandfather of our plumber James Watkins passed away March 28. James Edward Parrish was 81. He graduated from Fernandina and married his high school sweetheart, Ruthie. He served in the Army and was a paratrooper in the Korean War. He became a Fernandina Beach Police Sergeant. We know he was ZÛg^fZg[rma^\aZkZ\m^kh_abl`kZg]lhgCZf^l'Abl_ng^kZewill be at 1 p.m., Thursday, April 15, at The Journey Church. We salute you sir and thank you for your service. Come by the coffee is on. April 30 is the deadline for the Dylan McCormick Memorial Scholarship. Your ONE CALL FULL-SERVICE PLUMBING COMPANY is HIRING. Apply in person. 24/7 emergency service, repair, replace, remodel or new construction, showroom and counter sales for residential, commercial and industrial needs. Call, come in or email daveturnerplumbing@com-cast.net. Like us on Facebook.We welcome YARD CARDS SIGNS to our neighborhood. Come ou tand support your local businesses. DEERWALK Take Care Kid! rr Nassau County Animal Services will host an adoption event from 1-3 p.m. Saturday, April 17, at Pet Supplies Plus, 6500 Georgia Highway 40 E. in St. Marys, Ga. New pet parents will receive 10% off their first order. All pets are spayed, neutered and vaccinated. Little Delgado lost his home because his owner was allergic to him. This adorable little boy has a beauti ful chocolate-brown coat. His owner described him as being friendly and playful. He can’t leave the shelter for another week, but we are accepting adoption applications. Delgado would love to come to your house and chew your favorite shoes, pee on your new carpet, chase the cat and tip over your houseplants. In other words, he is a typical puppy! Bilbo is looking for a home. Bilbo weighs 83 pounds, and we think he is about 7 years old. He appears to be well cared for and socialized. He knows some commands. He loves people and going for walks. Here at the shelter, Bilbo tends to be a bit protective of his food, so it might be best if he dined in private. If you already have a dog(s) and are interested in Bilbo, a meet and greet at the shelter is a great start. Call the shelter at 904-530-6150 to r schedule an appointment to visit these pets. To see photos and descriptions of our available pets, visit our Facebook page. We are located at 86078 License Road in Yulee. Visiting hours are 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, 1-6 p.m. Wednesday, and 11 a.m.-3 p.m. on Saturday. r Sweet, soulful Colbie’s eyes say it all – she’s asking you to take her home and share her love forever! She’s housetrained and enjoys going for walks. She has a beautiful tan and white coat that’s soft for petting. She’s about 7 years old and lived in a home all her life. Her people said she knows how to sit, stay, lie down and shake, and she’s very smart and loyal. They said she should be supervised around young children and seems to be dog-selective, so she might do best as the only pet in the home. She likes to be petted and loves to play, including fetch and playing with toys. And tennis balls! She’s already spayed, microchipped and up to date on her shots, and ready to go home with you today. Please come meet our sweet, beautiful Colbie! Halo is a very pretty young kitty, with a light gray/taupe and white coat. Her coat is very soft for petting, and she has beautiful deep green eyes. She is just a touch shy at first, but loves to hang out with the other cats in the cattery. She is very sweet and loves it when we treat her with wet food. She is spayed, vac cinated and has a microchip. She’d love to be your angel – please come meet sweet Halo! If you’re interest ed in seeing her, call us at 904-321-1647 or visit NassauHumane.org to see if she’s at our cattery or one of our remote adoption locations. Our Adoption Center at 639 Airport Road in Fernandina Beach is open from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday, and 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; the center is closed Monday. We are abiding by social distance guidelines, and facemasks must be worn in the shelter. If you don’t have one, we will be glad to provide you a disposable mask for free at the door. To maintain social distancing, we are limiting the number of clients in the shelter at any one time. Please consider making an appointment to secure your place in case the shelter is busy. You can call us at 904-321-1647 or email us at info@nassauhumane.org. You can check out our adoptable pets anytime at NassauHumane.org, and follow us on Facebook. Come meet your new best friend! r r Meet Monica, a beautiful black tabby with medium length hair. She was found in a park with her babies that are currently in foster care. Monica is about 1 year old, and she is a very happy and sweet little kitty! Monica is good with the other cats in the adoption room, and she loves it when visitors stop in to see her. Cats Angels is a volunteer-based organization helping since 2001 with low cost spay/neuter services and TNVR (Trap-Neuter-Vaccinate-Return to Caregiver). We receive no local or federal government funding and operate solely on pri vate donations, fundraising, grants and sales from our Thrift Store, and your support is appreciated. If you want to know more about how to support or donate to Cats Angels, visit catsangels.com and click on “How To Help,” where you will find many ways to lend a hand. Recycle your aluminum and cat food cans at the bins in our parking lot at 709 S. Eighth St. We graciously accept donations for cat care and resale items for our Thrift Store. Information about our spay/neuter, TNVR and adoption programs is on our website. Cats Angels welcomes volunteers to help us care for the cats and as retail clerks in our Thrift Store. Our Volunteer Application is online or you can call. ­r n€‚ Nassau Humane Society Second Chance Re-Sale Store and The Closet always need volunteers and donors! Make new friends and choose from front of store or behind the scenes. We are the primary source of funding for the Nassau Humane Society, and 100% of sales go directly to the animals. For more information, call 310-9627.n Bring gently used items to donate to Second Chance resale store, 1002 S. 14th St., to benefit the Nassau Humane Society’s programs. Free pickup is available by calling 321-0022.ƒ€‚ Cats Angels is in need of volunteers for our Thrift Store and for cat care. The kitties need your help too. We have two cleaning shifts (morning and evening) every day, and the cats and our volunteers are always happy to meet new people. Our volunteer application is available online at our website at bit.ly/2ijwWGf or at the Cats Angels Thrift Store, 709 S. Eighth St. We’re open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. For more information, call us at 321-2267.r‚€€„n Cats Angels provides low-cost spay and neuter and TNVR (Trap-Neuter-Vaccinate-Return to Caregiver) services through First Coast No More Homeless Pets. Call 321-2267. r

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