Citation
The news-leader

Material Information

Title:
The news-leader
Uniform Title:
News-leader (Fernandina Beach, Fla.)
Portion of title:
News leader
Place of Publication:
Fernandina Beach, FL
Publisher:
Fernandina Beach News-Leader, Foy R. Maloy Jr. - Publisher
Creation Date:
January 4, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Fernandina Beach (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Nassau County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Nassau -- Fernandina Beach
Coordinates:
30.669906 x -81.461028

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 124, no. 9 (Feb. 27, 1980)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The News Leader. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000366799 ( ALEPH )
04377055 ( OCLC )
ACA5658 ( NOTIS )
sn 78002171 ( LCCN )
0163-4011 ( ISSN )

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Fernandina Beach news-leader

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r r r rn r r r r n r A clerical error involving a $500,000 grant put projects for curbs and sidewalks and a new fire station in jeopardy in the town of Callahan.Oct. 18, 1995 rn n READY TO SERVE HIS COMMUNITY AND DEFEND OUR VALUES . PAID BY BRADLEY M. BEAN FOR CITY COMMISSION | GROUP 1 Working to Protectour Beaches our Environment our Marina & our History for City Commissioner Group 1 Political advertisement paid for and approved by Marian Phillips for City Commissioner Group 1  U.S. Fourth District Congressman John Rutherford visited the Port of Fernandina last Thursday to observe and discuss long-awaited federally funded dredging work being done to deepen the turning area at the port with Worldwide Terminals Fernandina CEO Christopher Ragucci and members of the Ocean Highway and Port Authority board. Worldwide is the port operator and Ragucci also serves as port director. “Our Northeast Florida community can take a lot of pride in the growth we are seeing at the Port of Fernandina,” Rutherford told the News-Leader in an email following the event. “Last year I was proud to support its designation as part of the federal Marine Highway program, and now I am thrilled to see the recent $6.55 million federal invest ment in dredging the channel and turn ing basin.” Rutherford, who pushed for the fed eral funding of the project, explained, “Once completed, this work will allow ships and cargo to move more eas ily through the Port and help further grow the flow of commerce and jobs throughout the region. I appreciate the hard work of the Port officials, the industry partners, and the Army Corps of Engineers for making sure that this project is com pleted on budget and on time.” Beau Corbett, a project manager in the Jacksonville Office of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, told the News-Leader , “The original estimated cost for the project, which included administrative costs as well as the dredging contract, was $6.55 million. Through competition for the contract, we were able to get the cost of the actual dredging project down to $4,317,000, but there are other associated costs.” The contract was approved and fund ed Sept. 16 and will take about 30 days to complete, with an expected completion date in mid-November. “We did our job,” Corbett added. “We set the bar and got the job done, saving the taxpayers money.” The dredging contract was award ed to Great Lakes Dredge & Dock Company LLC. “This is a really fine port,” Corbett said. “The only problem was the depth of the turning area, which this dredging will correct.” He said this is the first time the dredging has been done in 20 years. OHPA Chairman Danny Fullwood, who attended the event with Vice Chairman Mike Cole, told the NewsLeader that the dredging project was originally proposed in 2000 – the last time the channel was dredged – but it didn’t happen until now. “I call this maintenance and dredg ing of the channel historic,” Ragucci told the News-Leader . “Nobody was pressing them to address. (It) wasn’t until Congressman Rutherford got involved. He found the funding and that is why I wanted him to come to the port Thursday and view the work in prog ress.” Ragucci explained that the depth of the turning area would be a mini mum of 36 feet at mean low tide. He said the new depth in conjunction with 6-foot tides would provide access to the port for large ships that require 40 feet of depth when loaded. Worldwide Terminals recently dredged the channel at the docking berths to 40 feet plus 2 feet. Those large ships will come in on high tide. Ragucci said the turning basin is not the only part of this overall project. “It covers from the ocean buoy and the port,” he said. The port’s dock is 1,200 lineal feet long. The turning basin goes 800 feet out from the dock.”  Bridges and their physical condi tion matter, and safe and efficient travel over them should be taken for granted. But according to the American Road & Transportation Builders Association, “More than one third (37 percent) of U.S. bridges – nearly 231,000 spans – need repair work. More than 46,000 bridges are rated in poor condition and classified as ‘structurally deficient’ ….” Of the 12,518 bridges in the state of Florida, “2.9% are classified as struc turally deficient.” According to the Florida Department of Transportation, as of September, Nassau County owns and maintains 36 bridges, FDOT owns and maintains 66 bridges in Nassau County, and three bridges are maintained by another enti ty, either another government agency or a private party. Recently, the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Highway Administration publicized a vast data base on Long Term Bridge Performance – LTBP – for bridges across the coun try, in every state and county, including Nassau. The database goes back two decades, in some cases, on each of the bridges in reference to the condition rat ing and evaluation; structure type and materials; inspection; load rating; and traffic and roadway data. Seeking to understand the current condition of the bridges in the county, the News-Leader reviewed bridge inspection reports in the database from as recently as 2018 and 2019, specifically looking for “scour analysis.”rn Scour is defined on the FHA’s web site as “the result of the erosive action of flowing water, excavating, and carrying away material from the bed and banks of streams. Different materials scour at different rates. Loose granular soils are rapidly eroded by flowing water, while cohesive or cemented soils are more scour resistant. However, ultimate scour in cohesive or cemented soils can be as deep as scour in sand-bed streams. Under constant flow conditions, scour will reach maximum depth in sandand gravel-bed material in hours; cohesive bed material in days; glacial till, sand stones, and shale in months; limestone  A second officer-involved fatality in less than two weeks occurred Friday. This time, the person shot was a man allegedly wielding a knife during a domestic dispute in Callahan. According to information released by the Nassau County Sheriff’s Office, Justin Dawley had threatened his brother multiple times in the past and was again threat ening him around noon at 56105 Nassau Oaks Drive. Deputies responded to the home after they were advised an armed man was threatening to harm another man within the home. Nassau County Undersheriff Roy Henderson commented on the incident: “This is not what you want to have hap pen, but it’s just in the nature of the what we do. We typically respond to calls and you don’t know what’s going to happen each time you respond.” NCSO says Dawley was inside a room of the home and allegedly lunged at a deputy who entered the room, JULIA ROBERTS/NEWS-LEADER Poll worker David Truluck said voters began lining up at 7 a.m. Monday and Tuesday to cast their bal-lots at the Atlantic Recreation Center. Truluck said all voters wore masks, although not all were socially distanced. Robert Canon said he had already voted by mail, while his wife, Paula, a flight attendant who expects to be traveling on Election Day, took advantage of early voting Tuesday. The couple said they waited less than 15 minutes to get in the door. The polls are open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily through Nov. 1. To find out if your precinct has a wait time, visit https://bit.ly/3dHju8d. nn  BETH JONES/NEWS-LEADER The Yulee High School girls volleyball team captured its second district title in a row. The YHS Lady Hornets beat Baker County 23-25, 25-15, 25-8, 25-21 last Thursday night to capture the District 3-4A title. Yulee hosts Raines at 7 p.m. Thursday in the region quarterfinal round. Pictured above, from left, are Carlyann Williams, Emma Cook, Grace King, Christina Jackson, Kaylee Manning, Ashley Hall, Caroline Brackens, Elizabeth Jackson, Leah Kasper, Aliyah Murto,, Rebecca Lundy, Kendra Darling, and Sonia Wallenius.   ­ €‚€ƒ„ƒ Rutherford PORT Continued on 6A ­ rnr  …„†‡ƒˆ‚ „‰… BRIDGES Continued on 3A DEPUTY Continued on 3A

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r NEWS DEADLINESCommunity News: Wednesday, Noon Letters to the editor: Monday, 5 p.m., Wednesday, 5 p.m.Church Notes: Tuesday, 5 p.m. People and Places: Wednesday, 3 p.m. AD DEADLINES .................. WEDNESDAY EDITION ........ FRIDAY EDITION Classified Ads: .................. Monday, 5:00 p.m.* ................ Wednesday, 5:00 p.m. Classified Display: ............ Friday, 3 p.m. ......................... Tuesday, 5 p.m. Legal Notices: ................... Friday, noon ........................... N/A Retail Advertising: ............ Friday, 3 p.m. ......................... Tuesday, 3 p.m. * Monday holidays the Classified deadline will be Friday at 5 p.m. MAIL SUBSCRIPTION RATES In Nassau County: $44.99 Out of Nassau County: $74.99 rr nrn n  ­€ r nr The News-Leader is published every Wednesday and Friday by The Fernandina Beach News-Leader, 1235 South 10th Street, P.O. Box 16766, Fernandina Beach, FL 32034. Periodicals postage paid at Fernandina Beach, Fla. (USPS 189-900) ISSN# 0163-4011. Reproductions of the contents of this publication in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher are prohibited. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: News-Leader, P.O. Box 16766, Fernandina Beach, FL 32035. The News-Leader may only be sold by persons or businesses authorized by the publisher or circulation director. NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS: The News-Leader assumes no financial responsibility for typographi cal errors in advertising. When notified promptly, the part of the advertisement in which the typographical error appears will be reprinted. All advertising is subject to the approval of the publisher. The News-Leader reserves the right to correctly classify, edit or delete any objectionable wording or reject the advertisement in its entirety at any time prior to scheduled publication if it is determined that the advertisement or any part thereof is contrary to the general standard of advertising acceptance. © Copyright 2020 The r. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any manner without specific written permission of the publisher. All rights reserved B & B Monuments Donna Byrd 904-277-2742 16 N. 13th St. State Licensed &LW\6FRRS 7KH$PHOLD,VODQG$TXDWKRQLVDPRQWKORQJHYHQWLQFROODERUDWLRQ ZLWKWKH&LW\RI)HUQDQGLQD%HDFKDQG$TXD*\P)LWQHVVEHJLQQLQJ 1RYHPEHUDQGHQGLQJ1RYHPEHU UHJLVWUDWLRQIHHLQFOXGHVHYHQWWVKLUWHYHQWEUDFHOHWDQG JLYHDZD\V0XVWFRPSOHWHDTXDDHURELFVFODVVHVWRUHFHLYHVKLUW 5HJLVWHURYHUWKHSKRQHRULQSHUVRQZLWK .DLWO\Q5LYHUDDWWKHEDFNRIWKH$WODQWLF3RRO 5HJLVWUDWLRQGHDGOLQHLV2FWREHU Monument Cleaning, Raising,Engraving and Bronze Renishing 904-261-8783 MEMORIALS A Public Service Announcement by The News-Leader Humane House Ad 2 1x1 6/22/06 3:35 PM Page 1 nnThe Fernandina Beach High School ESE Department is taking orders for a new crop of mammoth pecan halves ($11 per pound), chocolate-covered pecans ($8 per 12 ounces), pecan caramel clusters ($8 per 8 ounces), and cinnamon-glazed pecans ($8 per 10 ounces). The last date to place orders is Oct. 31; deliv eries should take place before Thanksgiving. Place orders by contacting Pamela Nobles at (904) 583-8592, (904) 261-5713, ext. 2622, or noblespa@nassau.k12.fl.us, Angela Green at (904) 261-5713, ext. 2694, or Valarie Pikula at (904) 261-5713.rnnElderSource, the Aging and Disability Resource Center and Area Agency on Aging for Northeast Florida, has announced meetings of several of its committees in October. Program and Planning Committee at 11 a.m. today to discuss general business. To participate, go online to https://bit.ly/2GUbcxH or call (929) 436-2866 and enter 402-600-129 followed by #. AAA Finance Committee at 1 p.m. Friday, Oct. 23, to discuss general business. To par ticipate, go online to https://us02web.zoom.us/j/755470668. For more information about any of the meet ings or other questions, call (904) 391-6670.The Coalition for the Homeless of Nassau County will resume in-person meetings this month with Nassau County Commissioner -XVWLQ7D\ORUZKRDOVRVHUYHVRQWKHFRXQW\·VEssential Housing Committee. The meeting ZLOOWDNHSODFHDWSP7KXUVGD\DW6W3HWHU·VEpiscopal Church, located at 801 Atlantic Ave. in Fernandina Beach.rrThe University of Florida/IFAS is offering free, unbiased Medicare consultations via tele phone and video conferencing. During open enrollment, which ends Dec. 7, you can change how you will receive your Medicare health and drug coverage for 2021. Whether you will be new to Medicare and need to enroll or are seeking information on changes you can make to your current Medicare Health and Drug Plans for 2021, this is your chance to receive knowl edgeable, no-cost, unbiased information about your choices. Appointments can be scheduled by calling Meg McAlpine with the UF/IFAS Nassau Extension Service at (904) 570-5713. rIn partnership with SHINE (Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders), the Nassau County Council on Aging is hosting three presentations about Medicare via Zoom over the next few months, with the first event scheduled for today. +HUH·VWKHIXOOVFKHGXOHDQGLQIRUPDWLRQWRSDU ticipate in the Zoom meetings: Wednesday, Jan. 20, at 2 p.m. Visit https:// bit.ly/2ROX4rp and use “895 5488 0452” as the Meeting ID and “Shine” as the Passcode. Nassau County SHINE/SMP Liaison Carrie Fortuny-Gonzalez will be the presenter. For more information or to schedule a phone appointment, contact COA at (904) 261-0701. n­­The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is seeking public feedback through the end of November on draft rules related to high-risk nonnative reptiles. Invasive species management is a high priority for the FWC because these animals negatively impact native fish and wildlife, cause damage that is costly to repair, and can pose a threat to human health and safety. The proposed rule changes to Chapter 68-5, F.A.C. specifically address pythons, tegus, green iguanas and other high-risk nonnative snakes and lizards and include reporting requirements for permittees, bios ecurity requirements to limit escape of these high-risk species, and some additional clarifying language. FWC staff members are holding 10 online workshops to present proposed rule changes and collect public comment on this topic. Staff will use this information to help improve the final rule language, which will be brought before the Commission at a future meeting. You can also take part in an online survey, which will help staff determine what topics to cover. To learn more about upcoming workshops, take part in the online survey or view the draft rules visit MyFWC.com/Nonnatives and click on the “Learn More” button in the middle of the page. €‚rn­County health departments in Florida are urging residents to contact their health care provider or pharmacy to get vaccinated against the flu as soon as possible. Vaccinations take about two weeks before they begin offering protection. Getting the flu shot each year is important but reducing illness and hospitalization from flu is even more critical this year to protect frontline health care workers and hospital systems who will continue to care for people with COVID-19 and other illnesses. The flu and COVID-19 are respiratory ill nesses, but until there is a steady vaccine sup ply against COVID-19, the way to prevent these two viruses from circulating at the same time is to get your flu vaccine now. Additionally, there will be less spread of the flu and COVID-19 if everyone continues to: Stay home if sick; Covers coughs and sneezes; Washes hands frequently and thoroughly; and Wears a face covering when around others or LIVRFLDOGLVWDQFLQJLVQ·WSRVVLEOHrrAs coronavirus cases surge, OneBlood says the need for convalescent plasma is reaching extraordinary levels. “OneBlood is experiencing more than a 500% increase in hospital orders for COVID-19 convalescent plasma. We are urging people who have recovered from the coronavirus to step forward and donate their plasma. They are urgently needed,” Susan Forbes, senior vice president of corporate communications for OneBlood, said in a news release. Plasma can be donated every 28 days. People who have recovered from the coronavirus are urged to visit www.oneblood.org to see if they meet the eligibility requirements to be a convalescent plasma donor. Appointments are required. In addition to meeting all FDA donor eligibil ity to be a blood donor, COVID-19 convalescent plasma donors must have complete resolution of symptoms at least 14 days prior to donation and provide one of the following: Provide prior diagnosis of COVID-19 docu mented by a laboratory test or a letter from a hospital confirming a COVID-19 diagnosis; or, provide a positive serological test for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. OneBlood is also testing all blood dona tions for the COVID-19 antibody. The anti body test is authorized by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and will indicate if the GRQRU·VLPPXQHV\VWHPKDVSURGXFHGDQWLERG ies to the virus, regardless of whether they ever showed symptoms. Donors will be able to see their results approximately two to five days after donating by logging into their donor portal at www.oneblood.org. Donors who test posi tive for the antibody will be eligible to become COVID-19 convalescent plasma donors.ƒn­The Fernandina Beach Branch of the Nassau County Public Library System has resumed processing passports by appointment only. New safety measures are in place which include only those needed for the application may be present, and all present must wear a facemask and gloves.The desk and all equip ment will be sanitized after each visit. Passport applications must be completed before the appointment, and applicants should bring a pen with black ink. Applicants will enter through the library main entrance at the desig nated appointment time. For appointments, visit the library website at nassaureads, and click on the Passport tab or call (904) 530-6508. Walk-ins are not being accepted at this time.   €‚ƒ William Yancy Bowen went to his heavenly home Sunday, October 18, 2020. He was born March 17, 1944 to Andrew Frank and Marjorie Lyde Bowen of Fernandina Beach, Fla. He met the love of his life, Elaine Cottle, in Fernandina Beach in 1963, and they were married June 21, 1964. Elaine and Billy relocated to Yulee, Fla., where he could sit on his dock, drink an ice cold Coors Light, and fish all day long. He loved to spend Saturdays watching the Gators play football, but he espe cially loved to be home with his family, shooting pool and sharing a laugh. He was preceded in death by his parents and his brothers, Frank and James. He is survived by his beautiful wife, Elaine; his two sons, Brent and Brett; his daughters-in-love, Tricia and Fatima; grandson, Justin and wife Maegan; granddaughter, Natalie; great-grandchil dren, Brantley and Alta; and his brother, Robert Andrew. Funeral services will be at noon Thursday, October 22, 2020 at Hedges Baptist Church, located at 85085 Sutton Place in Yulee. His fam ily will receive friends from 11 a.m. until the hour of service at the church. He will be laid to rest at Wilds Landing Cemetery, located at 67735 Owens Farm Road in Yulee. Please share your memories and condolences at www.oxleyheard.com. r „ƒ …ƒ†­ Mr. Henry Nelson Conway Jr., 98, of Fernandina Beach, Fla., passed away Saturday, October 17, 2020 at Osprey Village. He was born in Little Rock, Ark., to the late Henry Nelson and Lucille Iseman Conway. Mr. Conway served his coun try honorably in the U.S. Army Signal Corps during World War II. After the war, he spent 10 years in the Philippines working for the Veterans Administration. After earning his second bachelor’s degree from the American Institute for Foreign Trade, he relocated to Monrovia, Liberia, where he worked for the International Bank of Washington. He resided there for more than 20 years, managing a bank, an insurance company and the corporate formation and ship registration business for the Republic of Liberia. Upon moving stateside, Mr. Conway was appointed executive vice president of the International Bank of Washington, managing a number of banks in foreign countries along with the Liberian ship registration business. He and his wife, Rowena, moved to Fernandina Beach from McLean, Va. when he retired. Mr. Conway was instrumental in organizing reunions for his brothers in arms every year up until his health started to decline. He was preceded in death by his first wife of 62 years, Rowena Ann Conway. He leaves behind his wife, Carolyn Mobley Tyndall Conway of Fernandina Beach; his son, Henry Nelson Conway III and his wife, Melissa Aston Conway, of Charlotte, N.C.; grandchildren, Rebecca Ann Conway and Grant Sevier Conway and his wife, Rachel Jean, all of Charlotte. Mr. Conway’s family will receive friends 3-5 p.m. Friday, October 23, 2020 at Oxley-Heard Funeral Home. He will be returned to his native Little Rock to be laid to rest in Roselawn Memorial Park. Please share your memories and condolences at www.oxleyheard.com. r „ †‡  Helen Jeanne Eisele of Amelia Island, Fla. passed away October 15, 2020 at Community Hospice & Palliative Care’s Warner Center for Caring in Fernandina Beach, Fla. She was born May 27, 1928 to Abner W. and Margaret Holmberg of Ironwood, Mich. She was a graduate of the Luther L. Wright High School in Ironwood and Carroll University in Waukesha, Wisc., where she was named to Who’s Who in American Colleges and Universities. She earned her degree in library science at the University of Minnesota. She married William D. Eisele on December 27, 1953. Mrs. Eisele taught school in Watertown, Wisc. and was a school librarian in Escanaba, Mich. and at St. Paul’s School in Clearwater, Fla. She was of the Presbyterian faith. She was a wonderful wife, mother and grand mother who inspired her children, grandchildren and students to appreciate and love the reading of books. She is survived by her husband of 66 years, William D. Eisele of Amelia Island; a son, Dr. David W. Eisele (Janice) of Baltimore, Md.; a daughter, Meg Eisele Lilja (George) of Warren, Pa.; seven grandchildren, Leigh, Lauren and Mariel Eisele of Baltimore, Md., Danielle Lilja Warren (Dan) of Rochester, N.Y., David Lilja of Charleston, S.C., Bethany Lilja of Warren, and Duke Lilja, also of Warren; and two sisters, Ruth Reed of Minneapolis, Minn. and Margaret Garoutte (Kurt) of Saint Paul, Minn. In lieu of flowers, the family would prefer that her memory be honored by making memorial donations to the Rotary Club of Fernandina Beach, Dictionary Fund, P.O. Box 16046, Fernandina Beach, FL 32035. To view Mrs. Eisele’s online obituary and leave condolences, please visit the Green Pine Funeral Home website at www.greenpinefuneral.com. rr ƒˆ­„‰ Larry G. Hodges, 69, passed away Friday evening, October 16, 2020 at his Yulee, Fla. resi dence. Mr. Hodges was born in Jacksonville, Fla. and moved to Yulee in 1988. He was retired from U.S. Gypsum and was of the Baptist faith. He was a devoted husband and father and loved to watch western movies and TV shows. Larry is survived by his wife of 50 years, Rachel Ann Hodges of Yulee; his daughter and son-in-law, Millie D. and Robert Busbee, also of Yulee; two brothers, George Hodges of Jacksonville and Charles Hodges (Robbye) of Moultrie, Ga.; a granddaughter, Kaylee Busbee; two nephews, Nicholas and Chad Hodges; and his cousins, Sherry Reilly, Sharon Overstreet, Mollie Williams Wallace, Millie Ward, Mike Williams and Lamar Sword. A memorial service will be held at 3 p.m. Sunday, October 25, 2020 in the Stephens Chapel at Green Pine Funeral Home. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests that memorial donations be made to Community Hospice & Palliative Care at 4266 Sunbeam Road, Jacksonville, FL 32257 or online at community hospice.com. To view Mr. Hodges’ online obituary, please visit the Green Pine website at www.greenpine funeral.com. rr Š„‹ †­ Funeral services celebrating the life of Mr. Robin Hood Malone Jr. were held at noon Friday, September 25, 2020 in the chapel of Griffin Funeral Home in West Monroe, La. with the Rev. James Williams officiating. Family received friends for visitation from 10 a.m. until the time of service at the funeral home. Interment followed at St. Paschal Cemetery. Mr. Malone was born September 25, 1935 and passed from this life on September 20, 2020 at the age of 84. He spent his life loving his family and being a machinist for the paper industry. He was preceded in death by his father, Robin Hood Malone Sr.; stepmother, Hazel Malone; mother, Carry McWright Murray; and three sis ters. Those left to cherish his memory include his wife, Patricia Malone; daughters, Lisa Compton and husband Kenny, Lana Price and husband Randy, Lora Alexander and husband Kevin, Lacy Hunter and husband Sam, Sherrie Watson and husband Tracy, and Kara Rider; sons, Michael Malone and Doug LeVasseur; brother, Robin Henry Malone and wife Debra; sisters, Iris Davis and husband Donald, Martha Herbert and husband Mitchell, DeNell Cook and husband Dennis, and Fannie Carter and husband Travis; seven grand children and 10 great-grandchildren; and a host of extended family and friends. Pallbearers were Paul Cooper, Tracy Watson, Guy Williams, Jesse Wilson, Brian Bullock and Ken Compton. Honorary pallbearers were Larry Lawson, W.L. Brantley and Christopher Bayles Jr.  € Mark DeWayne Combs, 59, of Yulee, Fla., passed away Saturday, October 17, 2020. r rn rnDON’T LITTERSPAY~NEUTER rn

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277-3942 CFC 1426558 FL CFC 057478–GA MPR 006661 474390 E. S.R. 200 Fernandina Beach, FL 32034 DEERTRACKS Driving from Fernandina to Yulee we decided to eat at Olive
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The Hartford insurance com pany and the Fernandina Beach Main Street program offers the “second round of the HartBeat of Main Street Grant Program,” which opens at noon Thursday, according to a news release from the Fernandina Beach Main Street program. “In partnership with The Hartford, the program will con tinue to fund solutions that help small business owners respond and adapt to the COVID-19 pan demic, and also help to revitalize and strengthen older and historic downtown commercial districts,” the release says. A link to the application will be posted at https://bit.ly/34eKdpv once the online application goes live. In the meantime, you can review a PDF version of the application at https://bit.ly/2HfsWUg. Completed applications must be submitted by 7:59 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 29. Grant applicants are not required to be customers of The Hartford, and applications will be weighed and grants awarded with out consideration of applicants being or not being a present, past, or prospective customer of The Hartford. All applications will be judged based on: Feasibility of proposal; Extent to which grant will help address an acute business need or help a business owner or implement innovative solutions to address COVID-19-related chal lenges; Opportunity for other busi nesses to learn from work; How the HartBeat grant will help improve the viability of busi ness; The business’ commitment to giving back to their community and/or community engagement; and Strength of letters of recom mendation and supporting docu ments. For more information, visit the above link and also review the pro gram’s frequently asked questions at https://bit.ly/3o8FayC. Florida State College at Jacksonville and CareerSource Northeast Florida will bring jobseekers together with local and regional employers looking to fill open positions at free vir tual job fair, according to a news release. Representatives from more than 50 companies are scheduled to attend the Fall Virtual Career Fair on Thursday, Oct. 29, planned for 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Some of the companies that will take part include Aflac, Ascension St. Vincent’s, Baptist Health, Brightway Insurance, Brooks Rehab, Carlisle Interconnect Technologies, Coggin Automotive Group, Duval County School Police, Electrical Training Alliance, Fanatics, Inc., Florida Department of Children and Families, GuideWell, Jacksonville Fire & Rescue Department, Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office, Metric Engineering, North Florida Shipyards, Inc., OnPay Solutions, Inc., Stellar Energy, TD Bank, The Fresh Market, and Veritas Steel. The Virtual Career Fair is open to the public but regis tration is required. Attendees should dress as they would for an in-person job interview and be prepared to participate in a virtual interview with an employer if the opportunity arises. They should be able to share an updated resume in PDF format at the time of event registration. To register and to see a complete list of employers and the pre-workshop schedule, visit fscj.edu/cf2020 and plan to return there on the day of the event to participate. r Nassau Fence & Deck, Inc.INSTALL AND REPAIR(904) 261-6577 www.fencenassau.com NOW OPEN Come See the difference at Your PRINT -BLUEPRINTCOPY CENTER AMELIA ISLAND GRAPHICS shoplocal@aigraphics.net www.ameliaislandgraphics.comT: 904.261.0740 =KNVO\
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Justin Miller Senior Property Manager, Broker Associate, Realtor® 904-277-6597 As your Property Manager we will....t Eectively market your vacant property t Thoroughly screen each prospective tenant t Enforce the collection of rents t Manage maintenance & emergency repairs 24/7 t Provide you with paperless monthly statements & rent distributionst Perform routine inspections of your property t Give you the peace of mind & personal attention you deserve! Sales Rentals Property & Association Management 1880 South 14th St, Suite 103, Amelia Island, FL 32034 galphinre.com We continue to have major demand for potential tenants seeking housing on Amelia Island & Nassau County. This is an opportunity to sign leases with quality tenants at top rental rates! seriously the condition of the bridges in Nassau County and have completed maintenance to address inspection findings of five bridges already in 2020 and are currently performing mainte-nance on a sixth bridge.”rn The following is a list of the county-maintained bridges tagged with the two “scour criti-cal” codes in the federal database, and Companion’s responses. Structure No. 744006 Hill Road at Little Mills Creek Inspection: June 2018.Structure: Wood or timber. Constructed 1982. The follow-ing items were coded “does not meet currently acceptable stan-dards: bridge railings, transi-tions, approach guardrail; bridge guardrail ends, substructure con-dition fair: scour critical founda-tions unstable.” Companion responded: “Maintenance to this bridge was completed in 2018 including erosion control measures. Additional mainte-nance is scheduled for the 2021 fiscal year which (began) October 1, 2020. Work is expected to be completed in 2021.” Structure No. 740069 CR 200A (Pages Dairy Road) over Lofton Creek Inspection: June 2018.Structure: Concrete. Constructed 1958. The follow-ing items were coded “does not meet currently acceptable stan-dards: bridge railings, transitions, approach guardrail; bridge guard-rail ends, substructure condition poor: scour condition critical, foundations unstable.” Companion responded: “A replacement structure is current-ly under design for this bridge. Construction of the new struc-ture will coincide with the Pages Dairy Road widening project and is estimated to be completed in 2021/2022. Regular inspections will continue to be performed on the existing structure.” nrn Four more county-maintained bridges were listed in the federal database as being in poor condi-tion or not meeting standards. Companion responded to each one when asked about the status. Structure No. 744001 – Stokes Road over the St. Marys River Inspection: June 2018.Structure: Pre-stressed concrete. Constructed 1978. The fol-lowing items were coded “does not meet currently acceptable standards: transitions, approach guardrail; bridge guardrail ends. Substructure poor. Deck geom-etry intolerable: high priority replacement.” Companion responded: “Maintenance is currently being performed on this bridge to address any inspection findings with an estimated completion date of December 2020.” Structure No. 744304 – Crandall Road at McQueen Swamp Structure: Steel. Constructed 1973. “Channel remediation severely damaged, culvert con-dition significant deterioration.” Companion responded: “Maintenance is scheduled for this bridge for the 2021 fiscal year which (began) October 1, 2020. Work is expected to be completed in 2021.” Structure No. 740041 – CR 108 over Branch of Little St. Marys River Inspection: June 2018.Structure: Concrete. Constructed 1950.The following items were coded “does not meet currently acceptable standards: bridge railings, transitions.” Companion responded: “Maintenance began on this bridge in August 2020 and was completed in September 2020 to address inspection findings.” Structure No. 740050 – CR 121 over Deep Creek Inspection: June 2018.Structure: Concrete. Constructed 1949. The follow-ing items were coded, “does not meet currently acceptable standards: bridge railings, tran-sitions.” Companion responded: “Maintenance was completed by the FDOT in October 2019. The structure is listed as a candidate to be replaced by the FDOT for the 2026 fiscal year but has not been confirmed.”nr The News-Leader followed up with Hisler-Pace to determine the status of the six “scour criti-cal bridges” in Nassau County that have the “owned by state” designation. Two of the bridges in the database – 74001 and 7400082 – cross Lofton Creek on S.R. 200 and were replaced as part of the ongoing widening and upgrade project, but there were four other structures with “scour critical” codes in the fed-eral database: Structure No. 740008 – St. Marys River and U.S. 17 Inspection: 2018.Structure: Steel. Constructed 1927. The following items were coded “does not meet currently acceptable standards: bridge railings, deck geometry; intoler-able, high priority replacement, approach alignment appraisal; intolerable; high priority replace-ment, scour condition critical, foundations unstable.” Hisler-Pace responded: “740008 – All required phases of scour analy-sis have been completed. There are no plans for construction at this time. Structure is inspected every 12 months and following any severe storm events. Structure No. 740011 – Braddock Creek and US-SB (S.R. 15) Inspection: June 2018.Structure: Concrete. Constructed 1924. The following items were coded “does not meet current-ly acceptable standards: scour condition critical, foundations unstable.” Hisler-Pace respond-ed: “740011 – All required phas-es of scour analysis have been completed. There are no plans for construction at this time. Structure is inspected every 24 months and following any severe storm events.” Structure No. 740014 – Car Seat Creek and U.S. 1 SB (S.R. 15) Inspection June 2018.Structure: Concrete. Constructed 1924. The following items were coded “does not meet currently acceptable standards: “scour condition critical, foundations unstable.” Hisler-Pace respond-ed: “740014 – All required phas-es of scour analysis have been completed. There are no plans for construction at this time. Structure is inspected every 24 months and following any severe storm events. Structure No. 740043 – Cushing Creek and S.R. 115 Inspection: April 2017.Structure: Concrete. Constructed 1948. The following items were coded “does not meet current-ly acceptable standards: deck geometry; intolerable, high prior-ity replacement, scour condition critical, foundations unstable.” Hisler-Pace responded: “740043 – All required phases of scour analysis have been completed. There are no plans for construc-tion at this time. Structure is inspected every 24 months and following any severe storm events.n Asked for a more detailed explanation of the “scour critical” codes for the four state-main-tained bridges, Hisler-Pace said they are “closely monitored.” “Although a bridge is classified as scour critical, it does not mean the structure is in immediate danger of failure. All bridges are assessed for stabil-ity at the 100-year scour storm event. If the bridge is unstable as a result of this evaluation, a point (ground elevation) at which the bridge becomes unstable is established and the bridge is clas-sified as scour critical. As part of the Bridge Safety Inspection Program, scour conditions are monitored. If a structure approaches this scour criti-cal ground elevation threshold, action is taken by the department for state-owned bridges.” Hisler-Pace also sent an attachment with the following explanation: “Attached is an example profile where the point of instability is set for a struc-ture. This profile is created and verified for changes as part of the routine safety inspection. In the attached document, the bridge is approximately 11-14 feet away from the point of insta-bility. Since the bridge has not reached the point of instability, no immediate action is required other than monitoring. There are structures you have in Nassau County which are scour criti-cal by definition and are closely monitored as part of the Bridge Safety Inspection Program.”Continued from 3A Constructed in 1958, bridge 740069 CR 200A-Pages Dairy Road over Lofton Creek was coded “scour critical.” The bridge “does not meet currently accept-able standards: bridge railings, transitions, approach guardrail; bridge guardrail ends, substructure condition poor: scour condition critical, foundations unstable.”GARY D. MORGANFOR THE NEWS-LEADER NL/PSA

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He said two incidents occurred in 2018 and 2019 when large tankers had to offload some of their cargo elsewhere before coming to the Port of Fernandina. “This is the capstone that will allow this port to handle ships of the size it was designed to handle,” Ragucci stated. He said this dredging should be good for at least another five years. In 1945, Congress approved the 800-footwide turning basin and shifting the channel line 50 feet northwesterly. In 1950, a 32-foot chan nel was authorized but subsequently inactivated. The USACE was said to have returned to the Fernandina Harbor project definition in the 1945 Rivers and Harbors Act, but the Corps failed to maintain even the 28-foot depth. A March 1962 survey showed that the inner har bor had a controlling depth of only 23 feet, while in the area of the Rayonier wharf to Lanceford Creek the controlling depth was only 13.5 feet. By 1966, the controlling depths were 34 feet in the 5 miles of the outer harbor and 35 feet in the 2-mile stretch of inner harbor. In 1957, the “outer harbor” through Cumberland Sound was deepened to 34 feet as part of a water way leading through the mouth of the St. Marys River Intracoastal Waterway west of Cumberland Island to what was then the Kings Bay Army Terminal and later the Kings Bay Submarine Base. In October 1966, the Fernandina Harbor Project was transferred from Savannah, Ga. to the USACE Jacksonville District. In 2000, the USACE issued a document called “Maintenance Dredging, Fernandina Harbor, Nassau County, Florida,” in which the Jacksonville District “propose(d) to continue conducting routine maintenance dredging of Fernandina Harbor.” It said, “Approximately 300,000 cubic yards of sedi ment, resulting from shoaling, will be removed from the harbor’s entrance channel on an annual basis.” But, according to a February 2019 News-Leader article, “The maintenance dredging referred to became the U.S. Navy’s project that puts sand on the beach. The historic, ongoing ‘Fernandina Harbor’ project morphed from dredg ing Fernandina’s riverside to renourishing Fernandina’s beachside.” “According to a 2000 USACE Jacksonville District Post Disposal Summary Report, ‘The harbor’s inner channel and turning basin will also require dredging every 5 to 10 years,’” the article pointed out. “The historic Fernandina Harbor inner harbor continues to silt. So much so, that in 2018 a huge ship, touted by new port operator Worldwide Terminals Fernandina as one of the largest ever to dock at the port, had to offload cargo in Houston first.” Now, two decades later, the dredging work is finally being done, despite the timetable recom mended by the USACE report. Ragucci also debunked a rumor that a failing anchor was keeping the massive VB-10,000 crane tied up in Fernandina Beach rather than being moved to a site in Brunswick, Ga. area for the recovery/salvage operations of the auto transport cargo ship Golden Ray, which capsized and caught fire in September 2019. “There is absolutely nothing wrong with the (VB-10,000),” Ragucci told the News-Leader . He said he had checked with the owners of what he described as “the largest heavy-lift vessel ever built in the U.S. It can lift up to 7,500 tons.” “The problem has been having issues in Brunswick providing proper anchorage for the vessel at the work site to do the work,” Ragucci added. “They are presently driving pilings at the site to anchor the machine.” Ragucci added that he expects the VB-10,000 will be leaving Fernandina Beach “in a couple of weeks, depending on the weather and whether storms make the ocean too rough for transporting it there.” But he said that he expects the vessel may return to the Port of Fernandina for safe harbor from time to time if weather at the recovery site becomes bad. “There is no place up there for safe harbor for the VB-10,000,” he said. r n NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Nassau County Board of County Commissioners will conduct a public hearing on Monday, November 9, 2020 at 6:00pm or soon thereafter, as the matter may be heard, regarding the proposed Ordinance amending the Nassau County Comprehensiv e Plan. The public hearings will be held at the James S. Page Governmental Complex, 96135 Nassau Place, Yulee, Florida 32097. ORDINANCE NO. 2020 ____ AN ORDINANCE OF THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF NASSAU COUNTY, FLORIDA AMENDING THE 2030 NASSAU COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; AMENDING THE TRANSPORTATION AND CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS ELEMENTS; AMENDING THE FUTURE TRANSPORTATION MAP SERIES; PROVIDING FOR TRANSMITTAL; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE D ATE. This amendment will update the Future Transportation Map Series (FTMS) with XSGDWHGGDWDDQGDQDO\VLVWREHFRQVLVWHQWZLWKWKH1RUWK)ORULGD732·V/RQJ5DQJH7UDQVSRUWDWLRQ3ODQDQG7UDQVSRUWDWLRQ,PSURYHPHQW3URJUDP,WZLOODOVREHFRQVLVWHQWZLWKWKHSURSRVHGXSGDWHWRWKH&RXQW\DGRSWHG0RELOLW\3ODQ,WZLOODOVRinclude amendments to policies in the Transportation and Capital Improvements elements to properly reference the Future Transportation Map Series, add provisions IRUFRQWH[WVHQVLWLYHGHVLJQRIURDGZD\VDQGWRH[SORUHVSURYLVLRQVIRUFRRUGLQDW LQJZLWKXWLOLW\FRPSDQLHVWRSURYLGHWUDLOVWKURXJKXWLOLW\FRUULGRUVDQGWRH[SORUH HVWDEOLVKPHQWRIDIHHLQOLHXSROLF\IRUFRQVWUXFWLRQRIWUDLOVDQGVLGHZDONVAll interested parties are invited to attend the public hearings and to be heard. Copies of the proposed Ordinance and supporting information are available for inspection in the Department of Planning and Economic Opportunity, 96161 Nassau Place, Yulee, FL 32097. Comments may also be directed in writing to the Department of Planning and Economic Opportunity, e-mailed to planninginfo@nassaucountyfl.com , or received by telephone at (904) 530-6300. $OOFRPPHQWVZLOOEHFRPHSDUWRIWKHUHFRUGLQWKLVPDWWHUDQGVXEMHFWWR)ORULGD·VSXEOLFrecords law. Individuals with disabilities needing a reasonable accommodation to participate in this pro ceeding should contact the office of the County Manager at least two days prior to the pro ceeding at (904) 530-6010 or, if the hearing impaired, Florida Relay Service at 1-800-955-8770 (v) or 1-800-955-8771 (TDD).THE PUBLIC IS INVITED TO BE PRESENT AND BE HEARD. IF A PERSON DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE BOARD, AGENCY OR COMMISSION WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT SUCH MEETING OR HEARING HE/SHE WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS AND FOR THAT PURPOSE, MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, WHICH REC ORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.The Board of County Commissioners may continue hearings on these matters. Daniel B. Leeper, ChairBoard of County Commissioners John A. Crawford, Ex-Officio Clerk Po l iceLodg eRdEdwards Rd § ¨¦ 95 § ¨¦ 95£ [17 £ [17 ¬ «200 ¬ «200Chester Rd Blackrock Rd § ¨¦ 95£ [17 $ +108Amelia Concourse Ol d N a s s a u v i l leR dBarn wel l RdWill iamBurgessBl vdMiner Rd Harts Rd ! 1 ! 2A ! 2B ! 3 ! 4 ! 5 ! 6 ! 7 ! 8 ! 9 ! 11 ! 12 ! 10 ! 13 ! 14 ! 15 ! 16 Griffin Rd F ourCreeks R dFive Mile Rd CanoG r oundRd Crandall Rd Pa ges DairyRd New 2 Lane New 4 Lane¯ Key New Road Project 1CR 108 Ext. (New 4 Lane) 2A | 2BPages Dairy Rd Ext. Ph. 2A & 2B (New 2 Lane) 3Amelia Concourse Ext. 4Hendricks Rd Ext. to CR 107 5New Rd from Hendricks Rd to Amelia Concourse 6William Burgess Blvd Ext. Ph. 2 ( New 2 Lane) 7Christain Way Ext. (New 2 Lane) 8William Burgess Blvd Ext. Ph. 1 ( New 2 Lane) 9Cardinal Rd Improvements (New 2 Lane) 10New William Burgess Blvd Rd (New 2 La ne) 11Mentoria Rd Improvements (New 2 Lane) 12New 2 Lane Rd William Burgess District ( New 2 La ne) 13Semper Fi Improvements ( New 2 Lane) 14Wildwood Rd Improvements (New 2 Lane) 15Edwards Rd Ext. (New 2 Lane) 16New Rd from Griffin Rd to I-95 Interchange NOTICE OF INTENTION TO CONSIDER ENACTMENT OF AN ORDINANCE Please note: This Map depicts potential new Road Corridors to be adopted as part of the Future Transportation Map Series. Depicted lines are not corridor alignments but conceptual corridors. Preliminary design has yet to be conducted to determine alternative project alignments.7KHSURSRVHG)XWXUH7UDQVSRUWDWLRQ0DS6HULHVLVDYDLODEOHIRUYLHZLQJRQWKH&RXQW\·Vwebsite at: https://www.nassaucountyfl.com/1065/Proposed-Ordinances NOTICE OF INTENTION TO CONSIDER ENACTMENT OF AN ORDINANCES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Nassau County Board of County Commissioners will conduct the public hearings to consider the adoption of the ordinances captioned below on Monday, November 9,2020 beginning at 6:00 p.m. or soon thereafter as the matter may be heard at the James S. Page Governmental Complex, 96135 Nassau Place, Yulee, Florida 32097. ORDINANCE 2020 -_____ AN ORDINANCE OF NASSAU COUNTY, FLORIDA AMENDING THE FUTURE LAND USE MAP OF THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING FOR THE RECLASSIFICATION OF APPROXIMATELY 437.70 ACRES OF REAL PROPERTY ON THE NORTH AND SOUTH SIDE OF WILLIAM BURGESS BOULEVARD, BETWEEN THE ROBERT M. FOSTER JUSTICE CENTER AND HARVESTER STREET, FROM AGRICULTURE (AGR), HIGH DENSITY RESIDENTIAL (HDR), MEDIUM DENSITY RESIDENTIAL (MDR) AND CONSERVATION 1 (CSV-1) TO TRANSECT DISTRICTS DEFINED IN THE WILLIAM BURGESS DISTRICT CONTEXT AND CONNECTIVITY BLUEPRINT AS T-4 URBAN EDGE/URBAN GENERAL ZONE, T-3.5 URBAN TRANSITIONAL ZONE, T-3 SUB-URBAN ZONE, AND T-1 CONSERVATION ZONE; ADOPTING A UNIFIED DEVELOPMENT PLAN; PROVIDING FOR FINDINGS; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE . ORDINANCE 2020 -_____ AN ORDINANCE OF NASSAU COUNTY, FLORIDA REZONING APPROXIMATELY 437.70 ACRES OF REAL PROPERTY LOCATED ON THE NORTH AND SOUTH SIDE OF WILLIAM BURGESS BOULEVARD, BETWEEN THE ROBERT M. FOSTER JUSTICE CENTER AND HARVESTER STREET, FROM OPEN RURAL (OR), COMMERCIAL JUDICIAL (CJ) AND RESIDENTIAL JUDICIAL (RJ) TO TRANSECT DISTRICTS DEFINED IN THE WILLIAM BURGESS DISTRICT CONTEXT AND CONNECTIVITY BLUEPRINT AS T-4 URBAN EDGE/URBAN GENERAL ZONE, T-3.5 URBAN TRANSITIONAL ZONE, T-3 SUB-URBAN ZONE, AND T-1 CONSERVATION ZONE; ADOPTING A UNIFIED DEVELOPMENT PLAN; PROVIDING FOR FINDINGS; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.The William Burgess District Context and Connectivity Blueprint is available for viewing on the County website at https://www.nassaucountyfl.com/860/William-Burgess-Overlay-District. All interested parties are invited to attend the public hearings and to be heard. Copies of the proposed Ordinance and supporting information are available for inspection in the Department of Planning and Economic Opportunity, 96161 Nassau Place, Yulee, FL 32097. Comments may also be directed in writing to the Department of Planning and Economic Opportunity, e-mailed to planninginfo@nassau countyfl.com , or received by telephone at (904) 530-6300. All comments will become part of the record LQWKLVPDWWHUDQGVXEMHFWWR)ORULGD·VSXEOLFUHFRUGVODZIndividuals with disabilities needing a reasonable accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the office of the County Manager at least two days prior to the proceeding at (904) 530-6010 or, if the hearing impaired, Florida Relay Service at 1-800-955-8770 (v) or 1-800-955-8771 (TDD).THE PUBLIC IS INVITED TO BE PRESENT AND BE HEARD. IF A PERSON DECIDES TO AP PEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE BOARD, AGENCY OR COMMISSION WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT SUCH MEETING OR HEARING HE/SHE WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS AND FOR THAT PURPOSE, MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.The Planning & Zoning Board and the Board of County Commissioners may continue hearings on thes e matters. Daniel B. Leeper, ChairBoard of County Commissioners John A. Crawford, Ex-Officio Clerk JOHN SCHAFFNER/FOR THE NEWS-LEADER Rumors that a failing anchor have kept the VB-10,000 crane at the Port of Fernandina are not true, according to Christopher Ragucci, CEO of Worldwide Terminals Fernandina, operator of the port.Continued from 1A JOHN SCHAFFNER/FOR THE NEWS-LEADER Federal dollars are funding a more than $4.3 million dredging project at the Port of Fernandina that will result in depths that will allow larger ships to visit the facility.

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r I wanted to update your readers on what has been hap pening in regards to steps being taken to help keep Florida’s seniors safe. While there is a great deal of “political spin” on the news these days, perhaps a short diversion into the reality of what your Assisted Living Facility Administrators and frontline caregivers are doing each day might be useful. The Coronavirus emergency continues for Florida seniors. At Dayspring Senior Living and Dayspring Village, we have been able to remain free from infection now since March 2020. The long fight to protect the health and safety of the staff and residents has centered around the testing practices and the early intervention steps to help reduce and contain the impact of COVID-19. The emergency rules that required testing of all staff expired on Sept. 21. While Nursing Homes must continue to test under the new federal rules, the Assisted Living Facilities were given the option. At our two facilities in Hilliard we continue to test all staff and all residents. We are now rotating the tests so we are able to improve our detec tion methods and improve our response. We now know that under the HRSA funding that those employees who do not have insurance can have their test paid for by these federal funds. In fact if you need to be transported to a hospital for the purposes of being tested for COVID-19 then ambulance ride, the hospital visit and testing can all be covered under HRSA funding. President Trump has sent to the facilities these new rapid tests from Abbott Labs that take 15 minutes to perform and allow us to yield a fairly good result. We are told there is a 15% error rate with them, so we are now well-positioned to test all visitors who seek to come and see their family mem bers as part of the re-opening orders (from) the (Division) of Emergency Management allowing families to have com passionate care visitors, essential caregivers, and up to five general visitors, with certain conditions. For many families, this has allowed them to come and see their relatives after many months and to hold hands and to have some sense of normalcy that was not possible before. These visits, while they create a new pathway for infections to be introduced, are essential as we serve as an extension of the family, as part of the solution not a barrier to their family’s success. We have had to create new policies and procedures, infection control videos, training on how to handle the new tests, and how to report the results to CMS. I am fortunate that my two Assisted Living Facilities were some of the first in Florida to receive these tests. This past week, I participated on a conference call with Vice President Mike Pence and Secretary Alex Azar and learned how quickly the administration was responding through the Department of Defense to get these testing supplies to facilities. We are now working on restoring some home passes with the families, trips to the parks, and concerts in our micro parks on campus. We are working with our third party providers to get appointments scheduled, procedures completed, and to make sure we catch up on procedures that were delayed while the pandemic raged. What we have seen is that the system has changed in how people respond, we have seen residents make greater use of online shopping and telecommunications, we are now expanding on campus WI-FI services and have implemented upgraded enterprise grade internet speeds to over 250 mega bytes per second. We have seen that the stimulus checks in the hands of adults with mental illness will be used to help stimulate the local economy, many have made purchases from Walmart, local pizza stores and others for deliveries. During the lock down I have witnessed some residents become first time voters and cast their ballots, we have had the largest number of staff have babies in many years and we also have seen costs of care continue to rise as supply chains continue to strain as we race toward the second wave. We know that the cost of latex gloves, for instance, will soon skyrocket by 40% and we will start to see shortages in other areas of PPE as many nations in Europe and around the globe battle the second wave that will surely show up here in the United States. We know that we will again have to flip the switch and once again head towards a “hard lock down” to ensure we protect residents and staff from infec tions. We are tracking with great enthusiasm the vaccine that this nation has been moving mountains to perfect and we expect to see something in November or December 2020. There is a great deal that has been accomplished right here in Nassau County that we should be proud of and perhaps most of all we should pause for a minute to salute the hard work of the Florida Dept. of Health-Nassau, the emergency operations staff, and the frontline caregivers who show up each day and strap on a mask and get to work caring for our most vulnerable population. Be sure to send over a lunch or a Pizza some afternoon to just say thanks or maybe send a card to let them know you care, it will bring a smile and the light of the morning star will shine on our whole community because of it. I am grateful to be an American and live in this wonderful nation! Douglas D. Adkins, executive director Dayspring Village, Inc. Hilliard nnnrn Would the staff at the News-Leader please consider renaming Steve Nicklas’ column to more accurately reflect his chosen agenda? Let’s face it, other than a few articles about local tax issues, Steve has been waging a political campaign for months, not talking markets. Back on May 22, Steve swooned over our governor’s handling of the pandemic, which is akin to calling the ball game in the first inning because your team is ahead. Shortly after, Florida’s infection numbers skyrocketed. As opposi tion to the RNC convention grew over the summer, Steve decried anyone expressing concerns about health and safety , blaming folks for waging political opposition at the expense of a local economic boon. Yet Steve remained silent when it was party leadership that ultimately chose to cancel the event – finally – due to those same health and safety con cerns. Most recently, Steve has focused on the boat parades (Sept. 11), bus tours (Sept. 18) and fly-by rallies (Oct. 2) of that same political party. Perhaps we can call his column Steve’s Personal Politics Place? Maybe Steve could discuss the effects on financial mar kets of having a COVID-19 outbreak among senior leaders of our government, to include the president? In any event, Steve Nicklas is not writing articles reflecting that objec tive, critical analysis most people expect from a financial adviser. His articles read like press releases from a party campaign manager. If Steve is so dedicated to waging a partisan political campaign, I suggest the News-Leader offer up his editorial column space to a contributor who is able to provide a more balanced view of politics, or maybe even find someone who is willing to discuss “markets.” Chris Pyle Fernandina Beach rnn I do not write letters to the editor, but I did as Ed Weihenmayer suggested in his letter and this is what I concluded. Safe streets: The streets are NOT safe under Trump. Look around at the “police” who are unidentified and in unmarked vehicles. Look at the police who are accepting “help” from armed citizen “militia” and letting one of those militia walk away just after killing an unarmed demonstrator. Demonstrators have repeatedly called for peacefulness. It is a constitutional right in a democratic society to demonstrate. Economy: The pre-COVID-19 economy was very good. It had been since Obama and continued even though Trump had very little to do with it. Taxes: Trump mostly reduced taxes for his rich cro nies. The Democrats will only raise taxes on those mak ing $400K+ which will affect NONE of the middle class! WAKE UP! Energy independence: Mr. Weihenmayer talked about energy independence using the environment as the scape goat, as usual. The pipeline and fracking will continue to speed up Trump’s continuation of environmental suicide for the U.S. and the world. Energy independence on oil is NOT the answer. We HAVE TO be concerned about the ENVIRONMENT before it’s too late! Military readiness: Is the military really better equipped under Trump? Even after all that money that he wanted to take from the Pentagon to build his Wall? Even after he feels that our soldiers are stupid and losers? Trade deals: The trade deals seem to “sound” good, but talk to the farmers who can’t sell their crops anymore. Who has really profited from all of Trump’s “hard talk”? Stock market: To say that the stock market is up, is surely a positive way to look at things. No one knows what will happen in the future, but a lot will need to change to keep it going that way. Border control: To be proud of what Trump has done about border control is laughable, starting with that ridicu lous wall. The part that isn’t laughable is what Trump did to the immigrant families and the children that were separated from their parents. Immigrants do not take jobs away from citizens. They do the labor that Americans don’t want to do. The immigration problem is not a simple one, but there are humane solutions that can be used to solve it. Prison Reform: Trump has done nothing but rarely talk about prison reform. He has freed a couple of people who should not have been incarcerated, but he has done nothing to reform the system. Charter Schools: It was easy to tell that Mr. Weihenmayer was not an educator. Charter schools can be a good thing in some cases, but how about fixing public education and teacher salaries first? To say Democrats and teacher unions are against them is not seeing the whole picture and is very narrowly focused. Enterprise Zones: I think it’s amazing that Trump has made these a priority. I have never heard of them. VA Medical Care: I can only hope that this is true and that all those “stupid losers” as Trump calls them have been able to use the facilities. North Korea, Iran, China: Trump admires dictators, and has made a fool of himself with North Korea. China and Iran hardly see him as a world leader to be taken seriously. And nobody mentioned Russia … Why not? Our “enemies” don’t seem to fear Trump. They merely seem to ignore him hoping he will just go away. COVID-19: How can ANYONE even hint that Trump handled the pandemic in a reasonable, responsible way? Yes. science was getting to know the virus, but Trump has admitted he knew how dangerous things were at such an early stage and “played it down” so people wouldn’t panic. Look at the lives he could have saved and how much sooner we might have gotten a handle on things if he had been hon est about everything! Finally, I would just like to add that whether you agree on anything I have said, when you vote for the next president, please consider one thing Mr. Weihenmayer never men tioned in his letter – CHARACTER. Please don’t vote for a man who lies, thinks only about how to get more power, make more money, and the rest be damned. We’ve had 4 years of scandal, tweets, mayhem, and embarrassment. Let’s now have a chance to let our Allies know that they can depend on us to stand with them and the rest of the world. We are ALL in this together! Lucy Herring Fernandina Beach rrnnrnnrn I’ll make this short and sweet – I am strongly opposed to what I have heard is a potential request for a five story hotel on South Fletcher Avenue. This is not in character with our community and I would ask that you do all in your power to prevent this from occurring. We already have an abomination of a hotel that was approved despite my and other people who objected, on Atlantic Avenue. Let us not have this occur again. Jan Cote-Merow Fernandina Beach T his will be my last column before the election, an elec tion I’m looking forward to, not for any anticipated cel ebration but because it will have come and gone on Nov. 4. I’ve been voting since 1972 and some elections – national, state and local – have been uplifting, encourag ing, exciting and motivating, some have been kind of nondescript and some have left me discouraged, sad and wondering about the country’s, the state’s or the city’s future. This election has all the makings of the last kind. Lots of things have changed since 1972, but some of the things that stand out are … Social media is playing a major role in campaigns at all levels and that is not a good thing. I can’t remember an election during which so much misinformation was posted, sent out or made available to so many people. People read things and assume they’re accurate without considering the source and motives of the person, organization or group that’s providing that information, or, more likely, mis information. People, groups and orga nizations have agendas and it’s becom ing more and more evident that these folks have no misgivings about saying or writing anything that promotes that agenda. It seems like most Americans have forgotten their junior high or middle school civics – completely. Concepts like “checks and balances” and “separation of powers” are as foreign to most people as the Inuit language. A cursory scanning of our Constitution gives the president some executive powers, but he has to work with Congress to get most things done and the concept of judicial review means that the federal courts can review legislation or a presidential act as to its constitutionality. Of course, the Founders never envisioned that a president, any presi dent would wield so much influence over one house of Congress, say the Senate, or the federal court system, a part of which is the Supreme Court, as the current one. So, one can be forgiv en for thinking that the president can do pretty much anything. If a majority of the House or Senate are afraid of the president and follow him like a herd of sheep, or a majority of the Supreme Court begin to resemble a line of bobble heads, nodding in unison when ever the president speaks, then you’re right, the president can do pretty much anything – the Constitution becomes irrelevant. We’ll forget the state level where things haven’t changed since the 1980s. What’s interesting though, is how the legislature can ignore the will of Floridians and nobody does anything about it. Remember when Floridians voted to set aside money each budget year for land preservation? How’s that going? Remember when we voted in favor of allowing convicted felons to vote as long as they had served their sentence and were part of the commu nity? Not without a fight! Floridians put referendums on the ballot and approved them, but some of those approved referendums never come to pass, unless the governor and a majority of the legislature are in favor. Local elections used to be about where candidates stood on the issues, whether or not people knew, or knew of, the candidate, how knowledgeable they were on the issues and whether or not they had been active in the com munity. Some of that’s still true and some isn’t. I have been a candidate in 11 City Commission elections, the first of which was in 1978 and the last in 2006. In those days, $5,000 was enough to run a successful campaign and the people and groups contributing to those campaigns were local. Now a candidate needs a lot more than $5,000 to run a campaign and in some races most of the contributors are non-local people, organizations and interest groups. Nationally, it seems the only thing that matters is political party. In a recent poll, 93% of Republicans said they are going to vote for President Trump, and 97% of Democrats said they are voting for Biden. The election will be decided by independent voters and four or five swing states. In state elections, it’s all about political party – Republicans hold the Panhandle and North Florida while Democrats claim South Florida. Elections will be decided by what hap pens along the Interstate 4 corridor. In our local county elections, the only thing that matters is politi cal party; a candidate has to be a Republican if they want to get elected to anything. Elections are supposed to be non partisan in the city, but both parties are trying more and more to involve themselves in races as are out-of-town political actions committees, people and organizations. Funny, when the Constitution was written, there were no political par ties in the U.S. and our first president, George Washington, encouraged us to avoid them at all costs. If the Founders could only see us now! Ron Sapp served 24 years – eight terms – on the Fernandina Beach City Commission, with six terms as mayor. He also taught at Fernandina Beach High School for 30 years.  r r r nr r The News-Leader is published with pride weekly for the people of Nassau County by Community Newspapers, Inc., Athens, Georgia. We believe that strong newspapers build strong communi ties – “Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to the truth, integrity, quality and hard work. r r r r r r r rr r n r rnnnnnn r r nn PARESH/CAGLECARTOONS.COMNassau County Commissioners: Danny Leeper, District 1 -Fernandina Beach, 261-8029 (h), 430-3868 (cell), email: dleeper@nassaucountyfl.com Aaron C. Bell, District 2 6RXWK$PHOLD,VODQG1DVVDXYLOOH2·1HLO 451-4094 (cell), email: acbell@nassaucountyfl.com Pat Edwards, District 3 -Yulee, 335-0260 (cell), email: pedwards@nassaucountyfl.com Thomas R. Ford, District 4 -Hilliard, Bryceville, Boulogne, Kings Ferry, Nassau Oaks, 451-0766 (cell), 879-2015 (home) email: tford@nassaucountyfl.com Justin M. Taylor, District 5 -Callahan, West Yulee, 625-5624 (cell), email: jtaylor@nassaucountyfl.comCity of Fernandina Beach Commissioners: Mayor: Johnny Miller : 556-3299 (cell), email: jmiller@fbfl.org Vice Mayor: Len Kreger : 432-8389 (home), email: lkreger@fbfl.org Phil Chapman : 624-5590 (cell), email: pchapman@fbfl.org Mike Lednovich : 502-0650 (cell), email: mlednovich@fbfl.org Chip Ross : 410-394-0220 (cell) email: cross@fbfl.org   ­­ Letters must include writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers are normally limited to one letter in a 30-day period. No political endorsements the week before an election. No poems will be published. Letters should be typed or printed. Not all letters are pub lished. Send letters to: Letters to the Editor, P.O. Box 16766, Fernandina Beach, FL. 32035 Email: editor@fbnewsleader.com. Visit us online at fbnewsleader.com n

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AT NEED CREMATION PRE-NEED PLANNING NO COST CREMATION OPTIONS Lowest Prices for cremation in Nassau County Call for more Information (904) 261-2700 We’ve Moved! CREMATIONS OF NASSAU www.eternityfh.com r n É{­1I1s1"1qUs¤Q1Ê û‡-£ûUKKM-‡ª£UDM‡xD-‡-KUù~-M~~~@-DD~UUû~UM!‡‡-M!‡)ù~‡U‡ûUK~UxÝDD ­QU¤1i1"­U{sUÉ{­1G{ž1Ϛ1žU1s"1U fs{Êi1(I1Us(i1(1ž¤QUšT iUM!‡-Kû-‡ªx~-M‡z 3DLGIRUDQGDSSURYHGE\*HQHFH0LQVKHZIRU&LW\&RPPLVVLRQ*URXS PLQVKHZIRU\RXFRP –PSURYHFRRUGLQDWLRQEHWZHHQWKHFLW\FRXQW\ )RFXVRQLPSURYLQJFLW\SURFHVVHVWRUHGXFH –PSOHPHQWDQGIXQGWKHPDMRUUHZULWHRIRXU &RPSUHKHQVLYH3ODQRXU/DQG'HYHORSPHQW FRVWVPDNHLWHDVLHUWRGREXVLQHVVZLWKWKHFLW\ &RGHLQZKLFKZLOOEHRXUJURZWK GHYHORSPHQWURDGPDSIRUWKHIXWXUH IMû^~IUÝD~T J ACKSON E QUIPMENT www.JacksonEquipmentInc.com Bill Schuetz Cell: 904-610-9058 Office: 904-845-3696 Jackson Equipment552458 US HWY 1Hilliard Fl 32046 O ne of the joys of living in North Florida is the number of plants that have been cherished and shared with others for decades. Right now, I have two of these heirloom plants bloom-ing in my yard, both springing from gifts from Florida resident friends of mine, and both bring-ing cherished memories of these people back into my life every fall. Hurricane lilies are also called spider lilies, surprise lilies, naked ladies, and many other names wherever they are found. Here their local name arises from their sudden appearance, springing from the bare ground in September after heavy rains at the height of the hurricane season. These amaryllis relatives bear long, strappy leaves in the spring, but the leaves die back and fall off, and I often have forgotten them by September. But then one day, I walk out of my front door and there they are, orange flow-ers on tall stems that seemed to have grown tall overnight. My own orange hurricane lilies originated from a friend’s yard bordering her stately home in the historic district of St. Augustine. Audrey, a stately lady herself, rented out her carriage house to my friend Carole, and all three of us spent many an evening sipping wine on Audrey’s porch. Now, both Audrey and Carole are gone from this earth, but I still have the lilies that keep my thoughts of them fresh. I also have a few red hurricane lilies – just a starter set – that began a couple of years ago as gifts from my Tallahassee friend, Steve. Like the orange lilies, I expect these plants to continue to spread and flourish in my yard in the years to come. And, sadly, like Audrey and Carole, Steve has also passed on but left this legacy behind. At least my pinecone gingers have a happier story to relate. My first ginger rhizomes came from local friend Ann Weinburger, who is still alive and well, I’m happy to report. It took a couple of years for these gingers to bloom, but now, once established, I expect to enjoy these plants as long as I live. I was so thrilled when they finally bloomed this year that I cut off the flowers lurking below, put them in a vase along with some orange hur-ricane lilies, and posted my creation on Facebook. The response I got was amazing. Lots of people liked the post and others wanted their bulbs and rhizomes to start their own patches of plants. Pinecone gingers are an interesting plant. The flowers come up from the ground below the lush greenery of the plant. And how strange they are. They look like red pinecones but are soft and full of a liquid that some use as a shampoo or add to lotions, so much so they are sometimes called shampoo lilies. Now that I’ve researched them, I’ve found that you don’t even have to cut them to get this liquid. You can put a cup under them, gently squeeze them, collect the liquid and leave the flower alone. Soon enough you can harvest even more liquid. Here’s the dilemma: I am happy to share bulbs, and I’ve given away lots of orange hur-ricane lilies in years past, but I’ve now limited their spread. I have only a few more to share this year that are already spo-ken for. The pinecone gingers were even more of a problem, but at this point, I only have a few. After the Facebook post, the problem miraculously disap-peared. A friend of mine, Liz Slover, lives on Fort George Island off Heckscher Drive. After she saw my post, she invited me down to collect some pinecones from her plants. One recent day, I happily drove down to her house with our mutual friend, Susan Gallion. When we arrived, Liz was feeding the peacocks that visit her regularly for cat food kibble. We spent a pleasant afternoon drinking tea, catching up, and admiring her yard full of towering live oak trees and native vegetation extending down to the marsh. And boy, did she have pinecone gingers – a forest of them that originated from just a few that she and her husband, David, planted many years ago! Susan and I left with a bucket full of pinecone ginger flowers for our vases and our promise to be back again when the leaves die back and the rhi-zomes are easy to dig up. I see many more pinecone gingers in my future and eventually enough to share again. Pat Foster-Turley is a zoologist on Amelia Island. She wel-comes your nature questions and observations. Free-ranging peacocks visit a yard on Fort George Island. rnrn nn PHOTOS BY PAT FOSTER-TURLEY/FOR THE NEWS-LEADER Hurricane lilies, both orange and red, adorn my fall yard. Pinecone gingers, below, also called shampoo flowers, are an old fall favorite. 1112 South 14th Street Amelia Island In the 8 Flags Shopping Center (904) 261-5556 Monday – Friday 9am – 5pm Saturday 10am – 5pm NEW ITEMS COMING IN DAILY! GET YOUR HOME READY FOR THE HOLIDAYS EARLY!

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Our NEW HATS are finally in. Come by to check out our Inshore Slam Series. 904.277.0775 1925 South 14th Street Fernandina Beach, FL NOTICE OF POLLING PLACE CHANGES FOR THE GENERAL ELECTION TO BE HELD NOVEMBER 3, 2020 Eight polling locations in Nassau County have changed for the 2020 General Election. New Voter Information Cards were mailed to every registered voter in Nassau County in July. Note: Voters in Precinct 202 were mailed a new Voter Information Card in September as their polling place has changed back to the American Beach Community Center. If you did not receive your new card or if corrections are needed, please con tact the Supervisor of Elections office to update your voter record or visit www.VoteNassau.com. IT IS VERY IMPORTANT that all voters immediately review their new Voter Information Card to make sure their name, address and party affiliation is correct in order to receive the correct ballot style and, if voting in person on Election Day, to know where their polling place is located. For directions to your polling place, or to view your sample ballot, visit www.VoteNassau.com and click My Voter Information or call our office for assistance.On Election Day, voters MUST vote at their assigned precinct and polling place. FS 101.045 “A person is not permitted to vote in any election pre cinct or district other than the one in which the person has his or her legal residence and in which the person is registered.” Precincts and Polling Locations FOR VOTER REGISTRATION AND ELECTION INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT: Vicki P. CannonSupervisor of Elections96135 Nassau Place, Suite 3Yulee, Florida 32097 Website: www.VoteNassau.com Email: questions@votenassau.com Phone: 904.491.7500 Fax: 904.432.1400 Toll Free: 1.866.260.4301 TDD: 904.491.7510 Para solicitar este documento en español, llame a nuestra oficina al 904.491.7500 nrrnrrrn rJ:IGIG #!".*)%%#'!%)/)'-#'--2)2'.6"3"'!),."IGIG',%%/)'<4).,n'),&/)',-4,&#%.)3,6,!#-.,3).,#'--2)2'.6#'2%6<).;).,-#',#'.IGI4,&#%'4).,n'),&/)',#'*.&,-."#,*)%%#'!*%"-"'!$.)."&,#'")&&2'#.6'., ,#'.-')%%#'!r)/)'nnrnnn:r; CCCCCCCA;nr@=9>nBCCCCC #$#<'')' 2*,3#-),)%/)'PMHJL--2%:2#.J2%:%),#JIGPN -#.;444<).--2<)&&#%;+2-/)'-D3).'--2<)& ")';PGK).,#!".)2'.6%!< LGK-.--2#!""))%H,,#),,< %%"':rJIGHH #,-.*/-."2,",6%GJOIHGGNIGIG The following report was compiled by Beth Jones of the News-Leader from the Oct. 15 court docket of the Circuit Court for Judge James H. Daniel. Q Jessica Marlene Anderson admitted to violating probation for two counts of petit theft. She was adjudicated guilty and sentenced to 45 days in Nassau County Jail with credit for time served. Probation was revoked and terminated. All costs and fees were converted to a civil judgment. Q Eric Alexander Baker pleaded not guilty to aggravat-ed fleeing and eluding, driving under the influence of alcohol, obstructing or opposing a police officer without violence, and possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis. Q Kenneth Dwayne Beverly pleaded not guilty to possession of a controlled substance. Q A motion to suppress was denied for Kenneth Brian Bowditch for possession of fire-arm ammunition by a convicted felon. Q Nicolin Gail Broderway pleaded not guilty to aggravated fleeing or attempting to elude, trafficking more than 14 grams of methamphetamine, and pos-session of a firearm or concealed weapon by a convicted felon. Q Samantha Lynn Capello pleaded no contest to possession of a controlled substance and altering, destroying or conceal-ing evidence in the process of an investigation. Adjudication was withheld, and she was sentenced to time served and 18 months of drug offender probation to include drug abuse evaluation and follow-up treatment. She was ordered to undergo more frequent drug testing. Early termination may be considered after 12 months with success-ful completion of all terms and conditions. Probation was trans-ferred to Indian River County. She was ordered to pay $518 in court costs, $100 to the State Attorney’s Office and $150 to the Public Defender’s Office. Q Jeremy Devon Cooper pleaded no contest to posses-sion of more than 20 grams of cannabis. He was adjudicated guilty and sentenced to time served. He was ordered to pay $518 in court costs, $100 to the State Attorney’s Office and $150 to the Public Defender’s Office. Q Jeff Martin Denmark pleaded guilty to possession of a controlled substance and obstructing or opposing a police officer without violence. He was adjudicated guilty and sentenced to time served and 18 months of drug offender probation to include drug abuse evalua-tion, follow-up treatment, and more frequent drug testing. He was ordered to pay $518 in court costs, $100 to the State Attorney’s Office and $150 to the Public Defender’s Office. Q Joseph Daniel Eusey pleaded guilty to trafficking in heroin. He was adjudicated guilty and sentenced to 12 years in Florida State Prison with credit for time served. He was ordered to pay a $100 fine, $518 in court costs, $100 to the State Attorney’s Office and $150 to the Public Defender’s Office. Q Robert Mark Head Jr. pleaded no contest to possession of more than 20 grams of can-nabis, possession of a controlled substance, and possession of drug paraphernalia. He was adju-dicated guilty and sentenced to time served. He was ordered to pay $518 in court costs, $100 to the State Attorney’s Office, and $150 to the Public Defender’s Office. Q Darron Deshawn Hicks pleaded not guilty to burglary to a dwelling or structure with damage, criminal mischief of more than $1,000, and battery on a law enforcement officer. Q Richard Holoka Jr. pleaded no contest to two counts of aggravated assault. He was adju-dicated guilty and sentenced to six months in Nassau County Jail with credit for time served. He was ordered to pay $418 in court costs, $100 to the State Attorney’s Office, $150 to the Public Defender’s Office and $352 in surcharges. Q Butch Jeremy Hutcheson admitted to violation of proba-tion for grand theft of a motor vehicle. He was adjudicated guilty and sentenced to time served. Probation was revoked and terminated, and all costs and fees were converted to a civil judgment. Hutcheson pleaded no contest to possession of a firearm or concealed weapon by a convicted felon. He was adju-dicated guilty and sentenced to six years in Florida State Prison with credit for time served. He also pleaded no contest to bat-tery by a person detained in a detention facility. He was adju-dicated guilty and sentenced to time served. He was ordered to pay $836 in court costs, $200 to the State Attorney’s Office, $300 to the Public Defender’s Office and a $210 surcharge. Q James Edward Langford pleaded no contest to criminal mischief of $200 or less and pos-session of less than 20 grams of cannabis. He was adjudicated guilty and sentenced to time served. He was ordered to pay $446 in court costs, $100 to the State Attorney’s Office, $200 to the Public Defender’s Office and $1,000 in restitution. Q Alan Carl Lawson Jr. pleaded guilty to three counts of burglary of a structure or conveyance, four counts each of burglary of an unoccupied struc-ture and grand theft of a firearm, two counts of petit theft, and one count each of possession of bur-glary tools and grand theft. He was adjudicated guilty and sen-tenced to 48 months in Florida State Prison with credit for time served. He was ordered to pay $1,672 in court costs, $400 to the State Attorney’s Office and $200 in fees. Q Courtney Elizabeth Lominac pleaded no contest to battery on a person 65 years old or older and obstructing or opposing a police officer with-out violence. She was adjudi-cated guilty and sentenced to 12 months in Nassau County Jail with credit for time served. She was ordered to pay $418 in court costs, $100 to the State Attorney’s Office, $150 to the Public Defender’s Office and $352 in surcharges. Q Shyanne Kay McCorkel pleaded no contest to resist-ing arrest with violence. Adjudication was withheld. She was sentenced to time served and 12 months of probation. She must complete an anger man-agement course and 24 hours of community service. Early termi-nation may be considered upon completion of all conditions. She was ordered to pay $238 in court costs, $50 to the State Attorney’s Office, and $100 to the Public Defender’s Office. Q Austin Ryan Pruett denied violation of probation for obstructing or opposing a police officer without violence. Q Jermaine Wayne Sieg pleaded no contest to posses-sion of a controlled substance and possession of controlled substance paraphernalia. He was adjudicated guilty and sentenced to 60 days in Nassau County Jail with credit for time served. He was ordered to pay $518 in court costs, $100 to the State Attorney’s Office, and $150 to the Public Defender’s Office. Q Heather Marie Stephens denied violation of probation for fraudulent use of a credit card. Q Brandon Terrell Webster admitted to violation of proba-tion for armed robbery. He was adjudicated guilty and sentenced to eight months in Nassau County Jail with credit for time served. Probation was revoked and terminated. All costs and fees were converted to a civil judgment. Q Douglas Allen White was ordered to continue commit-ment for involuntary treatment for two counts of aggravated bat-tery with a deadly weapon. Q Edward Ogilvie Young denied violation of probation for aggravated battery with a deadly weapon. Beth Jones of the News-Leader compiled this report from records at the Nassau County Clerk of the Circuit Court. Arrest indicates suspicion of a crime, not guilt. To report information about a crime, contact the Fernandina Beach Police Department at 277-7342 or the Nassau County Sheriff’s Office at 225-5174. The “We Tip” program – 1-800-78Crime – also allows callers to leave anonymous tips. Q Angela Marie Hermann, 42, 86081 Britt Lynn Lane, No. 12, Yulee, Oct. 8, possession of methamphetamine and posses-sion of drug paraphernalia with residue. Q Robert Shane Burnette, 35, 94303 Duck Lake Drive, Fernandina Beach, Oct. 9, bur-glary with assault or battery and battery. Q Kacee Lynn Heussmann, 31, homeless, Oct. 10, robbery with a weapon and battery. Q Thomas Wilson Cobb, 32, 45245 Bismark Road, Callahan, Oct. 10, robbery with a weapon. Q Coy Bryant McGee, 20, 37212 Pinetree Drive, Hilliard, Oct. 11, driving while license suspended or revoked (felony habitual offender), possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis, and use of or possession with intent to use drug parapher-nalia. Q Joshua Nathon Veal Sr., 29, 232 Sara Road, Jacksonville, Oct. 12, high-speed aggra-vated fleeing or eluding. Q James Russell Moore, 30, 54877 Church Road, Callahan, Oct. 12, resisting arrest without violence and theft. Q Stephen Joseph Wyckoff, 28, 97255 Po Folks Way, Yulee, Oct. 15, two counts of pos-session of a weapon by a con-victed felon, and one count each trafficking more than 14 grams of methamphetamine and possession of a controlled sub-stance. Burnette Veal Wyckoff DON’T LITTER SP SP A A Y ~ NEUTER Y ~ NEUTER A Public Service Announcement by The News-Leader 1303 Jasmine St., Suite 101 Fernandina Beach, FL NLPSA The food pantry needs donations of non-perishable food items all year round.For more information, C all: 261 7000

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³ 2XUHFRQRP\LVWKHEHVWLW ¶ VHYHUEHHQ ´ Donald J. Trump/2020 State of the Union Address % H V W ( F R Q R P \ L Q 8 6 + L V W R U \ " 1 2 7 ( 9 ( 1 & / 2 6 ( AMERICA needs a PRESIDENT who HAS A PLAN to rebuild our economy, not one who FALSELY BRAGS about something he has NOT done. JUST ONE MORE REASON we, the undersigned, regardless of party affiliation or ideology, are voting for JOE BIDEN and KAMALA HARRIS . PLEASE JOIN US . There is a way to find out. Compare Trump ¶ s record to that of his predecessors over the past 60 years. Paid Political Advertisement Again, PRE-COVID , the Trump Administration ranked SEVENTH in new jobs created per annum. Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Commerce Average Annual New Jobs Created (in millions) Democratic/ Republican Even PRE-COVID , the Trump Administration ranked NINTH in terms of annual growth in Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Source: Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis Average Annual Growth in GDP (percent) Democratic/ Republican MAKE SURE YOUR VOTE COUNTS Whether you opt to vote in person on Election Day ( November 3 ), early ( October 19November 1 ) or by mail, make a plan to ensure your vote is counted. Confirm your registration status, verify when and where to vote, and comply with ID requirements. If you have questions or need assistance, contact the Nassau County Supervisor of Elections by phone ( 904-491-7500 ) or at votenassau.com . The message was created and paid for by residents of Northeast Florida. TRUE or FALSE ? Jo -Ann & Steve Leimberg Brenda & Jay Kayne Holly & Redgie Gutshall, USN Ret. Judy & Howard McCue Nancy & Jack Dickson Gigi Feazell Carole & Howard Haims Shelley and Jeff Hirshberg Elsa Mitschele Christine & Steve Whitman Leah Ward-Lee & Sam Lane Carolyn Phanstiel Jane Preston Peggy Weeks & Steve Crounse Ross & Clark Griffin Becky & Tommy Grimes Evi & Steve Mobbs Jane Sandhaus-Packer & Jeff Packer Beverly & Robert Combs Bonnie Johnson Cynthia & Donald Mackenzie Nancy & Stuart Billington Mary & Mike Clemen s Jan Cote-Merow Jean DesBarres Ann & James Kemp Joanna & Jackson Kennard Margaret Kirkland & John E. Baker Kathy & Chris Kirwan Annie Sparkle Mark Tomes Buffy & Bob Wells Miriam Dudiak Elizabeth Dion & Scott Kessler Judy & Craig Nelson Nancy & Jason Gladfelter Ruthellen Mulberg Anne H. Showalter Nancy & Stan Fishburn Wilma & Ralph Allen Bill & Sheila Braddock Peggy Bulger & Doug Leatherbury Patricia Bu rke Ursula Childs Jennifer & Mike Harrison Kate Hart Jody & Ray Hetchka Roslyn Hume & Ira Copperman Jutta Jacobs Kathy & Lawrence Kanter Ken Kneisel & Christine Reed Jacquie & Don Leary Louise Malone Peggy & Gary Mendelson Marsha & Michael Phelts Susan & Mike Raab Mary Jane & Tom Smith Mary Alice Southwick Karen Thompson Susan & Lee Weiner Bob & Maryanne Weintraub Marilyn & Norman Wesley Candis Whitney Sue & Brian McCourt Frances Hindsley Munsell McPhillips & Robert Prager Applexam Varela & David Boutin Anne J. & Anna M. Brans come Sheila Cocchi Jan Gundersen Diana & Arthur Herman Mary & David Kramek Janet Michea Penny Reid Gale & Mickey Ulmer Eileen & Jim Widerman Karelyn Lotz Trudie Richards Onyx Varela Carol Kline Laura Pitois Dana Day

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r n rn PHOTOS BY BETH JONES/NEWS-LEADER The Yulee High School girls volleyball team beat Baker County 23-25, 25-15, 25-8, 25-21 Thursday night to capture the District 3-4A title, the 15-5 Lady Hornets’ second district championship in a row. “Overall, the team played great,” YHS Head Coach Donna Jackson said. “We dropped the first set, but the girls quickly readjusted and came out on fire the next three sets.” Christina Jackson recorded 25 kills; Caroline Brackens had 22 kills; Ashley Hall had a pair of aces and 17 digs; Elizabeth Jackson had three blocks; and Kaylee Manning was credited with 46 assists. Yulee hosts Raines at 7 p.m. Thursday in the region quarterfinal round. Pictured left, from left, are Carlynn Williams, Emma Cook, Grace King, Christina Jackson, Kaylee Manning, Ashley Hall, Caroline Brackens, Elizabeth Jackson, Leah Kasper, Aliyah Murto, Rebecca Lundy, Kendra Darling and Sonia Wallenius. More pho-tos, 4B. r The host Fernandina Beach Pirates ensured a win ning season Friday night with a 56-50 overtime win over West Nassau. The 5-2 Pirates travel to Hilliard Friday and cap the regular season at North Florida Educational Institute in Jacksonville on Oct. 30. Junior quarterback Cam Miller had 229 passing yards and rushed for another 70 yards Friday. Kyle Lee had 108 receiving yards on the night. The visitors struck first. West Nassau scored on a six-yard run in the first quarter, but the Pirates answered when Miller connected with Lee for an 80-yard touchdown recep tion. The score was knotted at 7-7 at the end of the quarter. West Nassau scored first in the second quarter but the Pirates fired back with back-to-back touchdowns. Khamari Barksdale ran in from three yards out for a touchdown and Brooks Rohe returned an inter ception 15 yards for a TD. West Nassau responded with a touchdown after a 37-yard run, but the Pirates tacked on two more TDs before halftime. Ernest Cortez returned a kickoff 50 yards for a score and Miller found the end zone from five yards out. Phil Tita provided four PATs in the first half. The Pirates led 34-21 at the midway point. West Nassau scored first again to open the third quarter, cutting the Pirates’ lead to 34-29. It was the first of three back-to-back touchdowns. The Warriors scored two more times in the fourth quarter to take a 42-34 lead. Miller scored on an 11-yard run and tacked on the two-point conversion to even score at 42-42, sending the game into overtime. Again, the Warriors struck first, scoring on a one-yard run to take a 50-42 lead. Barksdale scored on a five-yard run and Miller scored on the two-point conversion, knotting the score at 50-50. Barksdale scored the gamewinner on a 10-yard run. The Pirates won 56-50. Miller completed 11 of 19 passes for 229 yards and a touchdown with one intercep tion. Lee reeled in three catch es for 108 yards, and Barksdale had 88 yards on five receptions. Miller rushed 12 times for 70 yards and two touchdowns. Barksdale had 32 yards on 11 touches. Josiah Rauls and Rohe led the Pirate defense. Rauls had six tackles, 10 assists and two quarterback sacks. Rohe had four tackles, 10 assists, an interception return for a touch down and caused a fumble. Cortez had three tackles and six assists; Willie Coleman had three tackles and seven assists; Lee had nine assists; and Caiden Sweat had 12 assists. Tita kicked off seven times for 274 yards with one touch back. He punted three times for a 42-yard average. PHOTOS BY BETH JONES/NEWS-LEADER Cam Miller hands off to Khamari Barks-dale, top left, and the two celebrate Barks-dale’s touchdown later in the game, right. Josiah Rauls moves in for a sack, above right. Brooks Rohe celebrates his TD, far right. Below from left, Kyle Lee, Ernest Cortez, Sincere Rogers and Josiah Rauls.

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The American Basketball Association and Nassau Pride announced the start of the 2020-21 season will be delayed until Jan. 2 instead of its original opening date of Nov. 7 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The pandemic forced the ABA to suspend operations on March 12, prior to the start of the postseason playoffs. The 13th-ranked Nassau Pride was looking to make a deep playoff push. The ABA plans to shorten the season and extend regular season play through mid-March. The league also plans to shorten the play-in rounds, and hold the Final Eight playoff games in Binghamton, N.Y., in mid-April. Full details of the restructured season will be announced in the upcoming months as it continues to monitor the pandemic. For infor-mation, visit www.nassaupride.com.r The First Coast Skating Academy at Jacksonville Ice & Sportsplex is now offering Learn to Skate classes for guests of all ages and skill levels. The classes take place twice a week, giving registrants the option of taking one or two classes per week. Jacksonville Ice also offers new participants the chance to try a Learn to Skate class for just $16. Face coverings are re-quired by all employees, instructors and guests while inside the building. Visit www.jacksonvilleice.com/learn-to-skate. Jacksonville Ice & Sports-plex is located at 3605 Philips Hwy. inside the San Marco East Business Park. Take Exit 347 off I-95 at Emerson.nn The Amelia Island Boules Club holds pétanque pickup games on the pétanque courts at Central Park, corner of Atlantic Avenue and South 11. Street, Saturdays at 9:30 a.m. and most afternoons on weekdays. Pétanque (pay-tonk) is a cousin of both horseshoes and bocce, the Italian bowling game. The public is always welcome. Call 491-1190.nn A new television show highlighting high school sports on the First Coast is airing on CW17 every Saturday morning. High School 9:12 Roundup, a 30-minute television show that airs each Saturday morning at 11:30 a.m., takes viewers inside the world of local high school athletics as well as on the sidelines for high school football games played on the First Coast. A re-air of the show is broadcast Sunday at midnight after each Sunday SportsZone on Channel 4 The Local Station. The show, hosted by local broadcast veteran Terry Norvelle and News4JAX Sports Editor Justin Barney, is recorded from a high school sporting event every week, including from the sidelines of a local high school foot-ball game each week during football season. The show will be about more than football. Reporter Kaley Whitehead takes viewers behind the scenes with features on every sport played on the high school scene on the First Coast, with features, interviews and sto-rylines you only see at the high school level. Visit JaxHighSchool912.com. Scheduled play at the pickleball courts at Central Park in Fernandina Beach has resumed. Beginner play (levels 1.0-2.5) is 3-4 p.m. Sunday; social play (3.0 plus with chal-lenge court) is from 4-6 p.m. Sunday. :RPHQ·VRSHQSOD\DOOOHYHOVRQFRXUWV 1-4 is from 8-10 a.m. Monday, and level 3.5 on courts 1, 5 and 6 from 4-6 p.m. Monday, with rating level 4.0 plus on courts 2-4. Levels 3.0 and 3.5 plus play from 8-10 a.m. Tuesday, and levels 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 from 10 a.m. to noon. Levels 3.0 and 3.5 plus with challenge court is from 4-6 p.m. Wednesday. 0HQ·VRSHQSOD\DOOOHYHOVRQFRXUWV is from 8-10 a.m. Nighttime social play (all lev-els) is from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday. Levels 3.0 and 3.5 plus is from 8-10 a.m. Friday, and levels 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 from 10 a.m. to noon. On Saturday, nighttime social play (all levels) is from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Visit www.fbpickleball.com, Fernandina Beach Pickleball Pirates on Facebook or email fbpbpirates@gmail.com.n The Amelia Island Sailing Club meets the first Tuesday of the month at the Kraft Athletic Club at Ten Acres, located off Buccaneer Trail. Social hour starts at 6:30 p.m., followed by a potluck dinner, business meeting and guest speaker presentation. Guests are wel-come. Current boat ownership or sailing skills are not prerequisites to joining. Club activities throughout the year may include day/overnight excursions by water and/or land, sailboat racing and social activi-ties as well as assisting with local conservation and environmental efforts in waters surround-ing Amelia Island. Visit www.ameliaislandsail-ingclub.wildapricot.org or email aisc@durel.net. n Senior league bowling is offered at 9:30 a.m. Wednesdays at the bowling alley off U.S. 17 in Yulee. The group also meets for Christian league at 6 p.m. Thursdays. The Nassau Sport Fishing Association holds its monthly business meetings on the second Wednesday of each month. The monthly social get-together is held on the fourth Wednesday of each month. The loca-tion for both meetings is Kraft Ten Acres, 961023 Buccaneer Trail, Fernandina Beach, Florida 32034. All are welcome to attend. The Nassau Sport Fishing Association, founded in 1983, is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit orga-nization, created to develop and promote salt-water fishing in the Nassau County area while adhering to state, federal and local regula-tions, to encourage compliance with the rules of water safety and to promote youth-related community and other civic-minded activities. Call 556-5531 or email info@nsfafish.net. Judy Stiber was crowned the October Queen of Tees for the Fernandina Beach Women’s Golf Association. She shot an impressive 76 to win the title. Low gross win-ners included Mary Poole, first; Stiber, second; and Vickie Galpin, third. Low net winners were Rachael Hentigan, first; Carol Anderson, second; and Barb Kratochvil, third.  The name of the game was “Aces Wild” as the Women’s Golf Association at the Amelia Island Club held its weekly play day on Thursday. The format placed an emphasis on putting, as each foursome’s score was based upon one better ball net of the team minus the number of players who scored a one-putt on each hole. In the A/B division, the firstplace winners were Betteanne Valick, Judy Schmonsees, Margaret Newton and Donna Sweet, with a final score of 32. The C/D division winners were Leslie Pierpont, Pete May, Cherie Billings and Dee Sullivan, finishing with a team score of 39. Notable low gross scores were recorded by Claudeen Lindberg (76), Melonie Murphy (83) and Valick (84). Single birdies were recorded by Sweet, Laurie Scinto, Valick, Schmonsees and Pierpont, while Lindberg recorded two birdies on her scorecard. Chip-ins were recorded by Lindberg and Billings, and Lindberg earned the only sandie. Dean Grunewald, director of member golf, led an informative and instructional clinic for the nine-hole division prior to their play day. The emphasis was on consistent ball position during setup along with good posture and balance in attaining a full golf swing. Members who attended the clinic were Lynn Freitag, Diane O’Malley, Pat Henderson, Gayle Howard, Peggy Kolasa and Judith Pines. Utilizing that knowledge on the golf course, the nine-hole winners were teammates O’Malley, Kolasa, Howard and Nancy Reidy.  A charity golf tournament to benefit the Collin Helms Memorial Scholarship Fund will be held Oct. 26 at the Amelia River Golf Club. Practices start at 10 a.m., and the shotgun start is at 11 a.m. This charity event is being organized by the Fernandina Beach Babe Ruth League and the Helms Family. The scholar-ship fund will benefit a college-bound senior chosen by Jon Shave, head baseball coach at Fernandina Beach High School. Format is a four-person scramble, and the cost is $125 per person or $400 per team. Lunch is included. The day’s event will conclude with an awards ceremony at 5 p.m. Hole sponsorships are available at $100 per hole or $150 for two holes. There will also be a silent auction with golf pack-ages, equipment and apparel. For registration or information, contact Michelle Seder at Michelleseder@gmail.com.  The Nassau County Sheriff’s Office and NCSO Charities are sponsoring the sixth annual Sheriff’s Golf Tournament on Oct. 23 at the Amelia National Golf and Country Club, 95211 SUBMITTED PHOTOS All of the players who competed in the Amelia River Golf Club’s ladies pink ball tourna-ment dressed in pink, above. Below, winners included, from left, Eileen Flynn, Laurie Bruner, Susan Kaye and Claudeen Lindberg. feraiaeaclfclcm & Easter Eg Ht YUC46441S UN DAYAPRIL 5 th 0am BRUNCH 2pm EG GHUNT RSVP in te Restarat r Call 9 Reseratis Reqested ADULTS | $ CHILDREN2 &UNDER ‡%LOO0HOWRQ5G )HUQDQGLQD%HDFK)/ IHUQDQGLQDEHDFKJROIFOXEFRP Cabin Fever? GET OUT OF THE HOUSE AND 21727+(&2856( 7LPHWRJHWRXWLQWKHIUHVKDLU IHUQDQGLQDEHDFKJROIFOXEFRP IHUQDQGLQDEHDFKJROIFOXEFRP IHUQDQGLQDEHDFKJROIFOXEFRP IHUQDQGLQDEHDFKJROIFOXEFRP IHUQDQGLQDEHDFKJROIFOXEFRP IHUQDQGLQDEHDFKJROIFOXEFRP IHUQDQGLQDEHDFKJROIFOXEFRP Book Online! MONDAY FRIDAY Includes: 18 Holes and Cart Open – 1:001:00 – Close $ 45 $ 29 r ­ SUBMITTED The 18-hole Ladies Group Association at the Golf Club of Amelia Island held its two-week handicap tournament on Oct. 8 and Thursday. Sue Lansdell was the overall winner with a two-day net score of 146. First flight winners were Linda Larabee, first place with a score of 151; and Sue Riegler, second, 152. Second flight winners were Janet Woodward, first, 152 (scorecard playoff); and Emily Gordon, second, 152. Pictured are, from left, Riegler, Larabee, Lansdell, Woodward and Gordon. Stiber­nThe Women’s Golf Association at the Amelia River Golf Club recently held a pink ball tournament in recognition of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Each team had a pink ball that was rotated among the players in the foursome. The score of the player with the pink ball on the hole counted in addition to one other player’s score. If a team finished with the pink ball, two strokes were deducted from the team score. If a team lost the pink ball, that team had two strokes added to its score. The winning team, with a score of 136, included Claudeen Lindberg, Susan Kaye, Laurie Bruner and Eileen Flynn. Second place went to Melinda McGrath, Leslie Geiger, Pam Gilles and Jayne Paige, with a score of 138. Closest-to-the-pin winners Janie Ramsay, No. 4; Shauna Snyder, No. 7; Laurie Bruner, No. 12; and Leslie Geiger, No. 17. €n GOLF Continued on 4B

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sremotsucemoS.hsaCsunoBliateRESdnahsaCsunoByratiliM ,hsaCsunoBlatipaCrelsyrhCES,hsaCsunoBliateRemirP-no NES,hsaCremusnoCliateRretneCssenisuBESedulcniyameci rP .ecitontuohtiwegnahcottcejbuserasnoitacificepsdnase cirpllA.seefrehtoroeefrelaed,eltit,gat,xatedulcnito nodsecirP.sevitnecniro/dnasetaberlanoitiddarofyfila uqyam Stock #9140 464037 State Rd. 200 , Yulee, FL 904-277-6969 2020 JEEP GLADIATOR Now In Stock Don’t Wait! Stock #9431 Davis Price MSRP $28,360 JEEP CHEROKEE LATITUDE 2019 22,838 $ $ $ 22,838 Davis Price 35,746 $ $ $ 35,746 MSRP $43,870 2019 RAM 1500 CLASSIC TRADESMAN m o c . r j d c s i v a d . w w w Stock #9426 DavisPrice MSRP $44,275 40,284 $ $ $ 40,284 2019 4x4 TRADESMAN 2500 CREW CAB J u s t m i n u t e s a w a y o n A 1 A ! MSRP $44,985 NEW JEEP UNLIMITEDWRANGLER SAHARA 4X4 Davis Price 39,985 $ $ $ 39,985 J u s t m i n u t e s a w a y o n A 1 A ! sremoscemo.saCsoBliaeREasaCsoByrailiM,saCsoBlaiaCre lsyrCE,saCsoBliaeRemirP-oNE,saCremsoCliaeRreeCsseis BEelciyamecirP .eciooiwegacocejserasoiacificesasecirllA.seefreoroe efrelae,eli,ga,aelcioosecirP.sevieciro/aseaerlaoiia rofyfilayam Stock #9140 464037 State Rd. 200 , Yulee, FL 904-277-6969 2020 JEEP GLADIATOR Now In Stock Don’t Wait! Stock #9431 Davis Price MSRP $28,360 JEEP CHEROKEE LATITUDE 2019 22,838 $ $ $ 22,838 Davis Price 35,746 $ $ $ 35,746 MSRP $43,870 2019 RAM 1500 CLASSIC TRADESMAN m o c . r j d c s i v a d . w w w Stock #9426 DavisPrice MSRP $44,275 40,284 $ $ $ 40,284 2019 4x4 TRADESMAN 2500 CREW CAB J u s t m i n u t e s a w a y o n A 1 A ! MSRP $44,985 NEW JEEP UNLIMITEDWRANGLER SAHARA 4X4 Davis Price 39,985 $ $ $ 39,985 J u s t m i n u t e s a w a y o n A 1 A ! “Serving the community for over 25 years.” Angelo Fanelli MSRP $ 48,115 Davis Discount -$9,444 Bonus & Incentives NOW ONLY 2020 RAM 1500 BIG HORN CREW CAB Davis Price $ 38,671 $ 38,671 * Stock #20468 2020 WRANGLER SPORT 4X4 MSRP $ 37,075 Davis Discount-$1,713 Bonus & Incentives Davis Price $ 35,362 $ 35,362 * Just Minutes Away On A1A 2020 DODGE CHALLENGER R/T COUPE MSRP $ 42,770 -$6,353 Davis Disc., Bonus & Incentives Davis Price $ 36,417 $ 36,417 * 2020 CHRYSLER PACIFICA TOURING L PASSENGER VAN MSRP $ 42,710 -$4,000 Davis Discount Davis Price $ 38,710 $ 38,710 * Stock #20269 Stock #20405 Stock #20141 Bonus & Incentives NOW ONLY NOW ONLY NOW ONLY NOW ONLY NOW ONLY NOW ONLY NOW ONLY NOW ONLY BIG HORN CREW CAB Davis Price 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 38,671 Stock #20468

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The city of Fernandina Beach Parks & Recreation Department offers the follow ing programs and activities. Visit visit www.fbfl.us. ‡3HFN*\PLVQRZIXOO\ open. The cardio area, weight room and basketball/volleyball court opened Friday, and all sports activities are restored to their normal days and times. ‡$WODQWLFNLGGLHSRROFORVHV Nov. 1 for the season. ‡2SHQDGXOWYROOH\EDOO DW3HFN*\P7XHVGD\VDQGFridays from 7-9 p.m. Informal team games on two courts. Teams selected each night. $JHVDQGXSDJHVDQG17 must have parental consent form signed by parents and notarized before participating). Cost is $2/day for city resi dents, $5 non-city. ‡
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W hen the wind is howling from the Northeast, many savvy local fishermen drop their anchor in Cumberland Sound, where fishing is excellent year round. A wide variety of structures, including jetty rocks, oyster bars, rocky shoreline and deep hard bottoms, attract a variety of saltwater game fish all year. “Cumberland Sound offers excellent black drum fishing during the spring, summer and fall fishing seasons,” Capt. Tony Peeples said. “One of my favorite black drum drops is located just a few hundred yards off Fort Clinch, where a good hard bottom attracts black and red drum. Fishermen will need a good anchor to hold on the hard bottom, as there is always a good current running too.” Most fishermen fish for black drum with a piece of blue crab, conch or fresh shrimp on the bottom. In many cases, it will also take an eight-ounce weight to hold your bait on the bottom when a good current is running. Flounder fishing is also excellent in Cumberland Sound, particularly close to the jetty rocks that protect the shoreline at Fort Clinch as well as the rocky shoreline at the mouth of Egans Creek. Skilled flounder fishermen will often target the high outgoing tide while cast net-ting finger mullet schooling at small creek mouth further up in Egans Creek. Once a few dozen finger mullet have been secured, live finger mullet are rigged with a fish finder setup and slowly retrieved along the rocky bottom at the mouth of this fishy creek. The fish finder setup includes an 18-inch length of 20-pound flourocarbon shack leader with a No. 2 kahle hook tied to the business end. A one-ounce egg weight is then attached to the main line fol-lowed by a plastic bead and a small two-way swivel. The shock leader and hook are then tied to the remaining side of the swivel. Finally, a finger mullet is barbed through the bottom of the mouth and out through the top and retrieved slowly along the bottom. When a flounder picks up your live finger mullet, do not set the hook. Foraging flounder will typically chew on the mul-let first before moving back into their mouth. Then, set the hook. Shark fishing is excellent all year round in Cumberland Sound for a variety of pelagic sharks. Right now the dusky sharks are spawning and offer-ing a good fight, especially for young anglers. Grayson Reed was recently fishing in Cumberland Sound on the bottom with large chunks of fish when a large fish took his barbed bait. After setting the hook, the battle lasted over an hour with the thoughts that Grayson may have hooked into a large stingray. However, his catch turned out to be a six-foot dusky shark that was soon released. rr F ERNANDINA B EACH T IDES T ides, Sun & Moo n : October 21 October 28, 2020 Sat. 10/24 Sun. 10/25 Mon. 10/26 Tues. 10/27Fri.10/23Thur.10/22Wed.10/28 Sunrise 7:33AMoonrise 12:63PSunset 6:47PMoonset 11:09PWed.10/21 High 12:45A 7.71’Low 6:32A 1.39’ High 1:25P 8.63’ Low 7:25P 1.80’ Sunrise 7:33AMoonrise 1:50PSunset 6:46PMoonset --P Moonset 12:08ASunrise 7:34AFirst Qtr. 9:24A Moonrise 2:39PSunset 6:45P High 1:38A 7.40’ Low 7:29A 1.80’ High 2:21P 8.27’Low 8:26P 2.11’ High 2:34A 7.17’ Low 8:32A 2.14’ High 3:20P 8.27’Low 9:28P 2.28’ High 3:33A 7.06’ Low 9:37A 2.34’ High 4:20P 7.79’Low 10:27P 2.31’ Moonset 2:07ASunrise 7:35AMoonrise 3:59PSunset 6:43P High 4:35A 7.11’ Low 10:39A 2.41’ High 5:18P 7.73’Low 11:20P 2.24’ Moonset 3:05ASunrise 7:36AMoonrise 4:32PSunset 6:52P High 5:34A 7.28’ Low 11:36A 2.41’ High 6:11P 7.76’Low --P --’ Moonset 4:00ASunrise 7:37AMoonrise 5:03PSunset 6:41PTide calculations are for Amelia River, Fernandina Beach. No corrections are necessary. Sun & Moon events are also calculated for Fernandina Beach, although actual times may vary because of land masses.Low 12:54A 1.98’ High 7:16A 7.80’ Low 1:18P 2.27’High 7:41P 7.84’ Low 12:09A 2.12’ High 6:28A 7.53’ Low 12:29P 2.36’High 6:58P 7.81’ Moonset 4:54ASunrise 7:37AMoonrise 5:31PSunset 6:40P Moonset 1:08ASunrise 7:34AMoonrise 3:22PSunset 6:44P Paying too much money for your business insurance? Simpler, smarter business insurance. We come to your business for personalized service to save you both time and money. We make insurance easy. 904-388-6446 Easy to Install Easy Storage Light Weight Translucent Also available: Replacement Windows and Siding Call for FREE Estimate: (904) 237-3836 FABRIC HURRICANE SHUTTER PHOTOS BY TERRY LACOSS/SPECIAL A rocky shoreline in Cumberland Sound and at the mouth of Egans Creek affords for excellent flounder fishing.Stephen Campbell, left, prepares to release a huge red drum he recently caught while fishing a deep drop-off in Cumberland Sound. Grayson Reed, right, tussled for an hour with this six-foot dusky shark in the deep waters of Cumberland Sound. A deep drop-off with a hard bottom in Cumberland Sound offers excellent black drum fishing just off historic Fort Clinch. Cumberland Sound fishermen can expect to catch a variety of sharks while fishing some of the deep drop-offs, including dusky, bull, lemon, nurse, bonnethead and ham-merhead. Shark fishing on the bottom with large chunks of fish is the best tactic. Use a cable or heavy monofilament leader of 100-pound test or more. Cumberland Sound also offers excellent sea trout and red fishing along the oyster-laden shores of Tiger Island. The last of the incoming and the first of the outgoing tides are best while fishing with live finger mullet or shrimp under a popping cork. If you just wish to catch fish for dinner, whiting fishing is excellent in Cumberland Sound while fishing on the bottom with fresh shrimp. One of the better areas in Cumberland Sound for catching whiting is the deep waters at the first Navy tower. Fishing on the bottom with fresh shrimp will also catch bluefish, ladyfish and croaker and offers great family fishing action. Chip Davis is holding the ever-popular annual Flounder Pounder Tournament on Saturday. The event benefits autism and attracts a lot of flounder fishermen and spon-sors. Last year, Adam Grimes took top prize with his 8.55pound flounder; Tom Wheeler took top aggregate with 16.76 pounds; Alex Morrison was top lady angler with 5.38 pounds; and Gavin Altman was top junior angler with 2.43 pounds. For information on the tournament, visit www.flounder-pounderjax.com.

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r n r r r rnn P eople who love dogs are special people. I had a chance to catch up with a friend, Jacki McDonald, who truly loves dogs and has spent much of her personal and professional life advocating for them. Her current project is focused on senior dogs, the ones so often overlooked when it comes to adopting a pet. Jacki was a rescue coor dinator, director of develop ment/head of fundraising and executive director of a shelter in Atlanta before relocating to Fernandina Beach to lead the Nassau Humane Society on Amelia Island. No longer with the Humane Society, she cur rently freelances full-time as a social media consultant and ani mal welfare lead contributor. As we sipped our coffee and caught up, she shared a story about the dog that changed her life, that special kind of dog that they make movies about. The dog’s name? Fizzle, after a character on The Simpsons . She describes a time in her life when she could not have been lower and found herself with a 3-year-old black and tan mixed-breed dog with one ear folded down that needed her as much as she needed him. She shared, “That hand some boy got me out into the fresh air regularly, radiated pure joy when I came home from a stress ful work day and was the best listener in the world.” To say they bonded is an under statement. It was devastating news when 10-year-old Fizzle was diagnosed with a severe heart murmur. Thus began two and a half years of cardiologist visits and medications, but his heart continued to deteriorate. Jacki was beyond heartbroken when he passed and could not imagine replacing her incredible Fizzle. Still, she longed to have a dog in her life again. Volunteering at Nassau County Animal Services in Yulee, she noticed a white-faced, clearly senior dog that sat silently peering out from his small steel cage. All of the other visitors were focused on the younger and highly energetic dogs in kennels around him. Jacki took the old dog out of the cage and assessed that he was not in good shape. He was miss ing hair, had no front teeth and his medical records indicated he had multiple BBs lodged throughout his body. On top of all that, he was heartworm posi tive. Yet, she has never looked back from her instant decision to take him home. Walter, the name she select ed because he looked like a dis tinguished elder, found a happy home and the care he so desper ately needed. He grew healthier and happier every day and now is a local community celeb rity! He appears on Facebook enjoying his outings around Fernandina with Jacki, curled up with his vast collection of toys or staring at his food dish, hop ing for extra snacks. Whether it is stopping at Redbones for some treats or lounging on one of the many downtown restau rant patios, Walter greets every one as though it’s the best day of his life, every single day! Walter is not the only senior dog who has ended up in a shelter, as it is sadly common as owners move or their older dog becomes an inconvenience. That is why Jacki is working to create a safety net for these elder pets, one dog at a time. She is in the process of applying for a state license and 501(c)(3) to launch the “Fizzle Farm for Senior Dogs” to provide older dogs the same care she gave her beloved Fizzle to keep his legacy alive. She is currently identifying senior dogs that could benefit from the same loving care that Walter is enjoying. If the dogs need veterinary care or heart worm treatment, her nonprofit will take care of the expenses. Jacki hopes her fellow neigh bors and friends will consider opening their homes to senior dogs in our local shelters so that their final days are filled with joy and comfort. Jacki encourages people to get in touch with her if they love old dogs and have a story to share or want to help via DICKIE ANDERSON/FOR THE NEWS-LEADER Walter is a senior dog who was stuck in a local shelter whose life changed after being adopted. r n email at TheFizzleFarm@gmail.com or follow on Instagram @Fizzle_Farm_For_Senior_Dogs. To receive her weekly newslet ter or get information about her books, including her four From the Porch books, contact Dickie at dickie.anderson@gmail.com. T he Amelia Island Jazz Festival swung through its online virtual shows this month with searing jazz that thrilled hundreds of fans locally, nationally, and in several foreign countries, including Russia and Romania, according to a news release. “We could not be more pleased,” AIJF Artistic Director Les DeMerle said in the release. “It was definitely a technical challenge, but given the terrific support of our Board Of Directors, volunteers, wonderful musicians, and a bank of computers, we proudly pulled it off.” “A Salute to the Duke” on Friday, Oct. 9, celebrated the music of Duke Ellington and fea tured The Dynamic Les DeMerle Quartet with vocalist Bonnie Eisele, multi-instrumentalist Dr. Bill Prince, Doug Matthews on piano, Ernie Ealum playing bass, and DeMerle performing on drums. The show began with a swinging instru mental arrangement by bassist Ray Brown of “It Don’t Mean a Thing If It Ain’t Got That Swing,” then rolled through a pair of Ellington classics, “Cotton Tail” and “In a Mellow Tone,” before Eisele took the stage and added vocals for “Take the A Train,” “Satin Doll,” “Beginning to See the Light,” and a sultry rendition of “I Got It Bad and That Ain’t Good.” DeMerle then introduced the Festival’s 2020 scholarship winner, drummer Janae Yates, a 2020 graduate of Douglas Anderson School Of The Arts in Jacksonville who is attending Florida State University. Yates replaced DeMerle on drums for a poly-rhythmic take on “Perdido.” Matthews showed off his piano dexterity with a blazing “C-Jam Blues” after which Ealum pulled out his bow to play a melodic “Sophisticated Lady” on his upright bass. The band then rocked the house with a rousing “Caravan” that featured a distinctive and powerful drum solo by DeMerle. Saturday’s headliner, trumpeter Longineu Parsons, sat in with the group for “Things Ain’t What They Used To Be,” during which they segued in and out of Ruth Brown’s “Mama, You Treat Your Daughter Mean,” a tune penned by Jacksonville songwriter Charlie “Hoss” Singleton. DeMerle presented a tribute to two AIJF favorites, saxophonist Richie Cole and guitarist Dan Voll, both of whom passed away recently, and Eisele sang the Cole classic “New York Afternoon” as a dedication to the two musi cians. A vocal version of “It Don’t Mean a Thing If It Ain’t Got That Swing” led into the evening’s final song, Ray Charles’ “Get On The Right Track, Baby,” with DeMerle handling vocals backed by Eisele and Yates, recreating the gospel sound of the Raelettes. “To Satchmo With Love” on Saturday, Oct. 10, paid tribute to the music of one of jazz’s gifted originators, Louis Armstrong, and featured Parsons along with The Dynamic Les DeMerle Quartet, comprised of the same line-up as above except for Prince. A classically trained trum peter, Parsons is well known for his Armstrong interpretations, and he showed off a mastery of Satchmo’s style, both on trumpet and vocally, according to the release, noting, “Not only did he nail the Armstrong delivery, but he injected his own intricate riffs that added to the fun.” Beginning with an up tempo rendition of “Back Home Again in Indiana,” the band reeled off “near definitive takes” on Armstrong staples including “Basin Street Blues,” “Tin Roof Blues,” “St. James Infirmary,” “Do You Know What It Means to Miss New Orleans” with vocals by Eisele, the obligatory “Hello Dolly,” “Black And Blue,” and “I’ll Be Glad When You’re Dead You Rascal You” that featured “a hilarious intro duction” by Parsons, who also provoked laughs with his suggestive tune, “The S.O.L. Blues” and followed with Armstrong’s big hit, “What A Wonderful World.” Eisele returned to sing “Alright, Okay, You Win” with DeMerle and the show concluded with a medley of traditional Crescent City second line gems, “Bourbon Street Parade” and “When the Saints Go Marching In.” Then, the WJCT Electro Lounge Jazz Brunch radio program presented highlights of the Amelia Island Jazz Festival over the past 17 years on Sunday, Oct. 11. Compiled and narrated by DeMerle, the highlights included David Sanborn, Ramsey Lewis, Nestor Torres, Houston Person, Delfeayo Marsalis, Bria Skonberg, and the Les DeMerle Band. “We had a grand time keeping the Festival alive virtually, but we look forward to hopefully getting back in front of live audiences in 2021,” said DeMerle. “We’ll keep you posted and keep swinging!” A not-for-profit 501(c)(3) corporation, the Les DeMerle Amelia Island Jazz Festival, distributes proceeds toward a scholarship program to fund college education for aspiring jazz musicians. For more information, visit ameliaislandjazzfestival.com. SUBMITTED PHOTOS Longineu Parsons, center, sat in with Friday’s group for “Things Ain’t What They Used To Be,” during which they segued in and out of Ruth Brown’s “Mama, You Treat Your Daughter Mean,” a tune penned by Jacksonville songwriter Charlie “Hoss” Singleton. Parsons returned Saturday, Oct. 10, to add his legendary trumpet playing to the Festival’s salute to Louis Armstrong. Les DeMerle, left, was joined by drummer Janae Yates, right, winner of the Jazz Festival’s 2020 scholarship who now attends Florida State University. Yates replaced DeMerle on drums for a poly-rhythmic take on “Perdido.” From left, Parsons, DeMerle, Eisele, and Yates also played “Do You Know What It Means to Miss New Orleans” with vocals by Eisele, the obligatory “Hello Dolly,” “Black And Blue,” and “I’ll Be Glad When You’re Dead You Rascal You.” Vocalist Bonnie Eisele joined The Dynamic Les DeMerle Quartet for the Friday, Oct. 9, headlining show that paid tribute to Duke Ellington. She sang “Take the A Train,” “Satin Doll,” and a sultry rendition of “I Got It Bad and That Ain’t Good.”

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Easy to Install Easy Storage Light Weight Translucent Also available: Replacement Windows and Siding Call for FREE Estimate: (904) 237-3836 FABRIC HURRICANE SHUTTER NL/PSA Nassau County resident Beverly Lawrence was recently awarded the North American Invasive Species Management Association’s Special Recognition Award, according to a news release. The award goes to an orga nization or individual who, through a specific act or group of acts, helps amplify NAISMA’s mission “to support, promote, and empower invasive species prevention and management in North America.” Lawrence has spurred out reach and volunteer efforts with many agency partners, including the city of Fernandina Beach, the UF/IFAS Nassau Extension, Florida Invasive Species Partnership, First Coast Invasive Working Group, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, and community members. “These efforts are particu larly important for the Brazilian peppertree and Russian Thistle,” the release explains. “Amelia Island is on the northern edge of Brazilian Pepper’s current range and eradication on the island is possible with pub lic support. Given the current extent of Russian thistle on Amelia Island’s beaches, with dedicated volunteer work, it may also be possible to eradicate this species from the island as well. Bev helped organize commu nity work days on the beaches to remove Russian thistle and participates regularly in the City’s efforts to control invasive plant species. Her efforts have increased awareness of invasives and their impacts on natural areas.” If you would like to participate in future invasive plant control events, contact Kathy Russell in the Fernandina Beach Parks & Recreation Department at krus sell@fbfl.org SUBMITTED The Princess Amelia Chapter Colonial Dames of the XVII Century gathered around a legacy tree at Egans Creek Park on a recent Saturday morning to honor Vice President Lucinda Jo “Cindy” Glenn, according to a news release. The legacy tree dedication ceremony was held on the one-year anniversary of her death. Standing in front of the Glenn Legacy Tree are, left to right, Jane Collins, Cara Curtin, Florida State Society Colonial Dames of the XVII Century Registrar Jean Mann, Princess Amelia Chapter President Sherry Harrell, Teresa Reynolds, Rumsey Young, Joanne Templeton, Vice President Sheila Carlin, Fernandina Beach City Manager Dale Martin, Chapter Registrar Lisa Bauer, Past President Georgia Murray, Recording Secretary Faith Varrasse, and prospective member Claudia Naugle. The historical marker denoting the park as the original site of the Egmont Plantation that appears in the background was erected under Glenn’s leadership as regent of the Amelia Island Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution, with research provided by Naugle, the chapter’s historian. Colonial Dames XVII Century is a national, lineage-based organi-zation of women with documented ancestors living in the country before 1701. Its primary mission is the preservation of historic sites and records, promotion of heraldry and coats of arms, support of charitable projects, and the education of the nation’s children. SUBMITTED Pictured are Florida Invasive Species Partnership Coordinator Emily Bell from the University of Florida/IFAS and Beverly Lawrence, who has been recognized for her work to help remove invasive species from Amelia Island. rn Barnabas Center was recently recognized with achievement of a four-star rating from Charity Navigator, America’s premier charity evaluator, according to a news release. Four stars is the highest rating possible, demon strating strong fiscal health and commitment to accountability and transparency. Barnabas has received the four-star evaluation for 14 con secutive years. Only 1% of rated charities nationwide achieve this status, “indicating that Barnabas Center outperforms most other charities in America,” the release says. Wanda Lanier, president and CEO of Barnabas Center, said in the release, “We are very proud to receive the cov eted four-star rating by Charity Navigator, which is indicative of the focus our Board and staff gives to being accountable for the financial and other resources donated or granted to Barnabas. We take very seriously our role as the major safety net organi zation for people in need in our community, serving as good stewards of the resources that are entrusted to us to carry out our mission.” “This exceptional designa tion from Charity Navigator sets Barnabas Center apart from its peers and demonstrates to the public its trustworthiness,” Michael Thatcher, president and CEO of Charity Navigator, also stated in the release. For more information about Barnabas’ programs, visit the Barnabas website at BarnabasNassau.org. SUBMITTED First Port City Bank and local marketing promotional vendor Island Promos recently partnered to donate more than 500 T-shirts to Emma Love Hardee Elementary School students and teachers for the school’s annual Boosterthon, a dance fitness challenge for 2020. Pictured from left are ELH Assistant Principal Ashley Clark, First Port Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer Michael Brooks, First Port Florida Division President Durand Childers, and ELH Principal Rebecca Smith. r r We’ve Moved Local News Sports Classifieds Advertising Local Events Schools COVID News Come by our new location to place a classified or retail ad, drop off news items, purchase a subscription or say HI! 1235 South 10th Street (Corner of 10th and Lime Streets) 9042613696 online at fbnewsleader.com Proudly serving the citizens and businesses of Nassau County since 1854!

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?? W , O 21, 2020/N ws-Leader?? LEGAL NOTICES NO TI CE OF IN TE NT ION TO CO NSIDER E NACTM ENT OF AN OR DI NANC E NO TI CE I S HE RE BY G IV EN th at t he N as sa u Co un ty P la nni ng a nd Z on in g Bo ar d will co nduc t a public hea ri ng o n Th ur sd ay , N ov em be r 5 , 2020 at 6 :00p m or s oo n th erea ft er as t he m at te r to b e hea rd r ega rd in g th e pr op os ed O rd ina nce. Th e pu bl ic hea ri ng will b e hel d at t he J am es S . Pa ge G ov er nmen ta l Co mpl ex , 9 6 135 N as sa u Pl ac e, Yu le e, Flo ri da 32097. A lso , t he Na ss au C ou nt y Bo ar d of Co un ty C om mi ss io ner s will co nduc t a public hea ri ng o n De ce mb er 14 , 2 02 0 at 6:00p m or s oo n t herea ft er a s th e ma tt er t o be h ea rd r ega rd in g th e pr op os ed O rd ina nce. T he p ublic hea ri ng will be hel d at t he Ja me s S. P ag e Go ve rn me nt al C om pl ex , 96135 N as sa u Pl ac e , Y ulee, Fl or ida 32097. OR DI NANC E 2 020 AN O RD IN ANC E OF T HE BO AR D OF C OU NT Y CO MMI SSI ON ER S OF N AS SA U CO UN TY , FL OR ID A , A ME ND IN G AR TI CL E 12 O F TH E LA ND D EVEL OP ME NT C OD E, R ES ID EN TI AL GE NE RA L1 (R G1) ; SP EC IF ICA LL Y SE CT IO N 12.06, B UI LD IN G RE ST RI CT IO NS ; AM EN DIN G AR TI CL E 12A O F TH E LA ND DE VELO PM EN T CO DE R ES IDE NT IA L GE NE RA L1 , A ME RI CA N BE AC H (R G1A B) ; SP EC IFIC AL LY S EC TI ON 12A .0 6, B UI LD IN G RE ST RI CTI ON S; A ME ND IN G AR TI CL E 13 O F TH E LA ND D EVEL OP ME NT C OD E, R ES ID EN TI AL GE NE RA L2 (R G2) ; SP EC IF ICA LL Y SE C TIO NS 13.04, M INIMU M LO T RE QU IR EMEN TS AND 13.06, B UI LD IN G RE ST RI CT IO NS ; AM EN DI NG A RT IC LE 20 OF T HE LA ND D EV EL OP ME NT C OD E, IN DU ST RI AL W AR EH OU SE ( IW ); SP EC IFIC AL LY S EC TI ON S 20.06 , MI NI MU M YA RD R EQ UI RE ME NT S AND 20.07, B UI LD IN G RE ST RI CT IO NS ; A ME ND IN G AR TI CL E 21 O F TH E LA ND D EV EL OPME NT C OD E, I ND US TR IA L HE AV Y (I H) ; SP EC IFIC AL LY SE CT IO NS 21. 06 , MI NI MU M YA RD R EQ UI RE ME NT S AND 21.07, B UI LD IN G RE ST RI CT IO NS ; AN D AM EN DI NG A RT IC LE 2 4 OF T HE L AN D DE VE LO PM EN T CO DE , RE CR EA TI ON AND OP EN S PA CE ( RO S) ; A DD IN G SE CT IO NS 24. 07 A ND 24.08 , BU IL DI NG R ES TR ICTI ON S; P RO VI DI NG F OR F IN DI NG S ; P RO VI DI NG F OR S EVER AB ILIT Y; AN D PR OV IDIN G AN E FFE CTI VE D AT E. Al l in te re st ed p ar ti es a re in vi te d to a tt end t he p ublic he ar in gs a nd t o be h ea rd . Co pies o f th e pr opos ed O rd ina nc e an d su ppo rt in g info rma ti on a re a vailabl e fo r insp ec ti on i n th e De pa rt m ent of P lanni ng a nd E co no mi c O ppo rt un ity , 9 6 161 N as sa u Pl ace , Y ul ee , F L 32097. Co mm ent s ma y al so b e di re ct ed in w ri ti ng t o th e De pa rt m ent of P lanni ng a nd E co no mi c O ppo rt un it y, e -m aile d to plan ning in fo @n a ssa ucounty fl.c om , o r re ceiv ed b y te leph on e at ( 9 04) 530-6300. Al l co mm ent s will b ec om e pa rt of t he r ec or d in t hi s ma tte r an d su bjec t to F lo ri da s public re co rd s law. 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Th e Pl an ning a nd Z on in g Bo ar d an d th e Bo ar d of Co un ty C om mi ss io ner s ma y co nt inue h ea ri ng s on t hi s ma tt er . FN L 2T 1021-28-2020 #605207 NO TI CE OF IN TE NT ION TO CO NSIDER EN ACTM EN T OF OR DI NANC E NO TI CE i s hereb y give n th at t he B oa rd o f Co un ty Co mm is si o ner s of N as sa u Co un ty , Fl or ida, a t a Re gu la r m eet in g to b e he ld o n We dnes day , t he 2 8 th d ay o f Oc to ber , 2020 a t 9:00 A .M ., o r as s oon t he re af te r as t he ma tt er m ay b e hea rd , at t he Na ss au C ou nt y Em er ge nc y Op er at io ns C enter , 7 7 150 C it iz ens C ir cle, Y ul ee , Flor ida, i nt end s to c on si de r fo r ad op ti on t he f ollo wi ng p ro po se d or di na nce: OR DI NAN CE N O . 2020 -2 6 AN O RD IN ANC E OF T HE BO AR D OF C OU NT Y CO MMI SSI ON ER S OF N AS SA U CO UN TY , FL OR ID A, A ME ND IN G OR DI NA NC E NO . 2 020-26 C RE AT IN G TH E AM ER IC AN B EA CH WA TE R AN D SE WE R DI ST RI CT , SP EC IFIC AL LY S EC TI ON 5 , AD VI SO RY B OA RD S AN D PR OVI DI NG A N E FFE CT IV E DA TE . Co pies o f th e Or di na nc e ar e availabl e at t he C le rk 's O ffi ce a t t he Robe rt M . F os te r Ju st ic e C enter , l oc at ed a t 76347 V et er an s Wa y, Y ulee , Fl or ida, M on da y th ro ug h Fr iday , 8 :3 0 a. m. t hr ou gh 5 :0 0 p.m ., e xc ep t le gal ho liday s. TH E PU BL IC I S IN VI TE D TO B E PR ESEN T AN D BE H EA RD . I F A PE RS ON D EC ID ES T O AP PE AL AN Y DE CI SI ON M AD E BY T HE BO AR D, A GE NC Y OR C OM MI SS IO N WI TH R ES PE CT T O AN Y MA TTE R CO NS ID ER ED A T SU CH M EE TI NG O R HE AR IN G, HE O R SH E WI LL N EE D A RE CO RD O F TH E PR OC EED IN GS , AN D TH AT , FO R SU CH PU RP OS E , H E OR S HE M AY NE ED T O EN SU RE T HA T A VE RBA TI M RE CO RD O F TH E PR OC EED IN GS I S MA DE , W HI CH RE CO RD I NC LU DE S TH E TE ST IMO NY A ND E VI DE NC E UP ON WH IC H TH E AP PE AL I S TO B E BA SE D. T he Bo ar d of C ou nt y Co mmi ss io ne rs m ay c on ti nu e he ar in gs o n th is m at te r. AT TE ST : BO AR D OF C OU NT Y CO MMI SS IO NE RS O F NA SS AU C OU NT Y, F LO RI DA BY : s / D AN IE L B . L EE PE R It s : C ha ir ma n /s/ J OH N A. C RA WF OR D It s : E xOf fi ci o Cl er k In di vi dual s wi th d is abilit ie s n eed in g a re as on able a cco mm od at io n to p ar ti cipa te in t hi s pr oc eedin g sh ou ld co nt ac t th e O ffi ce o f th e Ex O ffi ci o Cl er k to t he B oa rd o f Co un ty C om mi ss io ner s at le as t tw o da ys p ri or t o th e pr oc ee ding a t (9 04) 53061 00 , or , if t he hea ri ng i mp ai re d, or , if t he hea ri ng i mp ai re d, Fl or id a Re la y Se rv ic e at 1 -8 00 955-877 0 (v ) or 1 -8 009 558771 (T DD ). NF L 2T 1014-21-2020 #603548 IN THE CI RC UIT COUR T FOR TH E FOUR TH JUDICIAL CI RC UIT IN AND FOR NA SSAU COUN TY , FLORIDA CIRC UIT CI VI L DI VISION CAS E NO.: 19CA000504A XY X VA ND ER BI LT M OR TG AG E AND FI NANC E , I NC . Pl aint iff( s) , vs . AM AN DA L . T IN KE R; R OB ER T E. TI NK ER ; PO RT FO LI O RE CO VE RY A SS OCI AT ES , L LC ; De fend an t( s) NO TI CE O F FO RE CL OS UR E SA LE NO TI CE I S HE RE BY G IV EN TH AT , p ur su an t to P lain ti ff' s Fi na l Judg me nt o f Fo re clos ur e en te re d on S epte mb er 21, 2020 i n th e ab ov ecapt io ned ac ti on , t he C le rk o f Co ur t will se ll t o th e highes t an d be st bidde r fo r ca sh a t www. na ssa ucle rk .r ealf or eclo se .c om i n acco rd an ce wit h Ch ap te r 45, Fl or id a St at ut es o n th e 5t h da y of N ov em ber , 2 02 0 at 11:30 AM o n th e fo llo wi ng d esc ri be d pr op er ty a s se t fo rt h in s ai d Fina l Judgm ent o f Fo re cl os ur e or o rd er , t o wi t: : AL L OF T HA T CE RT AI N PA RT , P LA CE , O R PA RC EL O F LA ND L OC AT ED I N NA SS AU CO UN TY , FL OR ID A, B EI NG MORE P AR TI CU LA RL Y D ESC RI BE D AS F OL LO WS : A PO RTI ON O F TH E SO UT H ON EHA LF OF T HE S OU TH EA ST O NE QU AR TE R OF T HE N OR TH EA ST ON EQU AR TE R OF S EC TI ON 23, T OW NS HI P 4 NO RT H, RA NG E 23 E AS T, N AS SA U CO UN TY . CO MME NC E AT T HE SO UT HE AS T CO RN ER O F TH E NO RT H 1/ 2 OF T HE S OU TH EA ST 1/ 4 OF T HE N OR TH EA ST 1/4 O F SA ID S EC TIO N 23 ; TH EN CE N 89 D EG RE ES 4 4 MI NU TE S 59 SE CO ND S W A DI ST AN CE O F 659.01 F EET T O TH E PO IN T OF BE GI NN ING ; T HE NC E S 00 D EGR EE S 11 M IN UT ES 2 6 SE CON DS E , A DI ST AN CE O F 664.72 F EET ; TH EN CE N 8 9 DE GR EE S 21 M IN UT ES 2 0 SE CON DS W , A DI ST AN CE O F 328.67 F EET ; TH EN CE N 0 0 DE GR EE S 15 M IN UT ES 5 2 SE CON DS W , A DI ST AN CE O F 662.57 F EET ; T HE NC E S 89 D EGR EE S 44 M IN UT ES 5 9 SE CON DS E , A DI ST AN CE O F 329.51 F EET T O TH E PO IN T OF BE GI NN ING . R ES ERVI NG T HE NO RT H 60 F OO T OF T HE AF OR EM EN TI ON ED P RO PE RT Y FO R A IN GR ES S, E GR ES S AN D UT ILITIE S EA SE ME NT . T OG ET HE R WI TH T HA T CE RT AI N MO BI LE HO ME 2 007 C MH W IT H TH E SE RI AL N UM BE RS O F: WH C0 16 0 38G AA AND WH C0 16 0 38G AB . Pr op er ty a ddr es s : 282 21 Ch ar it y La ne , Hillia rd , F L 32046 An y pe rs on c la im in g an i nte re st i n th e su rp lu s fr om t he sa le , i f an y , o t her t ha n th e pr op er ty o wner a s of t he da te o f th e lis p end en s, m us t file a c laim b ef or e th e cler k re po rt s th e su rp lu s as u nclai me d. AM ER IC AN S WI TH D IS AB IL ITI ES A CT . I f yo u ar e a pe rs on wi th a d is abilit y wh o need s an y ac co mm od at io n in o rd er to par ti cipa te i n th is p ro ce ed in g, y ou a re e nt itle d at n o co st t o yo u , t o th e pr ov isio n of c er ta in a ss is ta nc e. P le as e co nt ac t th e ADA C oor dina to r fo r th e ci rc ui t cour t syst em a t cr ti nt rp @c oj .net o r (9 04 ) 6302564 a t le as t 7 da ys b ef or e 2564 a t le as t 7 da ys b ef or e yo ur s c hedul ed c ou rt a ppe aran ce , or i mm edia te ly up on r ec ei vi ng t hi s no ti fi ca ti on i f th e ti me b ef or e th e sc hed uled a ppear ance i s le ss th an 7 d ay s ; i f yo u ar e hea rin g or v oi ce i mp ai re d, c al l 711.CL ER K OF T HE C IR CU IT C OU RT As C le rk o f th e Co ur t Jo hn A . C ra wf or d As C le rk o f th e Co ur t BY : Ka re n J. L oc ke tt De pu ty C le rk FN L 2T 1014-21-2020 #603799 NO TI CE OF PUBLIC MEETING Th e So ut h Ame lia I sl an d Sh or e St abiliz at io n As so ci ati on , In c . w ill h ol d a Bo ar d of Tr us te es M eet in g on O ct ob er 21 , 2020, a t 2:00p .m ., v ia ZO OM . T o a tte nd t hi s me et in g, ple as e call ( 904) 27751 23 fo r th e lin k to t he m eet ing. FN L 2T 1014-21-2020 #603608 NO TI CE OF PUBLIC MEETING Th e So ut h Ame lia I sl an d Sh or e St abiliz at io n As so ci ati on , In c. w ill h ol d a Co mm uni ca ti on s Co mm itt ee Me et in g on O ct ob er 2 8 , 2 020 , at 2:00p. m. , v ia Z OO M. To a tt end t hi s me et ing , p leas e call (9 04) 277 5123 f or t he lin k to th e me et in g. FN L 2T 1014-21-2020 #603617 NO TI CE OF PUBLIC SALE: BI LL S TO WI NG g ives N ot ic e of F or eclo su re o f Li en a nd i nt ent t o se ll t hes e ve hicles o n 11/04/2020 , 08:30 a m at 4 25 S . 8 th , S T FE RN AND I NA BE AC H, Fl . 32034-3609 p ur su an t to su bs ec ti on 713. 78 of t he F lo ri da S ta tu te s . B IL LS T OW IN G re se rv es t he r ig ht t o acce pt o r re je ct a ny a nd /o r all bids . 1H FS C4 301Y A0 0 0166 2000 HO ND A 4 UZ AAR DU 4 8C Z58793 2008 MO RG AN FN L 1T 1021-202 0 #60494 5 NO TI CE OF SALE NO TI CE I S HE RE BY G IV EN th at t he u nd er si gned i nt en ds to s el l th e pe rs on al p ro pe rt y (h ous eho ld g ood s, et c.) a t public s al e by c om pe ti ti ve biddi ng o n Fr id ay t he 30t h da y of O c to be r 2020 a t 10: 00 am o n th e pr em is es w her e sa id p ro pe rt y ha s b een s to re d an d wh ic h ar e lo cat ed a t Br idgevi ew S el f St or ag e 474431 E as t St at e Road 2 00 Fe rn an dina B each, F L 320 34 Na ss au C ou nt y th e fo llo wi ng : Ham pt on Wild es 2128 Willia m Hu tc hi so n 2090 Ke lvin T yr on e Rh od es 5019 Ke vi n La uble 1115 Pu rc ha se s mu st b e paid fo r at t he t im e of p ur cha se b y cas h on ly . Da te d th is 10/ 21 /2 02 0 an d 10/28/2020FN L 2T 1021-28-2020 #605115 IN THE CI RC UIT COUR T, FOUR TH JUDICIAL CI RC UIT, IN A ND FOR NA SSAU COUN TY , FLORIDA CA SE NO.: 19CA -437 DI VISION: W. R . HO WE LL C OM PA NY , Pl aint iff, Vs . TS B OF N AS SA U CO UN TY , IN C. ; SO UT HE AS TE RN B AN K, D ef end an ts . NO TI CE O F SA LE NO TI CE I S HE RE BY G IV EN th at p ur su an t to a S um ma ry Ju dg m ent o f Fo re cl os ur e en te re d on F eb ru ar y 24 , 2020 an d as am end ed o n Oc to be r 5, 2020, i n th e ab ov ecap5, 2020, i n th e ab ov ecapti on ed a ct io n, t he C le rk o f th is C ou rt s ha ll s el l at p ublic sa le a t 11:30 a .m . o n No ve mbe r 19, 2020 th ro ug h th e Fo re cl os ur e Webs it e ht tp s: // na ssa ucle rk .r ealf or eclo se .c om / fo r Na ss au C ou nt y to t he hi gh es t bidde r fo r ca sh , a s pr es cr ib ed i n th e Summ ar y Ju dg m ent o f Fo re clos ur e , i n acco rd an ce w it h F.S . ' 45.031, th e fo llo wi ng p ro pe rt y si tu at ed i n Na ss au C ou nty , Flo ri da : Se e Ex hibi t A at ta ched he re to AN Y PE RS ON C LA IM IN G AN I NT ER ES T IN T HE S UR PL US FR OM T HE S AL E , I F AN Y, O TH ER TH AN T HE P RO PE RT Y OW NE R AS O F TH E D AT E OF T HE L IS PE ND EN S, M US T FI LE A C LA IM WI TH IN 6 0 D AY S AF TE R TH E SA LE . D AT ED o n Oc to be r 13, 2020. AM ER IC AN S WI TH D IS AB ILITI ES A CT ( ADA) N ot ice: I n ac co rd an ce wit h th e Am er ican s wi th D is abilit ie s Ac t of 1990 (A D A) p er so ns w it h di sa bilitie s n eed in g sp ecia l ac co mm oda ti on s to p ar ti ci pa te i n th is pr oc ee ding s ho ul d contac t th e AD A Co or dina to r in t he of fi ce o f th e Cl er k of t he C ircuit C ou rt a t Na ss au C ount y Co ur th ou se , 191 N as sa u Pl ace , Y ul ee , F lo ri da 32097, wi th in 2 w or ki ng d ay s of r ece ip t of t hi s no ti ce . I f yo u us e as si st iv e te ch no lo gy ( su ch a s a Br aille r ea der , a s cr een re ad er , TTY , e tc .) a nd t he f or ma t of a ny o f th e we bs ite ma te ri al i nt er fe re s wi th y ou r abilit y to a cce ss t he i nf or ma ti on , pl ea se c on ta ct t he C le rk of C ourt a t ADA@ na ssa ucle rk .c om o r (904) 5484 600 , 0 t o be p ro vi de d wi th f ur th er a ss ista nce . I f yo u ar e he ar in g or vo ic e im pa ir ed , yo u ma y call 711, a nd t he F lo ri da R elay Se rv ic e will a ss is t yo u wi th yo ur call to o ur o ffi ce . By : Kar en J. L oc ke tt D eput y Cl er k Ta yl or , S te wa rt , Ho us to n, & D us s , P.A . At to r ney s fo r Pl aint iff 590 Oa k St Jack so nv ille , FL 32204 EX HI BI T A A PO RT IO N OF T HE D . F ER NA ND EZ G RA NT , SE CT IO N 41, TO WN SH IP 2 N OR TH , R ANG E 28 E AS T , N A SSA U CO UN TY , FL OR ID A. A LS O BE IN G A PO RTI ON O F TH OS E LA ND S AS D ESC RI BE D I N O FFI CI AL RE CO RD S BO OK 1155 , P AG E 505 , T OG ET HE R WI TH T HO SE LA ND S AS D ES CR IB ED I N O FFI CI AL R EC OR D S BO OK 1243 , PA GE 1519 , O F TH E PU BL IC RE CO RD S OF N AS SA U CO UN TY , F LO RI D A, B EI NG M OR E PA RT IC UL AR LY D ES CR IB ED A S FO LL OW S: CO MME NC E AT T HE M OS T WE ST ER LY C OR NE R OF S AI D SE CT IO N 41 ; T HE NC E NO RT H 41 D EG RE ES 0 0 MI NU TE S 00 SE CO ND S EA ST , AL ON G TH E NO RT HW ES TE RL Y LI NE O F SE CTI ON 41, A D ISTA NC E OF 3376.00 F EET ; T HE NC E SO UT H 10 D EG RE ES 1 6 MI NU TE S 05 SE CO ND S EA ST , A D ISTA NC E OF 4 4. 10 F EET T O TH E NO RT HWE ST C OR NE R OF T HO SE LA ND S AS D ES CR IB ED A S "P AR CE L A" I N O FFI CI AL RE CO RD S BO OK 836 , P AG E 221 , O F TH E PU BL IC R EC OR D S OF N A SSA U CO UN TY , F LO RI DA ; T HE NC E SO UT H 88 D EGR EE S 38 M IN UT ES 4 4 SE CON D S EA ST , A LO NG T HE SO UT HE RL Y LI NE O F LO TS 2 1 TH RO UG H 24 , I N TH E PL AT O F OT TE R RUN , A S RECO RD ED I N PL AT B OO K 5 , P AG E 156, O F SA ID P UB LI C RE CO RD S , A D IS SA ID P UB LI C RE CO RD S , A D IS TA NC E OF 357.89 F EE T TO T HE PO INT OF B EG IN NING ; T HE NC E CO NT IN UE S OU TH 8 8 D EG R EES 38 MI NU TE S 44 SE CO ND S EA ST , A D IS TA NC E OF 402. 44 F EE T TO TH E NO RT HE AS T CO RN ER O F SA ID L AN D S AS D ES CR IB ED I N O FFI CI AL R EC OR D S BO OK 1243, P AG E 1519 ; T HE NC E SO UT H 01 D EG R EES 3 7 MI NUT ES 3 3 SE CO ND S WE ST , AL ON G TH E EA ST L IN E OF L AS T SA ID L AN DS , A D IS TA NC E OF 206.34 F EET T O TH E SO UT HE AS T CO RN ER OF LA ST S AI D L AND S; TH EN CE N OR TH 8 8 D EG R EES 31 M IN UT ES 1 4 SE CO ND S WE ST , AL ON G TH E SO UT HE RL Y LI NE OF LA ST S AI D L AN D S AND TH E WE ST ER LY E XT EN SI ON O F SA ID S OU TH ER LY L IN E, A D IS TA NC E OF 3 95 .2 9 FE ET ; TH EN CE N OR TH 0 0 D EG R EES 21 M IN UT ES 5 0 SE CO ND S WE ST , A D ISTA NC E OF 205.57 FE ET T O TH E PO IN T OF B EG IN NI NG . TO GE TH ER W IT H : A 6 0 FO OT E AS EM EN T FO R IN GR ES S, E GR ES S AN D U TI LI TI ES , AS D ES CR IB ED I N O FFI CI AL R EC OR D S BO OK 1243 , PA GE 1519. FN L 2T 1021-28-2020 #604558 BO ARD OF COUN TY CO MM ISSIONERS NA SSAU COUN TY , FLORIDA RE QU ES T FO R QU AL IF IC ATI ON S (RFQ ) NO TI CE I S HE RE BY G IV EN th at t he B oa rd o f Co un ty Co mm is si on er s of N as sa u Co un ty , Flor id a invi te s se aled bids f or : DE SI GN S ER VI CE S SA FE TY IM PR OV EM EN TS T O CO UN TY RO AD 108 FR OM B AY R OA D TO M ID DL E RO AD BI D NO . N C 20-024 Fo r de ta ile d info rm at io n re ga rd in g th e bi d du e da te an d bi d re qu ir emen ts f or t hi s RFQ , p leas e vi si t th e Na ss au Co un ty s we bs it e at h ttp :/ /w ww .n as sa uc ou n ty fl.co m or c on ta ct t he C on tr ac t Man agem en t De pa rt me n t at 904530 6040. Bi d info rm at io n is a ls o av aila bl e at h ttp :/ /w ww .d eman ds ta r. co m an d th e Co un ty s Bo x.co m si te (in fo rm at io n p ro vi de d on Co un ty w eb si te ). AT TE ST : JO HN A . C RA WF OR D DA NI EL B . LE EPER EX -O FFI CI O CL ER K CH AI RM AN BO AR D OF C OU NT Y CO MMI SSI ON ER S NA SS AU C OU NT Y, F LO RI DA FN L 1T 1021-202 0 #605274 RE ZO NI NG NO TI CE NO TI CE I S HE RE BY G IV EN th at o n Th ur sd ay , No ve mb er 5 , 2 020 a t 6:00 P .M . o r so on t herea ft er a s th e ma tte r ma y be h ea rd t he P la nn in g an d Zo ning B oa rd o f Na ss au Co un ty w ill h ol d a public he ar in g at t he C om mi ss io n Ch am be rs , J am es S . P ag e Go ve rn me nt al C om pl ex , 96135 N as sa u Pl ac e , Y ulee, Fl or id a 320 97 t o co ns id er A pplicat io n No . P UD 19-00 1 fo r re zo ni ng t o Pl a nne d Un it D eve lo pm en t . Al so , be i t kn ow n th at o n Mo nd ay , De ce mb er 14, 2 020 , at 6 :00 P .M . o r so on t herea ft er a s th e ma tte r ma y be h ea rd , t he Bo ar d of C ou nty C om mi ss io ne rs o f Na ss au Co un ty w ill h ol d a public he ar in g on a pp lic at io n No . PU D 19-001 , a t th e Co mmi ssi on C ha mb er s , J am es S . Pa ge C om pl ex l oc at io n conce rn in g th e fo llo wi ng d esc ri be d pr op er ty i n Na ss au sc ri be d pr op er ty i n Na ss au Co un ty . Lo ca ti on f or t he a bo ve de sc ri be d pr op er ty is: On t he we st s id e of B la ck ro ck R oa d, No rt h of S R2 00/A 1A . P ar ce l #s 45-3N 28-0000 -0 001-0110 , 4 53N 28-0000 0001-012 0 , 373N 28-0000 -0 001-000 0 ( po rti on ), a nd 5 0 -3 N28-0000 0022-0000 (p or ti on ). PU D 19-00 1 pr opos es t o re zo ne a ppr ox im at el y 152. 4 ac re s fr om O pe n Ru ra l (O R) an d Re si dentia l Si ng le F am ily 2 to P lan ned U ni t De ve lo pm ent ( PU D) . Th is a pp li ca ti on i s f ile d by :, Bl ac kr oc k Co ve , LL C , 46310 6 SR 200 /A 1A , Yu lee , F L 32097 ; Bl ac kr oc k Pa rk , L LP , 2 955 Har tle y Road , S ui te 1 0 8, J ac kso nv ill e, F L 322 57 ; A nd er so n, Willy ou ng , Br ew er a nd B oy et t, 96195 B lack ro ck R oa d, Y ulee , Fl or id a 32097, O wner s; a nd Ro ge rs T ow er s , P .A . , 960 185 Ga te wa y Bl vd ., S ui te 2 03 , F er na ndin a Be ach, F L 32034, Ag ent . Al l in te re st ed p ar ti es a re in vi te d to a tt end t he p ublic he ar in gs a nd t o be h ea rd . Co pies o f th e A pplicat io n an d su pp or ti ng i nf or ma ti on ar e availabl e fo r in sp ec ti on i n th e o ffi ce o f th e Pla nni ng an d Ec on om ic O ppo rt un it y De pa rt m ent , 96161 N as sa u Pl ace , Y ulee, F L 32097 . C om m ent s ma y al so b e di re ct ed in w ri ti ng t o th e Pl an ning a nd Ec on om ic O ppo rt un it y De pa rt m ent , e ma ile d to p lanni ng info @n as sa uc ou nt yf l.co m , o r re ceiv ed b y te le ph on e at ( 90 4) 530-630 0 . A ll co mm ent s w ill b ecom e a pa rt o f th e re co rd i n th is m at te r. Th is hea ri ng w ill b e co nduct ed a s a quas ijudicial he ar in g. In di vi dual s wi th d is abilit ie s n eed in g a re as on able a cco mm od at io n to p ar ti cipa te in t hi s pr oc eedin g sh ou ld co nt ac t th e o ffi ce o f th e Co un ty Man ag er a t le as t tw o da ys p ri or t o th e pr oc ee ding at ( 90 4) 530 -6 010 o r, i f th e he ar in g im pa ir ed , F lo ri da R ela y Se rv ic e at 1 -8 00-955-877 0 (v ) or 1 -8 00-955-877 1 (T DD ). TH E PU BL IC I S IN VI TE D TO B E PR ESEN T AN D BE H EA RD . I F A PE RS ON D EC ID ES T O AP PE AL AN Y DE CI SI ON M AD E BY T HE BO AR D, A GE NC Y OR C OM MI SS IO N WI TH R ES PE CT T O AN Y MA TTE R CO NS ID ER ED A T SU CH M EE TI NG O R HE AR IN G HE /S HE W IL L N EED A R EC OR D OF T HE P RO C EED IN GS A ND FO R TH AT P UR PO SE , MA Y NE ED T O EN SU RE T HA T A VE RBA TI M RE CO RD O F TH E PR OC EED IN GS I S MA DE , W HI CH RE CO RD I NC LU DE S TH E TE ST IMO NY A ND E VI DE NC E UP ON WH IC H A PPE AL I S TO B E BA SE D. Th e Pl an ning a nd Z on in g Bo ar d an d th e Bo ar d of Co un ty C om mi ss io ner s ma y co nt inue h ea ri ng s on t hi s ma tt er . Ni ck Gille tte , C hair Na ss au C ou nt y Pl an ning an d Zo ni ng B oa rd Da niel B . L eeper , Ch ai r Na ss au C ou nt y Bo ar d of Co un ty C o mmi ssi on er s FN L 2T 1021-28-2020 #603571 RE ZO NI NG NO TI CE NO TI CE I S HE RE BY G IV EN th at o n Th ur sd ay , No ve mb er 5 , 2 020 , a t 6:00 P M . o r so on t herea ft er a s th e ma tte r ma y be h ea rd , th e Pla nning a nd Zo ning B oa rd o f Na ss au Co un ty w ill h ol d a public he ar in g at t he C om mi ss ion he ar in g at t he C om mi ss ion Ch am be rs , J am es S . P ag e Go ve rn me nt al C om pl ex , 96135 N as sa u Pl ac e , Y ulee, Fl or id a 32097 t o co ns ider a pplicat io n No . R 20 -0 11 f or r ezo ni ng . A ls o, b e it k no wn t ha t on M on day , D ecem be r 14, 2020 , a t 6:00 P .M . o r so on t herea ft er a s th e ma tte r ma y be h ea rd , t he Bo ar d of C ou nty C om mi ss io ne rs o f Na ss au Co un ty w ill h ol d a public he ar in g on a pplicat io n fo r re zo ni ng N o. R 20 -0 11 , a t th e Co mm is si on C hamb er s, Ja me s S . P ag e Co mp le x lo ca ti on c on ce rn in g th e fo llo win g de sc ri be d pr op er ty i n Na ss au C ou nt y. Lo ca ti on f or t he a bo ve de sc ri be d pr op er ty i s: O n th e ea st s id e of F ir st C oa st H wy ., be tw ee n Tr adew in ds W ay an d Pl an ta ti on O ak s La ne, Pa rc el I D # 0 0 -0 0 -3 0 -0 760 00060020 R2 0 -0 11 p ro po se s to r ezo ne a ppr oxim at el y 1.67 ac re s fr om R es ident ia l Si ng le Fam ily 1 ( RS -1 ) to R es ident ia l Ge ner al 1 ( RG -1 ). Th is a pplicat io n is f ile d by : Ja me s E . A be rs on a nd A my A. B ever ly , 4820 F ir st C oa st Hw y. , o wner s. Og le th or pe De ve lo pm en t LL C, 6 0 8 Oc ea n Cl ub C ou rt , Fe rn an di na B ea ch, F L 320 34 , agen t. Th is hea ri ng w ill b e co nduct ed a s a quas ijudicial he ar in g. Al l in te re st ed p ar ti es a re in vi te d to a tt end t he p ublic he ar in gs a nd t o be h ea rd . Co pies o f th e pr opos ed O rd ina nc e an d su ppo rt in g info rma ti on a re a vailabl e fo r in sp ec ti on i n th e De pa rt m ent of P lanni ng a nd E co no mi c O ppo rt un ity , 9 6 161 N as sa u Pl ace , Y ul ee , F L 32097. Co mm ent s ma y al so b e di re ct ed in w ri ti ng t o th e De pa rt m ent of P lanni ng a nd E co no mi c O ppo rt un it y, e -m aile d to plan ning in fo @n a ssa ucounty fl.c om , o r re ceiv ed b y te le ph on e at ( 90 4) 530-630 0 . A ll co mm ent s will b ec om e pa rt of t he r ec or d in t hi s ma tte r an d su bj ec t to Flo ri da's p ublic re co rd s law. In di vi dual s wi th d is abilit ie s n eed in g a re as on able a cco mm od at io n to p ar ti cipa te in t hi s pr oc eedin g sh ou ld co nt ac t th e o ffi ce o f th e Co un ty Man ag er a t le as t tw o da ys p ri or t o th e pr oc ee ding at ( 90 4) 530 -6 010 o r, i f th e he ar in g im pa ir ed , F lo ri da R ela y Se rv ic e at 1 -8 00-955-877 0 (v ) or 1 -8 00-955-877 1 (T DD ). TH E PU BL IC I S IN VI TE D TO B E PR ESEN T AN D BE H EA RD . I F A PE RS ON D EC ID ES T O AP PE AL AN Y DE CI SI ON M AD E BY T HE BO AR D, A GE NC Y OR C OM MI SS IO N WI TH R ES PE CT T O AN Y MA TTE R CO NS ID ER ED A T SU CH M EE TI NG O R HE AR IN G HE /S HE W IL L N EED A R EC OR D OF T HE P RO C EED IN GS A ND FO R TH AT P UR PO SE , MA Y NE ED T O EN SU RE T HA T A VE RBA TI M RE CO RD O F TH E PR OC EED IN GS I S MA DE , W HI CH RE CO RD I NC LU DE S TH E TE ST IMO NY A ND E VI DE NC E UP ON WH IC H A PPE AL I S TO B E BA SE D. Th e Pl an ning a nd Z on in g Bo ar d an d th e Bo ar d of Co un ty C om mi ss io ner s ma y co nt inue h ea ri ng s on t hi s ma tt er . Ni ck Gille tte , C hair Na ss au C ou nt y Pl an ning an d Zo ni ng B oa rd Da niel B . L eeper , Ch ai r Na ss au C ou nt y Bo ar d of C ou nt y Co mm is si o ner s FN L 2T 1021-28-2020 #604348 1 Riley is approximately 8 years old and is a big 17-pound sweetheart! He was surrendered to a local shelter, but he has always been an indoor cat and would prefer to be the only cat in the house. Riley is a handsome boy and is ready to go to his new forever home. Do you know anyone looking for a com-panion? Stop by Cats Angels to meet Riley or call (904) 321-2267 to make an appoint-ment. Volunteers will be wearing masks at the Adoption Center and Thrift Store, and we are asking our shoppers to also wear masks and stay three cat lengths away from other customers. The Adoption Center will be restricted to three visitors or one family at a time. Adoptions will be by appointment and we ask that you submit an application before your appointment is made. Our cats are waiting for their forever homes and you can see them all online at our website. Do you have four hours a week to volunteer at the Cats Angels Thrift Store? Our volunteers have a lot of fun and enjoy helping all the custom-ers. If you interested in finding out more, call (904) 321-2267 and leave a message. Cats Angels is a volunteer-based organization helping since 2001 with low cost spay/neuter ser-vices and TNVR (Trap-Neuter-Vaccinate-Return to Caregiver). We receive no local or federal gov-ernment funding and operate solely on private donations, fund raising, grants and sales from our Thrift Store and your support is appreciated. If you want to know more about how to support or donate to Cats Angels, visit catsangels.com and click on “How To Help,” where you will find many ways to lend a hand. Recycle your aluminum and cat food cans at the bins in our parking lot at 709 S. Eighth St. We graciously accept donations for cat care and resale items for our Thrift Store. Information about our spay/neuter, TNVR and adoption pro-grams is on our website. Cats Angels welcomes volunteers to help us care for the cats and as retail clerks in our Thrift Store. Our Volunteer Application is online or you can call. r Junie is a happy, affectionate girl who loves to be loved! She’s friendly, active and playful. She’s also very smart! She’s hearing-impaired, but our staff has been working with her. She has already learned to sit, stay and come with hand signals. Our staff will be happy to tell you about care and training for this special girl. There are online resources like deafdogsrock.com with lots of information. She’s medium-sized and about 3 years old. She has a white coat with black markings, including freckles and the backs and side of her ears, and a dot on her forehead. She’s spayed, micro-chipped, up to date on her shots, and ready to go home with you. Junie’s great smile will lift your spirits even on gloomy days, plus you’ll have the great feeling of knowing that you’ve opened her world for her. Please come see this sweet girl soon! We also have an affectionate two-and-half-year-old hearing-impaired dog named Tugger, so named because he’ll tug at your heart. He’d love to meet you too! Sammo is a very sweet and handsome orange tabby cat. He is about 4 years old and has a pretty orange coat with beautiful pale green eyes. Sammo is very friendly and gets along well with the other cats in the cattery. He’s a medium-sized domestic shorthair mix, and he’s neutered, vaccinated, and micro-chipped. Please come meet Sammo! If you’re interested in seeing him, call us at (904) 321-1647 or visit NassauHumane.org to see if he’s at our cattery or one of our remote adoption locations. Our Adoption Center at 639 Airport Road in Fernandina Beach now is open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday, and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; the center is closed Monday. That’s an extra half-hour on weekday mornings (except Monday) and an extra hour on Sunday afternoon. We are abiding by social distance guidelines, and facemasks must be worn in the shelter. If you don’t have one, we will be glad to provide you a disposable mask for free at the door. We are abiding by social distance guidelines, and facemasks must be worn in the shelter. If you don’t have one, we will be glad to provide you a disposable mask for free at the door. To maintain social distancing, we are limiting the number of clients in the shelter at any one time. Please consider making an appointment to secure your place in case the shelter is busy. You can call us at (904) 321-1647 or email us at info@nas-sauhumane.org. You can check out our adoptable pets anytime at NassauHumane.org, and follow us on Facebook. Come meet your new best friend! rr Nassau County Animal Services and Petco are teaming up for a special adoption event from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at the Petco store located at 11900 Atlantic Blvd. in Jacksonville. Petco will be sponsoring all adoption fees that day, and new pet parents will receive $450 in discounts on Petco services and merchandise. Remember, Nassau County Animal Services always offers cat and kitten adoptions at the Petco stores in Yulee, St. Johns, Fleming Island, and Jacksonville from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday. Stop by Petco and meet your next best friend! These six adorable puppies just arrived at the shelter. They are playful, loving, and ready to chew your slippers! To those who are about to ask, “What breed are those stray puppies that just got dropped off?” At great expense to Nassau County taxpayers, we flew in a world-renowned, certified canine breedologist, Ima Fibber, Ph.D., and her assis-tant, Bea A. Liar, B.S., to determine the exact breed of these pups. According to Dr. Fibber and Ms. Liar, these pups are “Trojan Horse Terriers.” Dr. Fibber states that these loyal and faithful dogs were smuggled into the ancient city of Troy by the Greeks in the famous Trojan Horse in 1184 B.C. Dr. Fibber states this breed is ferociously loyal and intelligent and makes exceptionally wonderful pets. Our puppy adoption fee is $149 and includes spay/neuter surgery, rabies vaccination, distem-per, adenovirus type 2, parainfluenza, parvovirus combo vaccination, bordetella vaccina-tion, heartworm test if over 6 months, ID microchip, and Nassau County dog license (if applicable). Orville and Wilbur arrived at the shelter last week. The two nine-month-old brothers love people, treats and water. They are playful, and they seem to get along with other dogs. Please spread the word and let’s find them a home! Nassau County Animal Services has dozens of cats and kittens hoping to cuddle with new own-ers. Our feline adoption fees are $25 for kittens and $9 for adult cats. Our adoption fee includes spay/neuter surgery, rabies vaccination, FVRCP combo vaccination, parvovirus combo vaccina-tion, testing for feline leukemia and feline immu-nodeficiency virus (FIV), and an ID microchip ($250 value). Nassau County Animal Services is showing adoptable dogs and cats by appointment only. If you wish to visit a pet, call the shelter at (904) 530-6150 to schedule an appointment and receive visiting instructions. To see photos and descrip-tions our available pets, visit our website, follow our Facebook page, and register to receive our VIP e-newsletter by texting “nassauadopt” to 22828. It’s fast and free, and you can unsubscribe at any time. Nassau County Animal Services is located at 86078 License Road in Yulee. Shelter hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday, 1 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday nn  Nassau Humane Society Second Chance Re-Sale Store and The Closet always need volun-teers and donors! Make new friends and choose from front of store or behind the scenes. We are the primary source of funding for the Nassau Humane Society and 100% of sales go directly to the animals. For more information, call 310-9627.  Bring gently used items to donate to Second Chance resale store, 1002 S. 14th St., to benefit the Nassau Humane Society’s programs. Free pickup is available by calling 321-0022.  Cats Angels is in need of volunteers for our Thrift Store and for cat care. If you like work-ing in a retail setting, we have shifts available Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and from 2 to 5 p.m. If those hours don’t fit in your schedule but you would still like to help in the Thrift Store, let us know. The kitties need your help too. We have two cleaning shifts (morning and evening) every day and the cats and our volunteers are always happy to meet new people. Our volunteer application is available online at our website at bit.ly/2ijwWGf or at the Cats Angels Thrift Store, 709 S. Eighth St. We’re open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. For more infor-mation, call us 321-2267.  ­€ Cats Angels provides low-cost spay and neuter and TNVR (Trap-Neuter-Vaccinate-Return to Caregiver) services through First Coast No More Homeless Pets. Call 321-2267. nnr Print Edition PLUS FREE E-EDITION Contact us Today! 261-3696 fbnewsleader.com SAVE UP TO 62%

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