Citation
The news-leader

Material Information

Title:
The news-leader
Uniform Title:
News-leader (Fernandina Beach, Fla.)
Portion of title:
News leader
Place of Publication:
Fernandina Beach, FL
Publisher:
Fernandina Beach News-Leader, Foy R. Maloy Jr. - Publisher
Creation Date:
January 4, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Fernandina Beach (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Nassau County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Nassau -- Fernandina Beach
Coordinates:
30.669906 x -81.461028

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 124, no. 9 (Feb. 27, 1980)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The News Leader. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000366799 ( ALEPH )
04377055 ( OCLC )
ACA5658 ( NOTIS )
sn 78002171 ( LCCN )
0163-4011 ( ISSN )

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Fernandina Beach news-leader

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rfrf rþa f þt þR nþt t þEþt þa r b þFf þLrþa rþN þt þc þOþb þt þa þPnrþc þR nþt t þPnr þSnþt A Nassau County resident sued the Board of County Commissioners over the “dilapidated” condition of the courthouse bell tower in Fernandina Beach.April 19, 1970 þA þP þS rfn ntb b“People are getting restless.” That is the sentiment across Nassau County, the country and the world. And the debate regarding reopening the beaches here mirrors the debate around the world: Should officials begin the phased reopen ing of businesses, schools, and recre ation facilities, or keep them closed in an attempt to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus? City, county and state governments closed island beaches last month, and residents have remained vocal in their opinions about how they should be opened again. Some say open them altogether and trust people to follow guidelines; some say simply restrict who can be on the beach and when — even restricting use to county residents only; others want the beaches to remain closed to everyone indefinitely. In a Monday conference call that included county and Fernandina Beach officials, Danny Leeper, chair of the Nassau County Board of County Commissioners, said people are get ting restless. Some people on the call said they could be prepared to open the beaches on May 1, but officials fell short of declaring beaches will be open by that date. Beaches in Duval and St. Johns coun ties are now open, though with certain restrictions. Some in Georgia have also reopened, prompting some Nassau residents to ask local officials to do like wise. “I’ve talked to a couple of the hotels that have stayed open,” Amelia Island Tourist Development Council Managing Director Gil Langley said. “After hearing the beaches in Jacksonville and St. Johns have opened, they got a signifi cant number of calls wanting to know about our beaches and asking to make reservations.” Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis signed Executive Order 20-103 April 10, sus pending vacation rentals in the state through April 30. In a statement released after the con ference call, county Public Information Officer Sabrina Robertson said county officials were “taken by surprise last weekend when Duval County opened without communicating their plans to surrounding county governments. “Officials had originally hoped other regional counties would work in concert to open beaches to prevent a surge to one area,” according to the statement, which said calls to county officials regarding the matter have been mixed, with half asking the beaches be reopened and half wanting them to stay closed. Nassau County Sheriff Bill Leeper said he listened to a conference call with Gov. Ron DeSantis and believes the reopening of beaches in Duval and St. Johns counties may be part of a trend. “ (DeSantis) is looking (at putting) together a task force to look at open ing Florida in a phased process,” Leeper said. “I get the feeling it won’t be in the too distant future when things are going to start opening up a little bit.” There were benchmarks discussed that could be used to determine when it would be prudent to open the beaches.FBI JACKSONVILLEAgents from the FBI Jacksonville SWAT team joined firefighters from Nassau County Fire Rescue and deputies from the Nassau County Sheriff’s Office as well as neighbors in Yulee’s þ  Plummer Creek neighborhood to celebrate the 10th birthday on Saturday of Chas Carnes, right, who has hypoplastic left heart syndrome. The birthday parade was organized by his family, according to a news release from FBI Jacksonville. Driving the NCFR vehicle is Engineer Brett Louis. Riding in the passenger seat is Engineer Carl Nishiyama. bJan Carver has seen people with problems in both her career as a mag istrate and as a nurse practitioner. She believes she can use that experience to help solve the problems that land people in court, so she is running for Nassau County judge on Nov. 3. After graduating from Connecticut University, Carver earned a bachelor’s degree at the University of Florida and then worked as a nurse and a nurse practitioner. She obtained a law degree from Florida Coastal School of Law and a post-doctorate degree in elder law from Stetson University. After working in elder law, she became a magistrate as well as a court administrator. She remained a magistrate from 2016 until the beginning of this year, when the position went unfunded. As magistrate, Carver presided over five courts that addressed spe cific issues: mental health, drug-related offenses, family law, dependency, and civil traffic. She said in almost all the cases brought before her the underly ing issue was substance abuse, mental health, or domestic violence, which is why she calls them “problem-solving courts.” “I like problem-solving courts because we can actually get to society’s problems,” Carver said. “What you’re trying to do is get to the underlying issue and get (the defendants) the help they need. Why are you behaving badly? Are you stealing because you need money to go buy drugs? Is it because you’re homeless? If you can help them, you help the rest of society, because they’re not going to keep coming back. They go on and are hopefully productive and get past whatever got them into trouble so that they can move on and enjoy life.” Through her career as a nurse prac titioner (she still practices one day a week), her volunteer work with local nonprofits Barnabas Center and Nassau County Council on Aging, and her time spent as a magistrate, Carver said she has become familiar with the resources that can support people who end up in court due to an underlying problem. “I think that’s huge – knowing what’s available in the county to help people,” she said “I know how the system works from being the court administrator and what we need from that perspective, and I know how to do the job from being the magistrate, and the resources I know because of being a nurse practitioner and a magistrate.” Carver said the legal system should look beyond punishment toward produc ing the best outcome. “I would love to see us release people (on their own recognizance) instead of putting them in jail,” she said, and explained how that approach can help. “If they are working, and we put them in jail and keep them there by setting a bond they can’t pay, which most of them can’t, then they lose their job,” Carver said. “If it’s some low-level crime, why don’t we just let them out and give them a notice to appear? They still have to deal with the issue, but unless there’s a prob lem with them doing something again, why put them in jail? It costs us money. I think we’re going in that direction, but there’s old school thoughts. “My feeling is, if they don’t have a record and they’re not a danger to soci ety, deal with whatever you did but let them go back to work. The first day on the bench, I could make a difference. I rffntbttnJULIA ROBERTS/NEWS-LEADERThe beach on the north end of Amelia Island remained empty Tuesday morning, although city and county officials are considering what the plan to reopen the beaches would look like. They discussed a date of May 1 but no official date has been set. BEACHES Continued on page 3 rffntbntnJULIA ROBERTS/NEWS-LEADER“Judges don’t judge people. They judge behavior and they try to solve problems,” Jan Carver told the News-Leader. “That’s my perspective.” Carver is running for Nassau County judge on Nov. 3.ttnttftnbfnnbftCARVER Continued on page 5 NL Wednesday 04.22.20.indd 1 4/21/20 5:53 PM

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þA B&B Monuments Donna Byrd (904) 277-2742 474418 S.R. 200 State Licensed City ScoopIn honor of National Volunteer Week, the City would like to thank the many volunteers on boards, committees, and otherwise, for all they do! Monument Cleaning, Raising, Engraving and Bronze Renishing 904-261-8783 MEMORIALS rfnrtbtrThe University of Florida/IFAS Nassau County Extension Service is working to assist farmers market vendors with increasing their knowledge and skills and will hold Farm to Curb, a live virtual workshop, at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 28. Learn how to: Keep your food and non-food items safe from packaging to contactless delivery; Market and use social media to advertise products; Network with Nassau County vendors They can also earn the gold seal of approval from the University of Florida/IFAS Nassau Safety. To register, visit https://bit.ly/FarmtoCurb. For information, contact jdacey@ufl.edu.ntttbtMedicare can be a confusing subject, but it IFAS is providing free unbiased Medicare consultations via telephone. Whether you are new to Medicare and need to enroll or are seeking information on changes you can make, this is your chance to receive knowledge able, unbiased assistance with your choices. Appointments can be scheduled by calling Meg McAlpine at 570-5713.tttrtrSince Nassau County seniors cannot NCCOA will come to them with balanced, nutri tious meals and more. Any Nassau County senior age 60 or over may request a week of free meals. If you are interested, follow these simple steps: 1. Call NCCOA at (904) 261-0701. 2. Tell the staff member you would like to request meals, grocery shopping, and/or pre scription pick-up. 3. NCCOA will complete an intake form that includes your name, address, phone number, and birth date. 4. Your delivery will be scheduled. If you are able to lend your financial sup port for Nassau County seniors, contact 775-5481 or wbennett@nassaucountycoa.org. ttbtDue to the challenges created by COVID-19, NassauTRANSIT is changing its reservation policy for registered paratransit passengers. may now contact NassauTRANSIT and sched ule same-day, door-to-door service, depending for the elderly, disabled, economically disad vantaged, children at risk and individuals who have no other means of transportation. If you would like to register for the program, visit nassautransit.org/transportation-programs. To schedule a ride, call 261-0700. rIsais Bay-Chocoj, 41, of Fernandina Beach, Fla., passed away Saturday, April 11, 2020. He was born on July 6, 1978 in Guatemala to Nonalberto Bay and Rosa Chocoj. Isais worked as a landscape designer for Martex and had designed for several homes and businesses in the community. He was known as a hard-work ing, soft-spoken Christian man and a member of The Promise Land Church (La Tierra Prometida) in Fernandina Beach, where he was active in the ministry as part of the Prayer Team on Monday nights. He leaves behind his mother, Rosa Chocoj of Guatemala; his wife, Lydia Agular-Dominguez; and his children, Elmer, Denis, Noel, and Rocsana. Services to celebrate his life will be held at a later date. Please share your memories and condolences at www.oxleyheard.com.rffntbMr. Forest L. Evatt, 91, of Yulee, Fla., passed away Wednesday, April 15, 2020 in Jacksonville, Fla. at Community Hospice, St. Vincent’s Riverside. Born in Fernandina Beach, Fla., he was a son of the late Bert and Edna Cook Evatt. Mr. Evatt lived his entire life in Nassau County, mostly in the Chester community. In 1950, he met Ruth Warren in Jacksonville. She and her fam ily ran a lunch counter near the Tallyrand docks and he met her while eating lunch there. They were married in 1954 and settled in on the Evatt family home in Chester. Their marriage would continue for 57 years, until her passing in 2010. Through the years, Mr. Evatt worked on a tug boat, worked for Duval Engineers, and served as a deputy sheriff and state game warden in Nassau County. An avid fisherman, he and his wife also operated a shrimping and bait business for many years. Both he and Mrs. Evatt began work at Amelia Island Plantation in its earliest years and both continued there until their retirement in 2008. He was known as someone who took care of his family, as a hard worker, and as someone who could do almost anything, a true “Jack of All Trades.” Along with his wife, he attended New Life Baptist Church. They were also members of the “Over the Hill Gang,” a camping group that trav eled to many bluegrass festivals in the southeast. In addition to his parents and his wife, Mr. Evatt was predeceased by his daughter, Iva Dean Lane, in 1995. He leaves behind his grandson, Brent Lane and his wife, Katie, of Yulee; and his sisters, Clara Bass and Betty Lou Hickox and her husband, James, and a brother, Pete Evatt, all of Yulee, as well as several nieces, nephews and extended family members. Mr. Evatt will be laid to rest beside his wife in Chester Cemetery in a family service. There are plans for a service to remember and celebrate his life with friends and members of the community at a later time when circumstances permit. Please share your memories and condolences at www.oxleyheard.com.rftfEmily Dancil Franklin, 80, of Yulee, Fla., tran sitioned to her heavenly home April 5, 2020. Mrs. Franklin was the first lady of Miracle Faith Church of God for 24 years, the minister of music, Ladies Ministry president, and former Christian Education director for Dominion Worship Center of St. Petersburg, Fla. Cherished memories she leaves to her loving and devoted husband of 42 years, Bishop Willie J. Franklin Sr.; daughter, Sheryle Dancil preceded her in death; son, Eric Carter (Natasha); Diane Smith (Billy); Tony Franklin (Elizabeth); Bernita Franklin; Ruthella Franklin; Johnny Franklin; Chris Franklin; Willie Franklin Jr.; Tonya Postell; Maurice Woffard (Charlotte); Joe Godwin; 15 grandchildren; 50 great-grandchildren; and other relatives and friends. Visitation is 3-7 p.m. Friday, April 24, 2020. Her funeral will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, April 25, 2020 with a viewing 9:30 a.m. until the service time at Lawson Funeral Home Chapel, 4535 Central Ave. N, St. Petersburg.tErica Nicole Jones, 29, of Fernandina Beach, Fla., passed away Thursday, April 16, 2020 at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla. She was born in Jacksonville to Robert E. Jones and Donna L. Volpitta Clifton. Erica worked as a paralegal for the State Attorney’s Office in Jacksonville. She loved her job and those with whom she worked. Erica was strong in her faith and in her love for God and is now rejoicing at His side. She was preceded in death by both of her grandfathers, Samuel Volpitta and Frederick Jones. Erica leaves behind her parents, Donna Clifton and Robert Jones; her sister, Casey Jones; her Nanny, Shirley Volpitta; uncle, Michael Volpitta; the two lights in her life, a niece, Gracelyn, and nephew, C.J. (Coy); a very special cousin, Stephanie Lastinger; and two very special friends, Dawn Johnson and Kaitlyn Van Deren. There is not enough room to list all of her family and friends and they all know who they are. A celebration of her life will be held at a later time and will be posted to her Facebook page. Those desiring, please make a donation to any cancer center or organization dealing with autoimmune diseases. Please share your memories and condolences at oxleyheard.com.rf Sarah Mae Kenney (Rehberg, Tedder), 82, passed on into Eternal Peace on April 15, 2020. Born May 25, 1937 in the small town of Ochlocknee in Thomas County, Ga., she served in the U.S. Air Force and the Air National Guard. An avid reader, she gardened and enjoyed her pets. A true patriot, loving God, family and country, she will be missed. A Celebration of Life Ceremony will be announced at a later date. In lieu of flowers, please make a donation to your local hospice organization.nrtbtrftGail Ann Moulton, 63, passed away peacefully April 19, 2020 after a yearlong battle with cancer. Born in Dover, N.H. the daughter of Richard Carr and Irene (Carr) Young, she attended St. Mary’s Academy before moving to York, Maine in 1966. Gail graduated York High, Class of 1975 and married her high school sweetheart, Tim Moulton. Tim was an outdoor enthusi ast, avid fisherman and “shake the dirt out of your work boots” kind of guy while she was a prom queen and cheerleader who loved cruising around in her red Mustang convertible. The join ing of two opposites, devoted to creating a life as one. It is impossible to talk about one without the other. They grew up, raised an amazing family, and weathered the storms of life together, always together. In 1990, Tim’s work transferred him to Kings Bay Naval Base in Georgia. Leaving family and friends behind, they embraced a new life on beau tiful Amelia Island, Fla. Gail focused on making a new home for their young family and poured her self into raising their two children. She attended every sporting event and school function, always as their greatest cheerleader. The very embodiment of the words “I love being a girl,” Gail was all buttons and bows, ribbons and lace. Her creative flair (and fantastic cooking!) turned every occasion into an event. For Gail and Tim, trips back “home” to stay con nected with family and friends were the highlight of the year until Tim’s passing in 2018. Now, they are together again. In addition to her husband, Gail was prede ceased by her father, Richard Carr; sister, Kathy (Carr) Paquette; and beloved “Papa,” Bill Young. She will be greatly missed by her loving fam ily and is survived by her son, Ryan, his wife, Laurie Moulton, and their daughters, Katie and Samantha, of Charleston, S.C.; daughter, Courtnay Moulton, her fianc, Doug Greene, and their son, Finnley, of Amelia Island; mother, Irene Young of Sun City, Fla.; sister, Debbie and her husband, Tom Eldredge, of York, Maine; and in-laws, Bob and Kate Moulton of York, Maine, as well as many extended family members and friends. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, services will be scheduled for a later date when it is safe to gather. As they grieve her passing, the family wishes to extend their sincerest thanks to the amazing staff at Hadlow Hospice and all the nursing staff and doctors who have cared for her during this difficult time. Please share your memories and condolences at www.oxleyheard.com.rfMary Anne Prosswimmer passed away April 10, 2020. Born in Pittsburgh, Pa. in 1933, she graduated from Edgewood High School, then the registered nursing program at Allegheny General Hospital. She married her husband of 63 years, Alan Prosswimmer, in May 1955. The couple semi-retired to Amelia Island, Fla., where Mary Anne and a friend opened the Classy Needle. In 1998, she became a founding member of the Eight Flags Needlepoint Chapter of the American Needlepoint Guild. In 2009, they moved to Cypress Village in Jacksonville, Fla. and became involved with forming the weekly Happy Hour, the Resident’s Council, and a Bridge group. She also was proud that her experience with her children gave her a voice powerful enough to lead and call out group water exercises multiple times a week. Mary Anne was a loving and dedicated mother to five very active children born between 1960 and 1966. As a result, she was often quoted as saying she cooked “quantity, not quality.” Not only did she spend much of the 1970s and 1980s driving to and from swimming and diving meets for her children, she also had a nursing career. Mary Anne was preceded in death by her son, Randall (1961-1976), and husband, Alan (19302018). She is survived by her daughter, Carlene Bruno (Paul) of Jacksonville Beach, Fla.; sons, Jeffery of Carlsbad, Calif., Marshall (Richard Batting) of Fair Haven, N.J., and Eric (Karen) of Jacksonville Beach; her grandchildren, Paul Bruno (Mandy), Matt Bruno, Siena and Tatum Prosswimmer, Carly, Amanda and Katelyn Shepherd, and Camille and Randy Prosswimmer. Mary Anne is further survived by four greatgrandchildren, Paul Mason and Emily Bruno, and Oliver and Charlotte Lehr. Mary Anne will be greatly missed as the matri arch of the family and for her sage and insightful advice to all who may have known her.frtfBarry Campbell, 77, of Fernandina Beach, Fla. passed away Sunday, April 19, 2020.rfKendra Mobley, 48, of Fernandina Beach, Fla., passed away Saturday, April 18, 2020.rfff f ‘’‘n rftrtrrThe News-Leader is published every Wednesday and Friday by The Fernandina written permission from the publisher are prohibited. POSTMASTER: The News-Leader may only be sold by persons or businesses authorized by the publisher or circulation director.NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS: The News-Leader assumes no financial responsibility for typographical errors in adver tising. When notified promptly, the part of the advertisement in which the typographical error appears will be reprinted. All advertising is subject to the approval of the publisher. The News-Leader reserves the right to correctly classify, edit or delete any objectionable wording or reject the advertisement in its entirety at any time prior to scheduled publication if it is determined that the advertisement or any part thereof is contrary to the general standard of advertising acceptance. SUBSCRIPTION RATESMail in Nassau County þ. ........................................ $44.99 Mail out of Nassau County þ. .................................. $74.99 NEWS DEADLINES Community News: þ Wednesday, 12 p.m. Letters to the editor: þ Monday, 5 p.m. þ Wednesday, 5 p.m. Church þ Notes: þ Tuesday, 5 p.m. People and Places: þ Wednesday, 3 p.m. ADVERTISING DEADLINES WEDNESDAY NEWS-LEADER þ FRIDAY NEWS-LEADER Classified Ads: Monday, 5:00 p.m.* þ Wednesday, 5:00 p.m. Classified Display: Friday, 3 p.m. þ Tuesday, 5 p.m. Legal Notices: Friday, noon þ N/A Retail Advertising: Friday, 3 p.m. þ Tuesday, 3 p.m. * Monday holidays the Classified deadline will be Friday at 5 p.m. Copyright 2020 The ttt. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any manner without specific written permission of the publisher. All rights reserved ttttntrtntttbr The food pantry needs donations of non-perishable food items all year round. For more information, Call: 261 -70001303 Jasmine St., Ste. 101 Fernandina Beach, FL NLPSA Seniors, disabled adults, and their caregivers can get free, live help from trained customer service specialists and information about local programs and services through ElderSource’s HelpLine, according to a news release. ElderSource specialists are trained to listen to callers’ concerns and to help them access local agencies, services and programs, according to Linda Levin, CEO of ElderSource, a local nonprofit organization des ignated by the state as the Area Agency on Aging and Aging and Disability Resource Center for Northeast Florida. The agency provides information and refer ral resources for caregivers and seniors in Northeast Florida’s seven-county area. “ElderSource’s HelpLine is designed to help callers find the help they need to live as safely and as independently as pos sible,” Levin said in the release. “During the ongoing COVID-19 crisis, the HelpLine is proving to be a crucial source of reliable information and help to seniors and caregivers in our service area.” ElderSource HelpLine counselors work with callers to explain what resources are available and to help them enroll in the programs for which they are eligible. The service is part of the federal Aging and Disability Resource Centers program, which addresses the frustrations many older adults, people with disabilities, and family members experience when trying to learn about and access service pro grams and support. An additional program that ElderSource offers helps area seniors understand their Medicare benefits that cover expenses due to COVID19 testing and illness. The HelpLine assistance is available to persons of all income levels living in Baker, Clay, Duval, Flagler, Nassau, St. Johns and Volusia counties. The HelpLine specialists are avail able Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The ElderSource HelpLine number is 1-888-2424464.trbtttrttrbtfb“b“b‘”b NL Wednesday 04.22.20.indd 2

PAGE 3

City Commissioner Chip Ross, a doctor in the Emergency Department at Baptist Medical Center Nassau, said one of those benchmarks could be when DeSantis signs an order reopening the two state parks on the island – Fort Clinch and Amelia Island State Park – along with a declaration from Dr. Eugenia Ngo-Seidel, the director of Florida Department of Health – Nassau, that reopening the beaches would be the right move. Ngo-Seidel was on the call but did not give her opinion on the potential of a declaration. “We have not had any specific guidance,” Ngo-Seidel said. “The state Surgeon General’s Office has said there are discussions going on.” Ross said Nassau County’s beaches are “a magnet,” and social distancing rules might not be enough to keep people apart. “The more people arriving at this time, the higher the chance of spreading COVID-19 in our community. And reopening the beaches will most likely draw a large amount of people to the island,” Ross said. “Many believe that everyone using the beaches will stay far apart and there will be no increased risk of infection. From experience here and experience elsewhere, we know that at least some of the people will not maintain an appropriate distance. What percentage of people that is, we don’t know.” The concept of opening Nassau County beaches to only Nassau County residents has been suggested on social media, but Fernandina Beach City Attorney Tammi Bach told the News-Leader that both city and county government agreed to keep the beaches accessible to the general public in order to secure federal and state funding for beach renourishment, a multimillion dollar annual project managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Ross, Leeper, and County Manager and Attorney Mike Mullin also said it could not be done since Florida’s beaches are legally open to the public. Besides an increase in the possibility of spreading the virus among the public, officials also discussed those who would be on the front lines at the beach – lifeguards, beach rangers, and sheriff’s deputies. The rangers work under the Fernandina Beach Police Department to enforce laws on the beach. Ross noted that lifeguards are usually high school and college students and that beach rangers have an average age of 68, putting them in a group that has a high risk of serious health issues if they develop COVID-19, the disease the novel coronavirus causes. Sheriff Leeper said his department has received approximately 60 calls reporting people being on the beach. He said the Nassau County Sheriff’s Office has not issued any citations, only asking people to leave the beach. Fernandina Beach City Manager Dale Martin said the Fernandina Beach Police Department has also not issued citations. Danny Leeper suggested May 1 as a target date for a “soft opening.” “We are hopeful we can come together and start planning for a May 1 — maybe a soft reopening — maybe start the conversation, start the planning process and see how it may look going into that day so we will be ready and not have another conference call,” he said. The Fernandina Beach Fire Department oversees the city’s lifeguards. Chief Ty Silcox said the department is moving ahead with training with the goal to have lifeguards ready to hit the beaches May 1. “I don’t know that that will be when they are deployed,” Silcox said. “I think it comes down to when is the best and safest time to deploy those assets. I think we could come up with some other possibilities of how we could do this and what we could do once the decision is made by both commissions to open or keep the beaches closed, whatever is the choice.” Langley said having a target date will help his organization begin to plan in conjunction with the hospitality industry, but cautioned against opening too quickly, which he said could backfire. “From an optics standpoint, I think the worst-case scenario would be if we open them, and have to go back and close them because of something that occurred,” Langley said. “I think there is some demand in the marketplace, but I’d rather see us ... make a good decision and minimize our risk of negative push back.” “Our residents are getting restless,” Danny Leeper said. “They are seeing what’s happening to the north and south and I’m not going to do something just because the neighbor’s doing it. I want to do it in the right way. I want to give our residents hope of what we can maybe see in the near future.” Ross said the virus cannot be predicted, and plans should be flexible. “We can make all the plans we want, but this virus is going to decide what it wants to do,” Ross said. “I think the numberone number we should be looking at is the rate of infection, and how opening the beaches will impact that. When they are not going up, or are going down, then we can consider what our options are.” The Fernandina Beach City Commission had a regular meeting scheduled for 6 p.m. April 21, which will be conducted via videoconference, at which Martin said the matter would be discussed. The BOCC scheduled a special meeting for 10 a.m. Wednesday, April 22. Do you have hard water problems? FINANCING AVAILABLE $100 OFF NEW WATER CONDITIONERS(904) 612-3002 watersofteners.com 463155 State Road 200 Yulee, FL 32097 Authorized Water Treatment Dealer Unwanted smells and rust stains on your xtures? 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Continued from page 1 rfThe Nassau County Board of County Commissioners held a special Friday morning meeting during which they voted unanimously to receive the advice of a special county-city committee about how to safely reopen the beaches here. That committee held a conference call Tuesday morning. Gov. Ron DeSantis left it up to local officials to decide whether to close, and when to close, public beaches in an effort to enforce social distancing in public to mitigate the community spread of the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, which causes a disease called COVID-19. Fernandina Beach closed its public beaches as of 5 p.m. Saturday, March 21, and Nassau County did the same beginning at 6 a.m. Sunday, March 22, due to spring break crowds flocking to island beaches after Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry closed Duval County’s beaches at 5 p.m. that Friday. Social media posts quickly pointed out that the beaches were still open in Nassau County, and visitors and residents took advantage until the last minute. After a discussion Friday morning that resulted in a unanimous vote to donate $50,000 to Barnabas Center to assist those who have been furloughed from their jobs because of the coronavirus pandemic, and after a report about how the Nassau County Council on Aging has been in touch with several restaurants about providing meals at a set cost of $8 per meal to help feed “seniors in desperate need,” the discussion turned to the “surprise” decision Thursday night to re-open the beaches in Duval County on Friday evening, though with some major restrictions. County Manager and Attorney Mullin said the beaches in Jacksonville will be open daily from 6 a.m. to 11 a.m. and from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., and that visitors cannot sit and “can’t remain motionless.” A Facebook post from state Rep. Cord Byrd adds that the Duval beaches are only open for “essential activities, including walking, running, fishing, surfing, biking, swimming. Social distancing required – no group gatherings. Leashed dogs allowed during all open hours.” Mullin also mentioned hearing from UF Shands hospital that people on the beach should probably stay 26 feet away from each other instead of just six. Mullin emphasized the need for plans and suggested that a conference call with city of Fernandina Beach staff, Emergency Management, and the Florida Department of Health – Nassau needs to occur so that recommendations need to be formulated. Doing anything before then would “problematic,” he said. Emergency Management Director Greg Foster said his department has reached out to regional contacts about the Duval County reopening last weekend, but “it was a surprise to us.” Foster also expressed concern that authorities there will find people not following the new rfnntnrbfntt PEG DAVIS/NEWS-LEADERThe Nassau County Board of County Commissioners met Friday morning via videoconferencing software streamed online for the public. The public can watch BOCC meetings and some other meetings at nassauclerk.com/watch-meetings. rules and the beaches in Duval could just be shut down again in a few days. Nassau County Sheriff Bill Leeper expressed some exasperation, saying he had hoped for better regional cooperation, like during hurricanes. “During this pandemic, we haven’t had that,” Leeper said. He also expressed a major concern about public safety and the possibility of putting lifeguards in danger if they were to be deployed as usual on the island’s beaches and needed to go to someone’s aid, for example. Leeper said the weekend would give Nassau County the opportunity to observe what happens in Jacksonville, and said, while in favor of opening the beaches here eventually, “Let’s err on the side of caution.”ntb NL Wednesday 04.22.20.indd 3 4/21/20 5:54 PM

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þA The food pantry needs donations of non-perishable food items all year round. For more information, Call: 261-70001303 Jasmine St., Ste. 101 Fernandina Beach, FL NLPSA Contact A News-LeaderAdvertising Salesperson for Details To Include Your Business On the Business Card BillBoard261-3696 Nassau Fence & Deck, Inc.INSTALL AND REPAIR(904) 261-6577 www.fencenassau.com Deer Walk Shopping Center next to Dave Turner Plumbing 474378 East State Road 200 (A1A) 904.310.6915BEST FLAVORS & BEST PRICES PREMIUM VAPEE-CIGS MODS COILS E-JUICEWARNING: This product contains nicotine. Nicotine is an addictive chemical. Preserving and Protecting the Public TrustVETERANS ASSISTANCEBob Sullivan76347 Veterans Way, Yulee, FL 32097 904-548-4670 | 800-958-3496 | 904-548-4539bsullivan@nassauclerk.com | www.nassauclerk.com Contact Louis A LlerandiAgency OwnerLlerandi Agency474384 E State Road 200 Fernandina Beach, FL 32034 lallerandi@farmersagent.com LLERANDI AGENCY bsullivan@nassauclerk.com | www.nassauclerk.com Owner Freddie Cantrell Commercial & Residential 100% Quality Guarantee! 904.707.1475 Call Now for a Free EstimateLicensed & Insured When Quality Counts FIND THE RIGHT BUSINESS FOR THE JOB RIGHT HERE! LOCAL BUSINESS BILLBOARD NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Public Hearing is sched uled for Tuesday, May 5, 2020, at 6:00 PM in the City Commission Chambers, 204 Ash Street Fernandina Beach, Florida to consider the following application: ORDINANCE 2020-10 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF FERNANDINA BEACH, FLORIDA, ESTABLISH ING AND AMENDING FEES FOR THE AIRPORT AND PLANNING & CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT; PROVID ING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EF FECTIVE DATE.Interested parties may appear at said hearing and be heard as to the advisability of any action, which may be considered. Any persons with disabilities requiring accommodations in order to participate in this program or activity should contact 310-3115, TTY/TDD 711 or through the Florida Relay Service at 1-800-955-8771 at least 24 hours in advance to request such accommodation. IF ANY PERSON DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE BOARD/COMMISSION WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT SUCH HEARING, S/ HE WILL NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. For information, please contact the Staff of the City Clerk’s Office, 204 Ash Street, between the hours of 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM, Monday through Friday, (904) 310-3115. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY COMMISSION CITY OF FERNANDINA BEACH NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Public Hearing is scheduled for Tuesday, May 5, 2020, at 6:00 PM in the City Commission Chambers, 204 Ash Street Fernandina Beach, Florida to con sider the following application: ORDINANCE 2020-11 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF FERNANDINA BEACH, FLORIDA, AMENDING THE LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE (LDC) BY AMENDING SECTIONS 4.05.14 (TREE PROTECTION REQUIREMENTS); SECTION 11.08.04 (SPECIFIC PENALTIES FOR VIOLATION OF TREE PERMIT REQUIREMENTS) AND SECTION 10.03.00 (ADMIN ISTRATIVE WAIVERS); PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.Interested parties may appear at said hearing and be heard as to the advisability of any action, which may be considered. Any persons with disabilities requiring accommodations in order to participate in this program or activity should contact 310-3115, TTY/TDD 711 or through the Florida Relay Service at 1-800-955-8771 at least 24 hours in advance to request such accommodation. IF ANY PERSON DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE BOARD/COMMISSION WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT SUCH HEARING, S/HE WILL NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. For information, please contact the Staff of the City Clerk’s Office, 204 Ash Street, between the hours of 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM, Monday through Friday, (904) 310-3115. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY COMMISSION CITY OF FERNANDINA BEACH The Nassau County Board of County Commissioners has approved a donation to the Barnabas Center for programs that provide emergency assis tance to individuals who have been furloughed due to COVID19. For information on eligibil ity, call (904) 261-7000 or visit BarnabasNassau.org. It is also requested that you call in advance for a telephone pre-screening for crisis assistance, food stamp and/ or Medicaid applications before visiting the Barnabas office. The money will be used for emergency financial assistance, including: Short-term payment assistance with past due rent, mort gage, and utilities (electric, water, gas), etc. Applicants must be able to document loss of income due to furlough status, job loss, or reduced work hours; Assistance in applying for public benefits programs, i.e. food stamps and Medicaid; Referrals and information for additional services. The money will also provide for food assistance, available as follows: Food Pantry, Suite 101, 1303 Jasmine St., Fernandina Beach – Monday, 1 to 3 p.m.; Tuesday and Wednesday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Thursday through Sunday, closed. Hilliard Food Distribution at First Baptist Church, 15850 C.R. 108, Hilliard – Third Monday each month, arrive no earlier than 10:30 a.m.; drive-thru style. Weekly Food Assistance: Hilliard at First Baptist Church, 15850 C.R. 108 – Every Wednesday, 3 to 5 p.m. Weekly Food Assistance: Callahan at First Baptist Church, 45090 Green Ave. – Every rfFernandina Beach has many iconic locales – the marina and waterfront, homes and churches from the last century, a reno vated train station – but none evokes historic Fernandina more than the Palace Saloon, dubbed “Florida’s oldest bar.” Most downtown businesses have shut down due to Gov. Ron DeSantis’ order to shutter nonessential businesses, but the Palace Saloon remains open – just not as a bar. “We are a liquor store,” said bartender and current Fernandina Beach Mayor Johnny Miller. Miller stands behind the bar at the Palace several days and nights a week. He said the Palace is open for two five-hour shifts a day, thanks to the governor’s determination that alcohol sales are an essential service, though DeSantis also prohibited bars from seating customers. “People want normalcy. They want to be able to come in,” Miller said in the empty saloon that he says is doing 10% of its regular business. “I still have people come in and try to order drinks, and (I) have to tell them we’ve been shut for over a month. Some people say they have come from Jacksonville thinking they may be able to get a drink here.” Customers can still enjoy the Palace’s famous Pirate Punch, but not on the premises. “You can get a gallon of punch, but they have locked seals on them,” Miller said. “Any store that has a package license can still sell, but they have to be sealed. Everything in the bar has a lid on it. If people come in and want a cup or a glass, I can sell you individual beers, but I can’t open it and you can’t drink it on the street.” Another downtown staple still open for business is Atlantic Seafood Bait & Tackle, which has been in operation since 1975. The shop, located at the Fernandina Harbor Marina, is owned by Charlie Taylor and Ann Coonrod, Taylor’s sister. Taylor manages the store. He said business is down 60%, forc ing him to reduce the hours of some employees, but he has not had to lay anyone off. “We still have some loyal customers, locals as well as tourists,” Taylor said from behind the counter. “We sell wholesale to restaurants, but that is all shut down.” Taylor said that while the downturn in business has affected the quantity of products the store sells, he is struggling to adapt. “We try to carry fresh prod ucts,” he said. “Our customers are very, very happy with our fresh seafood. They appreciate it.” While Atlantic Seafood has been affected by hurricanes, Taylor said those were shortterm effects, lasting only a week, while the coronavirus is longterm. “We are having to totally adjust,” he said. “But, we plan to stay open.” Another downtown fixture is still fulfilling the public’s need for caffeine boosts. Amelia Island Coffee, like many restaurants on the island, is open for take-out business only. Manager Ricky Robbins said cus tomers can’t sit down and chat as usual while enjoying a meal or a snack, but they can take their orders to go. Robbins said he has taken the opportunity to sit in the coffee shop’s seating area, which surprised some of his customers. “My office is upstairs, because I don’t want to take a table away from a guest,” Robbins said. “But, because we were slow, I wanted to give our regulars more of a sense of ease, that I was there making sure everything was getting done as it should be.” So, he said, he began using one of the tables in the shop for a headquar ters. “One morning, a couple of people saw me eating at the table. They told me I couldn’t eat here,” Robbins said, laughing. “I told them I am the manager (and) this is my office now. I’m socially distancing. I’m here 10 hours a day. I have to eat.” Back at the Palace Saloon, Miller says that, just like during hurricanes, the people of Amelia Island are coming together as a community. This time they are taking care of each other by staying apart. “People are doing the right thing,” Miller said. “I honestly attribute that to people, the older community, taking it seriously. “People have a lot of respect for each other here. I think a small community like this, where people actually know each other they know somebody who could get sick. People know peo ple who could be affected directly. It’s not just a random, obscure thing. It’s actually going to affect people they know. Small towns are seeing this as their neighbors. This is just like hurricanes. When you are in a tragedy, people really grow a sense of community. They stick together.”ntbt JULIA ROBERTS/NEWS-LEADERThe Palace Saloon, above left, has been through fire, hurricanes, and Prohibition, and now is struggling to survive a global pandemic by operating as a liquor store where patrons can still purchase a gallon of the establishment’s signature Pirate’s Punch for takeout. And while you cannot sit and sip at Amelia Island Coffee, you can take out anything on the menu and chat with manager Ricky Robbins, above right, who has temporarily moved his office into the seating area of the restaurant. t ttHELP Continued on page 5 NL Wednesday 04.22.20.indd 4 4/21/20 6:00 PM

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visit StoryandSongBookstore.com or call 904-601-2118. 1430 Park Ave. (14th St. entrance to Amelia Park) Parking spaces aplenty Time for Jigsaw Puzzles! Choose from a variety of images for kids and adults with 200 to 2,000 pieces.know I made a difference as a magistrate. People would tell me I did.” In addition to her other volunteer work, Carver is involved with Jacksonville Area Legal Aid and is the current president of the Robert M. Foster Nassau County American Inn of Court, the local chapter of the American Inns of Court, a national organization that promotes professionalism, integrity, and ethics in the legal community. Carver said looking at the story of the person before her will be her priority as a judge. “Judges don’t judge people. They judge behavior and they try to solve problems,” she said. “That’s my perspective. There’s a lot of very nice, smart people who do some dumb things. So, you’ve made a mistake. You’ve got to pay the price, but let’s fix it, and let’s get you back on track.”Continued from page 1 Wednesday, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Weekly Food Assistance: Fernandina Beach at First Baptist Church, 1600 S. Eighth St. – Every Thursday, 12 to 2 p.m. In addition, the money will be used to provide urgent medical and dental care to adults who are uninsured, have low to moderate income, and do not have a primary care doctor or a regular dentist. Barnabas CEO Wanda Lanier said in a news release from the county, “We are ready to help individuals and families who have lost income due to job loss, reduced work hours, etc. during the COVID-19 crisis. Services that are available to Nassau County residents include food assistance, financial assistance with rent/mortgage and utility payments, and urgent medical and dental care.” For information about available assistance and eligibility, contact Barnabas Center at (904) 2617000 or visit BarnabasNassau.org. The Nassau County Chamber of Commerce is also offering its services to workers who are left unemployed or unpaid due to the coronavirus pandemic, according to a news release. In partnership with Barnabas Center, the Nassau County Chamber of Commerce has created a Workforce Assistance Program and Information Hotline. Individuals who need assistance with rent, utilities, food, and other necessities may also contact the Nassau County Chamber of Commerce office at (904) 261-3248 or via email info@ NassauCountyFLChamber.com. Applicants may be eligible if their work hours have been reduced due to coronavirus or if their workplace closes or instructs employees not to go to work, resulting in not being paid. Proof of Nassau County residency is required. The Chamber of Commerce is also providing paper unemployment applications. More than 1,600 applications have been distributed and are still available outside of the Chamber of Commerce office, located at 961687 Gateway Blvd., Suite 101-G, Fernandina Beach. Job seekers are encouraged to continue to visit NassauCountyFLChamber.com for available job openings and resources. Continued from page 4 Michael Miller of the NewsLeader compiled this report from records at the Nassau County Clerk of the Circuit Court. Arrest indicates suspicion of a crime, not guilt. To report information about a crime, contact the Fernandina Beach Police Department at 277-7342 or the Nassau County Sheriff’s Office at 225-5174. The “We Tip” program – 1-80078Crime – also allows callers to leave anonymous tips. Antuan Marcelus Scott, 37, 528 S. 13th Terrace, Fernandina Beach, April 9, unlawful sale, manufacturing, or delivery of a controlled substance and introducing contraband into a jail. Other charges are pending. Brian Keith Holtkamp, 31, 85015 Phillips Road, Yulee, April 9, unlawful sale, manufacturing, or delivery of a controlled substance and introducing contraband into a jail. Other charges are pending. Amy Lucia Brown, 29, 3753 Finch Place, Yulee, April 10, possession of methamphetamine, possession of heroin, and possession of drug paraphernalia with residue. Jeremy George Starkes, 28, 94303 Duck Lane, Fernandina Beach, April 12, felony batter with a prior conviction. Carrie Louise Cigic, 54, 571 S. Massachusetts Ave., Deland, Fla., April 13, DUI and possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis. David Cazarez Shamahs, 22, 27070 Pond Drive, Hilliard, April 16, uttering forged/counterfeit bill. Melissa Raydale Hayes, 37, 83814 Haddock Road, Yulee, April 16, theft over $300 and under $5,000. Issachar Ben Melchisedec, 57, homeless, Fernandina Beach, April 16, battery on a law enforcement officer. Other charges are pending. James Ellis Beasley, 24, 100 Mary Powell Drive, Apt. 133, St. Marys, Ga., April 17, witness tampering and battery involving domestic violence. Kristopher Jason Homblette, 41, 2811 Lauderdale Drive, Trenton, Fla., April 19, third DUI violation within 10 years. Grieving the death of a loved one is difficult and painful. In light of COVID-19 guidelines related to gatherings and social distancing, many mourners may not know where to turn, according to The Bereavement Department of Community Hospice & Palliative Care. The department is offering a free virtual presentation and bereavement discussion on Friday, April 24, from 2 to 3 p.m. “Using video conferencing for our bereavement group is easier than I thought,” Katie McConnell, a bereavement counselor, said in the release. “It helps to bring us together and know we are not alone in the middle of all this.” The virtual presentation will review healthy ways to deal with the grieving process and how to overcome obstacles to your grieving. Go to https://bit. ly/griefCOVID to register or call (904) 407-6464. Community Hospice & Palliative Care will continue to add additional sessions as a benefit to the community until inperson bereavement sessions are able to resume. The following report was compiled by Michael Miller of the News-Leader from the April 16 court docket of the Circuit Court for Judge James H. Daniel. Kevin Robert Black denied violation of probation for two counts of possession of a controlled substance. Isaiah Emmanuel Brazell pleaded not guilty to aggravated fleeing and eluding, driving while his license was suspended or revoked, and failure to leave information for the owner of an unattended vehicle after causing property damage. Latoya Catrice Clay had a motion to be released granted with GPS monitoring. She is charged with possession with intent to sell, deliver, manufacture, or purchase cocaine, possession with intent to sell, deliver, manufacture, or purchase a controlled substance, possession of a firearm or concealed weapon by a convicted felon, possession with intent to sell, deliver, manufacture, or purchase cannabis, and possession of cocaine. Skyler Marie Ezell pleaded not guilty to possession of a controlled substance. Michael Melvin Hoffman pleaded not guilty to a threat to use a destructive device and obstruction of or opposition to a police officer without violence. He was adjudicated guilty and sentenced to 22.8 months in Florida State Prison with credit for time served. He owes $418 in court costs, $100 to the State Attorney’s Office, and $150 to the Public Defender’s Office. Gabrielle Maureen Johnson pleaded guilty to three counts of possession with intent to sell, manufacture, or deliver a controlled substance. She was adjudicated guilty and sentenced to three months in Nassau County Jail with credit for time served, followed by 18 months of drug offender probation that includes substance abuse evaluation and follow-up along with frequent drug testing. Early termination will be considered after nine months of successful completion of all terms and conditions. She owes $1,036 in court costs, $200 to the State Attorney’s Office, and $300 to the Public Defender’s Office. Cole Johnson pleaded guilty to dealing in stolen property. He was adjudicated guilty and sentenced to 18 months and 15 days in Florida State Prison with credit for time served. His sentence will run currently with a case in Duval County. He owes $418 in court costs, $100 to the State Attorney’s Office, and $150 to the Public Defender’s Office. Keith Edward Kral pleaded not guilty to discharging a firearm from a vehicle, possession of a weapon or ammunition by a convicted felon, and obstruction of or opposition to a police officer without violence. Jermaine Lamar Martin admitted violation of probation for possession of cocaine and possession of a controlled substance. He was adjudicated guilty and sentenced to time served. Probation was revoked and terminated. Outstanding costs were converted to civil judgment. Vincent Edward McCollum pleaded guilty to fraudulent use of a credit card and possession of methamphetamine. He was adjudicated guilty and sentence to time served. He owes $936 in court costs, $200 to the State Attorney’s Office, $300 to the Public Defender’s Office, and $300 for restitution to the victim. Nicholas Jay Moore admitted violation of probation for two charges of grand theft. He was adjudicated guilty and sentenced to time served. Probation was revoked and terminated, and outstanding costs were converted to civil judgment. Amanda Leann Mott was ruled to be incompetent to proceed on a charge of fleeing or attempting to elude a police officer. She is to be evaluated for possible involuntary hospitalization. Travis Eugene Murray pleaded guilty to grand theft of a motor vehicle. He was adjudicated guilty and sentenced to time served. He owes $418 in court costs and $100 to the State Attorney’s Office. Mary Joyce Parrish admitted violation of probation for possession of drug paraphernalia and pleaded guilty to possession of a controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia. She was adjudicated guilty and sentenced to 60 days in Nassau County Jail with credit for time served. Probation was revoked and terminated. Outstanding costs were converted to civil judgment. Devin Lincoln Southerlin was sentenced to 12 months of probation for domestic battery. He must enroll and complete the batterers intervention program and undergo mental health evaluation and follow-up. Early termination will be considered after he successfully completes all conditions of probation. He owes $223 in court costs, $50 to the State Attorney’s Office, and $151 and $201 in surcharges related to the nature of the offense. Jennifer Sue Sylvester pleaded guilty to battery on a person 65 or older and obstruction of or opposition to a police officer without violence. She was adjudicated guilty and sentenced to time served and 18 months of probation. She must undergo mental health evaluation and follow-up. She owes $418 in court costs, $100 to the State Attorney’s Office, $150 to the Public Defender’s Office, and $201 and $151 in surcharges related to the nature of the offense. James Ernest Washington pleaded guilty to possession of methamphetamine, possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis, and having no valid driver’s license. He was adjudicated guilty and sentenced to time served. He owes $518 in court costs, $100 to the State Attorney’s Office, and $150 to the Public Defender’s Office.Oil prices went into negative territory for the first time in history Monday. The price of U.S. crude dropped nearly $56 per barrel or 306% to settle at -$37.63 per barrel, according to a news release from AAA – The Auto Club Group. The one-day drop is the largest on record dating back to 1983. The final price is far below the previous all-time low of $10.42 per barrel set on March 31, 1983. The unprecedented drop comes as the global crude supply begins to backup with nowhere for it to go. Fuel demand is down due to COVID19 and storage facilities are at or near capacity. “This doesn’t mean gas prices will go into the negative too,” said Mark Jenkins, spokesman for AAA. “Gasoline futures only lost 4 cents today. That’s because gasoline supplies are being throttled down. While three North American refineries have closed, others are reducing their production rates. Currently the state average is on track to eventually slip into the $1.40s, but this remains a very fluid situation, as with everything else during this pandemic.” Monday’s average price for gasoline in Florida was $1.82 per gallon. The daily average was 60 cents less than two months ago, and 93 cents less than this time last year. The Nassau County average on Monday was $1.701. Daily gas price averages can be found at https://gasprices. aaa.com, and state and metro averages can be found at https:// gasprices.aaa.com/?state=FL. Starkes Homblette rfrnrtrbrt bbrrrb rf rf NL Wednesday 04.22.20.indd 5 4/21/20 6:01 PM

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þA þO rf þNþw þE rntb The News-Leader is published with pride weekly for the people of Nassau County by Community Newspapers, Inc., Athens, Georgia. We believe that strong newspapers build strong communi ties – “Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to the truth, integrity, quality and hard work. þR þP þD þE þA þBþO rþ n fþC þp þE þRr þD þB rn þSþp þE þ þEþB þR rf þP þD ntbrf þDfþN þSþm rn þTrþm þCþm rf ntnntb tntnnnt nt nf It’s Sunday morning on what seems like day 750 of the coronavirus pandemic. Things seem like they’re happening – some beaches opening, the hope of some state parks, too, but maybe not. The curve appears to be plateauing in some areas, but in other areas it’s shooting up like a rocket. The weirdness of all this can be capsulized in one sentence: The governor of New York seemed upbeat Saturday when he reported that for the first time in two weeks the death toll fell below 550 – seriously! As an AP psychology teacher, I would have relished the opportunity to discuss with my students people’s response to this crisis and their behaviors. Sadly, this won’t happen because decision makers have closed schools for the remainder of the year. I could raise the issue virtually, online, but that’s a sad substitute for real, actual, face-to-face, teacher-to-class discussion. Oh well, such is life. Concerning our response to crisis, I would introduce students to the concepts of internal locus of control and external locus of control. Internals believe that the world is a safe, predictable place, that they are in control of their lives and that things are going to turn out well. They know that because they are in control. Research indicates that internals are happier, healthier – both physically and mentally – and more optimistic than externals. Externals, on the other hand, believe that their lives are determined by outside forces, fate, luck, etc. They believe that the world is an unsafe place, unpredictable and chaotic. Externals aren’t sure whether things are going to turn out well or not because of the absence of control. Control, then, is a big, big deal. Consider Martin Seligman’s concept of learned helplessness. Seligman believes that control, even the perception of control, has a major impact on our lives and whether we feel confident about things or not. Obviously, the more control – again, even perceived control – we believe we have over our lives, the better off we are, or believe ourselves to be. So much for the psychology lesson. I do believe, though, that the concepts of internal locus of control, external locus of control, and learned helplessness do go a long way toward explaining our behaviors so far in this crisis and our response to it, because I believe that most people in the world think they have no control over this situation and that the world is an unsafe, unpredictable place. So, what do people who have learned to be helpless do? What do people who crave some sort of control over their lives, even the perception of control, do? Well, they buy bathroom tissue – lots of it – and paper towels and hand sanitizers, even though they’re told that regular soap is more effective. They can’t control much in their lives but, by gosh, they can hoard paper products and all things that they believe will sanitize every surface and every nook and cranny in every possession they have – homes, cars, garden tools, children, older family members, and themselves. We in Florida are accustomed to lack of control in specific situations, particularly hurricanes. During hurricanes, we try to exercise control by obsessively checking spaghetti models every 15 minutes, by filling sandbags, by putting plywood over windows and doors, and finally, by evacuating. At the end of the day, as we creep along in lines of cars filled with people and possessions on interstates hopelessly overburdened, we feel good, in control, because we’ve done all we could. That’s the problem with this COVID-19 thing; we don’t know what to do. Internal locus of control – contentment, optimism, happiness – is elusive because things keep changing by the minute: open the beaches – no, don’t open the beaches; close schools— no, don’t close schools; masks will keep you safe – no, masks don’t keep you safe; get tested as soon as you can – no, get tested only if you exhibit symptoms; don’t go out in public – no, it’s OK to go outside if you’re exercising; these are critical jobs – no, professional wrestling is not a critical job, and on and on. Just know this: As things go on, as things become clearer, as things become more predictable, we will feel better about our lives. We’ll feel better because that old perception of control, or better yet, actual control of our lives, will come back again. The dust will have settled, and some semblance of normalcy will return. I don’t know about you, but I can’t wait. And, what will really be nice is to see shelves packed with paper products again!rfntJust read (“Waiting on tests results causes its own stress”) this front-page feature story in yesterday’s þ  NewsLeader þ  detailing an individual’s personal medical history and current health issues, including how all this has related to his family members. Nice photo taken in an orange grove. I am aware of several serious neighborhood flu cases, one involving hospitalization, just within the past 90 days. Should you be serious about publishing personal health articles on Amelia residents, I shall be happy to provide such information following my next dentist or urology appointment or my annual physical. When traveling the U.S. many years ago, you would see Burma Shave (no longer in business) roadside signage with humorous quips, and one would be very appropriate with respect to the aforementioned article but I dare not repeat it in this instance. (Example of one: A MAN A MISS A CAR A CURVE HE KISSED THE MISS AND MISSED THE CURVE BURMA SHAVE!) Suggestion: I would like to recommend you combine the Wednesday and Friday publications into one until the COVID-19 pandemic has abated and officially declared over and restaurants, stores, etc. have re-opened for business. Downtown Fernandina looks like an old ghost town. The amount of news at the moment doesn’t justify the time you have to spend and expense to publish two separate weekly editions. Your subscribers will understand. Maybe putting two Sudokus in the one issue would suffice! þ  Bill Huntley þ  Amelia IslandbftrftOpen letter to city manager and city commissioners. I’ll make this short and sweet – I support the closing of our beaches until the pandemic crisis is over. I am concerned that in order to enforce social distance, we will be diverting critical first responder resources to policing the beaches which I do not think is a judicious use of their talent. In addition, I am concerned that the opening of our beach es will encourage people from other areas to come to our county and bring the additional risk of infection. I know these are challenging times and this is a contro versial issue. However, I feel public safety should be our primary concern. Jan Cote-Merow Fernandina BeachfttDear Mr. Knocke, thank you for your comments to the commissioners regarding the proposed amendments to the Tree Protection ordinance (“Loving our trees,” April 17). We welcome public engagement regarding our tree canopy. I need to point out that the amendments to the Tree Protection Ordinance were proposed by Planning and Conservation (Department) staff and approved by the Planning Advisory Board. City staff proposed these amend ments because they have observed that these aspects of the Tree Protection ordinance are not working. The observations of the ATC Board are in line with those of city staff on these points and ATC does support these amendments. We did participate in discussion of these points with the Planning Advisory Board and some of these points have been under discussion for years; however, ATC did not bring forward this proposal. In terms of the penalties for residents: 1. Please note the difference between the proposed fees for residents and those for builders and developers. It is appropriate for resident penalties to be lower. 2. The current fines have become outdated and they do not seem to be effective. Many residents fail to recognize the importance of these trees for their wellbeing on our bar rier island in terms of temperature moderation, protection from storm winds, flooding, and general sustainability of the island. At least until the city is able to get the attention of residents on this issue, the penalties need to be sufficient to accomplish that. Please refer to the attached document that we distributed to city commissioners for further discussion of penalties. ATC also supports and promotes native shade tree plant ing by citizens, other organizations such as KNB, and our own organization. This year, we had planned three planting efforts: the American Beach Community Center, the curve on Simmons Rd. and one in the city which had not yet been determined. Unfortunately, only the first has been accom plished due to COVID-19 and other distractions. We hope to do better during our next planting season. Planting new trees is important, as is the development of succession plans for tracking the life cycles of the trees and planning for their replacement, as you have indicated. We have been advocating for succession planning with both the City and County since 2013. Although planting is critical, maintaining our older, estab lished trees is most important. These are the trees that provide the greatest protection, remove the most pollutants, etc. (Please refer to our website for more detail: þ  amelia treeconservancy.org.) These are also the trees that provide the character (sense of place) of the island. Those of us in ATC share your perspective regarding Simmons Park and tried to prevent or reduce removal of trees on that parcel. That part of the island has had most of its canopy removed. ATC is an all-volunteer community-supported 501(c)(3). We do not request any financial support from the city or county. While we have accepted small donations from community small businesses, we do not solicit donations from large corporations. We are happy to see that you are such a strong advocate for trees and for planting. We hope that you will help us advo cate for our trees and complete more planting by donating or becoming a member of ATC. Your efforts would certainly be welcomed. Margaret Kirkland, chair Amelia Tree ConservancyffrtOne big reason pharmaceuticals, as many other indus tries, have gone offshore is because the federal tax code is based on taxing production. This federal income/payroll tax system forces costs and prices up on U.S. goods. It is time to end this sniffling “direct taxation” code on jobs, income, investment and savings. Taxes do change behavior as shown by a stimulated economy caused by the Tax Cuts & Jobs Act. Unleash our financial freedom as protected by the U.S. Constitution before the 16th þ  Amendment. Imagine no IRS, income tax, payroll taxes and tax withholding. Start a national sales/consumption tax at a rate to replace the old system revenues and fund a monthly tax rebate that helps most the impoverished. This plan is called the FAIRtax, bill HR 25 now in the Ways and Means Committee. þ  It is a simple, efficient and visible tax plan. The FAIRtax would bring both lost and new businesses to our economy, increase individual dispos able income, and renew the America Dream of free market capitalism. Tax revenues would quickly increase to pay off the $2.2 trillion CARES Act plus more, unless the politi cians spend the new-found money. Learn more and view the videos at fairtax.org Paul Livingston JacksonvilleToday is the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, a global event in support of the environment. Earth Day was created in response to a series of calamitous ecological events including an 800-mile oil spill off the coast of Santa Barbara, Calif. that killed tens of thousands of seabirds, sea lions, and dolphins. After the spill, there was a massive outcry to push for environmental regulations. The first Earth Day was celebrated by 20 million people across the United States. A move ment was created on that spring day to focus our country on air and water pollution, oil spills, pesticides, and species extinction. The National Environmental Policy Act was the first of many new environmental protection laws sparked by the outcry. Cartoonist Walt Kelly created an antipollution poster featuring his comic strip charac ter Pogo with the quotation, “We have met the enemy and he is us.” This refrain remains true today as we are faced with a new set of existential concerns. Scientific data now shows that biodiversity is declining at a faster rate than at any time in his tory. A new United Nations report compiled by 500 scientists shows an alarming trend that could undermine life as we know it on Earth: “The loss of trees, grasslands and wetlands is driving spe cies extinctions, intensifying climate change and pushing the planet toward a sixth mass species extinction,” the report states. Living in the midst of a destabilizing pandemic, the last thing we need is a collapse of nature lurk ing around the corner. The health of ecosystems on which we and all other species depend are deteriorating more rapidly than ever. The founda tions of our economy, livelihood, food security, health and quality of life are being eroded world wide. The greatest cause of biodiversity decline is habitat loss, both on land and at sea. The victims are not just birds and woodland animals, but also the smaller creatures we depend on such as bees, butterflies, and beetles. Insects sit at the base of the food web. If they disappear, entire landscapes will change. The insect extinction rate is eight times faster than that of mammals, birds, or rep tiles. Sadly, the biome is not widely understood or appreciated. The biome is the interaction of all living things – from microorganisms to giant blue whales. It’s what makes this planet habitable. “If biodiversity disappears, so do people,” says Dr. Stephen Woodley of the International Union for Conservation of Nature. “We are part of nature and we do not exist without it.” Habitat loss, pesticides, chemical pollution and temperature change are altering the ecosystems around us, crushing the biodiversity we depend on, yet we live as if there are endless resources for us to plunder. We all need to wake up and act to slow the tipping of the scales. We, as a community and nation, are facing converging crises: effects of the pandemic, the resulting economic recession, the climate emer gency including biodiversity depletion, and grow ing inequality all around us. Our recovery must be planned in a way that that lifts up workers and families, re-envisions investments in low-carbon projects to tackle the climate emergency, and green jobs to make our society and economy stronger and more resilient in the face of pan demic, recession, and climate emergencies in the years ahead. There is some good news on the horizon that hints at a place to start. Just as the dire warnings of the first Earth Day led to major changes in how we treat the planet, today’s biodiversity challenge can be addressed even in these unstable times. A movement called the Campaign for Nature is a partnership of the Wyss Foundation and the National Geographic Society. This partnership seeks to help protect at least 30% of the planet by 2030 and is financed by a $1 billion investment by entrepreneur and conservationist Hansjrg Wyss. The campaign calls on policy makers to invest in conservation and commit to a science-driven plan to save the diversity and abundance of life on Earth – “new deal for nature,” so to speak. The by 30” as a global conservation target seeks to help protect at least 30% of the planet by 2030. We all understand that protected areas are the cornerstones of biodiversity conservation. Efforts to manage ecosystems sustainably should go beyond national governments and involve groups that can affect conservation policies, including businesses and local communities. The Fernandina Beach and Nassau County efforts to acquire conservation land will be an essential part of by 30.” On the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, we remember Rachel Carson, the mother of the mod ern-day environmental movement, who taught us that human domination of nature is not the correct course for our future. In a television interview, Carson said: “man’s endeavors to control nature by his powers to alter and to destroy would inevi tably evolve into a war against himself, a war he would lose unless he came to terms with nature.” So what might our future hold? Can we expect more pandemics and a world we’ll no longer recognize as our own? We need to ask what it means to “come to terms with nature.” I fathom to say in this season of grief that it is not to roll back environmental regulations that were estab lished to combat pollution and climate change. Deforestation, toxic chemicals in the environ ment, an excess of carbon dioxide emissions, and more generally, a loss of protected places cannot continue at the current rate. For the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, we need to reaffirm our commitment to understand our planet’s interconnected systems and to pro tect these systems for our own health as well as for the health and stability of future generations. This is what “coming to terms with nature” means to me, and all hands are needed on deck now.r nt þS þC þN þG rrrbrt PARESH NATH-KHALEEJ TIMES-CAGLE CARTOONS Nassau County Commissioners: þ Danny Leeper, District 1 -Fernandina Beach, 261-8029 (h), þ 430-3868 (cell), email: dleeper@nassaucountyfl.com þ Aaron C. Bell, District 2 þ 451-4094 (cell), email: acbell@nassaucountyfl.com þ Pat Edwards, District 3 -Yulee, 335-0260 (cell), þ email: pedwards@nassaucountyfl.com þ Thomas R. Ford, District 4 Hilliard, Bryceville, Boulogne, þ Kings Ferry, Nassau Oaks, 451-0766 (cell), 879-2015 (home) þ email: tford@nassaucountyfl.com þ Justin M. Taylor, District 5 -Callahan, West Yulee, 625-5624 (cell), þ email: jtaylor@nassaucountyfl.com City of Fernandina Beach Commissioners: þ Mayor: Johnny Miller : 556-3299 (cell), email: jmiller@fbfl.org þ Vice Mayor: Len Kreger : 432-8389 (home), email: lkreger@fbfl.org þ Phil Chapman : 624-5590 (cell), email: pchapman@fbfl.org þ Mike Lednovich : 502-0650 (cell), email: mlednovich@fbfl.org þ Chip Ross : 410-394-0220 (cell) email: cross@fbfl.org b NL Wednesday 04.22.20.indd 6 4/21/20 4:58 PM

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CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS r frnn rfntffbbbbb ANNOUNCEMENTS Lost & Found Personals Public Notice Miscellaneous EMPLOYMENT Help Wanted Business Opportunity Work Wanted Services EDUCATION Schools & Instruction Tutoring Lessons/Classes FARM & ANIMAL Equipment Livestock & Supplies Pets/Supplies Services MERCHANDISE Garage Sales Articles for Sale Antiques-Collectibles Produce Appliances Home Furnishings Muscial Instruments Auctions Wanted to Buy Free Items Miscellaneous RECREATION Boats/Watercraft RVs/Campers/TrailersREAL ESTATE Homes for Sale Condominiums Mobile Homes Ocean/Waterfront Lots & Land Farms & Acreage Commercial/Retail Investment Property Other Areas Wanted to Buy RENTALS Apartments Condominiums Homes Rooms Mobile Homes Vacation Rentals Office Commercial/Retail Roommate Wanted Wanted to Rent TRANSPORTATION Automobiles SUVs Trucks Vans Motorcycles/ATV’sSupport Local NOW Enjoy Local LaterLocal businesses, independent bookstores, restaurants, theaters, and Main Street retailers are what makes our communities strong, vital and unique. Your favorite local business may have to close due to the COVID-19 crisis.Keep Nassau County Strong! Here’s what you can do: Buy a Gift Card Place Orders Online Or By Phone Sign up for a store membership program Buy A Subscription Box From A Local Retailer NL/PSA (904) 261-40112057 S. Fletcher Ave. LONG-TERM RENTALS Fernandina Beach Realty Amelia-ERA.com ON ISLAND 3 bedroom, 2 bath house across from the beach. Deck with ocean view. New carpet and paint. $2,500 per month. Includes pest control and lawn maintenance. Available now. Looking for a Long Term Property Manager?With 150+ properties and over 30 years of experience we are here for you. Contact Chuck Lynch for more information. NEED HELP? HIRE ME! Call the News-Leader at 261-3696 to put the SERVICE DIRECTORY to work for you!Do you need an affordable way to let the community know about the services you offer? r rfntb tbtbnr bbbb bb btbnr bn ftbnr nb nf bbrb LAWN MAINTENANCE BLUEPRINTS rfntb nn nff r rfrn ftrbt fntbbn rfnn CONSTRUCTION HANDY MAN SERVICES Removal & Installation $ 42500 per pallet. Sod, Labor & Tax included.No fees up front. Call anytime (904) 868-7602 SOD REPLACEMENT Amelia Handy ManElectrical Plumbing Deck Repairs Any Electrical or Plumbing NO JOB TOO SMALL904-903-1175terry.layman500@yahoo.com Insured & Bonded rfrnftnnfbn b bt PAINTING ROOFING rfnr trbnr “Re-Roofing Is Our Specialty” Nassau Largest Roofing & Siding Contractor Since 1993 Re-Roofing New Roofing Siding Soffit & Fascia261-2233 Free Re-Roof EstimatesACoastal Building Sys tems Co . CCC-057 020 1 FNL01040104EEEE97 1 1/3/19 10:33 AM “Re-Roofing Is Our Specialty” Nassau Largest Roofing & Siding Contractor Since 1993 Re-Roofing New Roofing Siding Soffit & Fascia261-2233 Free Re-Roof EstimatesACoastal Building Sys tems Co . CCC-057 020 1 FNL01040104EEEE97 1 1/3/19 10:33 AM coastalroofs.com “Re-Roofing Is Our Specialty” Nassau Largest Roofing & Siding Contractor Since 1993 Re-Roofing New Roofing Siding Soffit & Fascia261-2233 Free Re-Roof EstimatesACoastal Building Sys tems Co . CCC-057 020 1 FNL01040104EEEE97 1 1/3/19 10:33 AM “Re-Roofing Is Our Specialty” Nassau Largest Roofing & Siding Contractor Since 1993 Re-Roofing New Roofing Siding Soffit & Fascia261-2233 Free Re-Roof EstimatesACoastal Building Sys tems Co . CCC-057 020 1 FNL01040104EEEE97 1 1/3/19 10:33 AM “Re-Roofing Is Our Specialty” Nassau Largest Roofing & Siding Contractor Since 1993 Re-Roofing New Roofing Siding Soffit & Fascia261-2233 Free Re-Roof EstimatesACoastal Building Sys tems Co . CCC-057 020 1 FNL01040104EEEE97 1 1/3/19 10:33 AM “Re-Roofing Is Our Specialty” Nassau Largest Roofing & Siding Contractor Since 1993 Re-Roofing New Roofing Siding Soffit & Fascia261-2233 Free Re-Roof EstimatesACoastal Building Sys tems Co . CCC-057 020 1 FNL01040104EEEE97 1 1/3/19 10:33 AM PRESSURE WASHING LAWN MAINTENANCE CONSTRUCTION 6”Seamless Aluminum GuttersFINANCING AVAILABLE (904) 261-1940LICENSED & INSURED Lowell Duster AMELIA GUTTERS When It Rains Be Prepared. 904-318-3700Insured LicensedBUSH HOGGING DRIVEWAY GRADING LAWN MAINTENANCE GARDEN TILLING PROPERTY DIRT WORK GRASS TOO TALL? GIVE SHAWN A CALL! Available now! Only at fbnewsleader.comNASSAU MARKETPLACE It Matters Now More Than Ever. In Print. Online. Local. 904.261.3696 | www.fbnewsleader.comIn times of uncertainty, rest assured that as your community newspaper, we are working hard with a local, regional and national network of ofcial resources to keep you informed and up to date on the issues and developments that matter most to you. Accurate. Reliable. Unbiased. Local.Subscribe Today at 904-261-3696 or www.fbnewsleader.com to stay informed and help protect the future of local reporting. Visit Our Website for Safety Information, CDC Updates, Local Closures & More: www.fbnewsleader.com 1 FNL04220422EEEE97 1 4/21/20 12:47 PM

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þA þNþw þL rfþL þCfnþwnþStnbt þP þSn SUBMITTED PHOTOSrAmelia Island residents of Willet Way held a street-wide food pantry drive to collect canned and boxed food items, paper products, and bottled water for the Salvation Army Hope House. While maintaining social distancing, neighbors came together for the common cause of stocking food pantry shelves for Nassau County residents who rely on Hope House for food and household goods. Pictured accepting the first several carloads of donations on March 31 is Tim Peak, who works at Hope House. Willet Way residents delivered a second wave of donations on April 15. Pictured are Tim Peak, Diana McKinney, and Glenda Guthrie. Hope House currently accepts food pantry donations between 10 a.m. and noon or 1 and 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at its Fernandina Beach location at 410 S. Ninth St. For questions, to arrange a donation drop-off, or for information about receiving food from the Hope House Emergency Pantry, call (904) 321-0435.SUBMITTED PHOTOSfrNassau County Council on Aging received an immediate contribution of $40,000 and a pledge for ongoing funding through June when the Fernandina Beach City Commission passed Resolution 2020-55 on Tuesday, April 7. NCCOA is providing free meals to local seniors, a need that grows each day during the COVID-19 public health emergency. Pictured is NCCOA President and CEO Janice Ancrum, top left, receiving the first install ment from Fernandina Beach Mayor Johnny Miller. At left, Miller also stopped by the Salvation Army Hope House to present a check to Mary Moore, right, manager of the facility. The same city resolution also provides $10,000 per month through June for Moore and her associates to stock the Hope House Emergency Pantry, which provides food to area residents in need. Even before the coronavirus pandemic put millions out of work across the country, and thousands locally, the Hope House Emergency Pantry has been a vital link to many eco nomically challenged Nassau County individuals and families who suffer food insecurity.In talking to my sons during the pandemic, it became apparent that a big challenge to them was keeping their children – my grandchildren – entertained, and with constructive content. This would be in addition to their online schoolwork. We talked about trying some long-distance learning and sharing, so I contacted my sister. We agreed to take on the teaching challenge. The grands are young, with the oldest 13, so we did not want to be too ambitious. I was inspired by a friend who recently handled similar challenges. One challenge was helping her daughter in Chicago. She and husband both work at home and needed someone to help with her young children. The second challenge was what to do with all the loquats that needed to be harvested in her backyard. What is a loquat? Like small oranges, their flesh may be white, yellow, or orange. Loquats are tasty when peeled and eaten fresh. They make excellent jellies, jams, preserves, cobblers, and pies. Her conclusion? A “Making Jam Class,” of course. She found a recipe, developed a lesson plan, and led her two grandchildren through the process of making loquat jam, from picking the fruit to enjoying the sticky, yummy jam. No cooking lessons from this Nana or Aunt Betsy. All three daughters-in-law are outstanding cooks and cook with their children. Even our 1 1/2-yearold, Ben, has special steps that reach the kitchen counter. When cooking with small children, be prepared for a major clean up of the kitchen and the little one. So, what did we have to offer? Our passion for travel and our collection of hundreds and hundreds of pictures from our wonderful trips exploring parts of the world. The photos include many European countries, South America and Africa. We used Zoom, an app that lets you set up meetings or get-togethers online. It is easy to understand why Zoom has been so popular in the pandemic. They have designed an app that is free and extremely easy to use; in tech lingo, it is called “frictionless.” Even our friends and relatives with zero technical know-how can join a Zoom meeting just by clicking a link. Instantly, you are looking at a screen with familiar faces and the lesson or conversation begins. You are allowed 40 minutes at no charge. We go into the application and sign in to our scheduled meeting. If you are going to share charts, pictures, or information you can go to your computer files and pull them up. The pandemic rfn FILE PHOTOVideo conferencing apps and services like Zoom have allowed families and friends to still have face time with each other during the coronavirus pandemic, and employees to con tinue working from home while meeting with co-workers and clients. has been very good for Zoom. Now 200 million of us desperate for the faces of the people in our lives are using Zoom or other similar apps, like Apple’s FaceTime. So far so good. We have found the simpler, the better. Yes, a bit educational, but more a generational outreach, a break for parents. And for us? The joy of engaging with young, eager minds. To receive her weekly newsletter or get information about her books including her four From the Porch books contact Dickie at dickie.anderson@gmail.com. NL Wednesday 04.22.20.indd 8 4/21/20 5:56 PM

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ACROSS 1. “Ali Baba and the Forty ____,” sing. 6. Eureka! 9. Schools of thought 13. Sound of artillery 14. Car nut 15. Without illumination 16. Nosey one 17. Kind of trip? 18. Lasso loop 21. *Tracee Ellis Ross on TV 25. Like a fiddle? 30. Quarantine state 35. *Egyptian goddess of fertility 37. Insane, in Spain 39. Mother or daughter, in Italy 43. Research facil. 46. Daytime entertainment 48. End of the road, pl. 50. Blatant promotion 53. Yours and mine 55. Little squirt against it 64. In advance 67. Fancy tie 69. Less than fernier 70. I have 71. “Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous” host 72. Fairies 73. Galley equipment 74. Feed the fire DOWN 1. Kitchen meas. 3. Pelvic parts 4. Tennis great Chris ____ 5. Particular arrangement 8. Ancient marketplace 9. Part of a scheme 10. No neatnik 11. Sushi restaurant soup 12. One-pot meal 15. Like the States 20. *One of the Gilmore girls 24. One-eyed giants mother 26. May edition, e.g. 27. *Worn atop the Queen Mother 29. Denials 32. Private 33. “Take it back!” 36. Lard cousin 38. October birthstone 42. Plural of sputum 49. Bottom line 51. Kind of ungulate, pl. 56. Living room centerpiece? 58. *Greek goddess of fertility 61. Opposite of cheer 62. International Civil Aviation Org. 63. Puppet precursor, possibly 66. *Female gametes 68. Caf alternative MOTHER’S DAY StatePoint Media rffWhile the Nassau Humane Society shelter is closed, dogs and cats are still available for adoption or foster! To schedule a meet and greet, first check out the available pets at nassauhumane.org/adopt. Then call us at 321-1647 or email info@nassauhumane.org to set up an appointment to see your favorite. Up to three family members can visit, escorted by a staff member. What better time than now to meet your new best friend! Here are two who may still be available. Pinch is about two years old, housetrained, and a real beauty. She came to us from another rescue where she had arrived from a hoarding case. When she came to NHS, she was lacking in confidence and socialization, but she has made significant progress. Here’s part of an update from her temporary foster: “Pinch is a sweetie pie! Took her about an hour to feel comfortable in her new temporary foster situation. She seemed very shy at first, but is extremely comfortable. She sits with me when I work (from home due to social distancing). She waits for a treat after our walks during the day. She has even met a new friend on one of our walks. She knows how to sit and shake for a treat. I don’t think I have ever heard her bark. She is a little skittish on walks when she hears a loud noise, but then just starts walking right up again. She doesn’t pull on the leash. She is totally housetrained and adheres to a schedule wonderfully. She is happy in her crate and loves a kong with a treat inside. She also loves stuffed animals to play with. She sleeps in the bed with me and sits and watches TV with me on the sofa. This girl is a treasure. I am so sad I cannot keep her forever.” Zimmer is a very handsome and sweet cat. He is about two years old and has a shiny, soft, luxurious medium-length coat and incredibly beautiful green eyes. He recently moved to a fancy condominium in our lobby and absolutely loves all of the attention he is getting. He is neutered and vaccinated and has a microchip. Zimmer is accustomed to living in a home, but unfortunately his person passed away, so he’s with us now. He likes it here but we know he’d be happier in a home where he could give and get lots of love. He adores being petted and will love the attention! For updates on what’s going on at NHS, please visit our website at NassauHumane.org or our Facebook page. We are immensely gratified by the community’s response to our requests for adoptions or fosters. We provide you with everything you need to care for a foster pet – you provide the love! Thank you for your understanding and your continued support of the Nassau Humane Society.Q: What can you tell me about CitraBlue St. Augustine grass? KLA: I personally have no experience with it here, but we should start seeing more often soon. CitraBlue ‘FSA1602’ St. Augustine grass was developed by the University of Florida’s turfgrass breeding program under the guidance of Dr. Kevin Kenworthy. He and his team worked under a sponsored research service agreement with the Turfgrass Producers of Florida Inc. CitraBlue St. Augustine is exclusively licensed to TPF by Florida Foundation Seed Producers Inc., a direct support organization of the University of Florida. CitraBlue is marketed by Sod Solutions Inc. and has become commercially available as of late2019 with more widespread availability in the spring of 2020. It takes on the dark green color of Floratam but has shown better disease resistance to gray leaf spot, large patch and take-all root rot. These three diseases are the biggest problems for our St. Augustine lawns. However, we will still need to keep to the best management practices of not over watering or over fertilizing. It also has shown promising growth in light shade. Rebecca Jordi, UF/IFAS Nassau County Extension director for Nassau County and Nassau County Horticulture Agent IV, is a University of Florida faculty member. Extension locations are the satellite office at the County Building in Yulee and the main Extension Office in Callahan. The UF/IFAS Nassau County Demonstration Garden is located at the James S. Page Governmental Complex and demonstrates best management practices for Northeast Florida. Mail questions to Garden Talk, c/o Rebecca Jordi, Nassau County Extension, 543350 US 1, Callahan, FL 32011. Visit http://nassau.ifas. ufl.edu.SUBMITTED PHOTOSSheltered International, a company with years of expertise in the freight industry, has been able to facilitate the importing process for personal protection equipment and recently donated 3,000 surgical masks and 100 face shields to local Nassau County first responders. Pictured above left is Sheriff Bill Leeper with equipment donated to the Nassau County Sheriff’s Office. Captain David Bishop, center, accepted Sheltered International’s donation on behalf of the Fernandina Beach Police Department. All three agencies each received a donation of 1,000 masks. Right, Deputy Chief Fino Murallo, left, and Chief Ty Silcox, right, both of the Fernandina Beach Fire Department, are pictured receiving PPE with Ocean Rescue Supervisor Haynes Cavender, center. While we are all keeping our physical distance, wearing protecting gear, and taking extra precautions to avoid the coronavirus, many of us still need to go to the grocery store, and now that trip can do some extra good, according to a news release. With the purchase of any of its reusable “Community Bags,” the Winn-Dixie store at 96076 Lofton Square Court in Yulee will donate $1 to Starting Point Behavioral Healthcare throughout the month of May. Starting Point uses these funds, along with other donations, to provide mental health services for those in the community who do not have the resources to pay. Representatives from WinnDixie said in the release, “In this time of uncertainty due to COVID-19, supporting local non-profits has never been more important. Supermarket visits are at an all-time high, and shoppers are still buying Community Bags in strong numbers. Therefore, the Community Bag Program continues and Starting Point Behavioral Healthcare has been chosen as recipient for the month of May.” “We are grateful for the ongoing support of Winn-Dixie and its commitment to our community during this pandemic crisis,” Dr. Laureen Pagel, CEO of Starting Point, also said in the release. “The COVID-19 emergency has highlighted the need for our mental health services even more, as more people experience anxiety, ntCookie came to Cats Angels from a local shelter just prior to the Adoption Center temporarily closing due to the coronavirus pandemic. Cookie is very young, a real sweetie and a favorite with the Cats Angels volunteers. Her fur is medium length and very soft. She is a beautiful young cat and would be perfect for a family! If you are interested in meeting Cookie, contact Cats Angels at 321-2267 to make an appointment. Cats Angels is asking for donations of kitten, cat and dog food to support members of our community so they can care for their pets during this challenging time. The Amazon Wish List has been set up with a Cats Angels Emergency link that will ensure your donations are delivered to the correct location while the Thrift Store is closed. In addition, the spay/neuter program has temporarily been placed on hold. As a result, there will be an increase in kittens born this year. Additional supplies such as soft kitten food, baby food, kitten formula, etc. will help care for the new babies. Cats Angels Thrift Store and Adoption Center will be closed until further notice. Cats Angels takes the coronavirus and COVID-19 very seriously, and we are here to support the volunteers and residents of our community. If you are interested in adopting, call 321-2267 to make an appointment. rrb nb nbThe Nassau County Animal Services shelter is currently closed due to the current public health emergency. As a result, the shelter is not accepting owner-surrendered animals, and animals in the shelter are not available for adoption or fostering until further notice. In addition, the department’s officers are not picking up strays in the county unless an animal is threatening and aggressive. For more information, call 530-6150.rf fnntbbb rStarting Point Behavioral Healthcare remains open and is scheduling online telehealth sessions for all medication management, individual and group therapy services. All current patients are being contacted by their therapist, case manager, or support staff member to begin using Zoom for future appointments. If a patient has an appointment scheduled but has not yet been contacted by an SPBH staff member, please call 225-8280 to speak with a registration clerk. Technical assistance is available for those who do not know how to use Zoom. For anyone experiencing a mental health crisis, a counselor is available 24/7. For children or adolescents, call 580-0529. For adults, call 206-1756. depression, increased substance use, and other issues connected to the pandemic. By helping us provide these critical services, Winn-Dixie is investing in the health of our entire community, and we thank them.” For more information and to find resources to help during the pandemic, visit spbh.org. tfbfbft UF/IFASCitraBlue St. Augustine grass, developed by the University of Florida, became available commercially late last year but is expected to become widespread in 2020. rfnrrtrbrffrr NL Wednesday 04.22.20.indd 9 4/21/20 5:58 PM

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þA ?? WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2020/NE ws-Leader?? LEGAL NOTICESLEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISING DEADLINE IS NOON THE FRIDAY BEFORE THE NEXT PUBLICATION IN TH E COUN TY C OUR T, FOUR TH JUDICIAL CI RC UIT, IN AND FOR NA SSAU COUN TY , FLORIDA CA SE NU MB ER: 20CC-6 1 Ch ri st op he r N R ees e Pl aint iff( S) VS . Pr emie r Au to mo ti ve De fend an ts (s ) An d St at e of Flo ri da De pa rt m ent o f High w ay Sa fe ty a nd Mo to r V ehi cl es , De fend an t NO TI CE OF AC TI ON YO UR A RE H ER EB Y NO TI FI ED t ha t a Co mp lain t fo r De clar at or y Judgem ent h as be en f ile d an d yo u ar e re quir ed t o se rv e a copy o f yo u wri tt en d efen ses, if any , t o it on P lain ti ff, w ho se n am e an d addr es s is C hr is to ph er R ees e, 86203 T im be r Ridg e St r eet , Yu lee Flor id a 32097, wit hi n 30 da ys f or t he d at e of fir st p ubli ca ti on a nd f ile t he o ri gi na l wit h t he Cl er k of t hi s co ur t ei t her b ef or e se rv ic e on P lain ti ff or imm ediate ly t herea ft er : ot he rw is e a De fa ul t judgem ent w ill b e entered f or t he re lie f de ma nded in th e Co mplai nt . WI TN ES S MY H AN D AND TH E SE AL O F TH E Co ur t on Ma rc h 11, 2020 Jo hn A . C ra wfo rd Cl er k of C ir cuit C ou rt By : A ma nd a De pu ty C le rk FN L 4T 0401-08-15-22-2020 #568282 COUR T OF CO MM ON PLE AS , FIRST JUDICIA L CIRC UIT Ca se No.: 2019CP -18-00503 SU MM ONS SO UT H CA RO LI NA , DO RC HE ST ER C OU NT Y JO SH UA M UC KE LV AN EY & L AU RA M UC KE LV AN EY , Pl aint iffs, v. ED WAR D L . T E RRY ; e t al., De fend an ts . ED WAR D L . T E RRY is su mmo ne d to a ns we r th e Co mplai nt in th is a ct io n, a vailabl e fr om D or ch es te r Co un ty C le rk of C ou rt , a nd s er ve y ou r An sw er o n Pl ai nti ffs a t P. O. B ox 2670, S um me rv ille , SC , 29 484 wi th in 3 0 da ys o f Ma y 13, 2020, e xclu si ve o f da y of s er vi ce . If y ou f ai l to t im el y an sw er d ef ault j ud gm en t will b e r end ered a gain st y ou f or r elie f de ma nd in th e Co mplai nt . FN L 4T 0422-29-2020 & 05-06-13-202 0 #573007 COUR T OF CO MM ON PLE AS , FIRST JUDICIA L CIRC UIT Ca se No.: 2019CP -18-00629 SU MM ONS SO UT H CA RO LI NA , DO RC HE ST ER C OU NT Y EL IZ AB ET H HA RK IN S & M IC HA EL B EL L , Plain ti ff s, v. ED WAR D L . T E RRY ; e t al., De fend an ts . ED WAR D L . T E RRY is su mmo ne d to a ns we r th e Co mplai nt in th is a ct io n, a vailabl e fr om D or ch es te r Co un ty C le rk of C ou rt , a nd s er ve y ou r An sw er o n Pl ai nti ffs a t P. O. B ox 2670, S um me rv ille , SC , 29 484 wi th in 3 0 da ys o f Ma y 13, 2020 , e xclu si ve o f da y of s er vi ce . If y ou f ai l to t im el y an sw er d ef ault j ud gm en t will b e r end ered a gain st y ou f or r elie f de ma nd in th e Co mplai nt . FN L 4T 0422-29-2020 & 0506-13-202 0 #572031 IN THE CI RC UIT COUR T OF THE FIFT H JU DICIAL CIRC UIT OF FL ORID A, IN A ND FOR NA SSAU COUN TY , FLORIDA CA SE NO: 2020-C A-2 0 RI VE R GL EN C O MMU N ITY D EVE LO PM EN T DI ST RI CT , a loc al un it o f sp ecialpu r po se g ov er nmen t or ga ni ze d an d exis tin g un der t he law s of t he St at e of Flo r ida, Pl aint iff, v. TH E ST AT E OF F LO RI DA , AND TH E TA XP AY ER S, P RO PE RT Y OW NE RS AND C ITIZ EN S OF RI VE R GL EN C O MMU N ITY D EVE LO PM EN T DI ST RI CT , IN CL UD IN G NO NRE SI DE NT S OW NI NG PR OP ER TY O R SU BJ EC T TO TA XA TI ON T HE RE IN , A ND O TH ER S HA VI NG O R CL AI MI NG AN Y RI GH TS , T IT LE O R INTE RE ST IN P RO PE RT Y TO B E AF FE CT ED BY T HE I SS U ANC E OF T HE BO ND S HE RE IN D ES CR IB ED , OR T O BE A FFE CT ED I N AN Y WA Y TH ER EB Y, De fend an ts . AM EN DED NO TIC E AN D OR DE R TO S HO W CA US E TO T HE S TATE O F FL OR ID A, AN D TH E TA XP AY ER S, PROPE RTY O WN ER S AN D CI TI ZE NS O F RI VE R GL EN C O MMU N ITY D EVE LO PM EN T DI ST RI CT , IN CL UD IN G NO NRE SI DE NT S OW NI NG PR OP ER TY O R SU BJ EC T TO TA XA TI ON T HE RE IN , A ND O TH ER S HA VI NG O R CL AI MI NG AN Y RI GH T, T IT LE O R INTE RE ST IN P RO PE RT Y TO B E AF FE CT ED BY T HE I SS UA NC E OF R IV ER GL EN C O MMU NI TY D EVEL OP ME NT D IS TRIC T CA P ITA L IM PR OV EM EN T RE VE NU E BO ND S, OR T O BE A FFE CT ED T HE REBY : Ri ve r G le n Co mm un it y De ve lo pm en t Di str ic t (t he D istr ic t) h avin g f ile d it s Co mplai nt f or V alidat io n of n ot t o ex ceed $18,000,000 p r incipa l am ou nt o f Ri ve r G le n Co mmu ni ty D ev elop me nt D is tr ict Ca pi ta l Im pr ov em en t Re ven ue B on ds , in o ne o r m or e se rie s (t he B on ds ) , a nd it ap pe ar in g in a nd f r om s ai d Co mp lain t an d th e Ex hibi ts at ta ch ed t heret o th at t he Di st ric t ha s ad op te d a r es ol uti on a ut ho rizin g th e is su an ce of t he B onds f or t he p ur po se of p r ov idin g fu nd s, t og ethe r wi th o t her a vailabl e fu nd s, f or pa yi ng t he c os ts o f plan ni ng , fi na nc ing, a cquir ing , c on st r uc ti ng , r ec on st r uc ti ng , eq uipping a nd ins ta llin g impr ov emen ts a s pa r t of its Pr oj ec t (a s de fi ne d in s ai d Co mp lain t) , an d it a ls o ap pe ar in g th at a ll o f th e fa ct s r equir ed t o be s ta te d by s ai d Co mp lain t an d Ex hibits b y Ch ap te r 7 5 , F lorid a St at ut es , ar e cont aine d t herei n , a nd th at t he D is tr ic t pr ay s th at t hi s Co ur t is su e an o r der as dir ected b y sa id C ha pt er 75, a nd th e Co ur t bein g fu lly a dv is ed in t he pr em is es : NO W, T HE REFO RE, IT I S OR DE RE D th at a ll t ax pa ye rs , p rop er ty o wn er s an d ci ti ze ns o f th e Di st ric t, i ncludin g nonr es iden ts o wn ing pr op er ty o r s ubject t o ta xati on , a nd o th er s ha vi ng o r clai mi ng a ny r ight s, t itle o r inte r es t in p r op er ty t o be a ffe ct ed b y th e is su an ce o f th e Bo nd s or t o be a ffe ct ed t hereb y, a nd t he S ta te o f Fl or ida , t hr ou gh t he S tate A tto r ney o f th e Fo ur th J udicia l Ci r cuit , i n an d fo r N as sa u Co un ty , Flor ida , a ppear o n th e 13t h da y of M ay , 2 020, a t th e ho ur o f 10:45 a .m . of s ai d da y, b ef or e th e Ho nor able St ephen M . F ah lgr en , at t he Ro ber t M. F os te r J us ti ce C en te r , 763 47 V eter an s Way , i n ch am be r s on t he T hi r d Fl oo r, Yu le e, F lorid a 3209 7 , N as sa u Co un ty in sa id C ir cuit , a nd sh ow c au se , if a ny t her e be , wh y th e pr ay er s of s ai d Co mplai nt f or t he v alidat io n of t he Bo nd s sh ou ld n ot b e gr an te d an d th e Bo nd s, t he p r oc eed in gs t heref or e, a nd o th er ma tt er s se t fo r th i n sa id C om plai nt , sh ou ld n ot b e va lid at ed a s pr ay ed f or in sa id C om plai nt . Pu r su an t to t he N as sa u Co un ty A dm inis tr at iv e Or de r 20201 , t hi s hea rin g sh al l be co nduc te d ei th er b y te leph on ic m eans o r v ideo c on fe r en ce u tili zi ng t he Z oo m Ap plicat ion . I n th e event t he Na ss au C ou nt y Ad mi ni st r at ive Or de r 2 0 201 is lif te d , t hi s he ar in g ma y be h el d in p er so n. P er so ns d es ir in g to a ppe ar a t th e he ar in g sh ou ld co nt ac t th e Di st ric ts M anag er , R iz ze tt a & Co mp any , I nc ., at ( 904) 4 36-6270, a t leas t 24ho ur s in a dv an ce t o co nf irm th e me an s by w hi ch t he he ar in g will b e he ld a nd o bta in acce ss in str uc ti on s. Al te rna ti ve ly , i nteres te d pe r so ns ma y r efer en ce t he C ou r ts we bs it e fo r r el ev an t info r ma ti on a nd a cc es s in fo r ma ti on at h tt ps :/ /www.na ssa ucler k. co m/ judgest ev enmfa hl gr en /. IT I S FU RT HE R OR DE RE D th at pr ior t o th e da te s et f or t he he ar in g on said Co mp lain t fo r valid at io n, t he C ler k of t hi s Co ur t sh al l caus e a co py o f th is A me nded N ot ic e an d Or de r t o be p ublis hed i n a ne ws pa per p ublis he d an d of ge ner al c ir cu la ti on in Na ss au Co un ty , be in g th e Co un ty wh er ei n sa id C om plai nt f or valid at io n is f iled , a t le as t on ce e ac h week f or t wo ( 2) co ns ecut iv e we ek s , c om m enc in g wi th t he f ir st p ublica ti on w hich s hall n ot b e le ss th an t went y (20) d ay s pr ior t o th e da te s et f or said hea r ing. IT I S FU RT HE R OR DE RE D th at by s uc h pu bl ic at io n of t hi s Am en de d No ti ce a nd O r de r, th e St at e of F lorida , a nd t he se ve r al t axpa ye rs , p r op er ty ow ne rs and ci ti ze ns o f th e Di str ic t, including n on -r es iden ts ow ni ng p r op er ty o r s ubject t o ta xa ti on t he r ei n , a nd o t her s ha vi ng o r c la imin g an y r ight s, ti tl e or i nteres t in p r op er ty t o be a ffe ct ed b y th e is su an ce of t he B on ds o r t o be a ffe ct ed t hereby , s hall b e an d ar e ma de p ar ty d efend an ts t o th is p r ocee ding , an d th at t hi s Co ur t sh al l ha ve j ur is dict io n of t hem t o th e sa me e xt en t as if sp ecif ically a nd p er so nally na me d as d efen dant s in s ai d Co mp lain t an d per so nally se r ve d wi th p r oc es s in t hi s caus e. DO NE A ND O RD ER ED a t th e Co ur th ou se in Na ss au Co un ty , Flor ida , t hi s 13 th d ay of A pr il, 2020 . Th e Ho no r ab le St ephen M. Fah lgr en , Ci r cuit C ou r t Judg e FN L 2T 0422-29-2020 #573287 IN THE CI RC UIT COUR T OF THE FIFT H JU DICIAL CIRC UIT OF FL ORID A, IN A ND FOR NA SSAU COUN TY , FLORIDA CA SE NO: 2020-C A-2 0 RI VE R GL EN C O MMU N ITY D EVELO PM EN T DI ST RI CT , a loc al un it o f sp ecialpu r po se g ov er nmen t or ga ni ze d an d exis tin g un der t he law s of t he St at e of Flo r ida, Pl aint iff, v. TH E ST AT E OF F LO RI DA , AND TH E TA XP AY ER S, P RO PE RT Y OW NE RS AND C ITIZ EN S OF RI VE R GL EN C O MMU N ITY D EVELO PM EN T DI ST RI CT , IN CL UD IN G NO NRE SI DE NT S OW NING PR OP ER TY O R SU BJ EC T TO TA XA TI ON T HE RE IN , A ND O TH ER S HA VI NG O R CL AI MI NG AN Y RI GH TS , T IT LE O R INTE RE ST IN P RO PE RT Y TO B E AF FE CT ED BY T HE I SS U ANC E OF T HE BO ND S HE RE IN D ES CR IB ED , OR T O BE A FFE CT ED I N AN Y WA Y TH ER EB Y, De fend an ts . AM EN DED NO TIC E AN D OR DE R TO S HO W CA US E TO T HE S TATE O F FL OR ID A, AN D TH E TA XP AY ER S, PROPE RTY O WN ER S AN D CI TI ZE NS O F RI VE R GL EN C O MMU N ITY D EVELO PM EN T DI ST RI CT , IN CL UD IN G NO NRE SI DE NT S OW NING PR OP ER TY O R SU BJ EC T TO TA XA TI ON T HE RE IN , A ND O TH ER S HA VI NG O R CL AI MI NG AN Y RI GH T, T IT LE O R INTE RE ST IN P RO PE RT Y TO B E AF FE CT ED BY T HE I SS UA NC E OF R IV ER GL EN C O MMU NI TY D EVEL OP ME NT D IS TRIC T CA P ITA L IM PR OV EM EN T RE VE NU E BO ND S, OR T O BE A FFE CT ED T HE REBY : Ri ve r G le n Co mm un it y De ve lo pm en t Di str ic t (t he D is tr ic t) h avin g f ile d it s Co mplai nt f or V alidat io n of n ot t o ex ceed $18,000,000 p r incipa l am ou nt o f Ri ve r G le n Co mmu ni ty D ev elop me nt D is tr ic t Ca pi ta l Im pr ov em en t Re ven ue B on ds , in o ne o r m or e se rie s (t he B on ds ) , a nd it ap pe ar in g in a nd f r om s ai d Co mp lain t an d th e Ex hibi ts at ta ch ed t heret o th at t he Di st ric t ha s ad op te d a r es ol uti on a ut ho rizin g th e is su an ce of t he B onds f or t he p ur po se of p r ov idin g fu nd s, t og ethe r wi th o t her a vailabl e fu nd s, f or pa yi ng t he c os ts o f plan ni ng , fi na nc ing, a cquir ing , c on st r uc ti ng , r ec on st r uc ti ng , eq uipping a nd ins ta llin g im pr ov emen ts a s pa r t of i ts Pr oj ec t (a s de fi ne d in s ai d Co mp lain t) , an d it a ls o ap pe ar in g th at a ll o f th e fa ct s r equir ed t o be s ta te d by s ai d Co mp lain t an d Ex hibits b y Ch ap te r 7 5 , F lorid a St at ut es , ar e cont aine d t herei n , a nd th at t he D is tr ic t pr ay s th at t hi s Co ur t is su e an o r der as dir ected b y sa id C ha pt er 75, a nd th e Co ur t bein g fu lly a dv is ed in t he pr em is es : NO W, T HE REFO RE, IT I S OR DE RE D th at a ll t ax pa ye rs , p rop er ty o wn er s an d ci ti ze ns o f th e Di st ric t, i ncludin g nonr es iden ts o wn in g pr op er ty o r s ubject t o ta xa ti on , a nd o th er s ha vi ng o r clai mi ng a ny r ight s, t itle o r inte r es t in p r op er ty t o be a ffe ct ed b y th e is su an ce o f th e Bo nd s or t o be a ffe ct ed t hereb y, a nd t he S ta te o f Fl or ida , t hr ou gh t he S tate A tto r ney o f th e Fo ur th J udicia l Ci r cuit , i n an d fo r N as sa u Co un ty , Flor ida , a ppear o n th e 13t h da y of M ay , 2 020, a t th e ho ur o f 10:45 a .m . of s ai d da y, b ef or e th e Ho nor able St ephen M . F ah lgr en , at t he Ro ber t M. F os te r J us ti ce C en te r , 763 47 V eter an s Way , i n ch am be r s on t he T hi r d Fl oo r , Yu le e, F lorid a 3209 7 , N as sa u Co un ty in sa id C ir cuit , a nd sh ow c au se , if a ny t her e be , wh y th e pr ay er s of s ai d Co mplai nt f or t he v alidat io n of t he Bo nd s sh ou ld n ot b e gr an te d an d th e Bo nd s, t he p r oc eed in gs t heref or e, a nd o th er ma tt er s se t fo r th in sa id C om plai nt , sh ou ld n ot b e va lid at ed a s pr ay ed f or in sa id C om plai nt . Pu r su an t to t he N as sa u Co un ty A dm inis tr at iv e Or de r 20201 , t hi s hea rin g sh al l be co nduc te d ei th er b y te le ph on ic m eans o r v ideo c on fe r en ce u tili zi ng t he Z oo m Ap plicat ion . I n th e event t he Na ss au C ou nt y Ad mi ni st r at ive Or de r 2 0 201 is lif te d , t hi s he ar in g ma y be h el d in p er so n. P er so ns d es ir in g to a ppe ar a t th e he ar in g sh ou ld co nt ac t th e Di st ric ts M anag er , R iz ze tt a & Co mp any , I nc ., at ( 904) 4 36-6270, a t leas t 24ho ur s in a dv an ce t o co nf irm th e me an s by w hi ch t he he ar in g will b e he ld a nd o bta in acce ss in str uc ti on s. Al te rna ti ve ly , i nteres te d pe r so ns ma y r efer en ce t he C ou r ts we bs it e fo r r el ev an t info r ma ti on a nd a cc es s in fo r ma ti on at h tt ps :/ /www.na ssa ucler k. co m/ judgest ev enmfa hl gr en /. IT I S FU RT HE R OR DE RE D th at pr ior t o th e da te s et f or t he he ar in g on said Co mp lain t fo r valid at io n, t he C ler k of t hi s Co ur t sh al l caus e a co py o f th is A me nded N ot ic e an d Or de r t o be p ublis hed in a ne ws pa per p ublis he d an d of ge ner al c ir cu la ti on in Na ss au Co un ty , be in g th e Co un ty wh er ei n sa id C om plai nt f or valid at io n is f iled , a t le as t on ce e ac h week f or t wo ( 2) co ns ecut iv e we ek s , c om m enc in g wi th t he f ir st p ublica ti on w hich s hall n ot b e le ss th an t went y (20) d ay s pr ior t o th e da te s et f or said hea r ing. IT I S FU RT HE R OR DE RE D th at by s uc h pu bl ic at io n of t hi s Am en de d No ti ce a nd O r de r, th e St at e of F lorida , a nd t he se ve r al t axpa ye rs , p r op er ty ow ne rs and ci ti ze ns o f th e Di str ic t, i ncluding n on -r es iden ts ow ni ng p r op er ty o r s ubject t o ta xa ti on t he r ei n , a nd o t her s ha vi ng o r c la imin g an y r ight s, ti tl e or interes t in p r op er ty t o be a ffe ct ed b y th e is su an ce of t he B on ds o r t o be a ffe ct ed t hereby , s hall b e an d ar e ma de p ar ty d efend an ts t o th is p r ocee ding , an d th at t hi s Co ur t sh al l ha ve j ur is dict io n of t hem t o th e sa me e xt en t as if sp ecif ically a nd p er so nally na me d as d efen dant s in s ai d Co mp lain t an d per so nally se r ve d wi th p r oc es s in t hi s caus e. DO NE A ND O RD ER ED a t th e Co ur th ou se i n Na ss au Co un ty , Flor ida , t hi s 13 th d ay of A pr il, 2020 . Th e Ho no r ab le St ephen M. Fah lgr en , Ci r cuit C ou r t Judg e FN L 2T 0422-29-2020 #573287 IN THE CI RC UIT COUR T OF THE FIFT H JU DICIAL CIRC UIT OF FL ORID A, IN A ND FOR NA SSAU COUN TY , FLORIDA CA SE NO: 2020-C A-2 0 RI VE R GL EN C O MMU N ITY D EVELO PM EN T DI ST RI CT , a loc al un it o f sp ecialpu r po se g ov er nmen t or ga ni ze d an d exis tin g un der t he law s of t he St at e of Flo r ida, Pl aint iff, v. TH E ST AT E OF F LO RI DA , AND TH E TA XP AY ER S, P RO PE RT Y OW NE RS AND C ITIZ EN S OF RI VE R GL EN C O MMU N ITY D EVELO PM EN T DI ST RI CT , IN CL UD IN G NO NRE SI DE NT S OW NING PR OP ER TY O R SU BJ EC T TO TA XA TI ON T HE RE IN , A ND O TH ER S HA VI NG O R CL AI MI NG AN Y RI GH TS , T IT LE O R INTE RE ST IN P RO PE RT Y TO B E AF FE CT ED BY T HE I SS U ANC E OF T HE BO ND S HE RE IN D ES CR IB ED , OR T O BE A FFE CT ED I N AN Y WA Y TH ER EB Y, De fend an ts . AM EN DED NO TIC E AN D OR DE R TO S HO W CA US E TO T HE S TATE O F FL OR ID A, AN D TH E TA XP AY ER S, PROPE RTY O WN ER S AN D CI TI ZE NS O F RI VE R GL EN C O MMU N ITY D EVELO PM EN T DI ST RI CT , IN CL UD IN G NO NRE SI DE NT S OW NING PR OP ER TY O R SU BJ EC T TO TA XA TI ON T HE RE IN , A ND O TH ER S HA VI NG O R CL AI MI NG AN Y RI GH T, T IT LE O R INTE RE ST IN P RO PE RT Y TO B E AF FE CT ED BY T HE I SS UA NC E OF R IV ER GL EN C O MMU NI TY D EVEL OP ME NT D IS TRIC T CA P ITA L IM PR OV EM EN T RE VE NU E BO ND S, OR T O BE A FFE CT ED T HE REBY : Ri ve r G le n Co mm un it y De ve lo pm en t Di str ic t (t he D istr ic t) h avin g f ile d it s Co mplai nt f or V alidat io n of n ot t o ex ceed $18,000,000 p r incipa l am ou nt o f Ri ve r G le n Co mmu ni ty D ev elop me nt D is tr ict Ca pi ta l Im pr ov em en t Re ven ue B on ds , in o ne o r m or e se rie s (t he B on ds ) , a nd i t ap pe ar in g in a nd f r om s ai d Co mp lain t an d th e Ex hibi ts at ta ch ed t heret o th at t he Di st ric t ha s ad op te d a r es ol uti on a ut ho rizin g th e is su an ce of t he B onds f or t he p ur po se of p r ov idin g fu nd s, t og ethe r wi th o t her a vailabl e fu nd s, f or pa yi ng t he c os ts o f plan ni ng , fi na nc ing, a cquir ing , c on st r uc ti ng , r ec on st r uc ti ng , eq uipping a nd ins ta llin g impr ov emen ts a s pa r t of i ts Pr oj ec t (a s de fi ne d in s ai d Co mp lain t) , an d it a ls o ap pe ar in g th at a ll o f th e fa ct s r equir ed t o be s ta te d by s ai d Co mp lain t an d Ex hibits b y Ch ap te r 7 5 , F lorid a St at ut es , ar e cont aine d t herei n , a nd th at t he D is tr ic t pr ay s th at t hi s Co ur t is su e an o r der as dir ected b y sa id C ha pt er 75, a nd th e Co ur t bein g fu lly a dv is ed in t he pr em is es : NO W, T HE REFO RE, IT I S OR DE RE D th at a ll t ax pa ye rs , p rop er ty o wn er s an d ci ti ze ns o f th e Di st ric t, includin g nonr es iden ts o wn ing pr op er ty o r s ubject t o ta xati on , a nd o th er s ha vi ng o r clai mi ng a ny r ight s, t itle o r inte r es t in p r op er ty t o be a ffe ct ed b y th e is su an ce o f th e Bo nd s or t o be a ffe ct ed t hereb y, a nd t he S ta te o f Fl or ida , t hr ou gh t he S tate A tto r ney o f th e Fo ur th J udicia l Ci r cuit , i n an d fo r N as sa u Co un ty , Flor ida , a ppear o n th e 13t h da y of M ay , 2 020, a t th e ho ur o f 10:45 a .m . of s ai d da y, b ef or e th e Ho nor able St ephen M . F ah lgr en , at t he Ro ber t M. F os te r J us ti ce C en te r , 763 47 V eter an s Way , i n ch am be r s on t he T hi r d Fl oo r, Yu le e, F lorid a 3209 7 , N as sa u Co un ty i n sa id C ir cuit , a nd sh ow c au se , if a ny t her e be , wh y th e pr ay er s of s ai d Co mplai nt f or t he v alidat io n of t he Bo nd s sh ou ld n ot b e gr an te d an d th e Bo nd s, t he p r oc eed in gs t heref or e, a nd o th er ma tt er s se t fo r th in sa id C om plai nt , sh ou ld n ot b e va lid at ed a s pr ay ed f or in sa id C om plai nt . Pu r su an t to t he N as sa u Co un ty A dm inis tr at iv e Or de r 20201 , t hi s hea rin g sh al l be co nduc te d ei th er b y te leph on ic m eans o r v ideo c on fe r en ce u tili zi ng t he Z oo m Ap plicat ion . I n th e event t he Na ss au C ou nt y Ad mi ni st r at iv e Or de r 2 0 201 is lif te d , t hi s he ar in g ma y be h el d in p er so n. P er so ns d es ir in g to a ppe ar a t th e he ar in g sh ou ld co nt ac t th e Di st ric ts M anag er , R iz ze tt a & Co mp any , I nc ., at ( 904) 4 36-6270, a t leas t 24ho ur s in a dv an ce t o co nf ir m th e me an s by w hi ch t he he ar in g will b e he ld a nd o bta in acce ss in str uc ti on s. Al te r na ti ve ly , i nteres te d pe r so ns ma y r efer en ce t he C ou r ts we bs it e fo r r el ev an t info r ma ti on a nd a cc es s in fo r ma ti on at h tt ps :/ /www.na ssa ucler k. co m/ judgest ev enmfa hl gr en /. IT I S FU RT HE R OR DE RE D th at pr ior t o th e da te s et f or t he he ar in g on said Co mp lain t fo r valid at io n, t he C ler k of t hi s Co ur t sh al l caus e a co py o f th is A me nded N ot ic e an d Or de r t o be p ublis hed in a ne ws pa per p ublis he d an d of ge ner al c ir cu la ti on in Na ss au Co un ty , be in g th e Co un ty wh er ei n sa id C om plai nt f or valid at io n is f iled , a t le as t on ce e ac h week f or t wo ( 2) co ns ecut iv e we ek s , c om m enc in g wi th t he f ir st p ublica ti on w hich s hall n ot b e le ss th an t went y (20) d ay s pr ior t o th e da te s et f or said hea r ing. IT I S FU RT HE R OR DE RE D th at by s uc h pu bl ic at io n of t hi s Am en de d No ti ce a nd O r de r , th e St at e of F lorida , a nd t he se ve r al t axpa ye rs , p r op er ty ow ne rs and ci ti ze ns o f th e Di str ic t, including n on -r es iden ts ow ni ng p r op er ty o r s ubject t o ta xa ti on t he r ei n , a nd o t her s ha vi ng o r c la imin g an y r ight s, ti tl e or interes t in p r op er ty t o be a ffe ct ed b y th e is su an ce of t he B on ds o r t o be a ffe ct ed t hereby , s hall b e an d ar e ma de p ar ty d efend an ts t o th is p r ocee ding , an d th at t hi s Co ur t sh al l ha ve j ur is dict io n of t hem t o th e sa me e xt en t as i f sp ecif ically a nd p er so nally na me d as d efen dant s in s ai d Co mp lain t an d per so nally se r ve d wi th p r oc es s in t hi s caus e. DO NE A ND O RD ER ED a t th e Co ur th ou se in Na ss au Co un ty , Flor ida , t hi s 13 th d ay of A pr il, 2020 . Th e Ho no r ab le St ephen M. Fah lgr en , Ci r cuit C ou r t Judg e FN L 2T 0422-29-2020 #573287 NO TI CE UN DE R FIC TI TIOUS NAME LA W PUR SUA NT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORID A STAT UT ES NO TI CE I S HE RE BY G IV EN th at t he u nder si gn ed , de si ri ng to e ng ag e in b us ines s un de r th e fi ct itio us n am e of A nch or ed C hr is ti an C ouns eling lo ca te d at 5 422 F ir st C oa st Hw y , i n th e Co un ty o f Na ssa u, in t he C it y of F er na ndin a Be ach, F lo ri da 3 2034 inten ds to r eg is te r th e sa id n am e wi th th e Di vi si on o f Co rp or at io ns o f th e Fl or id a De pa rt me nt o f St at e, T allaha ss ee , Flo ri da . Da te d at F er na ndin a Be ach, F lo ri da 32304 t hi s 15t h da y of A pr il, 2020. A ncho re d Ch ri st ia n Co un se ling Sh an e Jo hns Sh an e Jo hns L LC FN L 1T 0422-202 0 #573256 NO TI CE UN DE R FIC TI TIOUS NAME LA W PURSUA NT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORID A STAT UT ES NO TI CE I S HE RE BY G IV EN th at t he u nder si gn ed , de si ri ng to e ng ag e in b us ines s un de r th e fi ct itio us n am e of A nch or ed C hr is ti an C ouns elin g lo ca te d at 5 422 F ir st C oa st Hw y , i n th e Co un ty o f Na ssa u, in t he C it y of F er na ndin a Be ach, F lo ri da 3 2034 inten ds to r eg is te r th e sa id n am e wi th th e Di vi si on o f Co rp or at io ns o f th e Fl or id a De pa rt me nt o f St at e, T allaha ss ee , Flo ri da . Da te d at F er na ndin a Be ach, F lo ri da 32304 t hi s 15t h da y of A pr il, 2020. A ncho re d Ch ri st ia n Co un se ling Sh an e Jo hns Sh an e Jo hns L LC FN L 1T 0422-202 0 #573256 NO TI CE UN DE R FIC TI TIOUS NAME LA W PURSUA NT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORID A STAT UT ES NO TI CE I S HE RE BY G IV EN th at t he u nder si gn ed , de si ri ng to e ng ag e in b us ines s un de r th e fi ct itio us n am e of R ep ai r Pa rt s Di re ct loc at ed a t 510 Da de S tr eet , in t he Co un ty o f Na ss au , i n th e Ci ty o f Fe rn an di na B ea ch , Flor id a 320 34 i nt end s to r eg is te r th e sa id na me wit h th e Di vi si on o f Co rp or at io ns o f th e Flor id a De par tm ent o f St at e, T alla ha ss ee, Flo ri da . Da te d at T allaha ss ee , Fl or ida 32304 t hi s 6t h da y of A pr il, 2020. Ja me s Fe rg us on Re pai r Pa rt s Di re ct FN L 1T 0422-202 0 #573251 IN THE CI RC UIT COUR T FOR NA SSAU CO UN TY , FLORID A PROB AT E DI VISION File No. 2019CP -454 Division B IN R E : E ST AT E OF LU CI NDA JO G LE NN De ceas ed . NO TIC E TO C RE DI TO RS Th e ad mi ni st ra ti on o f th e es ta te o f Lu cind a Jo G le nn , deceas ed , w ho se d at e of de at h wa s Oc to be r 3, 2019, i s pe ndin g in t he C ir cuit C ou rt fo r Na ss au C ou nty , F lo ri da , Pr ob at e Di vi si on , th e addr es s of w hich is Robe rt M . Fo st er Ju st ic e C enter 7 6 347 V et er an s Way , Yu le e, F lo ri da 32 097. Th e name s an d addr es se s of th e pe rs on al r ep re se nt at iv e an d th e pe rs on al r ep re se nt ati ve 's a tt or ney a re s et f or th be lo w. Al l cr edit or s of t he d ec ede nt a nd o t her p er so ns h av in g clai ms o r de ma nd s agains t de cede nt 's e st at e on wh om a c op y of t hi s no ti ce i s re quir ed t o be s er ve d mu st file t he ir c laim s wi th t hi s cou rt ON O R BE FO RE T HE L AT ER O F 3 MO NT HS A FT ER T HE T IM E OF TH E FI RS T PU BL IC AT IO N OF T HI S NO TI CE OR 30 DA YS A FT ER T HE DA TE O F SE RV IC E OF A C OP Y OF T HI S NO TI CE O N TH EM . Al l ot he r cr edit or s of t he de cede nt a nd o th er p er so ns ha vi ng c laim s or d em ands agains t de cede nt 's e st at e mu st f ile t he ir c laim s wi th t hi s co u rt WIT HI N 3 MO NT HS A FT ER TH E DA TE O F TH E FI RS T PU BL ICA TI ON OF TH IS N OT IC E. AL L CL AI MS N OT F IL ED WI TH IN T HE T IM E PE RI OD S SE T FO RT H IN F LO RI DA S TATU TE S SE CT IO N 733.702 WI LL BE F OR EVER B A RRE D. NO TW IT HS TA ND IN G TH E TI ME P ER IO DS S ET F OR TH AB OV E , A NY C LA IM F IL ED TW O (2 ) YE AR S OR M OR E AF TE R TH E DE CE DE NT 'S D AT E OF DE AT H IS B A RRE D. Th e da te o f fi rs t publicat io n of th is n ot ic e is A pr il 22, 2020. At to r ney f or P er so na l Re pr es en ta ti ve : Te re sa L . P ri nc e At to r ney Fl or ida Ba r Nu mb er : 41953 To ma ss et ti & P ri nc e 406 As h St re et Fe rn an dina B ea ch, FL 3203 4 Te le ph on e: ( 904) 2611833 Fax: ( 904) 2120350 EMail: in fo @t pi sl andlaw .c om Se condar y EMail: tp ri nc e@ tp is landlaw.co m Pe rs on al R ep re se nt at iv e: Ca ra A nn C u rt in c/ o To ma ss et ti & P ri nc e 406 As h St re et Fe rn an dina B ea ch, Fl or ida 32034 FN L 2T 0422-29-2020 #573393 IN THE CI RC UIT COUR T FOR NA SSAU CO UN TY , FLORID A PROB AT E DI VISION File No. 2019CP -454 Division B IN R E : E ST AT E OF LU CI NDA JO G LE NN De ceas ed . NO TIC E TO C RE DI TO RS Th e ad mi ni st ra ti on o f th e es ta te o f Lu cind a Jo G le nn , deceas ed , w ho se d at e of de at h wa s Oc to be r 3, 2019, is pe ndin g in t he C ir cuit C ou rt fo r Na ss au C ou nty , F lo ri da , Pr ob at e Di vi si on , th e addr es s of w hich is Robe rt M . Fo st er Ju st ic e C enter 7 6 347 V et er an s Way , Yu le e, F lo ri da 32 097. Th e name s an d addr es se s of th e pe rs on al r ep re se nt at ive an d th e pe rs on al r ep re se nt ati ve 's a tt or ney a re s et f or th be lo w. Al l cr edit or s of t he d ec ede nt a nd o t her p er so ns h av in g clai ms o r de ma nd s agains t de cede nt 's e st at e on wh om a c op y of t hi s no ti ce i s re quir ed t o be s er ve d mu st file t he ir c laim s wi th t hi s cou rt ON O R BE FO RE T HE L AT ER O F 3 MO NT HS A FT ER T HE T IM E OF TH E FI RS T PU BL IC AT IO N OF T HI S NO TI CE OR 30 DA YS A FT ER T HE DA TE O F SE RV IC E OF A C OP Y OF T HI S NO TI CE O N TH EM . Al l ot he r cr edit or s of t he de cede nt a nd o th er p er so ns ha vi ng c laim s or d em ands agains t de cede nt 's e st at e mu st f ile t he ir c laim s wi th t hi s co u rt WIT HI N 3 MO NT HS A FT ER TH E DA TE O F TH E FI RS T PU BL ICA TI ON OF TH IS N OT IC E. AL L CL AI MS N OT F IL ED WI TH IN T HE T IM E PE RI OD S SE T FO RT H IN F LO RI DA S TATU TE S SE CT IO N 733.702 WI LL BE F OR EV ER B A RRE D. NO TW IT HS TA ND IN G TH E TI ME P ER IO DS S ET F OR TH AB OV E , A NY C LA IM F IL ED TW O (2 ) YE AR S OR M OR E AF TE R TH E DE CE DE NT 'S D AT E OF DE AT H IS B A RRE D. Th e da te o f fi rs t publicat io n of th is n ot ic e is A pr il 22, 2020. At to r ney f or P er so na l Re pr es en ta ti ve : Te re sa L . P ri nc e At to r ney Fl or ida Ba r Nu mb er : 41953 To ma ss et ti & P ri nc e 406 As h St re et Fe rn an dina B ea ch, FL 3203 4 Te le ph on e: ( 904) 2611833 Fax: ( 904) 2120350 EMail: in fo @t pi sl andlaw .c om Se condar y EMail: tp ri nc e@ tp is landlaw.co m Pe rs on al R ep re se nt at iv e: Ca ra A nn C u rt in c/ o To ma ss et ti & P ri nc e 406 As h St re et Fe rn an dina B ea ch, Fl or ida 32034 FN L 2T 0422-29-2020 #573393 IN TH E CIRC UIT COUR T, FOUR TH JUDICIAL CI RC UIT, IN AND FOR NA SSAU COUN TY FLORIDA CA SE NO.: 2020CP -4 3 DI VISION: IN R E: ES TATE OF RO DG ER OR VAL WO LT JE R, De ceas ed . NO TIC E TO C RE DI TO RS (Sum ma ry A dm inis tr at ion) TO A LL P ER SO NS H AV IN G CL AI MS O R DE MA ND S AG AINS T TH E AB OV E ES TATE : Yo u ar e he re by n ot ifie d th at an O rd er o f Summ ar y Ad mi n is tr at ion h as b ee n e n te re d in th e es tate o f Rodg er O rv al Wo lt jer , d ec ea se d, F ile N um be r 2020CP -4 3 , b y t he Ci rc ui t Co ur t fo r Na ss au C oun ty , Fl or ida , P ro ba te D ivision , th e addr es s of w hich is 416 C en tr e St re et , F er n an dina Be ac h, FL 32034; t ha t th e de ce den ts da te o f de at h wa s No ve mb er 8, 2019 a nd th at t he t ot al v al ue o f th e es tate is $10,00 0 an d th at t he n am es a nd ad dr es se s of t ho se t o wh om it ha s be en a ss igned b y su ch or de r ar e: Na me Ka t her in e M. W ol tj er A ddr es s 35109 M im os a Pa rk e Pl ace, Fe rn an dina Be ac h, F L 320 34 AL L INTE RE ST ED P ER SO NS AR E NO TI FI ED T HA T: Al l cr ed it or s of t he e st at e of t he d ec ed ent an d pe rs on s ha vi n g clai ms o r de ma nds again st t he e st at e of t he de cede n t ot he r th an t ho se fo r wh om p ro visi on f or f ul l pa ym en t wa s ma de in t he Or de r of S um ma ry A dm inis tr ati on m us t file t hei r clai ms w ith th is c ou rt WITHIN T HE T IM E PE RI OD S SE T FO RT H IN F LO RI DA ST AT UT ES S EC TI ON 733 .7 02 . AL L CL AI MS AND D EM AN DS NO T SO F IL ED WIL L BE F OR EV ER B A RRE D. N OT WI TH ST AN DIN G ANY O TH ER A PP LI CA BL E TI ME P ER IO D , A NY C LA IM FI LE D TW O (2 ) YE AR S OR MORE A FT ER T HE D EC EDEN TS DA TE OF DE AT H IS B A RRE D. Th e da te o f th e fi rs t publicati on o f th is N ot ic e is : A pr il 15, 2020. s / Mar k F. M os s At to rn ey s fo r Pe rs on Givin g No ti ce MA RK F. M OS S , E SQ . Fl or ida Ba r Nu mb er : 119573 La w Of fi ce s of Mar k F. Mo ss , P LL C 301 W. B ay S tr eet , S ui te 142 1 Jack so nv ille , FL 32202 Te le ph on e: ( 904) 3297242 EMail: se rv ice@ ma rk mo ss law.co m Pe rs on Givin g No ti ce Ka t her in e M. W ol tj er 35109 Mi mo sa Par ke Place Fe rn an din a Be ac h, F L 320 34 FN L 2T 0415-22-2020 #571639 IN TH E CIRC UIT COUR T, FOUR TH JUDICIAL CI RC UIT, IN AND FOR NA SSAU COUN TY FLORIDA CA SE NO.: 2020CP -4 3 DI VISION: IN R E: ES TATE OF RO DG ER OR VAL WO LT JE R, De ceas ed . NO TIC E TO C RE DI TO RS (Sum ma ry A dm inis tr at ion) TO A LL P ER SO NS H AV IN G CL AI MS O R DE MA ND S AG AINS T TH E AB OV E ES TATE : Yo u ar e he re by n ot ifie d th at an O rd er o f Summ ar y Ad mi nis tr at ion h as b ee n e n te re d in th e es tate o f Rodg er O rv al Wolt jer , d ec ea se d, F ile N um be r 2020CP -4 3 , b y t he Ci rc ui t Co ur t fo r Na ss au C oun ty , Fl or ida , P ro ba te D ivision , th e addr es s of w hich is 416 C entr e St re et , F er n an dina Be ac h, FL 32034; t ha t th e de ce den ts da te o f de at h wa s No ve mb er 8, 2019 a nd th at t he t ot al v al ue o f th e es tate is $10,00 0 an d th at t he n am es a nd ad dr es se s of t ho se t o wh om i t ha s be en a ss igned b y su ch or de r ar e: Na me Ka t her in e M. W ol tj er A ddr es s 35109 M im os a Pa rk e Pl ace, Fe rn an dina Be ac h, F L 320 34 AL L INTE RE ST ED P ER SO NS AR E NO TI FI ED T HA T: Al l cr ed it or s of t he e st at e of t he d ec ed ent an d pe rs on s ha vi n g clai ms o r de ma nds again st t he e st at e of t he de cede n t ot he r th an t ho se fo r wh om p ro visi on f or f ul l pa ym en t wa s ma de in t he Or de r of S um ma ry A dm inis tr ati on m us t file t hei r clai ms w it h th is c ou rt WITHIN T HE T IM E PE RI OD S SE T FO RT H IN F LO RI DA ST AT UT ES S EC TI ON 733 .7 02 . AL L CL AI MS AND D EM AN DS NO T SO F IL ED WIL L BE F OR EV ER B A RRE D. N OT WI TH ST AN DIN G ANY O TH ER A PP LI CA BL E TI ME P ER IO D , A NY C LA IM FI LE D TW O (2 ) YE AR S OR MORE A FT ER T HE D ECEDEN TS DA TE OF DE AT H IS B A RRE D. Th e da te o f th e fi rs t publicati on o f th is N ot ic e is : A pr il 15, 2020. s / Mar k F. M os s At to rn ey s fo r Pe rs on Givin g No ti ce MA RK F. M OS S , E SQ . Fl or ida Ba r Nu mb er : 119573 La w Of fi ce s of Mar k F. Mo ss , P LL C 301 W. B ay S tr eet , S ui te 142 1 Jack so nv ille , FL 32202 Te le ph on e: ( 904) 3297242 EMail: se rv ice@ ma rk mo ss law.co m Pe rs on Givin g No ti ce Ka t her in e M. W ol tj er 35109 Mi mo sa Par ke Place Fe rn an dina Be ac h, F L 320 34 FN L 2T 0415-22-2020 #571639 IN THE CI RC UIT COUR T, FOUR TH JUDICIA L CIRC UIT, IN AND FOR NAS SA U CO U NTY , FLORI DA. FILE NO. 2020CP -8 4 DI VISION B IN RE: ES TATE O F N ITA PYF RO M VE RE EN , De ce as ed NO TI CE T O CR ED IT OR S Th e ad mi ni st ra ti on o f th e es ta te o f N ITA P YF RO M VE RE EN , d ec ea se d , w ho se da te o f deat h w as D ecem be r 19, 2 0 19, is pe ndin g in t he Ci rc ui t Co ur t fo r Na ss au Co un ty , Flor ida , P ro ba te D iv isi on , t he a ddr es s of w hich i s 76347 V et er an s Wa y, Y ulee , FL 3 2 097. Th e na me s an d ad dr es se s of t he p er so na l re pr es ent at ives a nd t he p er so na l re pr esent at iv es ' at to r ney a re se t fo rt h belo w. Al l cr edit or s of t he d ec ede nt a nd o t her p er so ns h av in g clai ms o r de ma nd s agains t de cede nt 's e st at e on w ho m a copy o f th is n ot ice ha s b een s er ve d mu st f ile t hei r clai ms w it h th is c ou rt WI TH IN T HE L AT ER O F 3 MO NT HS A FT ER T HE D AT E OF TH E FI RS T PU BL IC AT IO N OF T HI S NO TI CE OR 30 DA YS A FT ER T HE TI ME O F SE RV IC E OF A C OP Y OF T HI S NO TI CE O N TH EM . Al l ot he r cr edit or s of t he de cede nt a nd o th er p er so ns ha vi ng c laim s or d em ands agains t th e dece dent 's e sta te m us t file t he ir c laim s with th is c ou rt WIT HI N 3 MO NT HS AF TE R TH E DA TE O F TH E FI RS T PU BL IC AT IO N OF T HI S NO TI CE . AL L CL AI MS N OT S O FI LE D WI LL B E FO RE VE R BA RRE D. NO TW IT HS TA ND IN G TH E TI ME P ER IO D SE T FO RT H AB OV E , A NY C LA IM F IL ED TW O (2 ) YE AR S OR M OR E AF TE R TH E DE CE DE NT 'S D AT E OF DE AT H IS B A RRE D. Th e da te o f th e fi rs t publ ica ti on o f th is N ot ic e is A pr il 15, 2020. At to rn ey f or P er so na l Repr esent at iv e: /s H a rri so n W. P oo le Har ri so n W. P oo le PO OLE & P OO LE , P.A . Flor ida Ba r No . 50239 303 Ce nt re S tr eet , Su it e 20 0 Fe rn andi na B each , FL 3 2034 Te leph on e: ( 904) 261-0742 Pe rs on al R ep re s ent at ive : /s L ei gh A nn A dler Le igh An n Ad ler 9623 8 Ma rs h La ke s Dr ive Fe rn andi na B each , FL 3 2034 /s Do ug la s Br oo ks D av id so n Do ug la s Br oo ks D avid so n 4825 La fa ye tt e Av en ue Ft . Wo rt h, T X 761 07 FN L 2T 04-1522 2020 #572 53 4 IN THE CI RC UIT COUR T, FOUR TH JUDICIA L CIRC UIT, IN AND FOR NAS SA U CO U NTY , FLORI DA. FILE NO. 2020CP -8 4 DI VISION B IN RE: ES TATE O F N ITA PYF RO M VE RE EN , De ce as ed NO TI CE T O CR ED IT OR S Th e ad mi ni st ra ti on o f th e es ta te o f N ITA P YF RO M VE RE EN , d ec ea se d , w ho se da te o f deat h w as D ecem be r 19, 2 0 19, is pe ndin g in t he Ci rc ui t Co ur t fo r Na ss au Co un ty , Flor ida , P ro ba te D ivisi on , t he a ddr es s of w hich is 76347 V et er an s Wa y, Y ulee , FL 3 2 097. Th e na me s an d ad dr es se s of t he p er so na l re pr es ent at ives a nd t he p er so na l re pr esent at iv es ' at to r ney a re se t fo rt h belo w. Al l cr edit or s of t he d ec ede nt a nd o t her p er so ns h av in g clai ms o r de ma nd s agains t de cede nt 's e st at e on w ho m a copy o f th is n ot ic e ha s b een s er ve d mu st f ile t hei r clai ms w it h th is c ou rt WI TH IN T HE L AT ER O F 3 MO NT HS A FT ER T HE D AT E OF TH E FI RS T PU BL IC AT IO N OF T HI S NO TI CE OR 30 DA YS A FT ER T HE TI ME O F SE RV IC E OF A C OP Y OF T HI S NO TI CE O N TH EM . Al l ot he r cr edit or s of t he de cede nt a nd o th er p er so ns ha vi ng c laim s or d em ands agains t th e dece dent 's e sta te m us t file t he ir c laim s wit h th is c ou rt WIT HI N 3 MO NT HS AF TE R TH E DA TE O F TH E FI RS T PU BL IC AT IO N OF T HI S NO TI CE . AL L CL AI MS N OT S O FI LE D WI LL B E FO RE VE R BA RRE D. NO TW IT HS TA ND IN G TH E TI ME P ER IO D SE T FO RT H AB OV E , A NY C LA IM F IL ED TW O (2 ) YE AR S OR M OR E AF TE R TH E DE CE DE NT 'S D AT E OF DE AT H IS B A RRE D. Th e da te o f th e fi rs t publ ica ti on o f th is N ot ic e is A pr il 15, 2020. At to rn ey f or P er so na l Repr esent at iv e: /s H a rri so n W. P oo le Har ri so n W. P oo le PO OLE & P OO LE , P.A . Flor ida Ba r No . 50239 303 Ce nt re S tr eet , Su it e 20 0 Fe rn andi na B each , FL 3 2034 Te leph on e: ( 904) 261-0742 Pe rs on al R ep re s ent at ive : /s L ei gh A nn A dler Le igh An n Ad ler 9623 8 Ma rs h La ke s Dr ive Fe rn andi na B each , FL 3 2034 /s Do ug la s Br oo ks D av id so n Do ug la s Br oo ks D avid so n 4825 La fa ye tt e Av en ue Ft . Wo rt h, T X 761 07 FN L 2T 04-1522 2020 #572 53 4 NO TI CE OF PUBLIC MEETING Th e So ut h Ame lia I sl an d Sh or e St abiliz at io n As so ci ati on , I nc . will h ol d a Co nt ra ct Co mm it te e Me etin g on A pr il 29t h, 2 020 , a t 2:0 0p. m. , vi a co nferen ce c all. To c al l in to th is m ee ti ng , plea se dia l (8 00 ) 925978 9 an d enter A cce ss Co de : 7594642#. Fo r fu rt her as si st an ce , p leas e call ( 904) 2775123. FN L 04-22-29-2020 #573381 1 I t looks like I’m not the only one these days experiencing an abundance of monarch butterfly caterpillars. Every day it seems someone else posts something about these “cats” on the newsfeeds I look at on Facebook. I just started noticing monarch caterpillars in my own yard about three weeks ago, after watching monarch butterflies flitting around my yard. Although I got busy with other things and failed to check for eggs, a short while later I noticed that my eight or so lush, fully leafed milkweed plants were showing places where the leaves had been chewed. And then it took no big feat of detective work to find the yellow-, black-, and white-striped caterpillars happily crunching on the greenery. All of my milkweeds had caterpillars of varying sizes. Some plants had as many as six caterpillars all working on the foliage. The milkweed plants have now become leafless stems and the caterpillars have disappeared. Like I’ve done before without success, I scanned the eaves of the deck and the branches of nearby shrubs and trees looking for the green chrysalises that mark the next stage in a caterpillar’s life change. But again, no luck at finding them. Although these chrysalises are vivid green with a golden halo of spots in a crown on top, they blend in very nicely with the green leaves. Maybe the ever-present anoles ate some of them. I just hope some are still around and that one day I will be rewarded once more by the sight of mature monarch butterflies flitting around my yard, laying eggs again on the milkweed plants when their leaves grow back. A few years ago, I took a more proactive approach at raising caterpillars. I brought some in the house and maintained them in a tub. Milkweed leaves were provided and a netted top over the tub confined them when they crawled up to find a place to hang and turn into a chrysalis. But this was not a very successful project for me. I started with five, plump caterpillars. One drowned in a pan of water and three succumbed to “black death,” a viral disease that caused the caterpillars to turn black and liquefy. Only one caterpillar made it to the chrysalis stage and on to a butterfly. The deterioration of my “cats” was horrible to watch, and I never attempted this indoor experiment again, but many people do and have better luck (or more sterile surroundings or drier air, or something that I lacked). One friend, Betty Duckworth, has reported almost daily on the growth of the caterpillars she has been feeding and watching in a caterpillar-rearing container that she bought online. She has been very successful, with a number of adult butterflies produced. She’s only mentioned one disease, called anal prolapse, which sounds about as bad as black death to me. Another friend, Sandra Baker-Hinton, has been raising monarch butterflies for years, but even she says there are more monarch caterpillars around now than she has ever noticed before. The problem for those who try to raise butterflies is tending to their voracious appetites. It gets expensive rushing off to Liberty Landscapes, just over the bridge, to buy more milkweed plants. Word has it that monarch caterpillars will also eat butternut squash, and I’m wondering who was first to try that unlikely food source. As for me, I’m still looking for chrysalises in my backyard and wishing for adult monarchs someday soon. And, not long afterward, I should also see swallowtail butterfly “cats” on the parsley and dill plants that I provide more for them than I do for the culinary value. Ever since my failed indoor butterfly growing project, I am now content to watch the insect action that is visible in my yard without having to be face-toface with anal prolapse or black death. This may still be happening, but at least I don’t have to watch. Pat Foster-Turley is a zoologist on Amelia Island. She welcomes your nature questions and observations.rfnttrtbttrnClockwise from left, monarch butterfly caterpillars are abundant in many area gardens this time of year. Monarch caterpillars can devour milkweed plants in hours. I just started noticing monarch caterpillars in my own yard about three weeks ago, after watching monarch butterflies flitting around my yard. A caterpillar enclosure and monarch chrysalis. You can buy caterpillar rearing tents online or make your own enclosure with a tub and net covering,PHOTOS BY PAT FOSTER-TURLEY FOR THE NEWS-LEADER rr NL Wednesday 04.22.20.indd 10 4/21/20 5:05 PM

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The Women’s Golf Association of the Amelia Island Club held its weekly play day on Thursday, featuring a best ball net of the twosome format. Once again, the final results were close. The first-place team, with a score of 64, was comprised of of Arleene Bearak and Carol Jespersen, and the second-place team of Claudeen Lindberg and Pam Fox finished its round with a score of 65. The third-place team, with a score of 66, included teammates Patty Miller and Pete May, and the fourth-place team of Susan Kaye and Carol Kimmel completed its round with a score of 68. Dianne Taylor and Jane Preston finished in fifth place with a final score of 69.rffntrbbThe Nassau County Sheriff’s Office and NCSO Charities Inc. are sponsoring the sixth annual Sheriff’s Golf Tournament on May 8 at the Amelia National Golf & Country Club. Registration starts at 7:30 a.m., and the scramble shotgun start is at 8:30 a.m. An awards ceremony and dinner follow play. Form a four-person team for $500. Sponsorships are available. For information or to register for the tournament, contact John Anstett at 548-4081 or janstett@nassauso.com.nbThe Golf Club at North Hampton invites men to join its newly formed Men’s Golf Association. The group plays Tuesdays with a different game every week. A specially planned lunch follows play for anyone interested. Membership at the club is not required to join. Email Dennis Engers at d12engers@gmail.com or call the pro shop at 548-0000. Yancy Smith, above right, weighed in the winning black drum during the recent Nassau County Black Drum Tournament. The drum weighed 69 pounds. Also pictured is Smith’s father, Hubert, with a big drum. Deseray Smith, left, is pictured with her firstplace lady angler black drum that weighed 54 pounds.SPECIAL PHOTOS F ERNANDINA B EACH T IDES T ides, Sun & Moo n : April 22 April 29, 2020 Sat. 4/25 Sun. 4/26 Mon. 4/27 Tues. 4/28Fri.4/24Thur.4/23Wed.4/29 Moonrise 6:50A Sunrise 6:50A Moonset 7:44P Sunset 7:58P Wed.4/22 Low 3:02A 1.78’ High 9:18A 7.50’ Low 3:09P 1.54’ High 9:33P 8.09’ Sunrise 6:49A Moonrise 7:20A Sunset 7:59P Moonset 8:38P Sunrise 6:48A Moonrise 7:53A Sunset 7:59P Moonset 9:34P Low 3:39A 1.69’ High 9:55A 7.38’ Low 3:43P 1.52’ High 10:09P 8.09’ Low 4:15A 1.65’ High 10:32A 7.21’ Low 4:16P 1.55’ High 10:45P 8.03’ Low 4:51A 1.67’ High 11:09A 7.02’ Low 4:50P 1.61’ High 11:22P 7.94’ Sunrise 6:46A Moonrise 9:09A Sunset 8:01P Moonset 11:28P Low 5:28A 1.75’ High 11:47A 6.87’ Low 5:27P 1.70’ High -P -- ’ Sunrise 6:45A Moonrise 9:55A Sunset 8:01P Moonset -P High 12:01A 7.84’ Low 6:09A 1.88’ High 12:28P 6.75’ Low 6:08P 1.82’ Moonset 12:24A Sunrise 6:44A Moonrise 10:46A Sunset 8:02PTide calculations are for Amelia River, Fernandina Beach. No corrections are necessary.Sun & Moon events are also calculated for Fernandina Beach, although actual times may vary because of land masses.High 1:33A 7.68’ Low 7:51A 2.13’ High 2:05P 6.70’ Low 7:58P 2.09’ High 12:45A 7.75’ Low 6:56A 2.02’ High 1:13P 6.69’ Low 6:58P 1.97’ Moonset 1:18A Sunrise 6:43A Moonrise 11:43A Sunset 8:03P Sunrise 6:47A Moonrise 8:29A Sunset 8:00P Moonset 10:30P PUT US TO WORK FOR YOU Florida’s Oldest Weekly Newspaper The News-Leader printed edition and fbnewsleader.com offer the opportunity to promote and advertise your business to thousands of customers each week. Call 261-3696 and ask for Candy or Meghan and put the News-Leader to work for you!This Space Available!mentioned to Forest that he would like some black drum to sell in the local fish house, Atlantic Seafood. In those days, Forest and Jadine Evatt were regarded as some of the best fishermen on the island and seldom came back to the Fernandina Harbor Marina without a big catch of black and red drum. “On that particular day, I asked Jim Rester and his father if they would like to go fishing with me,” Forest said. “The tide was flooding just off the ice dock in the Amelia River, where a deep hole always produced excellent black drum fishing during late spring and early summer. “I had iced down a five-gallon bucket full of blue crabs and shrimp, which I regard as ideal drum baits. If the drum are stubborn, I might add a piece of conch to sweeten the baited hook. At the end of our fishing trip, we used all of our drum baits and had landed some 1,100 pounds of black drum, which was more than enough for Hydie’s fish market.” I always remember Forest and Jadine Evatt working side-by-side at Amelia Island Plantation building wooden projects, particularly walkways. They frequently stopped by the Amelia Angler and shared fishing stories on their breaks. I have so many Forest Evatt fish stories etched in my fishing logs. A great local angler who will be missed tremendously. Continued from page 12While just a fraction of senior athletes follow a vegan diet, there is a trend with more turning to this option. Traditional opinions by coaches and athletes say that you can’t perform as well athletically on a purely plant-based diet, but runner Ellen Jaffe Jones is out to disprove that thought. In fact, the National Senior Games Association April Athlete of the Month says her own experience has already done that. “After a 5K, I ran in Florida in 2011, I was on the podium holding a trophy and wearing a bright neon yellow shirt with the cover of my book Eat Vegan on $4 a Day on it,” she recalls. “This guy tells me, ‘You can’t run on a vegan diet, and you certainly can’t race on a vegan diet.’ At that point, I had been running for 30 years and answered, ‘Let’s have that conversation.’” Jones leads a lot of conversations on the subject. Her early career as a television news investigative and consumer reporter provided the communication skills to become a speaker, author of six books and host of an active website and social media pages about vegan diet and lifestyle. “There’s a perception that vegans are weak and all they eat is spinach and broccoli with no variety,” she says. “That couldn’t be farther from the truth.” She began to shy away from meat protein after college when she gained weight while touring as a cast member of Up With People. “I was 150 pounds on a fivefoot-three frame — not pretty or comfortable,” she recalls. “I did all the high protein diets — Atkins, South Beach, Zone Diet. After I almost died from a colon blockage when I was 28, I ran to the bookstore and read everything on fiber, and when I focused on fiber over protein the weight came off.” Jones’s family history was reason enough to evaluate diet. “I’ve watched my mom and both sisters get breast cancer, and my aunt died from it at an early age,” she says solemnly. “One of my sisters got diabetes and eventually died from heart disease. All my life has been focused on how to avoid this mayhem. “We’ve been sold a bill of goods with ad campaigns for meat and dairy that promote misconceptions not based on science. There’s a lot of research now linking dairy to breast cancer, for example.” Fitness running became a part of her life 40 years ago. In recent years she added track competition, making it to Nationals three times. She reports always being a “middleof-the-packer” but that her performances have improved over time. She is proud to have secured 1,500-meter gold in her Florida Senior Games qualifier, and to be on the women’s 65-69 4x100 winning relay team at The Games in Albuquerque last year. She was also one of just two women of 66 athletes in her age group to run all six track events plus the relay. “I recently placed my 199th 5K or longer race since 2006 just on plants,” she notes. “I’m now running a 27-minute 5K, and I never ran that fast. Many of the women who used to beat me like crazy 15 years ago aren’t even running anymore.” Jones adds a big reason she entered athletics was to share that vegans largely do not get arthritis. “Animal protein lodges in the joints,” she says. “Arthritis specialists and organizations are now saying to cut down or eliminate animal protein to cut down on symptoms of osteoarthritis. And that includes dairy.” Her bottom line is that people should research and make up their own mind about diet. “There’s no money in broccoli. There’s no broccoli association or lobby, and that’s why we haven’t heard the good news about it and its sisters and brothers,” she explains. “When you understand that, you have to be your own investigative reporter to figure out the truth about food.” Visit www.nsga.com for information on the National Senior Games Association. Marion Hollins, one of the only female golf course developers in history, will be inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame as part of its Class of 2021. Joining Tiger Woods, who was announced last month, Hollins was selected through the contributor category for her impact as a visionary golf course architect and pioneer of the game. Winner of the 1921 United States Amateur and captain of the first American Curtis Cup team in 1932, Hollins’ influence on the game stretched beyond the fairways of competitive play. One of history’s few female golf course developers, she took a lead role in developing the Monterey Peninsula into a golf mecca, which is now home to some of the biggest tournaments in play. “When you start reading about Marion Hollins, you realize what a trailblazer she was,” said Annika Sorenstam, World Golf Hall of Fame Class of 2003 Inductee. “In her era, she didn’t have many resources with the status of women in sports and golf. “To be that kind of trailblazer with that kind of enthusiasm and energy and get into course development and design is very inspirational. She was an advocate for women and changed the landscape of the game.” Credited with being the first woman to conceive and build a planned unit development with a golf course as a central feature, she played a major role in the founding and formation of two of golf’s most iconic courses, Cypress Point and Pasatiempo. Hollins was a collaborator with Hall of Famer Alister MacKenzie on multiple projects; he credited her for the design of the 16th at Cypress Point. She also developed a friendship with the legendary Bobby Jones and influenced the development of Augusta National when she traveled there on MacKenzie’s behalf. Hollins is the second inductee in the Class of 2021, joining Woods. The additional members of the 2021 Class will be announced in the coming days. “Marion Hollins is most deserving of this honor,” said Greg McLaughlin, CEO of World Golf Foundation. “She was a principal force of the game, the visionary of some of today’s greatest courses, and I am grateful that her contributions will be celebrated as part of the 2021 Class and thereafter in the World Golf Hall of Fame.” The Class of 2021 is elected by the Hall of Fame’s Selection Committee, which discussed the merits of 10 finalists. The Selection Committee is a 20-member panel co-chaired by Hall of Fame Members Beth Daniel, Nick Price, Sorenstam and Curtis Strange, and includes media representatives and leaders of the major golf organizations. The finalists were nominated by the Hall of Fame’s Nominating Committee, which vetted every candidate that met the qualifications of the Hall of Fame’s three induction categories. For information on the induction process, visit www. worldgolfhalloffame.org. nbbrn Ellen Jaffe Jones rfnt In addition to nding out the latest news, sports and events happening in Nassau County you can also:Visit www.fbnewsleader.com today! Renew your subscription online! Browse back issues....and more! Place classi ed ads online! DO YOU KNOW? NEW Sports Wed.indd 2 4/21/20 5:25 PM

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þA þNþw þL rfn Yancy Smith, a seasoned saltwater angler and winner of the 2017 Fernandina Beach Black Drum Tournament, took top honors again, winning the inaugural Nassau County Black Drum Tournament with his 69-pound black drum. The top prize was $1,238. Also in the open division, Capt. Tony Peeples placed second with a 66.5pound black drum worth $743. Benny Hendrix Sr. took third with a 64-pound black drum worth $495. Deseray Smith took top lady angler honors, winning $500 for her 54-pound black drum. Meghan Murphy captured second and collected $100 for her 54-pound black drum. Louis Scott, Jr. took top junior angler honors, earning $500 for his 66-pound black drum. Noah Boyes was second and won $200 for a 53pound black drum. Total cash awards for the event totaled $3,475. There were 33 boats entered in the event with 20 lady anglers. Thank you to the sponsors, including Amelia Auto Glass and Coastal Marine. Many thanks go to Robert Haddock for heading up the tournament. Because of the current coronavirus, the awards and trophies have been postponed. This year’s black drum run has produced a lot of excellent fishing action at the deep waters of Cumberland Sound, the St. Marys jetty rocks, Nassau Sound and along the beaches of Amelia Island. One of the most popular and productive black drum fishing waters is the tip of the St. Marys rock jetties during the incoming tide. “I had a charter just the other day, which produced two big drum within minutes after anchoring my fishing boat at the tip of the St. Marys south jetty rocks,” Hendrix said. “The tide was coming in, and I prefer the incoming tide for drum fishing. I anchored up at the very end of the south jetty rocks on the river side. “After dropping a pair of barbed quarters of blue crab down to the bottom, my two guests landed two large black drum. My charter guests were completely worn out and instructed me to return the Fernandina Harbor Marina.” One of the better baits for black drum is blue crab cut up into quarters. Recreational fishermen can catch their own blue crabs with a crab trap. The law allows five crab traps per fisherman, and traps need to be marked with a float no less than six inches in diameter with the letter “R” no less than two inches tall marked on the float. The trap must be at least two-feet-by-two-feet with a mesh of no smaller than 1 1/2 inches. The harvester’s name and address must also be permanently affixed to the trap. Florida recreational fishermen can harvest 10 gallons of blue crabs per day with no size limit. The harvest of egg-bearing blue crabs is prohibited. For information on recreational harvesting of blue crabs, visit www.myfwc.com. Area tackle shops also sell live blue crabs. We lost one of Northeast Florida’s best loved fishermen. Longtime friend and fisherman Forest Evatt passed away on April 15 and will be laid to rest in the Chester Cemetery beside his wife, Jadine. Services will be conducted by Oxley-Heard Funeral Home. “I will always remember watching Forest drum fish at the jetty rocks,” Capt. Keith Edwards said. “Forest was definitely the best at out figuring the fish by pulling his anchor and moving to where he knew the fish would feed next.” Some 40 black drum fishing seasons ago, Hydie Peterson FISH Continued on page 11Zach Skipper, Zach Alkier, Bryce Schmidt and Brenna Shiver, top, from left, are pictured with a big catch of Amelia Island black drum. David Bean, above left, weighed in a 64-pound black drum for thirdplace honors in the drum tournament. First-place junior angler Louis Scott Jr. with his 66-pound black drum, above. Longtime friend and legendary black drum angler Forest Evatt recently passed away. Pictured, from left, are Forest and Jadine Evatt with Clara May and Everett Warren, left. More photos, Page 11.SPECIAL PHOTOS NEW Sports Wed.indd 1 4/21/20 5:22 PM