Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Place of Publication:
Lake City, FL
Publisher:
Community Newspapers Inc.
Todd Wilson
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
This project was funded under the provisions of the DLIS Florida American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) from the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Florida's DLIS Florida ARPA program is administered by the Department of State's Division of Library and Information Services.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
029170093 ( ALEPH )
33283560 ( OCLC )
ABZ6316 ( NOTIS )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Don Caldwell

Reporter Publisher

A personal opinion,

IDA needs to

reverse our
losing ways

Mr. Myral Caldwell
Rural Route 6

Cherry Creek, Miss. 39216

Dear Uncle Myral,

It’s been awhile. Sorry.

How are the tomatoes? Last year
you had a nice crop. Are you going
to sell them in the front yard?

If you grow some speckled butter-
beans, would you save me a bushel
or so? Maybe I can come up and
help shell them. We'll talk about
Confederate soldiers and kings and
things

I've got a problem.

Four months ago I told you about
the Westvaco Co. leaving Lake City
That’s not good. We've got folks
that need jobs.

We have an Industrial Develop-
ment Authority. Its purpose is to
create jobs for folks. Doug Davis is
the man in charge.

This morning we found out that
Guerdon Industries is closing.
That’s about 85 people out of work.
Most all are married. Two can live
as cheaply as one, if they both have
good jobs.

Uncle Myral, a man wrote a book
entitled, ‘‘Megatrends.” In that
book it stated this is supposed to be
the growingest place in the country.

Seems to me like we're going
backwards.

One hour ago our senior editorial
staffer, Joe Blewett, told me that
the IDA hadn’t met in four or five
months. Seems they haven't had
anything to discuss.

Maybe I ought to write a critical
column about their not having
anything to discuss.

That would give them something
to discuss.

One of my problems is that when
I worry, I get upset. I've got to
learn to just worry.

Our main problem is we don’t
know what we're doing in regard to
the present and future of our in-
dustrial base.

Some IDA folks say that we ought
to be a tourist-related community.
That would be nice, but we don’t
have Disney World or Sea World. In
fact, we're sorta old world instead
of a brave new world.

We just allocated $40,000 of tax
money to help draw tourists here
for the Tournament Players
Association golf tournament. That's
good. We needed to spend some of
those dollars from the Tourist
Development Council. (Doug Davis
heads that group, too.) That'll help
for a week next year.

I'm worried about the other 51
weeks. I need to stop worrying.

Other folks from the IDA think
that we need new industry. Now
that’s a philosophical consideration.
For right now, I'd like to start
holding our own. Anytime we get a
new prospect for industry, we get
problems.

We're like a pack of coon dogs at
the base of a sweet gum tree. Bark-
ing and howling. Everybody wants
new business as long as it locates in
the right place, the right people
make the money from the land sale
and we don’t alienate anyone from
existing corporations. (Sometimes
the heads of those industries get
mad because they think new
business will compete for the work
force, and they might have to pay
more wages, and then the folks who
want to move here go to Gainesville
or Live Oak and live happily ever
after.)

1 don’t know what Doug Davis
thinks. He won’t talk to the
newpaper people. Now, he probably
won't talk to me.

What I was wondering about to-
day — do you need any help with
the tomatoes?

Sincerely,
Don
Mr. Don Caldwell
P.O. Box 1709
Lake City, Fla. 32056
Dear Don:
You don’t know enough about

tomatoes to help much.

- Don’t get too uppity. Try real
hard to write something nice about
the Industrial Development Authori-
ty. If you look hard you might find
something positive.

Sincerely,
Uncle Myral

Tip of the day

Don’t mix ammonia with chlorine
bleach or any other household
chemical product. Don’t combine it
with a commercial oven cleaner or a

drain-cleaner product.

Since 1874

LIN TUE
El HY

I I a

GATNESUTL LE FI a0]

Lake City Re

he

rter

7,

28 %

yp, 2b¢
43

Vol. 113 No. 137, Lake City, Florida, Friday, May 9, 1986

Report hammers police

Grand jury critical of Bowers, ‘deplorable’ police operations

By RICK BUSH
Reporter staff writer

Problems ranging from misap-
propriation of city property to illicit
sex at the police gym are detailed in
a report on a Columbia County grand
jury probe into the Lake City Police
Department released today.

Circuit Court Judge Wallace Jopl-
ing, ruling this morning, denied the
majority of motions to repress or ex-
punge portions of the report and
released portions of the report not af-
fected.

Among the other allegations con-
tained in the report are questionable
financial practices at the police
department, questions about officers

Full text of
report, page 14A

receiving gifts of liquor and im-
proper destruction of seized proper-
ty.

The report, blasting the
‘“‘deplorable manner in which the
Lake City Police Department has
been run,” was prepared by the
grand jury April 10. It was sent to 11
people, including six who testified
before the panel, as well as the four
city councilman and the mayor.

It has been secret since its release
to allow people named in the report
time to file motions to repress or ex-

punge portions of the report that may
be unfounded or false. A motion was
filed last Friday with Judge Jopling
and most of the motion was denied to-
day.

Following its investigation, the
grand jury returned only one indict-
ment. Former Lake City Police Chief
Ray Simmons was indicted for grand
theft by that grand jury and pleaded
guilty to the charge on April 11. He
was sentenced by Jopling on April 23
to five years probation.

However, the grand jury said Sim-
mons’ indictment did not adequately
address problems in the police
department and issued the report
because of its concerns.

MOTHER TO MANY: Mother’s Day for Lois Herndon,
in rocking chair, is celebrated in a big way each year. She
does not know what her children have planned for her,
but it doesn’t matter. “I would love to have all of them at
the house to cook for. That’s what I enjoy,” said the petite
widow. Gathered around Mrs. Herndon in this special
Mother’s Day photo are, front row, from left, grand-
children Andy Herndon, Paula Crews, Brenda Rich and
Kim Herndon. Second row, from left, grandson Tim
Dorth, holding his son John Dortch; grandsons Michael

Stalvey and John Paul Crews; Mrs. Herndon, holding the
two children she baby-sits, Missy Wells, left, and Kelly
Roberts; son, Harold Herndon, and son-in-law, Everette
Crews. Third row, from left, son-in-law Robert Dortch,
holding his daughter, Amanda; daughter Velma Dortch;
granddaughter-in-law Rhonda Crews; daughter Linda
Crews; granddaughter Penni Herndon; daughter-in-law
Linda Herndon; and standing behind Linda Herndon is
son-in-law Mike Rich. (Photo by Margaret Leguire)

For her, Mother's Day every day

By MARGARET LEGUIRE
Reporter staff writer

Lois Herndon sat in a rocker, scuff-
ed by time and use, and quietly talk-
ed about her family, rocking back
and forth.

A family photo gallery covered
several pieces of nearby furniture,
seemingly surrounding the petite
67-year-old widow.

There was no sad reflection for this
mother of four, grandmother of 13
and great-grandmother of two. She’s
a mom and nothing could make her
happier.

“I have enjoyed a full life doing
what I like to do best,” said Mrs.
Herndon. “That is, cooking and tak-
ing care of my home and family.”

Mrs. Herndon has never been
employed, ‘‘but that does not mean I
have not worked.” From the beginn-
ing of her marriage to John Herndon
in 1938 the Union Countian ‘‘did most
of the farming while my husband
worked in construction.”

The couple moved to Columbia
County on their wedding day, “and

we have lived here in the Mount
Carmel Community ever since.”

After the birth of their children —
Harold in 1940, Linda Crews in 1942,
David in 1945 and Velma Dortch in
1950 — Mrs. Herndon would take
them to the fields with her to work.

“The baby would be put in a box at
the end of the row while I did what I
needed to do,” she said. ‘‘The others
would toddle along beside me in the
field.”

While the children were growing
up, Mrs. Herndon made their
clothing and “canned and put up
fruits and vegetables for the winter.”

The 140-acre farm provided all the
food and meats for the family. ‘‘And
we still grow all of our vegetables
and raise our pork and beef,” the pro-
ud mother said. “All of the children
fill their freezers with vegetables and
meat from the farm.

‘“‘Harold and my son-in-law,
Everette Crews, farm corn and
vegetables here. But we all pitch in
whenever we are needed.”

After the death of her husband in

1979, Mrs. Herndon began baby-
sitting for extra money.

“I've kept one child full-time since
she was six weeks old. She is now 3,
and calls me Granny. I sure think a
lot of all of the children I keep and I
hope they do me,” she said with a
gentle, motherly smile.

Mrs. Herndon also keeps two other
children part-time.

And in this age of career mothers
who dread the thought of being con-
fined to homemaking, Mrs. Herndon
wouldn’t have it any other way.

“You can ask any of my friends
how much I enjoy cooking,” Mrs.
Herndon said enthusiastically. “I
cook three meals a day. Breakfast
for me, lunch for my babies I keep,
and usually, I have company for
lunch. I also cook a large supper
every night for those of my family
who come by. I usually have several
who eat with me.”

Mrs. Herndon is adamant about
“sparing the rod and spoiling the

Please turn to MOTHER/P-4

Inmate runs up $60,000 bill

at hospital before escaping

By SCOTT CALLAHAN
Reporter staff writer

George ‘Coffee Dog’’ Dingle is ac-
cused of being a one-man crime
wave, charged with a string of armed
robberies, aggravated batteries,
thefts and other alleged crimes here
spanning a two-month period.

Today, the 36-year-old ex-con is
free, having failed to show up in Col-
umbia County Circuit Court about a
week ago after being released on his
own recognizance.

Moreover, he left the county
holding a medical bill in excess of
$60,000.

Sheriff Tom Tramel isn’t happy
about the situation, and blames stub-
born Baptist Medical Center officials

for letting Dingle walk away from the
Jacksonville facility. He was
hospitalized there following an at-
tempted suicide about three months
ago at the Columbia County Jail,
after he tried to hang himself in his
cell.

“We were not kept informed as we
should have been,” Tramel said
Thursday. “I guess it was a
breakdown in communications.”

According to Tramel, hospital of-
ficials said they were unable to guard
Dingle, who was seriously injured in
the hanging incident. When his condi-
tion began improving, they refused to
transfer him to Lake Shore Hospital,

Please turn to INMATE/P-4

PO ESTE ere VIE EE a

Lake City Manager Ralph Bowers
bears the brunt of criticism in the
report, but general complaints are
raised about the department, some of
its personnel and its overall accoun-
tability.

Sex at the gym

The grand jury criticized the police
department for activities at the
department gym at the old city pool
near Memorial Stadium.

“Unfortunately, the use of the
police gym has often been for pur-
poses which could only serve to
undermine public confidence in the

Please turn to REPORT/P-2

RALPH BOWERS
blasted in jury report

Guerdon shuts its
local factory down

By SCOTT CALLAHAN
Reporter staff writer

Guerdon Industries is shutting
down its 85-employee Lake City plant
because the manufactured housing
market has become saturated,
General Manager Rudy Harrington
said this morning.

Employees at the U.S. 90 East
plant have been told jobs will be
made available at the company’s
other Florida manufacturing facility
in Ocala.

“We'll be combining the produc-
tion line with our Ocala plant,” Harr-
ington said. ‘We're working with the
employees so as many as want to,
can move.”

Workers were told about the shut-
down Thursday.

Guerdon, which has been in opera-
tion here for 30 years, was forced to
close the plant because “there is way
too much production-line capacity”
in the manufactured housing in-
dustry, Harrington explained.

“A lot of (manufacturers) are do-
ing the same thing,” he said.

The plant could be re-opened in
seven or eight months if the
manufactured housing market im-
proves.

“We anticipate re-opening around
the first of the year,” Harrington
said. “We really hope so, but the
market right now seems to be
saturated.”

A spokeswoman for the Florida
Manufactured Housing Association
in Tallahassee said the state’s con-
dominium industry is experiencing
the same problem.

“Northerners are having problems
selling their first homes and moving
to Florida,” she said this morning.
“March and April usually signal the
end of the tourist season.”

Guerdon’s Lake City plant had a
$1.5 million annual payroll and pro-
duced about $10 million worth of

Please turn to GUERDON/P-4

Hospital rejects study;
calls for tax increase

By JOE BLEWETT
Senior staff writer

Lake Shore Hospital's doctors, still
unhappy with the lack of pay and sup-
port they receive for treating in-
digents, have asked that the hospital
levy the full 3 mills of ad valorem tax
permitted them by law.

In addition, both the doctors and
hospital trustees have rejected a
study on their indigent care problems
made by the Arthur Young Co. of
Atlanta, Ga. The $15,000 study, com-
missioned by the trustees, recom-
mended a number of steps designed
to solve the indigent care problem in
the hospital’s emergency room ser-
vice.

The hospital currently levies 1.74
mills, which brings in approximately
$700,000 a year in revenues.
However, the Columbia County Com-
mission is now levying 9.7 mills, in-
cluding the hospital’s 1.74 mills, and
state law places a 10-mill tax cap on
the county. Under law, however,
Lake Shore can levy up to 3 mills.

In asking for the millage hike, the
doctors did not specifically request
the additional money be used to fund
indigent care alone. Instead, they

Pointing the way

Carlos Estes stopped off in Lake City this week on his
way south from Bowling Green, Ky. with a load of

a A Ed “ IOI Shy RPS Ee TY

pointed out that the hospital is losing
money on its rescue service opera-
tion — at an estimated loss of $300,000
per year — and the net result is that it
can do less with the indigent care
problem.

“Some of the doctors are very
hostile,” said Dr. Pat Pennington,
chief of staff. “They feel this thing
(indigent care) has been kicked
around for a long time now and
nothing has been done...they’re not
interested in hassling anymore.”

Pennington said doctors feel that if
nothing is done within a short period,
perhaps 30 days, then some of them
will ‘go on consulting status.” Under
the consulting status, the doctors will
no longer handle unattached or in-
digent patients through the hospital’s
emergency room service. They
would only treat their own patients.

Trustees responded to the doctors’
demands by asking their chairman,
the Rev. Ed Montgomery, to meet
with the medical staff next Tuesday.

Trustee Terry McDavid questioned
whether or not the hospital can levy
the full 3 mills without county com-

Please turn to STUDY/P-4

flashing arrow signs. The signs are destined for stores
across Florida. (Photo by Rick Bush)

oh
4

Pi BO Sab a A nL A ah a



2 LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986

In brief:

Weapons charge

A 32-year-old South Bay, Fla., man
was charged with carrying a conceal-
ed weapon this week after it was
reported he was acting suspiciously
at the Econo Lodge on U.S. 90 West,
the Columbia County Sheriff's
Department said.

Charged was Rickie Lewis, P.O.
Box 269, South Bay.

A sheriff’s deputy responded to the
motel after receiving a report about
a suspicious person. The officer ask-
ed Lewis for identification and spot-
ted a .38-caliber Smith & Wesson
revolver when the man opened the
glove box of his car.

Food schedule

The May schedule for distribution
of surplus food by the Suwannee
River Economic Council is:

Tuesday, May 13, Golden Age
Center and Richardson Center, 9
a.m. - 3 p.m.

Thursday, May 15, Fort White City
Hall, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.

Friday, May 16, Springville Com-
munity Center, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
Monday and Tuesday, May 19 and
20 regular distribution day in Lake
City, at 300 N. Franklin St., 8:30
a.m.-4 p.m.

Wednesday, May 21, special
distribution to the physically disabl-
ed, handicapped and those over 60
who qualify, at the same location and
during the same hours.

Everyone must meet USDA in-
come guidelines and questions about
eligibility should be directed to the
Suwannee River Economic Council,
which has also announced that no
new cards will be issued, no lost
cards replaced and no recertification
during the distribution.

Drug paraphernalia
charge for local man

A Lake City man was arrested
Wednesday on a charge of possession
of drug paraphernalia after he was
stopped for a traffic offense.

Darrell Deron Butler, of 307 Dr.
Martin Luther King Drive, was
charged with possession of drug
paraphernalia.

Butler was arrested after an of-
ficers spotted a pipe which possibly
contained marijuana in Butler's car.

Carny caught here
for North Carolina

held in the Columbia County Jail for
an alleged burglary in North
Carolina, the sheriff’s department
said.

Arrested was Gregory Thielen, no
address given. He told arresting of-
ficers he worked for Myers Amuse-
ment Co.

Thielen was arrested at the S&S
convenience store on U.S. 90 West,
near the Suwannee County line, after
it was reported he had burglarized a
mobile home behind Horizon In-
dustries, also on U.S. 90 West.

Ridley Gamby told sheriff's
deputies he saw Thielen leaving the
mobile home and was struck when he
confronted the man.

Columbia
Consensus

752-5295

A 26-year-old carnival worker was
arrested Wednesday and is being

TODAY’S QUESTION: Do you
think the Cleveland Indians will win
the American League pennant this
year? ;

THURSDAY'S QUESTION: Do
you think President Reagan achiev-
ed anything in Tokyo?

NO75% YES 25%
(4 responses)

No, all he did is play the part of
dictator as usual, dictating to all the
other nations...no, because our
allies are too dependant on oil from
the Middle-East countries to go
anything to aggravate them...no, all
we have gotten from a few of our
so-called allies is a statement that
they agree with what he’s saying,
that’s today, what about next week
when more problems with Khadafy
arise?

EDITOR’S NOTE: Columbia Con-
sensus is intended to give our
readers an opportunity to express
opinions on a variety of subjects. It
is not a scientific poll of community
opinion but a representative sampl-
ing of readers’ feelings on specific
issues. Some answers are edited
because of length, language or per-
sonal attack. Suggestions for Colum-
bia Consensus questions are
welcome. Questions should be of
areawide interest. The Reporter
reserves the right to select from the
suggestions, reject any suggestion,
change the wording or use the idea
for a similar question. Just leave’
your suggestions on our call-in line,
752-5295. Thank you.

Report

from page 1.

police department,”” the panel
reported.

“Despite the fact that the police
gym is on city property only a short
distance from a sign which prohibits
the consumption of alcoholic
beverages on city property, it was
routine for city police officers to con-
sume alcoholic beverages at the
police gym. This fact was known to
the city manager who himself par-
ticipated on a least one occassion in
the consumption of alcohol at the
gym.

“In addition to the consumption of
alcoholic beverages on city property
in violation of city ordinance, other
improper activities routinely took
place at the police gym.

“It is clear to the grand jury that a
number of police officers engaged in
illicit sexual relations with others at
the police gym. In some cases, this
occurred while the officers were on
duty.

“The grand jury recognizes that in
presenting this information in this
fashion, the danger exists of im-
plicating innocent officers who never
engaged in this type of conduct. One
alternative would be to name the of-
ficers involved. However, the grand
jury feels that this would only bring
embarrassment upon the officers
named, and really would serve no
useful purpose.

The grand jury pointed out only a
minority of the police department
was involved in these activities.

Evidence room problems

The jury also found major pro-
blems in accountability, in operation
of the evidence room and record-
keeping.

“It is obvious to the grand jury that
had there been adequate safeguards
to protect the integrity of the
evidence room, many of the criminal
activities alleged against Ray Sim-
mons could not have occurred,” the
report begins. ‘Because these
safeguards did not exist, large
numbers of firearms have disap-
peared from the evidence room. In
addition, currency amounting to
several hundred dollars has disap-
peared.”

The report says, that according to
testimony, both Simmons and
evidence custodian Linda Penn-
ington had keys to the two locks on
the evidence room door. And while
the evidence room procedure was
designed to require two people pre-
sent for anyone to enter the evidence
room, in actual practice, the room
could be entered by either person
who had both keys. This system had
been in place since 1983.

“There were no written procedures
regarding the evidence room.
Although an evidence log was main-
tained, there were no records kept as
to who entered the evidence room
and what, if anything, was removed
on each entry into the evidence
room.”

Simmons was observed in the room
by several grand jury witnesses ‘‘on
a number of occasions, particularly
on weekends, entering and leaving
the evidence room,” according to the
report.

In order to ensure ‘the integrity”
of the evidence room, the grand jury
recommended some measures to be
implemented.

Those measure include:

® A written procedure detailing
what items need to be turned into the
evidence room, the conditions for

Weather

entering the evidence room and
reports to be filled out.

® A log listing, in detail, each item
of evidence turned in, who turned it
in, who it belongs to, the police and
court case numbers and who took
final possession of the item.

® A log detailing each person
entering the evidence room, the pur-
pose, the time of entry and departure
and any items removed or deposited.

® A requirement that all firearms
found, seized or recovered be placed
in the evidence room.

eo That access to the evidence
room be strictly limited and two peo-
ple be required to enter the room.

e That the evidence be inven-
toried at least semi-annually and that
evidence no longer needed be
destroyed or disposed of in accor-
dance with the law.

e That any cash seized or found be
placed in a locked safe in the
evidence room and not in the chief’s
safe or any other location.

Much of the report focuses on
weapons missing from the evidence
room and a general lack of accoun-
tability regarding guns.

Giving away guns

The bulk of criminal charges con-
tained in the indictment against Sim-
mons allege he sold or gave away
firearms belonging to or in the
custody of the LCPD.

In addition, the grand jury report
states, “firearms which were found
which could not be tied to a par-
ticular individual were often not
turned into the evidence room. In-
stead, they were placed in the in-
dividual lockers of the police
officers.” (After the grand jury met,
members of the police department
who had weapons or other evidence
in their lockers were told to turn it in-
to the department).

“Firearms that were turned into
the evidence room were apparently
routinely removed, and sold or given
to various individuals, both inside
and outside the police department,”
the report states.

Bowers received at least two han-
dguns from Simmons, the report
states, allegedly for his own protec-
tion. (Bowers allegedly got the guns
after receiving threats of violence.)

“The grand jury can see no good
reason why the city manager should
be possessing city-owned firearms,
either in his office or city vehicle,”
the report reads.

After the grand jury investigation
began, the firearms were placed on
the city manager’s office inventory,
but the jury felt the firearms should
be returned to the police department
to be disposed of in accordance with
the law.

The report also states Bower's
secretary, Mary Lynn Adams,
received a handgun. (However, Mrs.
Adams was not Bowers’ secretary at
the time.) “(I)t appears she was
endeavoring to purchase a firearm
for her personal use when Chief Sim-
mons gave her a pistol. Her actions
appear blameless in this matter, but
her receiving the pistol from former
Chief Simmons demonstrates the
ease by which city employees and
others obtained firearms from the
police department.”

The grand jury then blasted
Bowers for trading an engine and
transmission from a car he owned to
the police department in exchange
for two ‘riot type” shotguns owned
by the LCPD. Those guns were also

Rain chance is 40 percent today

In Lake City yesterday, the high temperature was 91 degrees and this
morning’s low was 67. There was no rain recorded by the Florida Division
of Forestry at its monitoring station near Lake City Municipal Airport bet-
ween 7 a.m. yesterday and 7 a.m. today.

The outlook for today is for partly cloudy with a chance of showers and
thunderstorms and a high around 90. Wind light and variable becoming nor-
theast around 15 mph this afternoon. Rain chance 40 percent. Tonight fair
with low in the lower 60s. Wind east 10 to 15 mph. Saturday mostly sunny
and breezy with high in the low to mid 80s. Wind northeast 15 to 20 mph.

The extended forecasts for Sunday through Tuesday: For the Peninsula:
Partly cloudy with a chance of afternoon and evening thunderstorms
statewide Sunday then mostly south Monday and Tuesday. Lows from near
60 north to upper 60s south and low 70s Keys. Highs in the 80s. For the
Panhandle: Generally fair. Only isolated afternoon and evening thunder-
showers. Lows 60 interior to 65 coast. Highs near 90 interior to 85 coast.

a i

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apparently added to his office inven-
tory after the investigation began.
“The grand jury feels the actions of
the city manager constitute a clear
violation of the ‘Standards of Conduct
for public officers and employees of
agencies’ as defined by Florida
statues,” the report said.
The jury recommended the guns be
returned to the police department.
In another instance, which the
grand jury calls a “clear violation of
Florida Statute 112.313,” Bowers pur-
chased a surplus city car at an auc-
tion where he served as auctioneer.
The grand jury called on the city
council to take ‘immediate and ap-
propriate action on these two ap-
parent violations of ethical standards
established by the Legislature.”

Gifts of liquor

The grand jury also stated its con-
cern with a practice of police officers
receiving gifts of liquor.

“It is apparently the custom for at
least one liquor store/lounge to fur-
nish a fifth of liquor to each member
of the police force as a Christmas
present.

“At least one other such establish-
ment furnishes a bottle of liquor to
selected members of the department
as a Christmas present.

‘‘While this practice is not
criminal, we feel it does create at
least an appearance of impropriety.”

Lack of supervision

Widespread irregularities within
the department were also dealt with
in the report.

“There were many other activities
that were either questionable or
clearly improper,” the report states.

The grand jury listed an incident in
which money was found and turned
into the police department. Eventual-
ly the money was returned to the per-
son who found it, but the bills were of
different denominations from those
turned in.

In another instance, reward money
promised to an individual was not
delivered for several weeks after it
was turned over to Simmons by the
city clerk.

Other examples of questionable
financial practices are listed, in-
cluding Simmons receiving an
estimated $658 from insurance com-
panies and attorneys for copies of ac-
cident and homicide reports and no
records being kept of these receipts.

The grand jury recommended
establishing a petty cash fund, an in-
formation and evidence fund and a
law enforcement trust account fo bet-
ter track money flowing into and out
of the department.

When an officer in the department
needed money for investigation work
he would turn in a voucher to the city
clerk’s office and receive the money
with his next regular salary check, a
practice the grand jury alleged led to
misuse of funds.

“It apparently was the practice for
the former Chief Simmons to request
an officer to turn in a voucher for a
greater sum than was needed. The of-
ficer would then cash the check and
give Simmons the difference. Sim-
mons would allegedly keep the dif-
ference and dispense it as needed,
either to that officer or other officers
within the police department,” the
report states. ‘Needless to say, a
system of this nature invites abuse
and misuse. There are absolutely no
safeguards in such a system, and no
way to accurately account for monies
expended.”

IN

improper desruction

“One of the most disturbing in-
cidents brought to the Grand Jury’s
attention was the improper destruc-
tion of alcoholic beverages seized by
the Lake City Police Department,”
the report continues.

According to the report, on April 7,
1985, police officers seized in excess
of 20 cases of beer and wine coolers,
along with 46 bottles of rum, gin,
vodka and whisky from the unlicens-
ed bar “El Chico’s.”

On May 5 police investigator Billie
Carter obtained an order from Coun-
ty Judge Vernon Douglas forfeiting
the alcoholic beverages to the LCPD
and ordering their disposition as
“provided by law.”

However, the jury discovered the
bulk of the alcohol was taken to the
police gym and either consumed or
taken home by police officers.

“This disposition of alcoholic
beverages was not in accordance
with law,” the report states.

The remaining alcohol was
delivered by Carter to Judge
Douglas. Douglas turned the booze
over to Columbia Association for
Retarded Citizens, and obtained a
receipt dated June 5, 1985 showing a
donation of six half-pints of vodka,
eight half-pints of rum and 12 half-
pints of gin for use at a pilots recep-
tion for the North Florida Air Show.

The report states that Florida law
allows forfeited alcohol to be donated
to any charitable institution with ap-
proval and consent of the Depart-
ment of Business Regulation.
“Although the consent of the Depart-

oF

ment of Business Regulation was not
sought, the Grand Jury is satisfied
that the spirit, if not the letter of the
law, was observed in donating the li-
quor to CARC.”

The panel noted that the Depart-
ment of Business Regulation gives
blanket approval to donate alcohol to
charitable institutions.

“Much more disturbing to the
Grand Jury is the report of the
destruction of those alcoholic
beverages by police officer Billie
Carter. Officer Billie Carter filled out
a supplemental police report, dated
May 5, 1985, showing that all of the
seized alcohol was destroyed at the
county landfill on May 5.” Carter
listed his stepson and son-in-law as
witnesses to the destruction.

“The proper procedure would be to
have the destruction witnessed by

disinterested witnesses, at least one

of whom should be a member of the
press,’’ the report states.

“Officer Carter's actions in this
matter were clearly improper, if not
criminal. Although the Grand Jury
declines to indict, it strongly recom-
mends that appropriate disciplinary
action be taken by the Lake City
Police Department.”

Trouble at the top

In its conclusions, the grand jury
places the blame for problems in the
police department squarely on the
shoulders of Simmons and his boss,
City Manager Ralph Bowers.

“The episodes detailed in this
report reflect just how bad the situa-
tion had become in the Lake City
Police Department,” the grand jury
said.

“The irregularities noted in this
report are indicative of an overall
lack of leadership and supervision of
the police department. Although the
chief of police must be looked to for
leadership and direction, others must
share in that responsibility. The city

manager, in his own words, functions
as public safety director. As such, he
must bear ultimate responsibility for
many of the irregularities noted in
this report.

“In addition, the city clerk has
responsibility for insuring that city
funds are properly received,
documented and expended.

“The grand jury is concerned that
someone, somewhere in city govern-
ment, did not properly address the
activities detailed in this report.”

The good and the future

But while upset over problems in
the department, the grand jury took
time to say the department and most
of its employees have a bright future.

“Although the tone of this report is
of necessity negative, there is much
good within the police department.
Lake City is privileged, by and large,
to have dedicated, conscientious law
enforcement officers within the
police department. The ingredients
are there for a top-notch police
department. What has been missing
is leadership at the top.”

The grand jury then recommended
a blue-ribbon panel to help screen ap-
plicants for the new chief of police.

The Lake City Council, however,
has already met and narrowed the
list of applicants to seven finalists.

Among the recommendations, the
jury states the new chief, when
selected, should adopt rules and
regulations for the department and
standards of conduct required of
police offiers. Special training should
also be conducted for all members of
the LCPD.

Some portions of the original
report were deleted after Jopling ap-
proved portions of a motion to
repress. It is possible that decision
could be appealed to the District
Court in Jacksonville within the next
30 days.

Visitor out $300

An Atlanta woman reported to
police Thursday her wallet contain-
ing $300 in cash was either lost or
stolen.

According to a Lake City police
spokesman, Helen S. Paul was at the
post office when she took her wallet
out of her purse to byy stamps.

Ms. Paul told police she went to
Quincy’s Restaurant to eat. When it
was time for her to pay the bill, she
discovered her wallet was missing.

In addition to the case, Ms. Paul -

said the wallet also contained inden-
tification and credit cards.

Charged again

A 22-year-old High Springs man
with a ‘“‘six-page driving (violation)
record” was jailed without bond here
Monday following an arrest for drunk
driving, the Florida Highway Patrol

said.

Charged with driving under the in-
fluence of alcohol and driving while
his license was suspended was
Timothy Hampton. He was booked
into the Columbia County Jail, with
bond to be set by a judge.

An FHP trooper said he observed
Hampton's car swerving from lane to
lane and stopped it along Lake Shore
Drive at about 2:27 a.m. A computer
check revealed Hampton’s driving
record and the fact his license had
been suspended for five years,
reports said.

Cancer Society beneift

An American Cancer Society car-
port sale is scheduled for Saturday,
beginning at 8 a.m., at the Church of
Christ located at First and Madison
streets.

All proceeds will go the local
Cancer Society chapter.

Mini-movie critique

New York Times News Service

Each week, The Lake City Reporter exerpts
from the New York Times’ Mini-Critiques
reviews of those movies currently playing in Lake
oy which have been reviewed by reviewer Scott

Not all the movies shown in Lake City have been
reviewed for this service.

Each film is given a rating by the critic:
* * * x» * — Unsurpassed
* % x * — Exceptional
* * * — Good
* x — Fair
* — Poor

The film code ratings are:

G — Suggested for general audiences

PG — Parental guidence suggested; some
material may not be suitable for pre-teenagers.

PG-13 — All ages, but parents are cautioned
about permitting children under 13 to attend.

R — Restricted; persons under 17 not admitted
unless accompanied by adult.

X — Persons under 18 not admitted

This week, we have reviews for Gung Ho,
Violets are Blue, The Money Pit and Just Between
Frends. No review was available for No Retreat,
No Surrender (Rated PG) or Showdown at Lin-
coln High (R).

Gung Ho
PG-13 xx
Ron Howard stubs his toe, at last, irritating

stereotypes rant and rave in every frame of this
culture-clash comedy, dealing with the Japanese
takeover of an American auto factory.

Violets are Blue
PG-13

\ * *
Laughably bad. If you're in a mood to hoot at
the screen, this is your cup of tea. Can you believe
Kevin Kline and Sissy Spacek as college kids?
They are undergrads in the opening sequence of
this ostensible romance. Can you believe Siss
Spacek as the other woman? Oh, agony! Le
becomes a noted news photographer and, taking

Ne 2
[ake City Reporter
Published Monday through Friday at
126 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32066.
Entered as 2nd Class matter, Lake Ci-
ty, Fla.. Member Audit Bureau of Cir-
culation and Associated Press. USPS
No. 301880.

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if the paper is not received by 5:00
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through Friday until 6:30 PM.
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P.O. Box 1709 - 752-1293

her first vacation in years, returns to her
hometown, Ocean City, Md. She can hardly wait
to pounce on Kline, who has become the editor of
the local newspaper. Miss Spacek can’t cut it as a
femme fatale. Kline deserves an award for not
breaking into hysterical laughter; he knew he was
slumming when he accepted this slop. Bonnie
Bedelia, as his shrewd wife, makes the two
miscreants look like the nincompoops that they
are.

The Money Pit
PG

* *

A slapstick comedy from director Richard Ben-
jamin, who has no flair for slapstick. Tom Hanks
and Shelley Long are sweethearts who buy a
bargain-priced house and discover that it needs a
budget-busting amount of repair.

Just Between Friends
PG-13 * *

An uncanny mixture of boudoir farce and tear-
jerking soap opera. A naive housewife (Mary
Tyler Moore) unknowingly becomes pals with her
husband's mistress (Christine Lahti). When the
husband (Ted Danson) is killed, the wife learns
about his infidelity and breaks up with her friend
just at the moment when she most needs a buddy.

W CINEMAS 90

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“Violets Are Blue” [PG13
5:30, 7:05, 8:50

“The Money Pit” [PG
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“No Retreat-No Surrender’
[PG - 5:30, 7:10, 9:00

“Just Between Friends "[PG13
5:30, 7:40, 9:45

"Showdown at Lincoln High"
[R - 5:30, 7:10, 9:00

MOVIE INFO + 752.0704



Focus: Doer

Medical Center.

LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986 3

Obituaries

moved to Big Spring, Tx. at an early
age. She attended school in the Big
Spring school system but moved to
Middleburg, Fla. in 1973. She was a
graduate of the Florida Junior Col-
lege in Jacksonville, Fla. and attend-
ed the First Baptist Church of Mid-
dleburg, Fla.

Survivors include: her husband,
Gary E. Douberly, Sr. of Middleburg,
Fla.; two daughters, Rebecca Ann
and Manda Gayle Douberly, both of

Augusta, Ga. but had lived in
Tallahassee for the past 49 years. She
graduated from Columbia High
School of Lake City in the class of
1934 and from Florida State College
for Women in 1938. She was a
member of the Kappa Delta Sorority.

Survivors include: one son, Mark
Hopkins; three grandchildren, Sara
Beth, Cathy and Charles; one sister,
Alice Miles Thurmond of Oak Ridge,
Tenn. and her step-mother, Mrs. Del
Miles of Lake City.

Ms. Dong Thi Vo Pawlak, 42, of Rt.
9, Box 1294, Lake City, Fla., died
Wednesday, May 7, 1986 near
Waldron, Ark. from injuries sustain-
ed in an auto accident.

Ms. Pawlak was a native of Viet-
nam, making her home in Lake City
since 1978 where she had worked as a
seamstress and attended the Hunt-
sville Baptist Church.

Survivors include: three children,
Walter Pawlak and Lena Pawlak
who live with their father William

Middleburg; one son, Gary E.
Douberly, Jr. of Middleburg; grand-
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Glen Embry of
Fresno, Cal.; three brothers, Robert
and Mark Sargrant, both of Boise,
Idaho and John Sargrant of Idaho Ci-
ty, Idaho; two sisters, Teresa
Sargrant of Boise, Idaho and
Saunema Anderson of Idaho City.

Pawlak of Lake City and Lisa
Pawlak of California.

Welcome To

Mynrtles.

Dong Thi Vo Pawlak

: : : Fried
Geraldine Miles Hopkins .
Geraldine Miles Hopkins, 68, of 1 NE (o{1] 1] NTRY (o1]1] Ki N Chicken
Tallahassee, Fla., died Thursday, 4:30-9 FRESH COOKED VEGETA Bucket oF
May 8, 1986 in Tallahassee Memorial Son day B1.ES Barrel
Hospital 11AM9 fL__ COUNTRY BUFFET To Go.

She was the widow of the late
Charles Hopkins, longtime engineer
with the Florida Department of
Transportation. She was a native of

SEAFOOD, CHICKEN,
CHOPS, PRIME RIB, etc.

Join Us For A Special

PAWLAK, Dong Thi Vo -- Graveside
funeral services will be held at 11:00
a.m. Monday, May 12, 1986 in Forest
Lawn Memorial Gardens with the
Rev. Jim Steele officiating. Sherrill-
Guerry Funeral Home, 616 S. MArion
St., Lake City is in charge of ar-
rangements.

Mother's Day Buffet
11AM-9PM

Browse thru our Antiques & Gift Shop for that special gift.
USO W.Atl75 755-0759 (Next to Cinema 90)

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Located at I-75 West 90 Next to Econo Lodge

Restaurant Mon.-Sun. 6-10
Lounge Mon.-Thur. 5-11, Fri. & Sat. 5-1

752-9203

Che

lenea
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“The Ultimate in Style”
Restaurant - Lounge

ns :
be Latest accomplishments: Car) Dean Davis, Jr.
or “As a volunteer worker with the Min Den bz ji 3 gly in
in Lake City Animal Shelter, we take i Y, Sea Wednes.
puppies to visit with the elderly at Jay, May 7 J lym
as Tanglewood and Dowling Park. We mes ined \nanayipac-
ty are also in the process of expanding He was a native of Winter Park,
d, this program to possibly include day Fla. residing in Lake City for the
care centers. I also handle cor- past seven years where he was a self-
at respondence work for the animal employed carpenter. He had attend-
n- shelter and do photography for ed the Columbia County School
he them.” System and Everybody’s Chapel

What makes her go: Church.

“After working all your life, you can- Survivors include: his parents,
not not go. If you stop, you’re dead.” Carl and Helen Davis, Sr., one
in brother, Norman L. Davis and one
ok GEORGETTE HUTTON How she became interested in her sister, Barbara Simmons, all of Lake
st Name: career: City; maternal grandparents, Harim
e. Georgette Hutton “It wasn’t so much a matter of selec. 20d Lois McDuvvie of Apopka, Fla.;
is tion but getting a job. Back in the paternal grandparents, Calvin L. and
ch Age: '40’s there wasn’t much selection. i gi NS

. And not much money, either. You did yor
s what you had to do and nursing work and Mrs. L.T. Taft of Waycross, Ga.
Address: was available to me.” .
4 670 McFarlane Ave. Her proudest achievement: Joviss Ann Douberly :

“Two super daughters, who're pret ovida Ann Douberly, 34, of Mid-
ts : ; . prey dleburg, Fla., daughter of Patricia
ce Occupation: nice. They are Linda, who lives in ‘Embry ‘and Norman Sargrant, Sr
ng Retired from nursing administration South Carolina, and Joan, now living died Tuesday, May 6, 1986 in an

after 25 years with Lake City VA in St. Petershurg. Hospital of rence Park, Fla
od CC She was born in California and
: alendar
: “Friday, May 9 ——USA Cloggers hold classes at i
T, —The Columbia County Health Teen Town, across from Youngs Funeral notices
he Center offers free blood pressure Park, with Basic I at 7 p.m. and DAVIS, Carl Dean, Jr. -- Funeral ser-
checks every weekday from 9 a.m.to Basic II at 7:30 p.m. vices will be held at 2:00 p.m., Mon-
he 5p.m. at the center, 302 S. Marion St., ——Members of the Moose will day, May 12, 1986 in Sherrill-Guerry
en Building A. meet at 8 p.m. at the Moose Lodge. Memorial Chapel with the Rev. Bea
nd ——Alcoholics Anonymous meets —The Alachua County Singles Coleman oifichaiing Tiemions is
nd at the Unity Club at 8 p.m. Club will have a board meeting at the iliow in the Fores Lawn Manan
of ——Alcoholics Anonymous will Windjammer, 520 S.W. 2nd Ave, Co oe wit TI oy
1d meet at the Gateway Mental Health Gainesville, at 7:30 p.m. Pune 2 i eel ot os
of Center, 950 Michigan St., at 8 p.m. —The Suwannee River Valley on ay
——The Moose will hold bingo at Exchange Club meets at the Bran- re
al the Moose Ledge at7 pm. ford Women's Club at 7 p.m. DOUBERLY, Jovida Ann - Funeral
p- ——Disabled American Veterans go. vices will be held on Friday, May
to Saturday, May 10 meet at the VA Hospital in the base- go 1986 at 2:00 p.m. at the First Bap-
on ——Alcoholics Anonymous and Al- ment conference room at 7:30 pm. ist Church of Middleburg, Fla. with
ct Anon will meet at St. James ——American Legion Post 57 will (he Rev. Jack Whitley, pastor of
xt Episcopal Church at 8 p.m. have bingo at 7 p.m. at the legion First Baptist Church of Middleburg,
—The Serenity Club of A.A. building, on U.S. 41 South. It is open officiating. Interment will follow in
meets at the Christian Service Center to the public. Mt. Zion Cemetery in Union County.
- at 8 p.m. ——The Lake City Runners Club The family will receive friends for
will have a fun run at 5:30 p.m. in visitation from 7:00 p.m. until 9:00
in- Sunday, May 11 Olustee Park. p.m. Thursday, May 8, 1986. Harry
ile ——Alcoholics Anonymous meets Guerry Funeral Home, 3900 S. First
as at the VA Hospital at 7:30 p.m. School lunch menus for Monday St., Lake City is in charge of ar-
ed —Columbia County — Spaghetti rangements.
ith Monday, May 12 with meat sauce, tossed salad, green ee
——The Optimist Club will meet at beans, french bread, cake, milk. HOPKINS, Geraldine Miles - Ser-
ed 6:45 a.m. at Shoney's. ——Union County — Spaghettiwith Vices will be held on Fahey. ey
to — The Lake Shore Hospital Aux- meat sauce, cheese cups, vegetable 1% ag 2 > I De
re iliary will meet at 10 a.m. at the (manager's choice), cabbage slaw, Church in Tallahassee, Fla. :
er hospital. fruit juice, rolls, milk. Ap.
ng ——The Columbia County Health
ad Center offers free blood pressure gm
rs, checks every weekday from 9 a.m. to S q
5 p.m. at the center, 302 S. Marion St., PAT UVMMERALL R rd
ft Building 4. : Printing And Office Products :
——The Civil Air Patrol will meet ~
i at 7 pil. ot fe Laks Ciiy Alpmt Your Full Service Printer y
y, Terminal. Coan NV) A il bi a
of ——The Fort White Town Counc
on will meet at 7:30 p.m. at the Fort ow val a e & or
White Town Hall. . t's :
af — Alcoholics Anonymous meets | Peg Board Bookkeeping Systems

at the Gateway Mental Health |
Center, 950 Michigan St., at 8 p.m.
——The Columbia County Library
will have crafts and story time for
children in kindergarten through
third grade at 3:30 p.m.

“Payroll, Cash Disbursements, Accounts Receivable,
Accounts Payable, Forms for Medical Offices

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4 LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986

from page 1.

Inmate

where the sheriff's department could
more easily have kept an eye on him,
the sheriff added.

‘“Dadburn it. Here on the one hand
they wanted to keep him there and,
on the other, they wouldn't provide
security,” Tramel said. ‘I don’t
know what you’d call it — a vicious
cycle.”

The sheriff’s department, which
was too short-staffed to guard Dingle
around the clock in Jacksonville, was
forced to hire Wells-Fargo security,
Tramel said. This service was not on-
ly costly, but the sheriff said hospital
security officers got word to him that
Wells-Fargo security was ‘‘far below
what it was supposed to be.”

“There were reports of sleeping on
the job, smoking and arguing with
patients about what to watch on
television,” the sheriff said.

Told Dingle posed no escape
threat, and wanting to force Baptist
Medical Center to transfer him to
Lake Shore, Tramel said he
discharged Wells-Fargo and had
Dingle released on his own
recognizance. This also legally
released the department from having
to provide security for the man.

‘It was primarily an attempt to get
the man back here,” Tramel said.

Study

But, the hospital still refused to
transfer Dingle and, after a quick
recovery, he walked out the door
April 1.

“We were caught between a rock
and a hard place,” Tramel explain-
ed. “It was well thought out, I assure
you. We just don’t go around turning
felons loose.”

To date, Dingle’s medical and
security bills total $62,965, County
Coordinator Dale Williams said. This
includes $332 in emergency room
costs at Lake Shore, where Dingle
was first admitted; $2,200 in Wells-
Fargo security costs; and $60,433 in
Baptist Medical Center-related costs.

Williams said Tramel turned the
bill over to the county commission
because ‘‘this far exceeds what the
sheriff's department has budgeted in
cases like these.”

It is now up to county officials to
determine their liability, Williams
said.

“I really don’t know what our
obligations are,” Williams said, poin-
ting out that Dingle, a former laborer
with Columbia Paving Co., was con-
sidercd an indigent.

According to court records, Dingle,
formerly of Apartment 3, Sergeants
Place, Lake City, is charged with

several counts of armed robbery,
robbery, possession of a weapon dur-
ing the commission of a felony, ag-
gravated battery with great bodily
harm, grand theft, trafficking in
stolen property and petty theft. The
charges came about like this:

e On Nov. 8, Dingle allegedly used a
knife to rob the Ecol station on U.S.
90 West. The clerk was forced into the
woods behind the service station, left
unharmed, and taken was about $97.
e On Nov. 16 he allegedly used a
screwdriver to rob the Tourist Inn on
U.S. 90 West. He reportedly stole
about $390 after stabbing the night
clerk in the face with the tool.

® On Dec. 16 he allegedly used a
knife to rob the Beverage Express on
East Duval Street. The take was
about $40 and several cartons of
cigarettes.

e Later that night, he allegedly used
a knife to rob the S&S convenience
store at the corner of State Road 100
and Baya Avenue. The clerk began
screaming and Dingle reportedly fl-
ed with six cartons of cigarettes.

e On Dec. 5 Dingle and an alleged
accomplice, 27-year-old Leo Frank
Edwards Jr., reportedly sold a stolen
video cassette recorder and color
television set to a Lake Jeffery Road

man.
® On. Jan 10, Dingle allegedly drug
a woman by the hair down East
Washington Street, beat her up and
stole $35 from her. He was questioned
by sheriff’s investigators that same

day and allegedly confessed to the |

motel and convenience store rob-
beries.

Dingle had claimed that a 30-year-
old accomplice, who he first met
while both were serving time at Lake
City Community Correctional
Center, took part in three of the arm-
ed robberies by driving a getaway
car. Emanuel Thomas, Route 10, Box
1138, was arrested, pleaded innocent
to armed robbery charges on March
17 and will go to trial on June 2.

Edwards also pleaded innocent to
dealing in stolen property charges on
March 17. Six weeks later he pleaded
guility to reduced charges of grand
theft II, a pre-sentence investigation
was ordered and a report will be
returned by June 16.

On March 1, nearly two months
before he was scheduled for arraign-
ment on April 29, Dingle reportedly
tied an electrical cord around his
neck and tried to hang himself in jail.
He never made that arraignment and
an arrest warrant was issued.

from page 1.

mission support, due to the 10-mill
cap on the county tax roll. “I'd like
our attorney (Marlin Feagle) to
research it further and report back to
us,” McDavid said. ‘Perhaps this is
something he’ll need to discuss with
the county attorney (Martin Page).

Trustees also adopted a resolution
in which they apologized to the doc-
tors for the Arthur Young report — a
report the triistees had previously ac-
cepted themselves and sent on to the
medical staff for their consideration.

In the resolution, they noted the
consulting firm’s representatives
had “misled them into believing that
Arthur Young had conferred with
Dr.’s B.E. McRae, Jr. and L. G. Lan-
drum” prior to recommending the
hospital recruit assistants for the two
veteran physicians.

The resolution further states,
«_.the board wishes to extend its
apologies tothe medical staff for any
damages or inconvenience resulting
from the acceptance of said study
and report.”

Trustees said they will now seek
another firm to make a second study,
which will consider the overall opera-
tion of the hospital rather than just

Mother

DR. PAT PENNINGTON
Doctors tired of ‘hassle’

the indigent care-emergency room
situation.

This study will also include making
a community poll or survey on
whether the public hospital should be
sold. County Commissioner Ron
Williams has asked for either a straw
ballot vote on the hospital sale ques-

tion during the November elections
or the community poll.

Earlier, Lake Shore doctors had re-
jected an offer by trustees of $100,000
annually to pay them for treating in-
digent emergency room patients.

_ Last night, Pennington said the doc-

tors don’t want the hospital to have to
take the funds from other depart-
ments in order to help them.

“The doctors don’t believe the
hospital should have to operate its
rescue service in the red, as it is a
community service,” he said. “And
they also feel that the $100,000 figure
is understated, that the real cost is
more in the neighborhood of
$200,000-$250,000.”

A joint county commission-hospital
trustee committee has been formed
to study the hospital’s indigent care
problem. The committee includes
Commissioners Ludie Ship and
Williams, along with Lake Shore
Trustees Dr. Jim Williams and Alyce
Caesar.

Trustees also asked Montgomery
and Administrator John Knight to
seek out doctors who have left the
medical staff to practice at Lake City
Medical Center and ask them to

from page 1.

child.”

“My children were never in trou-
ble. They knew better. Whenever
they were growing up and needed a
whipping, they got it. And everyone
of them and my grandchildren
respect me for it.”

While noting her children were
never troublesome, “children today
would not be having so many pro-
blems if parents would accept more
responsibilities in their raising and
discipline them as they should,” she
said.

Guerdon

Holidays are chock-full of laughter
and good times for the Herndon fami-
ly as they all gather on the farm far
“most of them.”

Mrs. Herndon’s third great-
grandchild is expected in November.
“I plan to rock and rock until he or
she starts crying. Then the mama
can take it home,” she said laughing-
ly.

Along with cooking, Mrs. Herndon
enjoys photography. “And I spend a
lot of time taking older widows to the

store and to the doctor,” said the
vivacious little lady.

Mrs. Herndon does not know what
her children have planned for her
Sunday for Mother’s Day.

“Sometimes they cook dinner at
one of the children’s home and
everyone gathers there,” she said.
“And sometimes I cook for all of
them here. When they come here to
eat, I am doing what I really enjoy —
cooking for my family — so I am hap-
py with that.”

from page 1.

manufaetured housing a year.
Although its primary product was
medium-priced double-wide homes,
the plant also built single-wides and
furniture for Guerdon and its com-
petitors.

The Lake City plant had expected
to increase production from three to
six floors a day if manufactuered

housing orders increased, T. Wolfe of
Guerdon told The Reporter last
March. A single-wide counts as one
floor and a double-wide counts as two
floors.

The first quarter of the year is
traditionally a slow manufacturing
period, Wolfe noted.

Guerdon, which also has three

manufacturing facilities in Georgia,
had the third largest plant in Colum-
bia County. Champion Home
Builders is the largest with about 200
employees at its Concord and Sun-
view plants, both located on U.S. 90
East. Second largest is Homes of
Merit, off County Road 100, which
employs about 100 people.

Tax debate focusing on IRAs

By JIM LUTHER
AP Tax Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) — Individual
Retirement Accounts, that new-
found but widely used tax shelter for
middle America, are becoming the
focus of Senate debate on a plan for
overhauling the income-tax system.

A full month before Senate floor ac-
tion on the bill is likely, two
Republican members have introduc-
ed a resolution that would put the
lawmakers on record in favor of
keeping fully deductible IRAs for
everybody who can afford them.

It is no secret that President
Reagan and Treasury Department
officials are concerned about a provi-
sion in the overhaul bill that would
allow the full IRA tax break only for
workers who are not eligible for com-
pany pension plans.

‘Reagan telephoned Sen. Bob
Packwood, R-Ore., chief author of
the bill, on Thursday to congratulate
him on the effort and said he is
generally satisfied with the plan,
White House spokesman Larry
Speakes told reporters. Packwood
chairs the Senate Finance Commit-
tee.

However, Speakes declined to say
whether Reagan supports the anti-

IRA part of the bill or another sen-
sitive provision, which would repeal
the preferential tax treatment of in-
dividual capital gains.

Reagan’s own tax-overhaul plan
would retain a fully deductible
$2,000-a-year IRA for all workers and
allow the same set-aside for spouses
who earn no wages. Non-working
spouses now are limited to a tax-
deferred contribution of $250 a year.

And rather than repealing the tax
break for capital gains, the president
proposed to expand it so that
inflation-caused increases in the
value of stocks and other assets
would not be taxed.

Senate Democratic Whip Alan
Cranston of California attacked the
Finance Committee bill Thursday on
both issues and several others as
well, as did Sen. John Melcher,
D-Mont. Their complaints and the ef-
fort by Sens. Bill Roth, R-Del., and
Alfonse D’Amato, R-N.Y., to keep
fully deductible IRAs marked a
departure from what has been strong
congressional support for the bill
since it was approved by the commit-
tee on Wednesday.

“IRAs are absolutely essential for
working middle-income families,”
D’Amato told colleagues. ‘‘They

have made it possible for families of
modest means to plan for the
future.”

“IRAs are just beginning to ac-
complish their goals,” Roth said.
“They have only been in place effec-
tively since 1982. But worse than the
absurdity of repealing a provision so
early is the signal it sends to middle-
class savers.

“If we were to implement savings
incentives in the future,” Roth said,
“who would believe us?”’

IRAs for all workers, including
those eligible for company pension
plans, were enacted as part of
Reagan's tax cut in 1981, to help take
pressure off the Social Security
system and to increase incentives for
saving. The investment industry
estimates about 28.5 million families
have IRAs, including about 20 million
who are covered by employer-paid
pensions.

Majority Leader Bob Dole, R-Kan.,
plans to begin Senate floor action on
the tax bill in early June. He told
reporters Thursday that “it’s got so
much zip right now we won’t be able
to hold it up too long.” The proposal
is so popular, he added, that it could
sail through the Senate in two weeks.

return. This action was urged in the
Arthur Young study, along with a
recommendation that the hospital
seek to “improve its community im-
age.”

Miss CBE

Lisa Huggins was chosen recently as Miss Cooperative Business Education
at a recent banquet held at the Lake City Holiday Inn. The award is based on
outstanding performance in the classroom, business communications, spell-
ing, clerical office practice, job interview and congeniality among the class.
Miss Huggins, left, is employed at Risser Petroleum. She is shown above with
Risser office manager Betty Ecelbarger. (Photo by Sharon Saunders)

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By ED BIRK

Associated Press Writer
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — In-

surance company representatives

have charged consumer advocate

in Tallahassee

The day in Tallahassee: May 10,
1986
THE HOUSE
Took no action on major bills.
THE SENATE

Merit Schools: Voted 33-2 to ap-
prove a bill (SB 845) that would
make more schools eligible to par-
ticipate in Florida's merit school
program. To House.

Credit card: Voted 37-0 for a bill
(CS-SB 58) that would prevent
merchants from adding a sur-
charge to credit card purchases.
To House.

Ultralights: Voted 37-0 for a bill
(CSSB 61) that would regulate
ultralight airplanes and their
pilots. To House.

Campaign Funds: Voted 39-0 for
a bill (SB 129) that would permit
legislators to send donations to
charities in lieu of sending flowers
to families of deceased consti-
tuents. To House.

Police dogs: Voted 36-0 for a bill
(SB 490) that would make it a
crime for people to beat up police
dogs or police horses. To House.

BOTH HOUSES

Passed a resolution designating
this week as the Days of Remem-
brance for 6 million Jews and
millions of others who died in
Hitler’s death camps.

THE GOVERNOR

Signed into law:

A bill (SB 178) repealing provi-
sions in state law regarding the
regulation of acupuncture clinics.

A bill (HB 127) that changes the
qualifying period for special
district elections.

A measure (HB 152) that names
a tunnel under U.S. Highway 1 in
Broward County as the Henry E.
Kinney Tunnel.

A bill (HB 160) that names the
Interfaith Chapel on the campus of
Florida School for Deaf and Blind
as the the Theresa Barabas Castro
Chapel.

Legislation (HB 245) that
specifies the rights of firefighters
who are being questioned about
matters that could result in
disciplinary action.

A bill (HB 376) that designates a
section of U.S. Highway 19 between
Capps and the Florida-Georgia
border as the Florida-Georgia
Parkway.

ASTRO GRAPH

Bernice Bede Osol

\\ Your
J) Birthday

May 10, 1986

“he year anead will be an extrernely
usy one for you. You'llhave many irons
\ the fire and success is in the offing af-
t - you weed out the unproductive
0: 3S.
T+ JRUS (April 20-May 20) You must
be actical and disciplined in your fi-
nanciai dealings today. Should you get
careless, you may wipe out a portion of
what you've accumulated. Find out if
there is romance in your future by or-
dering your Astro-Graph for the year
following your birthday. Mail $1 to As-
tro-Graph, c/o this newspaper, Box
1846, Cincinnati, OH 45201. Be sure to
state your zodiac sign.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Treat com-
panions tactfully today or you might
have to contend with petty flare-ups. Be
charming, considerate and
cooperative.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) Strive to be
helpful to others today, but also be sen-
sible about who you help. Don’t assume
the burden of someone who is merely
“‘gold-bricking."
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You'll get your
fair share of opportunities today, but
there's a strong possibility you won't
recognize them for what they are.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Half mea-
sures will count for nothing today if
you're faced with a challenging situa-
tion. The only way to score a success is
to go all out.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Today you
may view issues as you would like them
to be and not as they are. Wishful think-
ing will work to your detriment because
it will distort the picture.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Conditions
are a bit unusual today; you could be
held accountable for the mistakes of
others. Don't put yourself in a position
to be used.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Con-
tinuity of purpose is essential today if
you hope to have something to show for
the time, energy and effort you expend.
Stay in focus.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Some
extra responsibilities may be dumped
on you today. If you have a poor atti-
tude, they'll begin to appear awesome
and unmanageable.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) For the
sake of image and reputation, it's im-
perative that you be on your best be-
havior today. A bad impression won't
be eradicated easily.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) Results
could be undesirable today if you
launch a project and then let it fend for
itself. See whatever you begin through
to conclusion. :
ARIES (March 21-April 19) Be a realis-
tic reasoner today. If you view matters
irom distorted angles, it could cause
. to take actions that don't serve
cur best interests.

Ralph Nader with spewing misinfor-
mation when he accuses their in-
dustry companies of creating a false
prem crisis. ;
~npeared in T:z!lahassee
a behalf of (lie Florida
tar’s ©. lawyer division and to
2cet with lawmakers on the issue of
rising liability insurance premiums
and proposed reforms to Florida’s
civil justice system.
His consumer organization was
paid $5,000 for his work.
At a news conference, Nader said
the insurance industry was greedy
and getting greedier. Insurance

representatives rejected that asser-
tion.

“The trial bar’s hired gun came to
town and shot from the lip,” said
Dave Fountain of the Florida In-
surance News Service. “He accused
us of mammoth profits but showed no
evidence. There is no conspiracy on
the part of the insurance industry.”

Ken Walton, a lobbyist for the
Florida Association of Independent
Agents, said Nader was an outsider;
“a highly paid Washington lawyer
being paid for by the trial bar to
come tell Florida people what they
want. The Florida Legislature

recognizes the need for civil justice
reform.”

Insurance companies blame the
civil justice system for allowing fat
jury awards which lead to rising in-
surance premiums.

Nader charged that while voters,
lawmakers, President Reagan and
the news media may have been in-
itially duped by insurance propagan-
da, the tide of misinformation has
started to work against the industry
as consumers realize they have been
hearing lies.

“I’ve never seen a more vicious,
falsified propaganda campaign ... as

LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986 5

Ralph Nader accuses insurance industry of conspiracy

the casualty insurance industry has
been conducting in the last year,”
Nader said shortly after arriving on a
plane from Washington.

“The facts are that casualty in-
surance companies are registering
record profits, record stock prices,
record executive salaries and
substantial asset expansion.”

Lloyd’s of London, one of the
world’s largest insurance and re-
insurance companies, also was using
its influence to weaken American
civil justice laws, he charged.

Nader recommended legislation
requiring insurance companies to

divulge their profits and losses. That
way, he said, there could be no misin-
formation about the causes of rising
insurance rates.

He also urged states turn the in-
surance industry into a public utility
if companies threaten to pull out
because of proposed regulations.
That way the states could guarantee
coverage for consumers and profit
for the companies.

President Reagan has called for
reforms in the U.S. civil justice
system based on a federal report that
said litigation was causing insurance
rates to rise.

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6 LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986

Ted Bundy.

The name comes back to haunt North
Florida like a return of bad weather

This week, we’ve seen a nationally televis-
ed movie about him, based on a book that ex-
posed the monster behind the handsome face
and outstanding intellect.

More importantly, we've seen a U.S.
Supreme Court decision that Bundy received
a fair trial in the killings of two Florida State
University Chi Omega sorority sisters.

The next step in this too-long soap opera is
up to Gov. Bob Graham. Graham has not
heen shy about signing death warrants for
convicted killers; he signed two this week.
By a week from today, we expect to hear he
has signed the second one for Bundy (an
earlier warrant expired March 5).

A recent petition drive in Lake City produc-
ed 5,600 signatures calling on the governor to
have the execution carried out.

Bundy should be executed. Of that there is
no question. Even the most diehard capital
punishment opponent is hard-pressed to find
a reason to prolong the life of this deviate.

But whether the governor has received
9,600 signatures or 56,000 or 56 million should
make no difference. Executing Bundy is
necessary because it’s right, not because it’s
popular.

Bundy’s attorney in the case of the kidnap-
murder of Lake City schoolgirl Kimberly

Views/Comments

Bundy’s time runs out

Leach says he will appeal the conviction in
that case. Some observers feel the Leach
murder was the state’s weakest case against
Bundy.

But it’s the Chi Omega murders for which
Bundy faces the electric chair now and his
execution for those killings will make moot
the strength of any other case against him.

It may be legally entangling, but from a
philosophical standpoint, we'd like to see a
warrant signed in the Leach kidnap-murder
case; indeed, all of Lake City would like to
see the governor sign that one.

But Gov. Bob Graham doesn’t need The
Lake City Reporter to tell him what is right.
He knows. And he will sign another death
warrant for Bundy, we're sure. And he’ll do it
soon.

Bundy can well complain that he’s not be-

ing treated fairly, if fairness is measured

against the fates of other inmates. Recent ex-
ecutions in Florida have been of men with
about a decade on Death Row; Bundy has
been there only seven years.

It’s time to lower the average stay and ex-
ecute Ted Bundy.

Even if the execution is not for the Kimber-
ly Leach killing, many a Lake City parent
will sleep better knowing Ted Bundy can’t
escape yet another jail and haunt North
Florida again.

Today in history

By The Associated Press

Today is Friday, May 9, the 129th
day of 1986. There are 236 days left in
the year.

Today's highlight in history:

Twenty-five years ago, on May 9,
1961, the chairman of the Federal
Communications Commission,
Newton N. Minow, made his famous
speech before the National Associa-
tion of Broadcasters in Washington
calling television a
wasteland.”

On this date:

In 1502, Christopher Columbus left
Cadiz, Spain, on his fourth and final
trip to the New World.

In 1754, Benjamin Franklin's Penn-
sylvania Gazette ran the first
American newspaper cartoon, depic-
ting the colonies as a divided snake.
The caption read: ‘Join or die.”

In 1864, during the Civil War, Union
Gen. John Sedgwick was killed by a
Confederate sharpshooter at Spot-
sylvania, Va. (His last words: “They
couldn’t hit an elephant at this dist ...

‘vast

2)

ye 1913, the 17th amendment to the
Constitution, providing for the elec-
tion of senators by popular vote
rather than selection by state
legislatures, was ratified.

In 1926, Americans Richard Byrd
and Floyd Bennett became the first
men to make an airplane flight over
the North Pole.

In 1936, Italy annexed Ethiopia.

Ten years ago: An uneasy quiet
settled over Beirut, Lebanon, one day
after the country’s Parliament had
elected Elias Sarkis president.

Five years ago: Secretary of State
Alexander Haig was cheered and
heckled as he delivered a commence-
ment speech at Syracuse University
in upstate New York.

One year ago: On the last full day
of his 10-day European tour, Presi-
dent Reagan lashed out at the leaders
of the Soviet Union and Nicaragua in
a speech to the Portuguese assembly

in Lisbon.

Today’s birthdays: Dog training
expert Barbara Woodhouse is 76.
CBS newsman Mike Wallace is 68.
Actor Albert Finney, actress Glenda
Jackson and CBS newsman Terry
Drinkwater are 50. Producer-
director James L. Brooks is 46. Ac-
tress Candice Bergen is 40. Singer
Billy Joel is 37.

Thought for today: ‘Boredom is
rage spread thin.” — Paul Tillich,
German-American philosopher and
theologian (1886-1965).

Verse of the day

While (the apostles) were gazing
into heaven as he went, behold, two
men stood by them in white robes,
and said, “Men of Galilee, why do
you stand looking into heaven This
Jesus, who was taken up from you in-
to heaven, will come in the same way
as you saw him go into heaven.” Acts
1:10-11

THE EXPLORATION OF SPACE IS
A MIND-BOGGLING
CONCEPT,.,

WE HAYE WITNESSED MANY
FANTASTIC ANP AWESOME
THINGS...»

COVERED, WE'RE ON A NEW
| FRONTIER OF SPACE EXPLORATION,

«vs WATCHING THE FIRST
AUD\TOR SET FOOT ON

NASA.

©1386 FORT WORTH 5TAR- Tecegram HULME

Lake City Reporter

Since 1874

Don Caldwell, Publisher

Brad Rogers, Executive Editor

Bill McFadin, News Fditor
Sue Brannon, Controller

Stan Stewart, Advertising Director
John Manahan, Circulation Director
Larry Tucker, Production Director

A NEW YORK TIMES COMPANY

Y Published aternoons Monday through Friday
at 126 East Duval St. Lake City. Florida and
entered as Second Class Matter at the Post

Office in Lake City Flonde 32055

Copyright 1985 Lake City Reporter

Yesteryear

5 years ago - 1981

Gov. Bob Graham appointed local
contractor Ron Williams to the Col-
umbia County Commission to replace
suspended Commissioner Sandy
Paul Register.

10 years ago - 1976
Mining and chemical operations at
the huge Occidental Chemical Co.
plant in White Springs were to be
shut down for six weeks, with all
employees laid off.
[)

20 years ago - 1966

Members of the Downtown Mer-
chants’ Association asked the city
commission to remove the downtown
parking meters.

TOR TODAY...

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vr

A reader from Monterey, Calif.,
Donna Ball, mailed me an article out
of her hometown paper that gives
tips for travelers who might become
victims of a terrorist attack or a hi-
jacking in another country.

The best tip on how to avoid such,
of course, is to stay home where the
towel heads can’t get you. But, as Ms.
Ball states, isn’t following that ad-
vice giving in to terrorism?

The article quotes a man named
Jerry Hoffman, who is president of
Antone Security, an international
protection firm headquartered in
Bowie, Md.

His advice for avoiding an attack in
an airport appears fairly sound. He
says to avoid large crowds, have an
advance boarding pass and, when
picking up luggage, be among the
last to arrive at the baggage depart-
ment. So, I suppose, if there’s an at-
tack, it would come when there are
larger crowds in the area.

But now we come to Mr. Hoffman's
tips for dealing with a hijacking.

Ms. Ball, in her letter, commented
on some of Mr. Hoffman’s pointers.

eRemain calm: “This tip is
wasted on me. Calm is the last thing I
would be looking down a gun barrel
at 30,000 feet.”

eDon’t give the terrorists dirty
looks. ‘“‘Are you supposed to smile?
Nod approval?”

eBe courteous: “Why should I?
How would I be courteous? Load the
terrorists’ guns for them? Get them
some food? How?”

o Take cover if a rescue is attemp-
ted. “No problem there.”

e Concentrate on a reason to live:
“Like the thought of getting to see the

By MAYOR GERALD WITT
The deficit will be a campaign
issue.

The liberals will try to convince us

that Reagan invented the deficit.
That it is larger than ever is put at
Reagan’s feet. That it grew so large
because of the past liberal policies of
passing huge liberal programs of
social services without taxes to sup-
port them, paying for them with prin-
ting press money that resulted in
high inflation and interest rates.

That they were the direct cause of
the recession during which the deficit
expanded to its present proportion
will never be admitted by the
liberals.

Reagan has tried to stem the in-
crease of the givewaway programs,
which has resulted in many accusing
him of being an enemy of the poor,
cruel to the aged and children. He is
aware that a bankrupt nation means
poverty for every one of us.

The liberals would have the deficit
reduced by increasing taxes and
decreasing defense spending. They
would never suggest, for instance,
that a family of four with an income
of a thousand dollars a month should
not be eligible for free school lun-
ches; they would never suggest that
people on welfare or receiving
government subsidies should be in-
vestigated to determine if they are
eligible to receive taxpayers’ money.

Recently, three percent of parents
claiming free lunch eligibility for
their children in Jacksonville were
investigated and about 25 percent of
them were discovered to be cheaters.
But the bureaucrats say that such in-
vestigations require too much of
their time.

As a taxpayer, I say too much of
my money is being stolen, and if all

Lewis
Grizzard
Syndicated Columnist

hijackers blown away? That would
keep me going.”

e®Keep a low profile: “Sink down
in a seat? Pull my shirt over my
head? Crawl under a seat?”

eo No alcohol or racy magazines.
Muslim extremists don’t like them:
“Who cares what they like? I don’t
particularly like flying and have
been known to partake of serious
alcohol consumption aboard aircraft.

“The thought I might be the next
terrorist victim would not make me
change the habit. Further, I do not
make a habit of buying and certainly
have never flown with a racy
magazine.

“However, if I should pick up a
copy of Playgirl at the airport news-
tand prior to boarding that is my
business. Can you imagine us choos-

ing beverages and magazines when
we travel on the basis of Muslim ex-
tremists’ approval? What kind of
madness is this?”

Ms. Ball’s points are well taken. Do
everything to keep yourself alive if
you are caught in a terrorist situa-
tion, but let us not bow to these
crazies.

Ms. Ball’s closing remarks:

“Does this advice resemble —
could I have just imagined it — the
same advice someone would have
given the Jews during the holocaust?

“How to get along with the Nazis —
do what you are told, don’t resist, be
nice, smile, don’t try to escape. It
seems this kind of behavior is just as
likely to get you killed as not.

“...I can’t help but believe there is
something inherently wrong with
feigning approval of terrorism by
behaving like sheep and not
demonstrating any dignity or con-
cept of right or wrong.”

Lucky for us, Ms. Ball, we have a
president who agrees with you.

ria

©1986 by NEA, Inc. 4-P

“We canceled our plans to go abroad be-
cause of Khadafy and no money."

Mayor decries liberal drift

those making a claim on my money
were cnecked for honesty, more
money would be saved than could be
raised by new taxes.

The irresponsibility of the
bureaucrats in dispensing our tax
money has encouraged the develop-
ment of a society of thieves and
cheats. Only a few years past these
bureaucrats were soliciting the
students at the universities of Florida
to sign up for welfare payments.

The obvious intent of the liberals is
to destroy our free enterprise system
upon which our freedom depends, to
have us all look to the government for
the satisfaction of our needs and
desire. J. Peter Grace, chairman of
the presidential panel on government
waste, said that there are 31 million
people below the poverty level in our
nation, and that one-third of the
money being spent on welfare pro-
grams would be sufficient to give
them a decent standard of living.

The panel identified possible sav-
ings of $424 billion in three years by
such recommendations as closing un-
necessary military bases, slashing
government and military pensions to
put them in line with the private sec-
tor. About half the savings would
simply involve solving problems of
inefficiency.

Among the findings of the Grace
Commission were that: The Depart-
ment of Housing and Urban Develop-
ment makes only three attempts to
collect loans while the private sector
tries 24 to 36 times; the United States
Forest Service gave away $232

million of firewood in 1981; it costs
the Army $4.20 to process a payroll
check as opposed to $1 average in the
private sector; pension benefits in
the Civil Service Retirement System
are three times those in the private
sector; the federal government does
not negotiate volume discounts on its
enormous freight charges; half the
government’s computers are so old
that manufacturers no longer service
them. Additional personnel expenses
amount to $600 million annually.

As for defense, the liberals would
have us believe that freedom is a free
commodity like food stamps — that
money spent on defense is money
wasted. They would have us forget
Jefferson’s remark that the tree of
liberty must occasionally be watered
by the blood of patriots. They would
have us continually retreat before
the advance of communism and have
us believe it is in defense of peace.
They would have us regard Reagan
as a dangerous war-hungry president
because he has adopted policies of
rearmament and opposition to com-
munist aggression. They would have
us believe that the danger from the
threat of communism is a tale told by
an idiot, that our concern should be
directed towards those nations that
do not practice civil rights, that is, all
the nations that do not practice civil
rights but the communist ones.

The liberal defense of the advance
of communism in Central America is
the bone in the throat of the
Democratic Party that augurs its
sure defeat in the coming election in
November.

Our Democratic Party will never
win another national election until it
expels the liberal component or until
the liberals end their romance with
communism.



el

Happenings

March of Dimes walk

The March of Dimes ‘Walk
America” is scheduled for Saturday,
in Lake City.

This year, 10 corporate teams will
join the individuals and students who
have participated in past walks.

Employees from Aero, AMI Lake
City Medical Center, Barnett bank,
NCNB, Southern Bell, Wal-Mart, K
mart, Occidential Chemical Co. and
Holiday Inn will take part.

For more information, call
chairmen Joe Petrock at 752-9081 or
Mal Jopling at 752-8103.

Helping a friend

Friends of Elaine Bielling are hav-
ing a bazaar adjacent to Carter’s
Food Store located on U.S. 41-441
Saturday, beginning at 8 a.m.

All proceeds will go to the Elaine
Bielling Fund at Community Na-
tional Bank to help cover the medical
costs from brain surgery and the
costs of continuing care which she
will require for the reminder of her
life.

Silent Auction set

The Lake City Newcomers Club
will hold its Silent Auction at the
Masonic Lodge Wednesday, beginn-
ing at 10 a.m.

Seminar slated
for area nurses

The Nurses Associations of Live
Oak and Lake City are co-sponsoring
a seminar, “Care of the Caretaker”,
featuring Dr. Sally Karioth, Tues-
day, May 13, from 7-9 p.m., in the
meeting room of the Suwannee Coun-
ty Collesium.

There will be no charge for the
seminar, with costs shared by Live
Oak and Lake City nursing districts.

Two continuing education credits
will be offered for nurses.

Meeting Thursday

The Suwannee Valley Personnel
Association will hold its monthly
meeting Thursday, at 6:30 p.m., at
the Howard Johnson restaurant
located on U.S. 90 West.

Mark Tiogo, Work Assessment and
Counseling Unit counselor at Lake
City Community College, will be the
guest speaker.

His topic will be on the ways in
which he and his unit can be of
assistance to the personnel profes-
sion and local business in general.

Toigo will also explain the Apticom
Evaluation System.

The public is invited to attend.

Club sets event

The Lake City Country Club has
scheduled an evening of ‘‘Moonlight,
Roses and All That Jazz” for Satur-
day, May 17, at the club.

Cocktail hour is scheduled for 6
p.m., dinner at 7 p.m. and dancing at
8 p.m.

The Frank Brown Orchestra, an
18-piece band from Tallahassee, will
be playing favorites from the “Big
Band Era’.

A seated dinner of prime rib will be
catered from Wayside Restaurant.

The cost is $18 per person and
reservations should be made by call-
ing Lake City Country Club by May
14.

Kaye Hinckley and Marsha Jopl-
ing, chairpersons for the May Social
event of the club, said reservations
were limited and ask that callb be
made as soon as possible.

Bail money sought

The “Jail Bail” for Cystic Fibrosis
is scheduled for Saturday, May 17, at
Gleason’s Corner Mall from 12-4 p.m.

Volunteers will be “jailed” for a
fee, and local citizens will have the
opportunity to jail participants and to
pay to either have them stay in jail
longer or have them released.

Several local political and com-
munity leaders have agreed to par-
ticipate.

Hotel auction set

An auction of the contents of the
Blanche Hotel located on North
Marion Street is scheduled for Satur-
day, May 17.

The hotel is being renovated to
become a mini mall and office com-
plex.

For more information, contact
Gateway Auction Service Inc., 408
Marion St. Lake City, or phone
752-2485. .

Lake Butler bluegrass

The eighth Lake Butler Berry
Blossom Bluegrass Festival is
scheduled for Friday and Saturday,
May 16-17, one mile south of Lake
Butler on Hwy. 121.

Tickets may be purchased by
writing to Lake Butler Bluegrass
Festival, Route 3, Box 712, Lake
Butler, FL 32054.

There are a limited number of
camper hookups which may be
reserved with the purchase of ad-

vance tickets only.

LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986 7

By MARGARET LEGUIRE
Reporter staff writer

A love affair with a nurse?

Of course.

Most Lake Citians can relate to a
nurse who has touched their lives in a
special way when they were in the
hospital or on a visit to their physi-
cian.

Their warmth, smile or just a sim-
ple touch has many times given
strength and encourgement in many
patients’ darkest hours.

And for that special nurse in each
of our lives, the week of May 4-10 has
been set aside to recognize these
honorable professionals.

In addition to individual nurses be-
ing recognized for their contributions
this week, local hospitals planned
events in which their nurses were
honored.

Lake Shore Hospital planned a lun-
cheon, complete with tableclothes
and flowers, for their nurses in the
small dinning room of the hospital.

In addition to some hosptial food,
dietition Jeannette Kennedy said a

living Today

This is the week to honor those caring nurses

portion of the food would be catered.

AMI Lake City Medical Center
gave their nurses a reception in the
dinning area. Each nurse was given a
white or pink carnation.

Steve Chapman, LCMC executive
director, presented the nurse of the
year award to Nancy Moore, RN,
charge nurse on the 3-11 shift.

Ms. Moore also received her own
parking space for one year.

She was presented $100 and a cor-
sage, and her name will be placed on
a plaque to be displayed in the lobby.

Ms. Moore was chosen for this
award by her peers “for her hard
work and dedication to her job,” said
Kim Allen, LCMC marketing direc-
tor.

Tanglewood Convalescent Home
invited Lake City Mayor Gerald Witt
and Columbia County Sheriff Tom
Tramel as special guests to a steak
dinner for their nurses.

Mayor Witt and Sheriff Tramel
commended the nurses on their
dedication to the medical field and
the community.

Mayor Witt presented a proclama-
tion honoring the nursing profes-
sional on their day.

The Lake City Veterans Ad-
ministration Medical Center honored
their nurses with a luncheon and
entertainment.

Following the luncheon, a skit was
presented by the nurses.

Vocal numbers by duet Cynthia
Fritsche and Pat Shepard, the ‘Male
RN’s”, and the Columbia High
School Vocal Ensemble were also
performed for the nurses.

Chief of VA Nursing Services
Elizabeth Kelly presented awards for
excellence in nursing to Terri
Webster, RN; Verlinda Galloway,
LPN; and Martha Harries, NA.

Before this special ‘‘Nurses’
Week’ ends, take a few moments of
your time to remember that special
nurse with a note of thanks, a phone
call or flowers.

You will be glad you did when you
are once again touched by their com-
passion and professionlism.

TANGLEWOOD SERVES DINNER: The nurses at
Tanglewood Convalescent Center were treated to a steak
dinner at which Lake City Mayor Gerald Witt and Colum-
bia County Sheriff Tom Tramel were special guests.

Leguire)

Visiting prior to the meal are Mayor Witt; Bonita Brill,
LPN; Sheriff Tramel; Jane Smith, R.N.; Gloria Royals,
LPN; and Pat Collins, LPN. (Photos by Margaret

1

VA PRESENTS AWARDS: Elizabeth Kelly, center, chief of Nursing Ser-

vices at the Lake City Veterans Administration Medical Center, presented
awards to Terri Wester, RN, left; and Martha Harris, NA; for excellence in -
nursing as part of their Nurses’ Day activities. Verlinda Galloway was also
presented the same award but was not availabe for photograph. :

LAKE SHORE GIVES LUNCHEON: Nurses at Lake Shore Hospital were
guests of honor at a luncheon given in conjunction with Nurses’ Day. Shown in
the Lake Shore small dinning room are, seated, from left, are: Sandy Ryan,
RN; Jackie Brannon, RN, day shift supervisor; Suzanne Chasteen, RN; and
Wanda Wheeler, LPN. Standing, from left, are: Jeanette Kennedy, dietition;
and Dorthy Pattison, nursing supervisor.

Around town

By Margaret Leguire 752-1293

IN THE MOVIES TOO

Lake City and several nearby
towns are well represented in the
television mini-series ‘North and
South: Book II”.

In addition to Steve Knight, Danny
O’Neal and Vic Vasco, the three re-
enactors written about in last
Friday’s edition of The Lake City
Reporter, 10 more re-enactors from
Company B were also a part of the
large production, The Reporter was
notified this week.

The additional re-enactors who
participated are: Frank Loughran,
Olustee; Skip Mills, Orange Park;
Dewayne Sordie, Fort White; Clark
Williams and Wendy Nettles, Mac-
Clenny; Michael Vickers and Nick
Buonzino, Jasper; and Richard
Polbos, George and David Ripple and
Mathew Young, Lake City.

TERRY FAMILY REUNION

Relatives and friends of the Terry
family of Columbia County are in-
vited to a reunion honoring the 80th
birthday of Inez Terry Rouse, Sun-
day, at the American Legion Post 57
on U.S. 441 South.

Dinner will be served at 1 p.m.

Those attending are asked to bring
a covered dish and enjoy a day
featuring good food, fun and
fellowship.

This event had previously been
planned to be held at Camp O’Leno,
but due to conflicting dates, the loca-
tion was changed to the American
Legion.

DOLL RAFFLE

The Historic Preservation Board is
having a raffle for a porcelain Bisque
doll, hand painted by Ethel
McDonald and dressed by Florence
Helms.

The drawing will be held Saturday
at the annual attic sale.

Tickets are 50 cents and are
available at the Chamber of Com-
merce or from any HPB member.
BOY SCOUTS NEED HELP

The Boy Scouts of America/North
Florida Council needs volunteers to
work on the staff at the Boy Scout
camp near Melrose.

The council has summer camp
staff openings for program director,
business manager, aquatic director,
provisional scoutmaster, chaplain
and health officer. Applicants must

i chen

be 21 years of age.

Employment dates for staff are
June 15-Aug. 19.

Interested persons should contact
Camp Director Otto Szanto at
1-388-0591.

HONOR STUDENT

Andrew R. Hirko, Lake City, was
recently recognized by Frank
Thomas, the academic dean of
Abraham Baldwin Agricultural Col-
lege, as one of the students who
qualified for the honor student status
at the college.

Hirko is a forest resources student.
ENJOYS FREE HOUSE PAINTING

The Lake City Board of Realtors
celebrated American Home Week by
painting 86-year-old Maude Tripp’s
home on East Putnam Street.

Mrs. Tripp, a widow, was delighted
with the efforts of the realtors.

Members of the Board of Realtors
from C-21 Daniel Crapps, Hometown
Agency, Coldwell Bankers, Bishop
Agency, Jones Realty, Edgley Real-
ty, and C-21-Darby-Rogers, provided
the labor.

In addition, several area mer-
chants contributed labor and sup-
plies to the project. They were; Lake
City Paint Center, Brown-Vann Paint
Store, Lake City Industries, Bud
Giebieg, Columbia Home Improve-
ment, Myrtle’s County Cookin’,
Dicks Realty, Hale and Brannon, Sun
Country, Crown Realty, Leila Jones
and Philiip Pickens.

LCCC ENTRANCE TEST

The ACT Assessment Test is
reguired for students planning to
enter Lake City Community College
on a degree program.

When students take the ACT, they
provide information about
themselves, their past experiences,
their abilities, interests and goals.

The report will include scores on
the four subject test areas (English,
mathematics, social studies and
natural sciences), a composite (or
average) score, and information
about the student’s interests, plans,
accomplishments and needs.

Test results take 4-7 weeks, so
students should plan to take the ACT
on a date that allows enough time for
the college to receive the results
before they enroll.

LIC 1adu paul UAy veo wae sud Lan

fall semester college entrants is June
14. The test will be administered at
Columbia High School in Lake City,
and Dixie County High School in
Cross City.

Deadline for registration is Friday,
May 16.

Registration packets are available
at any high school guidance office, at
LCCC and the LCCC Downtown
Center.

For more information, contact the
Counseling and Testing Office at
LCCC.

ELECTED TO PHI BETA KAPPA

Elizabeth E. Oteiza, Lake City,
was recently elected to the honorary
scholastic society Phi Beta Chapter
at the University of Florida.

Students selected for this honor are
of high intellecutal ability pursing a
broad liberal education acording to a
Uf spokesperson. :

Ms. Oteiza is the daughter of Dr.
.and_ Mrs. J. A. Oteiza, Lake City.
YOUTH STEER PROJECT

The 4-H and Future Farmers of
America in Columbia County are
preparing to begin their livestock
projects which they will exhibit and
show in the 1986 county fair.

The steer project is an educational
activitiy in which young adults ex-
perience the proper way to finish and
care for beef cattle,

The program will begin Monday.
All entries must be registered with
with the Columbia County Extension
Service.

All interested 4-H and FFA
members are invited to particioate in
this year’s program.

WINNING ART ON DISPLAY

The works of artist Jack Beckwith,
the first place winner in the recent
Columbia Arts Guild May Day Arts
Festival, will be on display at Lake
Shore Hospital through May 17.

Beckwith’s works were also judged
the most popular with the judges and
best of show.
HOWARD-CRAWFORD
HELD

The Howard-Crawford family reu-
nion was held at Camp O’Leno State
Park last weekend from Friday
through Sunday.

A weekend of fun, games and
fellowship was enjoyed by those at-

REUNION

Vokiubiag.

An auction, at which crafts were
sold, was held with all proceeds going
to the camping fund.

The Howard family reunion com-
bined with the Crawford family reu-
nion for the first time this year.
CPR CLASSES SCHEDULED

AMI Lake City Medical Center has
scheduled CPR (Cardiopulmonary
Resuscitation) class during National
Hospital Week May 11-17.

The class will be held Monday and
Thursday, from 6-10 p.m., in the
LCMC conference room.

Both sessions must be attended for
certification in CPR. The class is
limited to eight people.

For more information, please con-
tact Kim Allen at LCMC.

FLOWER SHOW SCHEDULED

Union Correctional Institution has
scheduled their silver anniversary
flower show Friday-Sunday at the
Employees Training Building West
of the Institution.

There will 25 divisions in which
participants have entered.

The small beginning of 400 visitors
to the first flower show given in 1961
has grown to more than 3,500 visitors
to the 1985 show.

Union Correctional Institution is
located on State Road 16.

Flower show winner

The Lake City Garden Cluk’s Annual Flower Show was held recently in the
Garden Center. Artistic Division winners, from left, Vera Register, Edna
Keen and Wanda Morris, are shown with their awards. Other category win-
ners are Edna Keen, arboreal award winner; Lassie Black, horticulture ex-
cellance winner; and Juanita Moses, sweepstakes winner. (Photo by Scott

Callahan)

A CRE THEN YN



8 LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986

Engagements

Witt - Porter

Mr. and Mrs. Olan Darrell Witt,
Tribble Street, announce the engage-
ment of their daughter, Kimberly
Dale, to William Russ Porter, Lake
City, son of Mr. and Mrs. William F.
Porter, Inglewood Dr.

The wedding will be at 7 p.m. on
June 13 at First Assembly of God.
The reception will follow at the
church.

The bride-elect is a 1982 gradute of
Columbia High School. She attended

Tallahassee Community College,
Tallahassee, and Florida Junior Col-
lege, Jacksonville. She is employed
with the Columbia Association for
Retarded Citizens.

Porter is a 1975 graduate of Orange
Park High School. He is employed
with Winn Dixie Stores, Inc.

All relatives and friends are in-
vited to attend the ceremony and the
reception.

KIMBERLY DALE WITT

Uprichard
- Warner

Lynda Lea Uprichard, Cedar
Street, and Revis Martin Warner,
Live Oak, announce their engage-
ment.

The wedding will be at 7 p.m. on
May 23 at the Lake City Garden
Center. The reception will follow at
the Garden Center.

The bride-elect is employed at
Lake City Community College.

Warner is employed at Occidental
Chemical.

All relatives and friends are in-
vited to attend the ceremony and the
reception.

Weddings

Prast

Elizabeth Ann Prast, Altamonte
Springs, became the bride of Gary
Lynn Faircloth, Altamonte Springs,
in a morning ceremony in Ringgold,
Ga. The bride is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Edsel Prast, Longwood.
The groom’s parents are Mr. and
Mrs. Benjamin Faircloth, Lake City.

Following a wedding trip to the
Smokey Mountains, Key West,
Miami and Sanibel Island, the couple
are at home in Altamonte Springs.

Keen

Dina Hull Keen became the bride
of Robert Alan Kinch in an evening
ceremony in the park of St. Armand’s
Circle, Sarasota. The bride is the
daughter of Irene Sealey, Lake City,
and Wilbur Hull, Arlington, Texas.
She is the granddaughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Sam Keen, Lake City. The
groom’s parents are Mr. and Mrs.
Gordon Kinch, Battle Creek, Mich.

Vows were exchanged before a
wicker arch with big white satin
bows and satin ribbon streamers.
Eight colorful impatient baskets in
white wicker stands lined the
walkway for the bride.

Jim Crook officiated at the
ceremony.

The bride, given in marriage by
ker father, wore an ivory taffeta
gown featuring puffed sleeves and a
fitted strapless bodice on a sheath
skirt accented with a rosette to the
side of her waist attached with a
chapel train. Her waist-length cap-
ped veil of illusion was adorned with
beaded pearls and lace. The bride
carried a bouquet of yellow and

. burgundy silk spring flowers with
baby’s breath, a long strand of pearls
and satin ribbon streamers.

The bride’s matron of honor was
her sister, Deborah Breeding. She
wore a pink dress with drop
shoulders and white scalloped lace

and rosette bows at the bottom.
Bridesmaid Jeanette Whitmill wore
a taffeta burgundy dress identical to
the matron of honor. Both of the
bride’s attendants carried a bouquet
of yellow and white flowers tied with
burgundy and yellow satin ribbons.
Gordon Kinch served as his son’s
best man. Ushers were Adam Geiss,

Faircloth

The bride is a graduate of
Michigan State University. She is
employed at AT&T Information
Systems.

Faircloth is a 1975 graduate of Col-
umbia High School and a graduate of
Lake City Community College. He at-
tended Santa Fe Community College
and the University of Central
Florida. He is employed as a Senior
Network Operator at AT&T.

Kinch

MRS. ROBERT ALAN KINCH

and Brian and Stephen Keen, sons of
the bride.

The mother of the bride wore a full
length, long-sleeved gown which
featured a drape slant tunic. She
wore matching accessories and a
corsage of white silk sweetheart
roses.

The groom’s mother chose a blue
and white dress accented with a
white trimmed collar and a corsage
of white silk sweetheart roses.

The couple were taken by horse-
drawn buggy to the reception which
followed at the Holiday Inn, Lido
Beach. Festivities continued at the
Columbia Restaurant, St. Armand’s
Circle.

Anita Gordon performed piano
selections at the reception; Norma
Butko was the organist for the out-
side wedding ceremony.

The couple are at home in Braden-
ton where Kinch operates a wall
covering installation business.

Treat: Mom Special. .

Mother's Day anid
Every Sunday

11AM-11PM

| Tender Succulant Oven-Roasted
| Prime Rib AuJus

With Potato & Salad Bar

| °6.75
_PIER 75

SUA RAR

I- 75 & US 9 90 West
- Charlie & Cindy Gwin invite you to dine with them.

752-7317

Barley - McCray

Dawn M. Barley became the bride
of Austin Craig McCray, DeLand, in
an afternoon ceremony at Northside
Baptist Church, DeLand. The bride is
the daughter of Darla and Donald R.
Barley, Orange City. The groom’s
parents are Betty and Jason McCray,
Lake City.

Jack Nightingale officiated at the
double-ring ceremony.

The bride, given in marriage by
her father, wore a gown of chiffon
over taffeta with double lace trimm-
ing. Her veil and headpiece were edg-
ed with pearls and she carried a Bi-
ble and orchids. The bride’s matron
of honor was her sister, Donna Doss.
Her bridesmaides were Sandy Yost
and Donna McArthur.

Paul Douglas was the best man.
Ushers were Brian McCray and Mike
Hensley.

Judy Mullins performed organ
music, and Jack Nightingale per-
formed a solo selection.

Hostesses for the reception were
Thelma Crippon, Pat Grantland,

. Suzie Trentham, Shelly Foster, Cyn-

thia Wlasinski and Lois Nightingale.

Entertaining

and
Informative . .

CLASSIFIED

MR. AND MRS.
AUSTIN CRAIG MCCRAY

Following a wedding trip to St.
Augustine, the couple are at home in
Orange City.

The bride is a 1984 graduate of
DeLand High School. She is
employed by the Volusia County
Sheriff’s Department, DeLand.

McCray graduated from Columbia
High School and is employed with
Smith’s Surveying and Drafting.

Five easy ways
to charge your purchases:

E53 Hudson

GLEASON’S CORNER MALL, LAKE CITY

i — = Mosrcor elk

Re LR

Jom 3 a

GIVE MO
OUR BEST

The first 100 customers to the Lingerie Department
Saturday, May 10th, will receive a Spring Plant for
mother with a purchase in our Lingerie Department.

Buy one scarf at full price and
receive second scarf at 30% off.
Sat. and Sun., May 10th & 11th

Shopping Hours: Mon. thru Sat. 10am til 9pm/Sun. 1pm til 6pm

Crews - Witt

Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Crews, Lake
City, announce the engagement of
their daughter, Angela Anita, to
Thomas Walter Witt, son of Mr. and
Mrs. T. Gerald Witt, Lake City.

The wedding will be at 4 p.m. on Ju-
ly 19 at First Baptist Church. The
reception will follow at the Lake City
Garden Club.

The bride-elect is a graduate of
Columbia High School and a
graduate of Florida State University
with a bachelors degree in Elemen-
tary Education. She is employed by
the Columbia County School system.

Witt is a Columbia High School
graduate and a graduate of Florida
State University with a bachelors
degree in Social Work. He is

me AAA

ANGELA ANITA CREWS
employed by Health and
Rehabilitative Services.

All relatives and friends are in-

vited to attend the ceremony and the
reception.

Weiffenbach - Hunter

Dr. and Mrs. Don D. Weiffenbach,
Lake City, announce the engagement
of their daughter, Patricia Dee, to
Alan Jeffery Hunter, son of Beverly
Hunter and W. L. Hunter, both of
Lake City.

The wedding will be at 4:30 p.m. on
August 9 at First Presbyterian
Church. The reception will follow at
Lake City Country Club.

The bride-elect is a 1984 graduate
of Columbia High School. She is
employed at Gateway Mental Health
Center and American Inn Motel.

Hunter is a 1980 Columbia High
School graduate and is enlisted in the
National Guard. He is a member of
the Elk’s Lodge.

All relatives and friends are in-

PATRICIA DEE WEIFFENBACH
AND ALAN JEFFERY HUNTER

vited to attend the ceremony and the
reception.

end

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Summer scholarships

The Hopwood Summer Scholarship
Program for high school juniors will
be offered by Lynchburg College, a
private co-educational college of
liberal arts and sciences in Lyn-
chburg, Va.

The program is based upon par-
ticipation in a. one-week summer col-
lege course, several of which will be
offered at Lynchburg College July
267-August 2.

On the basis of the student’s work
in the summer course and high
school records, Preliminary
Scholastic Aptitude Test scores, and
recommendations, he or she may be
awarded a four-year Hopwood
Scholarship in the amount of $2,500 a
year tuition at LC, effective upon
completion of the student’s senior
year of high school.

Applications forms are available
from the dean of the college, and the

8 application deadline is May 9.

Miss Olustee backer

Regina Timmons, left. owner of the Bridal Shop, recently presented a $250
check to the Miss Olustee Festival Scholarship Fund. Shown accepting the
award from Ms. Timmons is Susan Lilovich, the 1986 Miss Olustee Festival.
(Photo by Margaret Leguire)

Child abuse
workshops

Photos featured

Write to Lynchburg College,
Dean’s Office, Lynchburg, Virginia
24501 or call 1-804-522-8325.

" Exchange student

Establish a lifelong friendship with
someone from another country by
hosting a student for the 1986-87
school year.

High school foreign exchange
students, sponsored by the Student
Exchange Service (YES), a non-
profit organization, will be arriving
late summer for an American
cultural experience.

Carefully screened students come
with their own spending money and
are covered by excellent medical in-
surance. Families may claim a $50
tax deduction for each month they
provide room and board to the stu-
dent.

For more information please con-
tact: Youth Exchange Service,
World Trade Center Bldg., 350 South

Figueroa St. Number 257-P, Los

LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986 9

Angeles, California 90071, or phone:
1-800-848-2121.

Low-fat cooking

The Seventh Day Adventist Church
will sponsor a series of nutrition
classes that teach tasty low-fat, low
cholesterol cooking. :

The cooking classes will be held on
the following days: Tuesday; Thurs-
day, May 22; and Tuesday May 27, in

the Community Center of the church,
located at 740 South Avalon St.

Each participant will receive a
notebook of materials and healthy
recipes explaining the main points
brought out in each lecture. The lec-
tures shown to the class from video
cassettes include professinal presen-
tations by physicians from Weimar
Institute, a health center located
near Sacramento California.

The Child Abuse Prevention Pro-
ject, in conjunction with the Lake Ci-
ty Community College Police Science
Program, is conducting a series of

The photography of Charles
Shirley, the Lake City Reporter
Branford corespondent, is featured
in the Lake City Community College
Performing Arts Center this month.

NOTICE!

In an effort to consolidate news
of record, The Reporter has begun
the Columbia Almanac on a weekly
basis. Births will be included
among the items in that feature.

HEARING TEST SET
FOR SENIOR CITIZENS

Lake City, FL. -- Free
electronic hearing tests will
be given on Monday, Tues-
day, Wednesday, huey
& Friday from 9:00 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. at Beltone Hear-
ing Aid Service.

A Licensed Hearing Aid
Specialist will be available
to give these free tests.

The tests have been ar-
ranged for anyone who
suspects they are losing
their hearing. Such persons

enerally say they can hear

ut cannot understand con-
versation clearly. Testing
with the latest electronic
equipment will indicate
whether it can be helped
electronically.

Everyone,

especially

those over 50, should have
an electronic hearing test
at least once a year. If there
is a hearing problem, a free
electronic hearing test may
reveal that newly
developed methods of cor-
rection will help, even for
those who have been told in
the fast that a hearing aid
would not help them.

For those wishing the
free test but wish to avoid
waiting, an appointment for
a specific day and time
may be arranged by phon-
ing 752-5577.

In home testing will be
available for those unable
to attend thi special event.
To avoid waiting call
752-5371.

workshops for law enforcement of-
ficers.

The meetings are scheduled for
Wednesday and Friday, from 3-6
p.m. each day.

Shirley, who served as a
photographer with the first expedi-
tion to the North Pole, has displayed
several of his historical photos of that
mission.

Sometimes it makes sense to
re-invent the wheel. ......... os cu

got started by providing local communities with the professional banking services
they needed. But then many of them got to be so big, they sort of lost touch with
the people who made them successful in the first place.

STANLEY STEEMER.
71 28 | SPRING SPECIALS

eFurniture carefully moved and returned to
its original location.

*Truck-powered steam cleaning process.

eReasonable, competitive rates.

eSaturday and special evening hours.

*Professional upholstery cleaning available.

oCall about our current special.

*Radio Dispatch

*Emergency Water Extraction

*Call For Appointment - ‘755-1992

That's why we decided to start all over again. We ramed our bank Community
National. Because we felt that serving the local community with the best possible
personal and commercial financial services was a great new idea. And we
completely renovated a historic building right in the middle of Lake City’s business
district. To symbolize our commitment to the local community. And to help with its
revitalization.

Shirley White-Owner

WITH THIS COUPON

# 2 ROOMS & HALL

3ROOMS & HALL... .............. Come in today and get all the details on our great new invention. You'll find us easy

to do business with. And easy to find...right in the heart of the community.

Community National Bank
201 N. Marion Street Telephone: 755-3240

Our name says a lot about the way we do business.

4 ROOMS & HALL

5 ROOMS & HALL

6 ROOMS & HALL

COMBINATION ROOMS COUNT AS 2 ROOMS, CALL FOR COMMERCIAL RATES

Offer good with coupon only. Not valid with any other offer. Coupon must be presented at time of

sale. Residential Only
NO SUBSTITUTIONS EXPIRES 5/19

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7



ON THE AIR :

TODAY
Baseball
4:00 p.m. San Diego Padres at Chicago Cubs,
Cable channel 18.
5:3 p.m. Philadelphia Phillies at Atlanta
Braves, Cable channel 8 and radio on WGRO-960
AM.

Golf
4:30 p.m. Dominion Senior Invitational, Cable
channel 21.

Hockey
8:00 p.m. NHL playoffs, New York Rangers at
Montreal Expos, Cable channel 21.

Basketball

8:20 p.m. NBA playoffs, Milwaukee Bucks at

Philadelphia 76ers, Cable channel 8.
SATURDAY
Baseball

1:15 p.m. Cincinnati Reds at New York Mets,
Channel 17.

7:35 p.m. Philadelphia Phillies at Atlanta
Braves, Cable channel 8 and radio on WGRO-960
AM.

Golf
2:00 p.m. PGA, Byron Nelon Classic, Channel 4.
5:00 p.m. PGA Seniors, Dominion Senior Invita-
tional, Cable channel 21.

Tennis
3:00 p.m. Tournament of Champions, Channels
12 and 20.
Basketball

3:30 p.m. NBA playoffs, Channel 4.
Ra

cing
5:00 p.m. Indianapolis 500 time trials, Channels
12 and 20.
Hockey

7:30 p.m. NHL playoffs, St. Louis Blues at
Calgary Flames, Cable channel 21.
SUNDAY
aio Baseball
2:05 p.m. Philadelphia Phillies at Atlanta
Braves, Cable channel 8 and radio on WGRO-960
AM

2:15 p.m. San Diego Padres at Chicago Cubs,
Cable channel 18.

3:00 p.m. Los Angeles Dodgers at Montreal Ex-
pos, Channels 12 and 20.

Basketball
1:00 p.m. NBA playoffs, Channel 4.
Tennis

1:00 p.m. Tournament of Champions, Channels

12 and 20.

Racing
3:00 p.m. NASCAR Winston, Cable channel 21.
Boxing
3:00 p.m. Meldrick Taylor vs. Harold Brazier,
Channel 17.

4:00 pm.. Gene Hatcher vs. Frankie Warren,
Channel 17.

CHARTS .

CEDAR KEY TIDES

TODAY: High 3:09 a.m. and 2:13 p.m., Low 8:27 |
a.m. and 9:20 p.m.

SATURDAY: High3:43a.m. and 2:35 p.m., Low |
8:45 a.m. and 9:52 p.m.

SUNDAY: High 4:19 a.m. and 3:03 p.m., Low |
9:15 a.m. and 10:24 p.m.

MARINE WEATHER
Tarpon s to Apalachicola
Wind north 15 knots today, becoming south to

southeast 15 to 20 knots tonight. Seas less than 3
feet, increasing to 3 to 5 feet offshore. Bay and in-
let waters a light chop. Widely scattered showers
and a few thunderstorms.

P BASEBALL

'NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 18 4 818 —
Montreal 14 10 58 5
Pittsburgh 11 12 418 â„¢%
St. Louis 11 14 40 8%
0 11 15 428 9
Philadelphia 4 391 9%
West Division
Houston 10 600 —
San Francisco 17 12 58 —
San Diego 4 14 50 2%
Los Angeles 4 16 47 3%
Atlanta 2 14 482 3%
Cincinnati 6.17 21 8
Thursday’s Games

Atlanta 10, Cincinnati 5

St. Louis 13, San Diego 3

Chicago 6, Los Angeles 5

Pittsburgh 8, San Francisco 2

Only games scheduled

Friday’s Games

Los Angeles (Valenzuela 4-1) at Montreal
(Smith 2-2)

San Diego (Hawkins 1-2) at Chicago (Sutcliffe
14)
35 adelphia (Gross 2-3) at Atlanta (Johnson

2)

Cincinnati (Soto 2-3) at New York (Ojeda 40),
(m)

Houston (Scott 3-2) at Pittsburgh (Kipper 0-2),
(m)

San Francisco (LaCoss 2-0) at St. Louis (Forsch
2-1), (n)

AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct. GB
Cleveland 17 8 .680 —
New York 18 9 667 —
Boston 17 10 630 1
Milwaukee 4 12 538 3%
Detroit 1B 12 52 ¢4
Baltimore 2 13 480 5
Toronto 12 16 429 6%
West Division
California 16 13 552 —
Oakland 16 13 .552 —
Texas 3 12 52 1
Kansas City 11 14 40 3
Minnesota 11 16 407 4
Seattle 9 2 J 7
Chicago T 18 2% 7?
Thursday’s Games

Oakland 2, Milwaukee 1
Boston 4, Seattle 2
Toronto 7, California 6
Only games scheduled
Friday’s Games
Chicago (Davis 1-1) at Cleveland (Niekro 2-2),

(m)

3 aunt City (Gubicza 0-4) at Baltimore (Dixon
1), (n)
New York (Tewksbury 3-1) at Texas (Witt 2-1),

(m)

Detroit (Terrell 3-1) at Minnesota (Blyleven
22), (n)

Toronto (Stieb 0-3) at Seattle (Moore 1-3), (n)
i (Clemens 540) at Oakland (Langford
13), (n)

20 bwsukoe (Leary 3-2) at California (McCaskill

), (m)

HOCKEY

Wales Conference
(Best-of-Seven)
N.Y. Rangers vs. Montreal
N.Y. Rangers 2, Montreal 0, Montreal leads

series 3-1
Friday, May 9
N.Y. Rangers at Montreal
Sunday, May 11

Montreal at N.Y. Rangers, if necessary
Wednesday, May 14
N.Y. Rangers at Montreal, necessary

Campbell Conference
St. Louis vs. Calgary
St. Louis 5, Calgary 2, series tied 2-2
Saturday, May 10
St. Louis at Calgary
Monday, May 12
Calgary at St. Louis
Wednesday, May 14
St. Louis at Calgary, if necessary

BASKETBALL

! NBA Playoff Glance
All Times EDT
Second Round
(Best-of-Seven)
Boston 132, Atlanta 99, Boston wins series 4-1
Milwaukee 113, Philadelphia 108, Milwaukee
leads series 3-2
Houston 126, Denver 112, 20T, Houston wins
series 4-2
L.A. Lakers 120, Dallas 107, L.A. Lakers win
series 4-2
Friday, May 9
Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 8:30 p.m.
Sunday, May 11
Philadelphia at Milwaukee, TBA, if necessary
Remaining dates and times TBA

10 LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986

Niblack is new Union Co. coach as Palmer leaves

By HARVEY CAMPBELL
Reporter Sports Editor

LAKE BUTLER — Lake Butler-
Union County head football coach
Dub Palmer surprised nearly
everyone in Lake Butler last week by
announcing that he was resigning his
position and accepting the head post
at Dunnellon High School.

This week, even a bigger surprise

was delivered to Union County High:

School supporters as former
Gainesville High coach Jim Niblack,
one of the state’s most successful
coaches, announced intentions to

become the new head coach for the
Tiger program.

“Things have moved real quick,
but yes, I expect to be the coach at
Union County,” Niblack said Thurs-
day night. “I think coach Palmer’s
decision caught everyone by surprise
and then my mother passed away
Monday morning so I really have on-
ly had one visit to the school and with
the kids.

“I’m hoping to get back over there
(Lake Butler) on Monday and get
things going. Unless something
comes up that I haven’t anticipated,

I'll be the head coach, however,”
Niblack added.

Niblack, 55, began his coaching
career as an assistant at Gainesville
High from 1955 through 1957. His first
head coaching job was at Alachua-

Santa Fe in 1958, followed by three
stints as head coach at Gainesville
High, assistant positions with the
Jacksonville Express and Sharks of
the World Football League and a two
year stay as an assistant with the
Buffalo Bills.

In addition, Niblack served as an

assistant coach at the University of

Florida on two occasions and also
had a two-year stint at Kentucky.

Niblack’s overall mark is 150-404.

Assistant coach Frank Lauterbur
will be working under Niblack at
Union County and is currently runn-
ing spring drills, which began Mon-
day with approximately 60
youngsters out for the team.

Palmer, meanwhile, leaves Union
County after a one-year tenure at the
school, posting a 6-4 mark last year.
The Dunnellon job will be Palmer's

tenth head coaching position, having
posted an overall mark of 216-49-11 in
31 years, which ranks him in the top
five in the state for both career wins
and winning percentage.

Union County High baseball coach
Bill Browning is also accompanying
Palmer to Dunnellon.

The opening at Dunnellon
developed after coach Richard Ken-
nedy resigned to accept the head
coaching job at Trenton. Dunnellon
was 10-2 last year and lost to eventual
state champion DeFuniak Springs-
Walton in the state semifinals.

Reporter Sports

Lakers and Rockets
win NBA playoffs

By The Associated Press

Having disposed of their respective
second-round opponents, the Los
Angeles Lakers and Houston Rockets
are heading for a summit meeting in
the NBA's Western Conference
playoffs.

“I think Houston has a great
chance of beating Los Angeles if they
don’t tighten up during the close
games,” Denver Coach Doug Moe
said after his team was knocked out
of the NBA playoffs by a 126-122
double-overtime loss to the Rockets
Thursday night. “I really think
they’ll win. They don’t have the ex-
perience L.A. has, but if they can
relax and stay calm, they've got a
chance.”

The Rockets earned a berth in the
Western final against the Lakers,
who also wrapped up their second-
round series in six games with a
120-107 victory over the Dallas
Mavericks Thursday night.

The results were according to
form. The Lakers, defending NBA
champions, had won the Pacific Divi-
sion in a breeze and the Rockets had
won the Midwest with the second-

best record in the Western. Con-
ference.

Tonight, Milwaukee will host
Philadelphia in their Eastern Con-
ference semifinal with the Bucks
leading the 76ers 3-2. The winner will
advance to the Eastern Conference
final against the Boston Celtics, who
won their second-round series
against Atlanta.

The Lakers, aroused by pre-game
comment from Dallas management
they considered derogatory, charged
into the conference finals behind
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar’s 27 points
and Earvin Johnson's clutch fourth-
quarter play.

The Lakers were called ‘‘clowns’’
by Dallas General Manager Norm
Sonju before the game, but the in-
tense defending champions took con-
trol from the start.

“Dallas is history now and we
didn’t have to boast to do it,”’ Lakers
Coach Pat Riley said. “That’s one of
the strengths of this team.”

Abdul-Jabbar was hit with a cup of
ice while he was leaving the floor.

An irate Abdul-Jabbar jabbed the
quiet Dallas fans in the fourth period

aa

WATERMELON DAY: Columbia High head football
coach Joe Montgomery looks on as the defense smothers
the ball carrier during a six-on-six competition Thursday
at CHS. Today, the offense will face the defense in a

“watermelon scrimmage’ beginning at 4:50 p.m. The
losers of the scrimmage will be serving up watermelon to
the winners. The public is invited to attend. (Photo by
Harvey Campbell)

saying: ‘I was wondering where
they were. They didn’t have much to

. say then, did they?”

Rockets 126, Nuggets 122

Lewis Lloyd and Rodney McCray
hit key jumpers in the final 1:45 of a
second overtime period as Houston,
despite losing three starters to fouls,
outlasted Denver.

Lloyd’s 18-footer, just beating the
24-second shot clock with 1:45 left,
gave Houston a 124-121 lead. McCray
sank a 17-footer along the baseline
with 55 seconds remaining, and
Denver couldn’t counter.

The Rockets were without Akeem
Olajuwon (two technicals), Ralph
Sampson and point guard Robert
Reid (fouled out) at the end.

Houston, trailing by as many as 12
points, sent the game into overtime
on the play of Olajuwon and Jim
Petersen. The game was tied at 108 at
the end of regulation time and 114 at
the end of the first overtime.

Olajuwon finished with 28 points to
pace Houston. Lloyd had 25 and Mc-
Cray 20. Alex English had 42 points
for Denver, followed by Calvin Natt’s
23.

Sa

Murphy powers Braves to win

By The Associated rress

For a guy who did not think he
would be on the Opening Day roster,
Mike Bielecki is doing just fine for
the Pittsburgh Pirates.

National League

Bielecki won his third game
without a loss this season Thursday
night, pitching seven strong innings
before needing relief help as the
Pirates beat the San Francisco
Giants 8-2.

“I think I can pitch up here and win
some games but I don’t think I have
the capability of being a big star,”
said Bielecki, who had off-season
surgery to repair a ruptured disk.

Bielecki took a two-hitter and 8-0
lead into the eighth, but gave up a
leadoff pinch-home run to Joel
Youngblood, his first, and then
another homer to Will Clark, his fifth.
The home runs ended Bielecki’s str-
ing of consecutvie scoreless innings
at 15.

The loss dropped the visiting
Giants out of first place in the Na-
tional League West. San Francisco
now trails Houston by 14 percentage
points.

Cardinals 13, Padres 3
St. Louis pitcher Tim Conroy was

as surprised as anybody when he got
two hits and drove in four runs to lead
a 20-hit Cardinal attack.

Braves 10, Reds 5

Atlanta Manager Chuck Tanner
believes two-time NL Most Valuable
Player Dale Murphy should be the
player against whom all others are
measured.

“I've never known anyone like
him,” Tanner said after Murphy hit
his sixth and seventh homers of the
season to drive in five runs. “When
you ask who to compare him with,
you must compare someone with
him. God only makes one like him in
90 years.”

Cubs 6, Dodgers 5
The wind was blowing in at Wrigley
Field. That didn’t bother Chicago’s
leading home run hitter, shortstop
Shawon Dunston, but it sure ruined
the day for Los Angeles left-hander
Jerry Reuss.

American League

Some say baseball teams play bet-
ter in their first game after a
managerial shakeup. Not the Seattle
Mariners, though. They kept playing
the same way that got their old
manager fired,

“It’s the kind of game that makes
you want to go home and kick the
dog,” coach Marty Martinez, the
Mariners’ interim manager, said
Thursday night after a 4-2 loss to the
Boston Red Sox.

The Mariners, picked by many to
challenge this season in the
American League West, dismissed
Manager Chuck Cottier on Thursday
afternoon. The loss to visiting Boston
gave Seattle a 9-20 record, including
five straight defeats and 17 losses in
the last 21 games.

“I’ve been in losing situations like
the Mariners and you're always
wondering what will happen next,”
said Boston’s Marty Barrett, who
capped a four-run rally in the seventh
inning with a two-run triple.

In the only other two AL games on
Thursday, Toronto rallied past
California 76 and Oakland edged
Milwaukee 2-1.

Boston squandered several scoring
opportunities before breaking
through against Mike Morgan, 2-3, in
the seventh inning. Trailing 2-0,
Wade Boggs and Bill Buckner singled
with one out, and RBI singles by Jim
Rice and Don Balyor tied the score.

The Red Sox won for the ninth time
in their last 11 games.

points over Denver Ni

LOOKING AT TWO: Houston Rockets’

a

Lewis Lloyd puts up two of his 25

ets’ Lafayette Lever during Thursday night National

Basketball Association playoff action. Houston Defeated Denver 126-122 in
double overtime to advance to the finals of the Western Regional playoffs
against the Los Angeles Lakers. (AP Laserphoto)

Simmons roast
tickets are on sale

By HARVEY CAMPBELL
Reporter Sports Editor

Tickets are now on sale at four
local outlets for the Bobby Simmons
roast slated for Lake City on
the evening of Tuesday, May 20 at 7
p.m.

The roast will be held in honor of
Simmons and his wife, Carol, who
have been the first-family of athletics
at Columbia High for the past 15
years.

Simmons served as head football
coach and athletic director during
that tenure and stepped down as foot-
ball coach in early February, while
continuing as athletic director until
the end of the current school year.

Tickets for the prime rib dinner
and roast are priced at $12.50 per per-
son and can be obtained at McDuffie
Sporting Goods, Lake City Athletic,
Columbia High and The Lake City
Reporter. Checks should be made
payable to The Bobby Simmons
Roast.

Anyone interested in being on the

Bobby Simmons
program for the roast should contact
Columbia High Principal David
Ellis.

Dress for the event will be semi-
formal.

In addition to several hundred local
friends of Carol and Bobby,
numerous out of town guests are ex-
pected, including coaches from
Jacksonville and Valdosta.

For additional information, con-
tact Harvey Campbell at the Lake Ci-
ty Reporter, 752-1293.

BIG DAY: Atlanta Braves outfielder Dale Murphy is congratulated at home
by teammate Rafael Ramirez after Murphy hit his second home run of the
game against the Cincinnati Reds at Riverfront Stadium Thursday afternoon.
Murphy had five runs-batted-in as the Braves won 10-5. (AP Laserphoto)



Sports briefs

Today's sports schedule *

® In the Dixie Youth baseball Youth League today, the Lake City
Reporter plays Publix at 5:30. At 7:30 Columbia County Bank faces
Rossi Hardware.

® Eades Security plays O’Neal Roofing in Boys League play.

® In the Minor League Collins & Griffin takes on Rountree-Moore
while Clayton Nichols goes up against Dr. Martin.

o In Recreation Department Men's League play Lake City Mer-
chants play Foodway at 6:45.

o In Church League “A” First Baptist No. 1 takes on First
Nazrene at 8 p.m.

® Pine Grove Baptist plays Parkview Baptist No. 1 at 6:45 in
Church League “B” play.

In the Women’s League Pepsi plays Foodway at 8 p.m.

Dixie Youth fun day is Saturday

The Annual Dixie Youth Parents-Kids Fun day will be held Satur-
day at 10 a.m. at the Southside Baseball Complex.

During the day-long event the men and women will play softball
while the kids serve as managers, coaches and umpires. Ham-
burgers, hot cogs and cokes will be sold. There will be a $1 charge
for those who play softball which will be collected before the first

Union Co.
squad advances
to state title game

Special to the Reporter

BRADENTON — The Union Coun-
ty softball team, down 8-3 entering
the fourth inning, used home runs by
sisters Hope and Demetrise Thomas
Thursday to take an 11-8 win over de-
fending state champion Bradenton
Christian in their state Class 1A soft-
ball semifinal.

Union County will play Tallahassee
Maclay (23-1), a 17-1 winner over
Fort Lauderdale Westminster, today
at 4 p.m. for the state championship.

The Tigers, now 22-4, were down 8-
3 when, in the bottom of the third in-
ning, first baseman Tonya Curry

\

LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986 1 1

softball

“Hope’s home run was the biggest
hit of the game,” said Brackett. But
Bradenton Christian Coach Lois van
Beek, whose team fell to 14-5, was
more impressed with Demetrise
Thomas’ homer.

“I was waiting for their DH to hit
one,” said van Beek. “She had hit
dribblers her first two times up.

“I had heard they (the Tigers)
were good, but when I saw them
warmup...”

Union Co. 300 314
Bradenton

0— 11 Wu 4
12 000 0— 8 13 §

Fortenberry and Page. Rosie Berg and (not
available).
WP— Fortenberry (22-4). LP— Berg (14-5).

DOMINATING: Lake City’s Wayne Davis and his Collins Auto Part open

wheel modified car have combined to dominate the class at Valdosta Speed-
way action lately. Davis has won his class each of the past four weeks and he’ll
be pursuing a fifth consecutive win this weekend. In addition, Davis has
posted the fastest time of any car, regardless of class, during the past month.

jumped up to catch a high throw, was 2B Forinar (UC), price (B). 38— DeSve (UC),
game of the day. Those planning to participate should sign up with gor oe Hig Bradenton NE BRE 18): HR ~ 1.Y0emes (WG). D. Thomas tc). (Photo by Bobby Sealey).
the team mom. air and and came down on her back.
If you have any further questions, please call your team mom; or Paramedics were called out, but Cur- Tank McNamara
Bob Gilliam, 755-1547; or Paula Owens, 752-2031, ext. 20. ry was all right and remained in the | 7 y spy ae er
3 game. THIS 15 THE'ENTERTAINER “WE STUPY THE PACE, PEOPLE . if SE's BETTING
Softball tourney this weekend “That play turned us around emo- Have TO STOP FROM RODING THE PACE. LOOK FOR 5| THAT YOU WONT. 12 He
: ; ; tionally,” said Union County Coach O THEFIELD TO KISS THE FACE. H > FR
A girls softball tournament will be held at the Westwind softball : PLAYERS. 3 7 ped EARTR,
COMI IoE Satta. Starts 3 Betty Brackett. “We were very, very : iit PESTA or WAT?
plex Satur ay, starting at 8 a.m. nervous, but after that we shook it off 1 / £
The tourney will be hosted by Jerry’s Food Mart Renegades and and decided it was time to get down to 5 \ 7
will have a field of 10 teams, including teams from St. Augustine, playing our kind of ball. We got the > oe” |
Gainesville and Valdosta, Ga. killer look.” = / 5
Union had taken a 3-0 first-inning \ ITy JPR
Dixie Youth signup underway lead on errors, but Bradenton Chris- = T
. : ; : tian came back with a run in the first, . J
Sign-up is now underway at the Southside Recreation Department two in the second and five in the third
for boys ages 15 through 18, who are interested in playing Dixie Youth for its 8-3 lead. 3 / \
Senior League baseball. Registration fee is $20 and a copy of your In the top of the fourth, junior Hope 5-9 5

birth certificate will be required. To be eligible, you must be 15
before August 1 and cannot turn 19 before August 1.

Registration will run from Monday, May 5 through Friday, May 16.
For further information, call 752-4803 or the Southside Recreation
Dept. at 752-2031.

Racing action Saturday

Racing action is slated Saturday night at Gateway National
Raceway Park. Gates will open at 5:30 p.m. with racing action get-
ting underway at 8 p.m. Feature events will include a 25-lap late
model race, 15-lap limited outlaw division and a 15-lap thunder car
competition. In addition, heat races will be held in each division.

National tennis tourney slated here

The Ford Sports Mixed Doubles Tennis Tournament is slated to be
held at Lake City Country Club the weekend of May 30, 31 and June 1.
Entry fee for the event is 25 per team and all players will receive a
T-shirt, towel and tennis balls. You must be at least 21-years of age to
enter and no teaching pros are eligible to play. Local winners will ad-

t ional tition at P. City with the national finals MEN'S LEAGUE
8 Pas OO Weng) ty Lak iy Bac 1 INTEREST FREE CREDIT . . .

director Jay Penny at 755-6055.

Boys’ Club golf tourney slated

The Columbia County Boys’ Club will be hosting its 12th Annual
Golf Tournament on Saturday, May 17 at Quail Heights Country Club.
Tickets for the event are priced at $25 and both men and women are
invited to participate. Included in the entry fee is greens fee, cart,

prizes and refreshments. For additional information, call 752-4184, Delta Force 10
Lake City Correctional/
after 3 p.m. Lake City Paint 6 Pri
: Delia pores, assisted Be Rye Smithy, 3-for4, Size Tice

- H H efeated Lake City Correctional/Lake City Paint,
Benefit tennis play upcoming 104. Wilbur Spihts it 100 for Lake Cy Cor san Bos

; ; ; ti ity Paint. :

The Third Annual Coppertone-Columbia County Open Tennis Tour- Fe Fermandv's Tv 27 Sida avs P155/80R13

nament is slated for Lake City Country Club on the weekend of May Pizza Hut 0 Whitews)

16, 17 and 18. The event is a fundraiser for the American Cancer
Society. >

Divisions of play include men’s singles and doubles A, B and C;
women’s singles and doubles A, B and C; mixed doubles A, B and C;
Men’s 40 and over singles; women’s 40 and over singles; novice
children 10 and under (boys and girls); and novice children 14 and
under (boys and girls). Entry fee is $15 per person in singles play, $20
per team in doubles and $8 for children.

Tournament director is Bill Clark and tournament chairman is
Debra Daniels. For additional information, call 755-2334.

Thomas cracked a three-run homer
to pull the Tigers back into the game
at 8-6. Union County scored another
run in the fifth to make it 8-7.

In the sixth, Tracy Fortner led off
with a double, then moved to third on
a single by Cassie Daniels. Curry hit a
sacrifice fly to tie the game, and then
ninth-grader Demetrise Thomas
slugged a two-run homer for the
game-winning runs. The Tigers got an
insurance run later in the inning
when Shawn DeSue tripled and
scored on an error.

Softball results

Both the Men’s and Women’s Leagues played
Wednesday. Here are those results.

The Lake City Businessmen held Country Ban-
dits scoreless in a 15-0 game. Hitting for the Lake
City Businessmen were Tim Hattaway and Ver-
non Masters, both 3-for-3. David Lang, Jerry Mur-
ray and Ashley Ellis each hit 1-for-2 for Country
Bandits.

Lake City Merchants 8
Hillandale Farms 1

Tim Herndon hit 4-for-4, leading the Lake City
Merchants to an 81 defeat of Hillandale Farms.
Johnny Mauldlin put in a 3-for-4 performance for
Hillandale Farms.

Fernando's TV shutout Pizza Hut in a 27-0 con-
test. Richard Bass hit 4-for-4, while George Smith
and Leon Gilbert both hit 2-for-2 for Fernando's
TV. For Pizza Hut, Carl McGhaghy hit 1-for-1.

WOMEN’S LEAGUE
Nettles Sausage 16
Foodway 1

Nettles Sausage enjoyed a 16-1 victory over
Foodway. Hitting for Nettles Sausage were Angie
Sistrunk, Terri Lee and Kay Wilson, each 2-for-3.
Patti Furnish hit 2-for2 for Foodway.

Colonial Plaza 17
Video 1800 3

Colonial Plaza defeated Video 1800, 17-3, as
Carla Moore hit 3-for-3, and Glenda Markham and
Terri Robinson both hit 2-for-2. For Video 1800
Marilyn Douglas hit 1-for-1.

3)

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COMPLETE VEFICLE REPAIRS FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC VEHICLES Service Specials are for most cars hight trucks and vans

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win wT a WR i



12 LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986

Memorial golf tourney nears

By CHRIS POTTLE
Lake City Country Club pro

You are cordially invited to par-
ticipate in the 29th annual Memorial
Day Invitational Golf Tournament
Saturday and Sunday, May 24-25. The
entry fee is $55 if postmarked on or
before May 14 and $65 if postmarked
on or after May 15. The fee includes
electric golf car both days.

The field will be limited to the first
200 paid entries. No entry will be ac-
cepted without the entry fee. The en-
try deadline is Tuesday, May 20.

The invitational will be preceded
as in the past by a North Florida Sec-
tion PGA conducted Pro-Am on Fri-
day, May 23. Call 752-2266 for starting
times. A free practice round will be
held on Thursday for entrants in the
Pro-Am and/or Invitational.

A cocktail party and dinner will be
served at the country club on Satur-
day, May 24, at 7 p.m. The cost per
person will be $12.50. The cost of the
cocktail party and dinner is not in-
cluded in the entry fee and therefore
applies to all entrants and guests.

Play will be pre-flighted by han-
dicap and play in flights will be at
scratch.

Our ladies had a good turnout for
the Tuesday Ladies” Day Tourna-
ment. Harriett Dunn took first place
as she bettered quota by 8 points. Se-
cond place was won by Peg Galbraith
with plus 7, followed by Martha
Monpetit. Please plan to join us on
Tuesdays.

Bobby Stamper, with three birdies
to his credit, won the Wednesday
Dogfight with plus 14. Bobby shot a
gross 75. Tom Witt, also at 75, was se-
cond with plus 4. Bob Pedlow was
third with plus 3.

Our weekly Saturday tournament
was a “Throw Out Event.” This for-

mat allows each player to throw out
his worst hole and then subtract han-
dicap. Dale DeRosio, playing his best
golf, shot an even par round of 72 and
a net 57 for first. Gary Yarington

duplicated Dale’s feat and, too, shot
his career round, 72, for a net 58 and
second. Cliff Martin was third with

'60, amd Mike Kernen was fourth with

62.

Branford drills started

By HARVEY CAMPBELL
Reporter Sports Editor

BRANFORD — Spring drills are
underway at Branford High School
and new coach Tommy Chambers
says that although the 1986 Buccan-
ners are extremely young, the squad
has exhibited a good attitude and
willingness to work.

“T read” where Columbia High
coach Joe Montgomery says his kids
like to hit and I'd say that pretty well
is the same case here,” Chambers
claims. “We only have four seniors
on a team which currently has 27 kids
going out and we're going to have to
do a lot of learning, but we've got a
good group and I'm encouraged.”

Metro baseball

tourney underway

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP)
John Zaksek and John Young
homered to spark Cincinnati to a 6-5
upset of Virginia Tech in the opening
game of the Metro Conference
‘baseball tournament Thursday.

In the second game of the first
round, South Carolina got home runs
from Jeff Morris, Charlie Aldrich
and Dave Hollins in a 10-1 rout of
Southern Mississippi. And Wayne
Thompson launched a home run and
two doubles to power Memphis State
past Louisville 19-3 in the nightcap.

In Friday’s second round, Cincin-
nati, 25-26, plays top-seeded Florida
State

Game law violations are
no laughing matter here

By LEW WHITACRE
Reporter Outdoors Writer

Life is full of mysteries that I do not
understand. For instance, why do
some people insist on killing deer at
this time of year when does are drop-
ping fawns?

Is the need for food so great that
these people will risk arrest, possible
confiscation of vehicle and gun, a
maximum sentence of one year in
jail and up to a $1,000 fine? I have
serious doubts about this.

Could it be some sort of game
whereby taking an illegal deer and
getting away with the crime is
“beating the system?”

School-aged children do not really
believe shoplifting is a crime, and
many parents whose children have
been apprehended stealing candy or
lipstick seem to feel the same way.

Is our society so wrapped up in
everyday activities that our moral
standards have digressed to the point
where anything goes? -

Two Bradford County citizens were
recently arrested for taking or at-
tempting to take deer at night with a
gun and light which is a first-degree
misdemeanor. Herman Floyd Crews,
Lawtey, and Rod Allen Christian,
Starke, were arrested and so charg-
ed.

This was Crews second arrest
within 11 months for the same
charge. Crews was arrested on May
8, 1985, and he was slapped with a
fine of $45.50. At the time of the se-
cond arrest in April, Crews was driv-
ing the same vehicle utilized in the
1985 violation.

I fail to see how justice was served
in this particular case but will be

watching with a keen interest in the
disposition of the pending second
case.

There are hundreds of laws per-
taining to the wild game in the state
of Flroida stating whether a violation
is a misdemeanor of first or second
degree and carries a stipulated max-
imum fire and/or jail sentence.

The presiding judge hearing the
case has a great deal of leeway in im-
posing any sentence and may
withhold adjudication if he so
desires.

Basically, the average American is
a decent, law-abiding person who has
an ingrained respect for law and
order and fair play, but certain
issues seem to be exempt from ra-
tional reasoning.

Game law violations seem to be
one of these issues. A year or so ago I
noted an alligator violator who
received a one-year jail sentence,
and I received several phones calls,
anonymous, of course, which reviled
my character, reflected on my
ancestry, and in general informed
me no alligator was worth a jail
sentence.

Another case in point. Judge Ver-
non Douglas proposed confiscation of
vehicles driven by convicted drunk
drivers. Some people responded by
stating this was punishment of a
vehicle and not the driver.

I fail to see how you can punish a
car. You can damage it; but you can
inflict no pain. You can’t starve it,
nor shame it. About the only thing
you can do is wear it out or destroy it.

Incidentally, I think confiscation of
the car might be a pretty good idea.

Fishing Report

(Reports current as of Thursday afternoon)
SUWANNEE AREA
Spotted seatrout are being caught in good numbers,
with sand trout abundant near the mouths of the
river. Best bet: Trout.Source: Jon’s Marina
SUWANNEE AREA
Good trout catches were made earlier in the week,
but anglers have been few In recent days.Best bet:
Trout.Source: Suwannee Shores Marina
CEDAR KEY AREA
Bill Roberts brought In a 46-pound cobla, only to be
topped by Jack Hudson, who had one of 55 pounds.
Both Ed Oehmig and Gary Warren caught Spanish
mackerel at Seahorse Reef Ist weekend. Trout fishing
Is excellent. Best bet: Trout.Soufce: Cedar Cove
WACCASASSA AREA
Trout fishermen are doing well, one man bringing
in 29, all of good size. A few small cobia have been
cau, none stretching to the required 37 inches. No
redfish have been reported.Best bet: Trout.Seurce:
Waccasassa Marina/Camp
YANKEETOWN AREA
Many fishi Shawn Stephenson and Lee Deadrich
have been finding big reds each time they've tried, to
a top of 14 pounds. Mark Waldorf had a redfish of 162
pounds. Van Akin brought in 40 grouper, the largest 17
pounds. J. McKeever had a cobla of 23 pounds, the
boat Cobla Phobia finding one of 242 pounds.
Wednesday a man got Into a school of what he thought
were barracuda, throwing back all but one, which was
later Identified as a Spanish mackerel. Many good
catches of trout hve been reported.Best bet:
Trout.Source: Yank Boat C y
CRYSTAL RIVER AREA
Trout are doing well, both on the humps and from
Gomez Rocks to the Bombing Range. A few small
Spanish mackerel are also showing up In the trout
catches.Best bet: Trout.Source: Knox Baithouse
HOMOSASSA RIVER AREA
Flyrod master Earl Waters brought in a 14-pound
cobla, and released six other smaller ones. Trout fish-
ing Is excellent, catches running 15 to 30 per boat,
most of the action being northwest of the bird rack.
The spring Influx of tarpon has not yet occurred.Best
bet: Trout.Seurce: McRae’s
ST. AUGUSTINE
Big reds, flounder, and trout are being caught
around the jetties. Manta rays are running, with co-
bia following behind. Bluefish to 10 pounds have been
reported from surf fishermen. Action Is slow in the
waterway, with only a few trout being brought in.Best
bet: Pot luck at the |etties. Source: Sea Gull Bait &
Tackle
Freshwater look
Reports current as of Thursday afternoon)
LAKE SANTA FE
The specks are back on the brush piles in deep wa-
ter, with bedding shellcrackers now along the
shorelines.Best bet: Speckled perch Source: Ship-
man’s Fish Camp
SUWANNEE RIVER
Joe Blanton and Jack Williams won the Chiefland
Athletic Boosters bass tourney last weekend, winning
$1,000 with 19 pounds of bass, Including the buster, a
ely-naiinder that won an additianal €00 Kirk ard

Mae Griffin brought In limits of bream, as did Red
and Mrs. Hilton. The Suwannee River Bass Club will
hold a tourney on May 24, all proceeds going to Spe-
clal Olympics. Swallowtail kites are nesting just
across the river from the camp. Best bet:
Bream.Source: Treasure Camp
CROSS CREEK
Bream are back on the beds, hitting grass shrimp.
Reports are that some anglers are finding big shell-
crackers In the middle of Orange Lake, in small
patches of hydrilla. Crawford Solomon guided one
man to a nine-pound bass last weekend. Specks are
few, but large, running five to seven fish in a morn-
Ing’s effort. Best bet: Bream.Source: Cross Creek Fish
Camp
CROSS CREEK
Fishing In Orange Lake with a plastic worm, Bill
Darby caught and released a 12-pound bass; the re-
lease was Inadvertent, occurring at boatside as he
weighed the fish with his eyes. Bream are hitting
grass shrimp, both in the south end of Orange Lake
and In Lochloosa.Best bet: Bream.Source: Cross
Creek Lodge
LAKE LOCHLOOSA
Bass are hitting early and late in the day. Ted Elliott
says to throw a Devil’s Horse info a hole in the
hydrilla, pop it a couple of times, and hang on. Roger
Rinker brought In nine big specks Thursday morning.
Lochloosa has been treated with the herbicide Sonar,
but It's too early to know how successful it has
been.Best bet: Bass.Source: Twin Lakes Fish Camp
LAKE LOCHLOOSA
Some anglers are finding big bream, shellcrackers,
and specks In deep water, fishing down through the
vegetation, using both grass shrimp and minnows.
Small bass are being caugiy with regularity. A large
area well out from the camp was treated with Sonar,
but results are not yet known.Best bet:
Bream.Source: C’s Fish Camp
NEWNAN’S LAKE
One boat with three anglers docked with 63 specks,
caught trolling minnows at the inside edge of the deep
water. Bream are bedding in the first rows of the
trees, but the water level is rapidly dropping as the
drouth continues. Bass fishing is slow. There are now
100 registrations on hand for the Small Fry Fishing
Tourney, scheduled for two weeks from
Saturday.Best bet: Speckled perch.Source:
McGilvray’s Fish Camp
ORANGE LAKE
Brice Morgan used a Hot Spot to land a bass of 8
pounds, 4 ounces. Smaller bass are hitting well, along
with plentiful bream, shellcrackers, and occasional
speckled perch. Best bet: Bream or bass.Source:
Mcintosh Fish Camp
ORANGE LAKE
Ronnie Martin caught a bass of 9 pounds, 12 ounces
Wednesday. Paul Harvey, of the Florida Bass Associa-
tion for the Deaf, won that organization’s bass
tournament last weekend, with three bass weighing 5
pounds, 6 ounces. A total of 63 association members
were at the camp, about 40 of them aciuaily
fishing.Best bet: Bass. Source: Orange Lake Fis
Camp

Chambers is installing a new of-
fense this spring, which he describes
as being a cross between the Straight
T and Notre Dame Box, very similar
to the single wing.

The Buccaneers will conclude spr-
ing drills by hosting a jamboree, in-
cluding Bell, Bronson, Cross City,
Trenton and Mayo. The jamboree is
slated for May 29 with Branford fac-
ing Bronson and Mayo in quarters of
action.

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SUN
MON

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Sale Price Pkg. Deli-
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chocolate-flavored

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LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986 13

‘A REPORT ON OUR

CITIZENSHIP

For 112 years, the Lake City Reporter
has been concerned with quality com-
munity journalism. But we believe a
good newspaper must do more than
print the news, analyze its meaning and
implications, and entertain its readers.

A newspaper must also be a good
citizen of the community it serves.
Listed on this page are some of the
things The Reporter and its employees
have done to fulfill that role.

United
way

Community services

Our commitment to community and
public services is exemplified by affilia-
tion of our employees with the following
organizations, institutions and pro-
grams:

Acteens
American Cancer Society-Columbia County
Chapter
Blue-Grey Army Inc.
- Business and Professional Women’s Club
Cluster Home Advisory Board
Columbia Association for Retarded Citizens
Columbia County Boys Club
Columbia County Chapter of the NAACP
Columbia County Extension Advisory Board
Columbia County Gator Club
Columbia County Girls Club
Columbia County Ministerial Alliance
Columbia County School Volunteer Program
Columbia County Youth Council
Columbia High Homecoming
Columbia High Cager Club

The Lake City Reporter sponsors a number of youth
and adult community recreation athletic teams in
baseball, football and softball.

Columbia High Dugout Club

Columbia High Quarterback Club

Community Concert Association

Dixie Youth Baseball Inc.

Downtown Action Corp.

FAMU Alumni Association-Columbia County
Chapter

Florida Conference of Editorial Writers

Florida Press Association

Florida Press Club

Florida Sheriff's Association

Florida Society of Newspaper Editors

Friends of the Library

Florida Sportswriters Association

Gateway Girl Scout Council

HRS Emergency Shelter

Kiwanis

Lake City Community College Foundation

Lake City Community Correctional Center
Citizens Advisory Board

Lake City Runners Club

Lions Club

Miss Olustee Scholarship Pageant

Newspapers in Education Program

North Florida Council of the Boy Scouts of
America

North Florida State Air Show

Olustee Festival
. Shands Hospital Kidney Program

Summers Elementary School Lay Advisory
Board

United Methodist Youth Fellowship

United Way of Columbia County

Woman's Club of Lake City

Woman of the Year

Young Matrons ;

Youth Evangelistic Outreach Work Team

For a dozen years The Reporter has paid tribute to women
of Columbia County for their civic contributions.

Woman of the Year

Aiming to recognize the civic con-
tributions of Columbia County women,
the Lake City Reporter has for the past
dozen years sponsored and hosted the
annual Woman of the Year awards. The
Woman of the Year Award recognizes
the woman who has done most to im-
prove the way of life in Columbia Coun-
ty through civic and volunteer efforts.

In 1985, the award categories were ex-
panded from one overall selection to in-
clude honors for the top working
woman, homemaker and community
volunteer, in addition to an main
Woman of the Year. This was because
women from increasingly diversified
vocations add to the betterment of the
community in equally wide ranging
ways.

Nominated in 1985 were 36 women,
ranging in age from 13 to 77 years old.
Their contributions range from
volunteer social work to helping the ter-
minally ill cope to making huge strides
professionally. A committee of women
representing a cross-section of Colum-
bia County select the winners based on
nominations from civic groups, chur-
ches, businesses and individuals.

Contributions
The Reporter makes financial and in-
kind contributions to charitable,

The Lake City Reporter promotes fitness and health with its annual Alligator Run.

cultural, community and educational
causes in the region it serves. These in-
clude Blue-Grey Army Inc., Columbia
County Youth Council, Community Con-
cert Association, Dixie Youth Baseball,
Downtown Action Corp., Columbia High
Dugout Club, Lake City Community Col-
lege Foundation, Miss Olustee Festival
Scholarship Pageant, North Florida
Council/Boys Scouts of America, North
Florida State Air Show, Union County
Athletic Boosters, United Way of Colum-
bia County, Lake City Community Col-
lege athletics, Lake City-Columbia
County Recreation Department pro-
grams and area schools.

The Reporter Cooking School provides area
homemakers with the latest in cooking and home
economy information.

Cooking School

For more than a decade, the Lake Ci-
ty Reporter has sponsored and hosted
an annual Cooking School as a service
to Columbia County area homemakers.
The Cooking School, presented by pro-
fessional home economists from the
Homemakers’ School, provides
homemakers with up-to-date cooking
techniques, recipes and home economy
measures.

In conjunction with the Cooking
School, The Reporter sponsors a prize-
rich recipe contest, allowing contestants
to share their favorite old and new
recipes with all our readers, as well as

win gifts.

Some 700 area residents have attend-
ed the Cooking School each of the last
five years.

Athletic awards

The Lake City Reporter selects an All-
Ncrth Florida football team each fall
and names an area coach of the year in
the sport. Reporter Sports Editor
Harvey Campbell is also active on the
all-state nomination committee for all
sports and has been successful in get-
ting area athletes recognized for their
accomplishments with post-season
honors.

The Reporter has compiled and
distributed, as a member of the
Associated Press, the Florida Communi-
ty College Coaches Basketball Poll for
the past six years and annually presents
the player of the year award to
Florida’s top junior college player at the
state championships game.

Fishing and golf

The Lake City Reporter sponsors an
annual fishing tournament on Lake
DeSoto in downtown Lake City for all
area youngsters. The event is co-
sponsored by the Florida Game and
Fresh Water Game Commission and a
number of area businesses. Last year’s
event, held the Saturday after Labor
Day, involved nearly 400 youngsters and
approximately 200 prizes were awarded.

Also in late summer, the newspaper
sponsors the annual Lake City Reporter
Junior Golf Championship, providing
strong competition and prizes to dozens
of top young golfers from the area.

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The Reporter's Small-Fry Fishing Tournament provides sum-
mer fun to area youngsters.

It has been said a newspaper should reflect the people it serves. We hope
we have done that in the past and will strive to continue doing so in the
future. Thanks for reading the Lake City Reporter.

Lake City Reporter

5

i HE SE HE CE WR



14 LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986

Complete text of grand jury report on police operations

REPORT OF THE GRAND JURY

The Columbia County Grand Jury has today

returned an Indictment against former Lake City
Police Chief Ray Simmons. That Indictment
charges Simmons with Grand Theft arising from
his activities as Chief of Police.
The criminal conduct charged in the Indictment
came to light as the result of an inventory of the
evidence room at the Lake City Police Depart-
ment. The inventory was requested by the City
Council of Lake City after the suspension of Sim-
mons, following Driving While Under the In-
fluence of Alcoholic Beverages (DUI) charges fil-
ed against him. :

The Grand Jury feels strongly that the mere fil-
ing of an Indictment does not adequately address
the problems within the Lake City Police Depart-
ment. Accordingly, the Grand Jury has chosen to-
issue this report to reflect the concerns of the
Grand Jury about the deplorable manner in which
the Lake Gity Police Department has been run.

PROBLEMS IN THE EVIDENCE ROOM

It is obvious B the Grand Jury hak) Rad Here
been adequate safeguards to prof inf y
of the evidence room, many of the ein
tivities alleged against Ray Simmons could not
have occurred. Because these safeguards did not
exist, large numbers of firearms have disap-
peared from the evidence room. In addition, cur-
rency amounting to several hundred dollars has
also disappeared. Other items have also been
removed from the evidence room.

According to testimony received by the Grand
Jury, the evidence room could be entered by
unlocking two different locks. Former Chief Sim-
mons and Evidence Custodian Linda Pennington
each had both of the keys required to enter the
evidence room. Thus, although the system ap-
parently was designed to require two persons to
enter the evidence room, in actual practice, the
room could be entered by either of the person who
held both keys. This gasticulay system had been
in effect since 1983, when former Major Ray Dyal
and Captain George Disbrow both decided to turn
in their keys to the evidence room to Simmons.

There were no written procedures Tegariing
the evidence room. Although an evidence log was
maintained, there were no records kept as to who
entered the evidence room and what, if anything,
was removed on each entry into the evidence
room. According to testimony from several
sources, former Chief Simmons was observed on
a number of occasions, particularly on weekends
entering and leaving the evidence room.

Although not the subject of any criminal
charges, it is apparent to the Grand Jury that both
a television set and a stereo were removed from
the evidence room and placed in the police 3
In addition, an air compressor was removed from
the evidence room and delivered to Simmons’
home. This compressor was ultimately delivered
to the shop of police officer Billie Carter. It was
returned to the evidence room after the Grand
Jury had begun this investigation. ;

In order to insure the security and integrity of
the evidence room, the Grand Jury recommends
that the following measures be implemented:

(1) Written procedures be adopted detailing the
items to be turned into the evidence room,
describing conditions under which entry may be
gained into the evidence room, and requiring
detailed records including the following;

(a) An evidence log listing in detail each item of
evidence turned in, the seizing officer, the person
from whom the item was seized, the police case
number, the court case number, and the name of
any person susbequently taking possession of the
item, and J

(b) An evidence room log listing each person
who entered the evidence room, the purpose, the
time of entry, the time of departure, and any
items removed or deposited.

(2) A requirement that all firearms found, seiz-
ed, or recovered be placed in the evidence room
as soon as possible.

(3) That access to the evidence room be strictly
limited, with two people being required to enter

room.
(4) That the evidence room be inventoried on at

least a semi-annual basis, with verification of in-
ventories as part of the annual audits, and that
items no longer needed as evidence be destroyed
or otherwise disposed of in accordance with ap-
plicable law.

(5) That any cash or currency seized, found or
recovered be placed in a locked safe within the
evidence room, and not in the Chief’s safe or any
other location outside the evidence room.

GENERAL LACK OF ACCOUNTABILITY
REGARDING GUNS

The bulk of the criminal charges contained in
the Indictment against former Chief Ray Sim-
mons allege that he sold or otherwise disposed of
firearms belonging to or in the custody of the
Lake City Police Department. However, in addi-
tion to those guns mentioned in the Indictment,
the evidence heard by the Grand Jury
demonstrates appalling irregularities within the
Lake City Police Department concerning

firearms.

Most firearms seized as evidence in criminal
cases apparently were turned in to the evidence
room. dan firearms which were found
which could not be tied to a particular individual
were often not turned in to the evidence room. In-
stead, they were placed in the individual lockers
of the police officers. Many of them remained
there for years, being turned in only after this in-
vestigation began. In some cases, firearms were
not turned in at all, but were given out to various
officers within the police department.

Firearms that were turned in to the evidence
room were apparently routinely removed, and
sold or given to various individuals, both inside
and outside the police department. At least two
handguns were given to City Manager Ralph
Bowers by former Police Chief Simmons. Another
handgun was given to Mr. Bowers’ secretary. The
handguns given Bowers were allegedly for his
own protection, to be used in connection with his
official duties. However, until this investigation
began, those firearms did not appear on any in-
ventory of the police department or any other
department of city government. Mr. Bowers was
not a police officer and has not completed the
statutory training and certification required to be
a police officer. The Grand Jury can see no good
reason why the City Manager should be
ing city-owned firearms, either in his office or city
vehicle. Even if the firearms were the personal
property of the City Manager, the Grand Jury

uestions the necessity and propriety of those
iin in his office or city vehicle.

Although the two firearms given Mr. Bowers
have been Placed on the inventory of the City

er’s Office with the past few weeks, the
Grand Jury feels these firearms should be return-
ed to the Police Department, to be disposed of in
accordance with the law.

With respect to the handgun given to Mr.
Bowers’ secretary, it appears she was endeavor-
ing to Jurehsse a firearm for her personal use
when Chief Simmons gave her a pistol. Her ac-
tions a to be blameless in this matter, but
her receiving a pistol from former Chief Simmons
demonstrates the ease by which city employees
and other obtained firearms from the Police
Department.

Another incident involving the transfer of
firearms from former Police Chief Simmons to
City Manager Ralph Bowers is of particular con-
cern to the Grand Jury. According to testimony
received by the Grand Jury, the Police Depart-
ment needed to replace the engine and transmis-
sion in a patrol car. Bowers and Simmons discuss-
ed the situation. Bowers agreed to trade a used
engine and transmission owned by him personally
to the Police Department. In return, Simmons
agreed to give Bowers two (2) “riot” type
shotguns owned by the Police Department. Since
this investigation began, Bowers has apparently
listed the two shotguns on the inventory of the City
Manager's Office, allegedly because he recogniz-
ed he could not legally sell or trade his personal
property to the city. This is closely akin to “‘shut-
ting the barn door after the horses are already
out.” The Grand Jury feels the actions of the City
Manager constitute a clear violation of the ‘‘Stan-
dards of Conduct for public officers and

employees of agencies” as defined by Florida
Statute 112.313. The Grand Jury recommends that
these shotguns be returned to the police depart-
ment. Another clear violation of Florida Statute
112.313 occurred when the city manager purchas-
ed a surplus city car at an auction where he serv-
ed as auctioneer. The Grand Jury recommends
that the City Council take immediate and ap-
propriate action on these two apparent violations
of ethical standards established by the
legislature.

OVERALL LACK OF SUPERVISION OF
POLICE ACTIVITIES

The Grand Jury is concerned about other
widespread irregularities within the Police
Department. In addition to those irregularities
charged in the Indictment, and other ir-
regularities already noted in this Report, there
were many other activities that were either ques-
tionable or clearly improper. The Grand Jury has
divided those activities into four separate areas of
concern. :

(a) Questionable Financial Practices

The handling of money by the Lake City Police
Department, and particularly by former Chief
Ray Simmons, is a matter of concern to this
Grand Jury. In one instance brought to the Grand
Jury’s attention, a person lost a sum of moeny.
That money was found by another person and
turned in to the Lake City Police Department.
Eventually, the money was returned to the person
who found it, but the bills were of different
denominations than those which were lost.

In another instance, an individual furnished in-
formation to the police de) ent and was pro-
mised reward money for his efforts. Former Chief
Simmons received the reward money from the Ci-
ty Clerk. However, it was only after several
weeks had passed, and several requests made,
that the individual received the reward money.

In yet another instance, an individual damaged
a city patrol car. The individual was criminally
charged, and was ordered to make restitution to
the police de] ent of $75.00. The restitution
was ultimately paid to former Chief Simmons.
However, there is no record of that money having
been turned in to the City Clerk by Simmons.
Neither is there any evidence that the money was
spent for any public purpose.

Other improprieties involved the sale of acci-
dent reports and homicide reports by the police
department. On automobile accidents in-
vestigated by the police department, accident
reports are completed. In those accidents involv-
ing fatalities, a more detailed report, called a
homicide report, is completed. Insurance com-
panies, adjusters, attorneys and others often need
copies of such reports. The police department
charged $2.00 for copies of accident reports and
$25.00 for copies of homicide reports.

Apparently, all sums collected from the sale of
these reports were turned over to former Chief
Simmons. There is absolutely no record of this
money ever being turned over to the City Clerk.
Neither are there any records to indicated this
money was spent for any public purpose.

In yet another questionable transaction, city
police seized $396.95 in connection with a drug
case. The money was ultimately forfeited to the
police department. However, the money was
never placed in a law enforcement trust fund as
required by Florida Statute 932.704. That money
has also disappeared, again with no evidence that
it was spent for any public purpose.

It appears to the Grand Jury that adequate
financial safeguards could and should have been
implemented to prevent some of the financial ir-
regularities discussed in this report. Those

eguards include establishment of a petty cash
fund, information and evidence (I & E) fund, and
a law enforcement trust account.

A petty cash fund is designed to allow an agency
to receive and disburse small sums of money
without the necessity of preparing a voucher or
purchase order. For instance, every month, the
police department could receive a set sum of
money to put in petty cash. This petty cash fund
could then be used to pay postage charges, inex-
pensive office supplies, and similar expenditures.
In addition. collections, such as those from
the sale of accident reports and homicide reports

should be deposited into the petty cash fund.

An Information and Evidence (I& E) fund is a
fund maintainted by a law enforcement agency to
pay expenses connected with orma-
tion and evidence. Principally, this involves
payments of sums of money to informants and
payments for controlled buys of or other
contraband. Although the payment of money to
confidential informants (C.I.’s) necessarily in-
volves some secrecy which would be compromis-
ed by excessive paperwork, a properly ad-
ministered I & E fund will insure that the funds
are properly spent, and significantly reduce the
opportunities for misappropriation.

Rather than utilize an I & E fund, the Lake City
Police Department used a ‘‘voucher’’ system for I
& E expenditures. If an individual officer knew in
advance he needed I & E funds, he would turnin a
voucher to the City Clerk’s Office. When the of-
ficer received his re; salary check, the check
would include the additional amount requested
for I & E purposes. When an officer did not have
ano riaiyio turnina Youcher Beforsiand, he
woudl spen own money for purposes,
and then voucher the City.

It apparently was the practice for the former
Chief Simmons to request an officer to turn in a
voucher for a greater sum than was needed. The
officer would then cash the check and give Sim-
mons the difference. Simmons would alleged:
keep the difference and dispense it as needed,
either to that officer or other officers within the
police department. Needless to say, a system of
this nature invites abuse and misuse. There are
absolutely no safeguards in such a system, and no
way to accurately account for money expended.

A law enforcement trust fund is a fund man-
dated Oy Firide Siete ai to fersive

Tom e of forfeil roperty. Su
a fund must be established and na by
the City Council. According to law, the funds can
be spent only upon written request from the Chief
of Police. They can be spent only for the purposes
enumerated in the statute.

The Grand Jury urges the City Council to take
measures to insure the establishment and proper
administration of a petty cash fund, information
and evidence (I & E) fund, and a law enforcement
trust fund.

Gifts of Liquor to Police Officers

The Grand Jury started out investigating what
was believed to be the theft of liquor intended for
members of the Lake City Police Department.
Although it is apparent that no such theft occur-
red, the Grand Jury is nevertheless concerned
about the practice of police officers receiving

ifts of liquor. It is apparently the custom for at

east one liquor store/lounge to furnish a fifth of li-
For 10 ach member of the police force as a

i present. At least one other such
establishment furnishes a bottle of liquor to
selected members of the department as a
Christmas present.

While this practice is not criminal, we feel it
does create at least an appearance of improprie-
ty. Accordingly, we condemn the practice pep ask
for the adoption of departmental rules and regula-
tions which would prohibit practices of this
nature.

(c) Improprieties at Police Gymnasium

The Lake City Police Department maintains a
gymnasium on city prope for the use of depart:
ment employees. Unfortunately, the use of the
police gym has often been for purposes which
could only serve to undermine public confidence
in the police department. Despite the fact that the
police gym is on city property only a short
distance from a sign which prohibits the con-
sumption of alcoholic beverages on city property,
it was routine for city police officers to consume
alcoholic beverages at the police gym. This fact
was known to the city manager who himself par-
ticipated on at least one occassion in the consump-
tion of alcohol at the gym.

In addition to the consumption of alcoholic
beverages on city property in violation of city or-
dinance, other improper activities routinely took
Place at the police gym. It is clear to the Grand

ury that a number of police officers engaged in
illicit sexual relations with others at the police
gn In some cases, this occurred while the of-

icers were on duty.

The Grand Jury recognizes that in presenting
this information in this fashion, the danger exists
of implicating innocent officers who never engag-
ed in this type of conduct. One alternative would
be to name the officers involved. However, the
Grand Jury feels that this would only bring em-
barrassment upon the officers named, and really
would serve no useful purpose. The Grand Jury
does point out that these activities were engaged
in by a minority of the officers within the depart-
men

We recognize that police officers, like private
citizens, are entitled to lead their own private
lives. However, when police officers are using
public facilities and are being paid public monies,
to engage in sexual activities, their “private” ac-
tions become subject to public scrutiny.

This report has already noted that items were
taken from the evidence room, notably a televi-
sion set and a stereo, and improperly placed in the
gym for use of the department.

It is clear that activities were ocurring at the
joiice Fu which were not only improper, but il-

egal. Further, these activities appeared to be a
matter of general knowledge within the depart-
ment. The Grand Jury urges that appropriate
rules and regulations be adopted concerning the
use of the police . We would further urge that
appropriate disciplinary action be taken against
any officer violating these rules and regulations.

(d) Improper Destruction of Forfeited Property

One of the most disturbing incidents brought to
the Grand Jury's attention was the improper
destruction of alcoholic beverages seized by the
Lake City Police Department. On April 7, 1985, of-
ficers of the Lake City Police Department seized
in excess of 20 cases of beer and wine coolers from
“El Chico’s’’, an unlicensed establishment. Also
seized were 46 bottles of gin, rum, vodka and

whiskey.

On May 5, 1985, Officer Billie Carter obtained an
order of forfeiture from County Judge Vernon
Douglas forfeiting the alcoholic beverages to the
police de t, and ordering their disposition
as “provided by law.”

Unfortunately, the alcoholic beverages were
not di of in accordance with law. Instead,
the bulk of the beverages were taken to the police
gym. There they were either consumed or taken
home by officers of the Lake City-Police Depart-
ment. This disposition of the alcoholic beverages
was not in accordance with law. The remainder of
the forfeitured beverages were delivered by Of-
ficer Billie Carter to County Judge Vernon
Douglas. Judge Douglas turned the beverages
over to Columbia Association for Retarded
Citizens (C.A.R.C.). He received a receipt dated
June 5, 1985, showing a donation of six (6) one half
pints of vodka, eight (8) one half pints of rum, and
twelve (12) one half pints of gin fur use at the
pilots reception at the North Florida Air Show.

Florida Statute 562.44 provides that forfeited
alcoholic beverages may ‘‘with the approval and
consent of the Department of Business Regulation
(emphasis supplied) be donated to any ...
charitable institution that may have a legitimate
use therefore...” Although the consent of the
Department of Business Regulation was not
sought, the Grand Jury is satisfied that the spirit,
if not the letter of the law, was observed in
donating the liquor to C.A.R.C. This is particular-
ly true in that the Department of Business
Regulation, in practice, gives blanket approval,
even without request, to donations to charitable
institutions. Although the Grand Jury recognizes
the legality of disposing of alcoholic beverages by
donating them to charitable institutions, the
Grand Jury strongly recommends that all
forfeited alcoholic beverages be destroyed.

Much more disturbing to the Grand Jury is the
report of the destruction of those alcoholic
beverages submitted by police officer Billie
Carter. Officer Billie Carter filled out a sup-
plemental police report, dated May 5, 1985, show-
ing that all of the seized alcohol was destroyed at
the county land-fill on May 5, 1985. He listed his
stepson and son-in-law as witnesses to the
destruction, and made notations on photographs
of the seized alcohol, indicating that it was
destroyed at the land-fill on that date.

The proper procedure would be to have the
destruction witnessed by disinterested witnesses,

mends that appropriate disciplinary getion be
i

CONCLUSION

The episodes detailed in this Report reflect just
a ars ct
Police De) ent. es
this report are indicative of an overall lack of
leadership and supervision of the police depart-
ment. Al the Chief of Police must be looked
to for lead p and direction, others must share

in that responsibility. The City Manager, In his

ultimate

many of the irregularities noted in this report. In
addition, the City Clerk has responsibility for in-
suring that city funds are propery received,
documented and expended. Grand Jury is
concerned that someone, somewhere in city
government, did not proper! address the ac-
tivities detailed in this report. concern is par-
ticularly justified in that many of these activities
seemed a matter of general knowledge within the
police report.

Althought the tone of this report is of necessity
negative, there is much good within the folice
department. Lake City is privileged, by and large,
to pan dedicated, conscientious law enforcement
officers within the police department. The ingre-
dients are there for a top-notch police depart-
ment. What has been missing is leadership at the
top.

A search is underway for a new chief of police.
Several present officers of the department may
themselves be well qualified for this position. The
Grand Jury feels that the findings in this report
make it imperative that the right person be
selected for the job. This is essential to restore

morale within department and reestablish
public confidence in the t. For this
reason, we ly urge the creation of a blue-

ribbon advisory panel to screen applications, in-
terview candidates, and make recommendations
concerning the new chief of police. This sugges-
tion has apparently already been rejected by the
City Manager. However, the concerns reflected in
this report make it imperative that the selection
Process not be Sivan controlled by ne a!
er. Accordi , We urge creation
this panel by the City IB heed this Grand
Jury has been made aware of other information
not detailed in this report, we urge that considera-
tion be given to appointing the foreman, or some
other member of this Grand Jury to such a panel.

The Grand Jury further recommends that the
new Chief of Police immediately adopt ap-
propriate rules and regulations including stan-
dards of conduct required of police officers, and
that these rules and regulations be promulgated
through Sppropriate training for all members of
the police department.

The Grand Jury requests that this report be
sealed for fifteen (15) days as required by Florida
Statute 905.28. Further we request that the
Honorable Mary Childs, Clerk of the Circuit
Court, furnish copies of this report to the following
individuals.

Ray Simmons, former Police Chief

Vernon Douglas, County Judge

Billie Carter, Lake City Police Department

Ralph Bowers, City Manager

Ronnie Minchin, City Cler

Gerald Witt, Mayor

Richard Cole, Councilman

Glenel Bowden, Councilman

Mike Collins, Councilman

Mike Null, Councilman

Leroy Wilson, Acting Chief of Police

Dated at Lake City, Florida, this 10th day of
April, 1986.

City manager responds to criticisms in grand jury report on police

The following is a statement issued
this morning by City Manager Ralph
Bowers, who was a prominent figure
in a report by a Columbia County
grand jury investigating city police
operations.

By RALPH BOWERS
Lake City Manager

The City Council and myself were
shocked by the report of the
deplorable situation in the Lake City
Police Department contained in the
report which we received on or about
April 17.

Immediately upon receipt of this
report, I, in close contact with
members of the council, have pro-
ceeded to take such steps as we
thought appropriate under the cir-
cumstances to correct the deficien-
cies in the Lake City Police Depart-
ment.

I felt and I believe the City Council
agrees that the best way to clear up
these problems is to place a person in

Bid to move district's voting lines

By SHARON SAUNDERS
Reporter staff writer

The Columbia County Commission
voted down a request Wednesday by
Commissioner Ronald Williams call-
ing for adding about 120 black voters
to his district.

The commission met with the Col-
umbia County School Board to
discuss whether a redistricting pro-
posal, the result of an out-of-court
settlement in an at-large voting suit
by the NAACP, could be changed to
add the voters to Williams’ district.

Williams said he talked to about 20
black families living in a 1%-mile
stretch west of the city limits,
bordered on the north by Georgia
Southern Railroad track, and the
group was upset because they were
not in the predominantly black
district and will not have black
representation. Williams is the only
black on the county commission.

Separate, but similar suits were fil-
ed against the commission and
school board by the Columbia County
Branch of the NAACP to force the
boards to convert to a single-member
district voting plan. The civil rights
group claimed countywide election of
commission and school board
representatives diluted black voting
strength.

A redistricting map, which has
been approved by U.S. District Judge
Howell Melton, had been approved
by both boards as part of the suit set-
tlement with the NAACP. Included in
the redistricting map is a district

charge who has the authority to
make the decisions necessary to br-
ing the department into conformity
with proper operation procedures
and to a high level of efficiency and
service to our public.

For the Council or myself to
become involved in the affairs as
they now stand would tend to only im-
pede the effective pursuit of the pro-
per remedies by the new police chief.
Therefore, we have devoted all of our
time, energy and effort since receipt
of the report to obtaining a top-
quality person to serve as police
chief. This has been a joint effort bet-
ween myself and the council.

This selection process, of course, is
in the sunshine and we welcome input
from the grand jury members and
the general public.

We are now in the process of check-
ing out the personal references in the
field which has been narrowed to
seven persons and hope to have a top-
notch, qualified police chief on the

highly populated with blacks in
which Williams and school board
member Dick Chapple currently
represent.

Williams asked the board to use
Duval Street as the northern border
to include the 120 black voters in his
district and pointed out he believed
the area was once included in his
district on the redistricting map.

Saying that it made no difference
to them whether the 120 black voters
were in District 1 or District 4, com-
missioners voted down the proposed
change 4-1, with Williams casting the
dissenting vote.

Prior to the commission voting on
the matter, school board attorney
Terry McDavid told commissioners
articles appearing in The Reporter
implied the school board was respon-
sible for altering the maps to exclude
the area in question from the map.

“That is totally inaccurate....,”
said McDavid, adding a legal
description from NAACP lawyer
David Lipman was used in drawing
the boundary line for the map.

McDavid said in reviewing the
legal description from Lipman, he
made some changes where the
description was in error.

“I started revising them to make
them technically correct,” said
McDavid. “I didn’t change any boun-
daries, but made the descriptions
easier to follow.”

McDavid also pointed out to the
public officials he is ‘not sure”
Melton would approve of a change at

job within the next few weeks.

I would now like to make a state-
ment with respect to the grand jury
report as it pertains to me individual-
ly.

I believe the grand jury in good
faith reported based on the informa-
tion they had before them; but as to
certain references to me, either they
did not have all of the facts or some of
their information was incorrect.
Rather than challenge the report as it
pertains to me in a court of law and
hold up the public’s right to the
report, I have withdrawn any formal
challenge to the report and agreed to.
its immediate release.

Two handguns belonging to the city
were placed in my care and respon-
sibility by the Chief of Police some
five years ago. To my knowledge this
was not a violation of any city policy.
When it was pointed out to me by the
State Attorney’s Office during this
recent investigation that there was

this point because the statistics are
accurate. The fee for including the
black voters in Williams district
could cost an estimated $3,000,
McDavid pointed out.

Glynn Presley, a member of the
local NAACP, said nowhere in the
NAACP map did it say the railroad
track would be the boundary line.

‘‘Somewhere along the line
somebody did some finagling,” said
Presley. “To a certain degree we're
upset.”

Columbia County Commission
Ludie Shipp asked why an NAACP
representative had not appeared
before either of the boards to discuss
the matter.

“We've been before the school
board and county commission and it

no record existing showing these
guns, I immediately placed them in
the city inventory system. As City
Manager, my life has been threaten-
ed on at least two occasions, and I felt
this form of protection was ap-
propriate.

Some 5% or six years ago, I provid-
ed a replacement engine and
transmission to the police depart-
ment from my deceased father’s car
for a police car that was out of ser-
vice. In those days we were very
short on ready cash, and while I
made this matter known to the coun-
cil, I did not secure the council’s for-
mal approval in a public meeting.

As I told the grand jury, I intended
to discuss this with the council in a
public meeting. I depend on your
sense of fairness in this matter since
the action I took, however misguided,
was intended as a favor to the city
and not something improper.

rejected

is like running into a brick wall,”
Presley said.

County Commissioner Jerry
“Buck” Ward said he was very
unhappy with where the boundary
lines were drawn in his district.

“T wasn’t up here complaining and
grumbling,” said Ward.

School board member Dick Chap-
ple, of District 1, said it did not mat-
ter to him where the line is drawn.

“I don’t care...whether it is up or
down the river,” he said. “A few
whites would be upset if the line was
moved.”

According to Supervisor of Elec-
tion Carolyn Kirby, about 162 votes
are located in the area that Williams
wanted to include in his district and
anywhere from 100 to 120 of those
voters in the area are black.

RHA re A, CE bE.

Wind erosion help

Wind erosion to croplands in Col-
umbia County is at its peak, said
Henry Bussey, chairman of the Santa
Fe Soil Conservation District.

On a windy day, just look at any
large field that has had its vegetative
cover plowed under in preparation of
planting, and wind erosion can be
found, Bussey said. Since the
county’s sandy soils are highly
susceptible to wind erosion, and the
strong winds of early spring intensify
the problem, landowners need to
know how to avoid it.

A windbreak of trees, windcropp-
ing — or planting rye windbreaks —

and minimum tillage are ideal ways
to prevent wind erosion, Bussey said.
For more information, contact the
soil conservation district at at
755-5100.

Abuse case probed

The Florida Department of Health
and Rehabilitative services is in-
vestigating a case of possible child
abuse.

According to a Columbia County
Sheriff’s Department report, the
father of a 13-year-old allegedly beat
his son with a rubber hose.

No charges, however, have been
filed against the father.

As the council probably knows, the
shotguns that I accepted in trade
have been in my office at City Hall
virtually all of the intervening time.

References to the secretary receiv-
ing a gun from the chief deserve com-
ment. I had no knowledge of the
chief’s dealings with this person who
was not even my secretary at the
time of the transaction which was
probably two or three years ago.
Prior to this inquiry, I had no
knowledge of this transaction.

I do not agree with the grand jury’s
interpretation that my purchase of a
car at a public auction — open to any
participant — constitutes a violation
of ethical conduct. There were 30 or
more people present at the time and
all bidding was in the open. The
resolution authorizing the sale
directs that the purchasing agent,
who was not me, dispose of the pro-
perty. The fact that I volunteered my
time as auctioneer does not in my
judgment constitute any ethical
violation.

Moose officers

With reference to the improprieties
at the police gymnasium, I
acknowledge that on one occasion I
attended a barbecue bachelor party
at the gym and consumed alcohol at
that one occasion. Upon reflection, I
told the Chief that I felt that these ac-
tivities (including mine) were im-
oroper, and that I didn’t want them to
be repeated. The Chief assured me
that it was no problem, and that he
would see that my wishes were car-
ried out. :

I had no knowledge that consump-
tion of alcohol on these premises was
apparently a routine practice, nor
did I have knowledge of the use of the
premises for purposes other than as a
police gym. I specifically deny
knowledge of any on-duty or off-duty
marital infidelity at the gym.

Finally, I want to personally
assure the council and the public that
there has been no intentional wrong-
doing or impropriety on my part. If
anyone perceives otherwise, to them
I apologize.

Lake City Moose Lodge 624 has a new slate of officers. Charlie Harrelson,
left, junior past governor of the Lake City Moose Lodge, passes the gavel to
Jerry Losey, the current governor of the lodge. Newly elected officers in-
clude: Charlie Kattau, junior governor; George Williams, prelate; David
Somhorst, secretary; Ted Bowman, treasurer; John Regan, sergeant of
arms; and Gene Leader, assistant sergeant of arms. (Photo by Sharon

Saunders)



LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986 1- B

Religion

LAST WASHINGTON APPEARANCE: The Rev. Billy Graham gestures

~ while speaking to an audience at R.F.K. Stadium in Washington Sunday.
Graham ended his eight-day crusade in the nation’s capital this week. (AP
Laserphoto)

Catholic initiation
program in August

The Catholic Diocese of St.
Augustine is planning an institute on
Christian Initiation of Adults for
parish teams Aug. 17-22 at the
University of North Florida. For
more information call Sister Lucille
Clynes at (904) 262-3200.

Spokesmen Quartette
in concert Sunday

The Spokesmen Quartette of
Jacksonville will present a concert
Sunday at 7 p.m. in the sanctuary of
Southside Baptist Church, 600 Baya
Ave.

Beth Haven Baptist
gospel sing May 17

A gospel sing featuring the Pate
Family and. Gedgl Children is
scheduled for Beth Haven Baptist
Church at 7 p.m. May 17.

Beth Haven Baptist Church is
located on Highway 240 in Suwannee
County.

Film series focuses
on positive parenting

Zig Ziglar’s four-part film series,
“Raising Positive Kids in a Negative
World is being presented at First
Baptist’s Family Festival during
May.

Parents are encouraged to attend
these films each Sunday at 6:15 p.m.
in the lower auditorium of First Bap-
tist Church, 206 E. Orange St. in Lake
City.

Jehovah Witnesses
meet this weekend

Delegates from 16 North Florida
cities are expected to attend the
Jehovah’s Witnesses two-day
assembly Saturday and Sunday in
Jacksonville.

The theme of this year’s circuit
assembly is “Love for the Worldwide
Brotherhood.” The sessions begin at
9:55 a.m. each day.

A total of 3,000 people are expected
to attend including delegates from
Lake City, Live Oak and High Spr-
ings.

206 EAST ORANGE STREET
IN DOWNTOWN LAKE CITY
ROBERT K. DAVIS, JR.-PASTOR

752-5422

PE EE EEE Err

First Baptist Church

WORSHIP SERVICES
11AM & 7:30PM
Sunday School..... 9:45AM
RIN Church Training... .. 6:30PM
Evening Worship
Broadcast Over WDSR
Radio at 7:30 PM

cSsassssTsSsSaAasSTsTLaSNS

11 AM & 7:30 PM: Dr. Clarence E. Hackett - Guest Speaker

aR Ee RE EE EE tiie diedidiinieg

PE

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7
/

Tomb”

FAITH CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP

of
HIGH SPRINGS

Come experience the excitement

and the power of the

Sunday - 10:00 a.m. - Morning Worship Service
Sermon Topic: “The Rise and Fall of Satan - From
“The Garden of Eden to The Empty

(Part one of a series on the Devil, Demons, and Demon Activity)
Sunday - 6:30 p.m. -- Holy Ghost Night
Sermon Topic: “The Gifts of the Holy Spirit”

Wednesday - 7:30 p.m. -- Mid-Week Bible Study
Special Seminar with Rev. Bob Yandian
“The Making of a Marriage”

(Part one of a six part series on video tape)

A Full-Gospel, Charismatic, Word of Faith Church

15 S.W. Third Ave.
High Springs, Fl.
454-1563

of God's Word

Holy Spirit.

Lanfords singing
near Fort White

The Lanfords of High Springs will
be featured during a gospel sing
Saturday at 7:30 p.m. at the Gospel
Hall, four miles south of Fort White
on Highway 47.

Florida bishop elected
Methodist president

Bishop Earl G. Hunt, Jr., resident
episcopal leader of the Florida area,
was elected president-designate of
the Council of Bishops of the United
Methodist Church during its April
meeting.

Hunt will assume the presidency in
April 1987.

The council, composed of all active
and retired bishops of the United
Methodist Church, oversees the
spiritual and temporal affairs of the
church.

Blind offered
Bible cassettes

Bible Alliance Inc. and Bible
Alliance Mission, non-profit, non-
denominational organizations, are
offering free Bible cassette tapes for
anyone with low vision, the visually
impaired or blind and anyone with
physical disabilities which affect
their ability to read.

The tapes of the New and Old
Testaments, Bible messages and Bi-
ble studies are available free of any
charges or postage.

Orders from individuals should in-
clude written certificaton of blind-
ness or reading impairment from a

source recognized by The Library of
Congress, National Library Service
for the Blind and Physically Han-
dicapped, a rehabilitation teacher,
librarian or physician.

Groups recognized by The Library
of Congress may also order tapes.

Further information is available
by writing to: Bible Alliance, Inc./Bi-
ble Alliance Mission, Inc., P.O. Box
1549, Bradenton, Fla., 33506. Or by
telephoning (813) 748-3031.

Church sets premiere
of family musical

The premiere of a unique musical,
“Bind us Together,” will be held Sun-
day, May 18 at 7 p.m. at the North
Central Baptist Church of
Gainesville.

The program features the Sanc-
tuary Choir and Orchestra of North
Florida Baptist.

“Bind us Together’’ focuses on the
family and the problems facing the
family in today’s society.

Rev. Greg Hochstetler, associated
pastor in charge of music and media
for the church and director of the
choir and orchestra calls the
musical, “One of the most important
musicals we have produced in my six
years of ministry with North Central.
It makes some timely statements
about the family that our entire na-
tion needs to hear and do something
about.”

There will be only one performance
and doors open at 6 p.m. The church
is located at 404 NW 14th Ave. in
Gainesville. A nursery will be provid-
ed for small children.

GREE # 3

HUG FROM THE POPE: Pope John Paul II hugs a small boy during his

visit to the church of St. Philip of Cantalice in a suburb of Rome last Sunday.
The Pope mentioned the people of Kiev and the Chernobyl nuclear accident

during his speech. (AP Laserphoto)

Directory

Adventist

Baptist

Christian

Interdenominational

FIRST ADVENT

CHRISTIAN CHURCH

Sun. School 9:45 a.m.
Children’s Church 11 a.m.
Worship 11 a.m. & 7 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study 7 p.m.
Rt. 47 & McFarlane Ave.
Church & Pastor's Office

phone 752-3900

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
Brown at Avalon
1 block No. Baya Ave.
Saturday Service
Sabbath School 9:30 a.m.
Worship Serv. 11:00 a.m.

Assembly of God

EVERYBODY'S TABERNACLE
US 41 & I-75 - 752-2486
2 Sun. Morn. Serv. 8:30 & 11:00
SS 10:00, Sun. Eve. 6:30, Wed. 7:30
l Rev. Arnold Thacker, Pastor

FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD

2597 E. Duval 752-2195

Sunday School 10 AM
Morning Worship 11 AM

Coming Together
Rally 6:30 PM

Wed. Family Night 7 PM
| | Rev. Earl K. P:ttibone, Sr.

GLAD TIDINGS
ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Sun. School 9:46 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Praise Service 6:30 p.m.
| Wed. Family Night 7:00 p.m.
8/10 mi. N. on 7th St.
off US 90
752-7177 - Pastor James M. Meloy

WESTSIDE ASSEMBLY
"End your search for a
Friendly Church”
Women’s Clb.-305 Hernando’
Sun. 10& 11 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Wed. Family Night 7 p.m.
Pastor Van Vleck 755-3552

Baptist

BEREA BAPTIST
Highway 47 South
| Sun. School 9:45am
Morn, Worship 11am
Church Training 6pm
Eve. Worship 7pm
Wed. Prayer Serv. 7:00pm
Service Signed
for deaf
Dr. Fritz Fountain,
Pastor

BIBLE BAPTIST CHURCH

Center, 400 S. Hernando St.
Sunday School 10: A.M.
"A.M. Wor. 10:45

For info, call John Lane 755-2808

EASTSIDE BAPTIST
CHURCH
10 James Street
Sun. School 9:45

Edwin E. Anderson, Pastor

Lance J. Fricke, Assoc. Pastor

Morn. Worship 11:00
Eve. Church Training 6:30
Eve. Worship 7:30
Wed. Prayer Mtg. 7:30 pm
Nursery Provided
Rev. Glen Lawhon, pastor
752-2860

Now meeting in the Lake City Garden

EVERYBODY'S CHAPEL
Hwy 100 East
Sun. Sch. 10:00 a.m.
Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Eve. 7:00 p.m.
Rev. Ben Coleman, pastor

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
206 E. Orange Street
Downtown Lake City
Bible Study 9:45 a.m.

Worship 11:00 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday Supper 5:45 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Service 6:30 p.m.
Robert K. Davis, Pastor
FELLOWSHIP
BAPTIST CHURCH
County Line Road
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morn. Worship 11:00 a.m.
Eve. Worship 7:30 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7:30 pm
Fred Perry-Pastor

LANTERN PARK
BAPTIST CHURCH
(Indepenent Baptist)
251 Llewellyn Ave.
752-8506 or 752-5140
Rev. L.E. Peterson, Pastor
Sunday School 10 am
Sun. Morn. Service 11 am
Sunday School 6 pm
Sunday Eve. Service 7 pm
Wed. Eve. Service 7:30 pm
Sun. 7 pm Broadcast
Lantern Park Baptist Time WDSR

PARKVIEW BAPTIST
CHURCH
340 North Seventh St.
Sun. School 9:45 a.m.
Morn. Worship 11 a.m.
Youth Disciple Life 5:30 p.m.
Church Training 6:30 p.m.
Eve. Worship 7:30 p.m.
Wed. Fellowship Supper
5:30 p.m.

Mid. Week Service 7:00 p.m.
W. Doyle Bell, Pastor
Assc. Pastor, Educ. & Youth
Jim Battles

PINEGROVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
Hwy 441 North
Sun. School 9:45 a.m.
Morn. Worship 11 a.m.
Children’s Church 11 a.m.
Eve. Worship 7 p.m.
Church Training 6 p.m.
Wed Prayer Meeting
7:30 p.m.
Nursery Provided
Franklin Russell, Pastor

CHURCH
The Sunday Place To Be
600 E. Baya Ave.

Morn. Worhship 11 a.m.
Bible Study 9:45 a.m.
Children’s Church 11 a.m.
Eve. Worship 7 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7:00 p.m.
Nursery Provided

Catholic

EPIPHANY CATHOLIC
CHURCH
3600 S. Marion St.
Sat. Eve. Mass 7 p.m.
Sun. Morn. Mass 7 a.m.
9a.m. &11 am.
sacrament of Penance
Sat. 6:15 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH
Duval at Fourth
Bible School 9:45am
Morn. Worship 11:00am
Evening Worship 7 p.m.
Phone, 752-2805

VOICE OF
DELIVERANCE
Washington Street behind
the bus shed
Sunday 2:30 p.m.
Tuesday 7:30 p.m.
Eve. Loretta Harry

Christian Science

Lutheran

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
SOCIETY
227 E. Baya Ave.
$5 9:30 a.m.
752-5385 for ride
to Sunday School
Sun. Serv. 11 a.m.
Testimonies of Healing
Wednesday 7:30 p.m.

Church of Christ

FIRST & MADISON STS.

‘Advocating a return to undenomina-

tional New Testament Christianity’’
Sun. Bible Study 9 A.M.
Worship, 10 A.M. & 6 P.M.
‘Wed. Bible Study, 7:30 P.M.

Church of God

EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
Hwy 242 at Hwy 47
Morn. Worship 9:45
Sun. Eve. Worship 6:30
Wed. Eve. Worship 7:30
Phone 752-8547
LAKE CITY
CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St.

S.S. 9:45 a.m., Worship 11 a.m.
Sun. Evening 6:30 p.m.
Prayer Meeting Mon. 7 p.m.
Family Night Wed. 7:30 p.m.
Phone 752-5965

The Rev. Peter W. Fauerbach, Pastor]

OUR REDEEMER
LUTHERAN CHURCH
Located 2 miles South of
VA Hospital on US 441
Worship services 8:30 a.m. & 11:00
Sunday School 9:45
L.R. Fiene, pastor
904-755-4299
ST. LUKE'S, LCA
925 E. Duval
752-3807
Worship 11:00

Methodist

Episcopal

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL
613 S. Marion St.
The Rev. W.M. Hall
Holy Communion
Wednesdays 9:30 A.M.
Sundays 8 and 10 A.M.

Interdenominational

" CHRISTIAN HERITAGE
1 Mile South Hwy 47
Sun. School 10 a.m.

Morn. Worship 11 a.m.
Sun Eve. 6:30 p.m.
Nursery Provided.
Wayne Hancock, Jr.

Pastor

FAITH CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP OF
HIGH SPRINGS
Established 1980
15 SW Third Avenue
High Springs
Sun. Serv. 10 a.m. & 6:30 p.m.
Wed. Serv. 7:30 p.m.
Nursery Available
Pator Edwin Anderson 454-1563

JOY EXPLOSION CHURCH
Joe Duckett, pastor
312 mi. SR 252 (Pinemt.)
Sunday 10:30 Worship
In-home cell groups 6:30
Wed. Eve. Serv. 7:30 pm
752-SAVE.

BETHEL UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
4 mi. S. on Hwy 41
Worship Service 9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:30 a.m.
Pastor: Rev. Don Dalton

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
1801 S. Marion St.
9:45 a.m. S.S.
Worship 11 a.m. & 7 p.m.
Nursery Provided
Pastor, John H. Green

WESLEY MEMORIAL
UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
South McFarlane Ave.
Adjac. to Summers School
A.F. Donovan, Minister
Services, 8:30, 11 a.m., 7 p.m.
WHITE SPRINGS
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Rev. Eugene Thomas
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Worship Service 11 a.m.

Presbyterian

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
1233 W. Baya Ave.
Rev. E.F. Montgomery, Jr.
Rev. Blaine Walker
Sun. School 9:45 a.m.
Morn. Worship 11 a.m.

Take time
to visit the

church of
your choice
this
weekend

OHI



2-B LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986 .

Teen-aged virgin wonders just how far is too far, before?

DEAR ABBY: I am a 19-year-old
college student, and even though
I’ve dated quite a bit, I'm rather
naive about sex. I am still a virgin
and hope to remain one until I
marry. Don’t get me wrong, I'm no
“Goody Two Shoes,” but I don't
want to risk an unwanted preg-
nancy.

I'm dating a guy right now who
has been around. He knows how 1
feel about sex before marriage, so
he’s never pressured me to go all the
way, but I’ve come closer with him
than I have with any other guy. I'm
ashamed to tell you how far we've
gone, but I'm still a virgin (I think).

Martina fined

WASHINGTON (AP)
Authorities have opted to fine tennis
star Martina Navratilova $1,000
rather than prosecute her for carry-
ing a concealed gun and ammunition
aboard a plane, officials say.

After she was stopped at San Fran-
cisco International Airport on March
2, Navratilova told authorities the
.38-caliber Smith & Wesson and 10
rounds of ammunition were packed
in a carry-on case by mistake,
Russell Park of the Federal Aviation
Administration’s Los Angeles office
said Tuesday."

The FAA's civil penalty was levied
after authorities decided against pro-
secuting her, Park said.

Navratilova could not be reached
for comment because she isin Japan,
the Women’s Tennis Association of-
fice in Miami said.

Dears

By Abigail Van Buren

A long time ago you explained
how a virgin could get pregnant.
I'm sorry I didn’t save it, but I never
dreamed I'd need it.

Well, last night I was with this
guy and things really got out of
hand: Everything happened so fast.
Please run that piece again about
how a virgin can get pregnant. I'm
worried.

B.,, ST. PAUL

DEAR B.: The piece is from
my booklet, “What Every Teen-
ager Ought to Know.” Many
junior and senior high school
teachers wrote to say that they
had read it aloud to their students:

HOW TO GET PREGNANT

One of the questions I have
been asked often by teens is:
“How far can I go without
getting pregnant?”

That is not a dumb question.
It’s a very intelligent one. A lot
of kids get aroused by just lying
close to each other while kiss-
ing. Then they just naturally
proceed to the next step, which
is petting.

Sometimes they remove some
of their clothing because it’s “in

ACROSS 3 River in France Answer to Previous Puzzle
4 Alpine country
A

1 Stretch out 5 So far Njaye AO RITA N g
4 Indian maid 6 Inter = Y|O|U E|D EIN S A N|Y
8 Hebrew letter 7 Rugged guy E|N|G RIA|T|T]Y N|I|T
12 — de cologne (comp. wd.) TIES A elclo]L]E
13 River in the 8 Everything BlTlu AlT]

Congo 9 Chinese
14 Crescent shape currency NIA|G E[PIE|E RIIIEJL
15 Celtic sea deity 10 Preposition A|N|O D|R|A|G E|L|K]O
16 Incite 11 Never (poet.) rlolTlA o|R|E|L klElA
18 Slumbered 17 Pots

K|A|H|N A|L|A|I A|D|D

20 Swiss river 19 Corral
21 Negative 23 Handle (Fr. N|OJRESN|T|H :

conjunction 25 Organ of sight A|[B|L|E[R H{O|B|O|S
22 Division of 26 Cheers Nl AlY AlBlAlS|E rRlulT
2 geolagis me 27 i Lud- AlININ TI alml els AlRIA

ompass poin wi
26 Longing (sl.) 28 Verne hero KIEIN EID]! T E|IS|T

30 Arab country 29 Desert in Asia

34 Uncle 31 Indianapolis 44 Pronounced 57 Jane Austen
35 At (2 wads.) 500 46 Catch title
37 Direction 32 Osiris’ wife 48 The ones here
38 Goals 33 Sweetsop 50 Reverberate 58 Do housework
40 Central 36 Central points 51 Screwball (sl) 60 School organiza-
American oil 39 Female saint 52 Aquatic bird ;
tree (abbr) 54 Hubbub tion (abbr)
42 Company (Fr., 41 Well visualized 56 Honk 61 French friend
a3 2h) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1
45 Coldness 2 S —-
47 Take a meal
49 Actress Lupino [75 6 17
50 Heartbeat chart
(abbr.) 18 19 20 21
53 Jesus
monogram 22 23 24 25
55 Rolled out
59 Government 26 [27 |28 29 30 31 [32 ]33
overthrow (2
wads.) 34 35 36 37
62 Flightless bird
63 Small wood 38 39 40 a1 42
64 Greek island
65 Printer’s 43 44 45 48
measures
66 Sooner State 47 48 49
(abbr.)
67 Commentator 50 [51 [52 53 54 55 56 |57 |58
Sevareid
68 Lump of butter [°° 80 59 £2
DOWN i ge 85
1 Skinny fish ge £7 68
2 Film critic
Pauline 0195

(€)1986 by NEA, Inc 9

Cb

BiG BONUS!

10x13 Wall
Portrait

with coupon ($15 value)
NOW ONLY

$1295

2 - 8x10s
3 - 5x7s
15 wallets

-T

10x13 Wall Portrait when you purchase

no special effects or special poses)

same portrait. Not valid with any other

group posed together

US Highway 90

Bonus 10x13 Wall Portrait Present this coupon to our

photographer when you make your 95¢ deposit and you'll receive a BONUS

price. Your Wall Portrait will feature one

95¢ deposit per advertised package $1

tised package poses our selection. One

Thursday, May 8 Thru Monday, May 12

Daily: 1C AM - 8 PM
Sunday: 12 Noon - 5 PM

THE PORTRAIT PLACE

1 20 portrait package at the regular
of our popular traditional poses (sorry,

sitting fee for each additional subject in
fer. One bonus 10x13 per family. Adver-
idvertised package per subject, or

f

West, Lake City

ee cc ct se er wee eee ee te se ee se i

’

the way,” or they burrow un-
derneath it to explore each
other’s bodies with their hands.
This is known as heavy petting,
or “doing everything else but.”

The technical (and legal) def-
inition of sexual intercourse is
“penetration.” (The male’s sex
organ must penetrate the fe-
male’s.) However, as impossible
as it may sound, in the medical
literature can be found cases
where there has been no pene-
tration — the girl remained a
virgin, but after engaging in
heavy petting, she found herself
pregnant.

How can that be? Simple.

The boy and girl were lying
very close to each other (un-
clothed), doing ‘everything
but,” when a small amount of
sperm leaked out ... near (not
inside, but very close to) the
girl’s vagina. The sperm got
into the moisture around the
vagina and found its way up
into it, and fertilized the egg!

* ¥ *¥

DEAR ABBY: Seven years ago I
had an abortion. At the time it was
the only way out of a very bad
situation. (It was either that, or
suicide.) I am a baptized Catholic,
so I know that I was automatically
excommunicated from the Catholic
Church when I had the abortion. I
haven't been to church since.

I want so much to confess and re-
ceive some kind of absolution, but I
can’t face going to the confessional.
I'm afraid the priest will throw me
out and ask me not to return.

Will you please ask one of your
priest friends if there is some way to
return to the church after excommu-
nication? I am sure there are other
Catholics who would like to know.

TORMENTED SOUL

DEAR TORMENTED: Go to
confession. The priest will not
throw you out. A Catholic is
forgiven the sin when he or she
truly repents. If you lack the
courage to face your own parish
priest, go to another parish.

§

HONORING MENTAL HEALTH MONTH: Lake City
Mayor Gerald Witt and County Commission Chairman
Kenneth Witt met with local mental health advocates and
officials Monday and presented the first joint city and
county proclamation to the group. The two officials
declared May Mental Health month and recognized
board members, volunteers and staff of the North
Florida Mental Health Family Support Group. From left

are Glen Khachigan, program director

DEAR ABBY: This is to express
my appreciation for printing that
excellent poem, “Slow Me Down,
Lord.” At 91 years old, I am
memorizing it to use in some of my
meetings with older persons.
Gratefully,

THE REV. H.T. MILLER,

(8 0

Leguire)
of the NFMH sup-

ANDERSON, IND.

* * ok

(Every teen-ager should know the
truth about sex, drugs and how to be
happy. For Abby’s booklet, send your
name and address clearly printed with
a check or money order for $2.50 and
a long, stamped (39 cents) self-ad-
dressed envelope to: Dear Abby, Teen
Booklet, P.O. Box 38923, Hollywood,
Calif. 90038.)

port program; Dorcas Combs, member of the Alliance
for the Mentally Ill Steering Committee; Tim Atkinson,
NFMH executive director; John Matthews and Lillian
Cason, members of the Alliance for the Mentally Ill
Steering Committee; Louis Williams, chairman of the
board of the North Florida Mental Health Center; Com-
missioner Witt and Mayor Witt. (Photo by Margaret

ORO

VCR’S * MOVIES * ACCESSORIES
SALES & RENTALS

Kmart Plaza Hwy 90 W. 752-3399

BARNETT BANK
OF COLUMBIA COUNTY
Home
| GES

150 W. Madison St.
Lake City, Florida
MEMBER FDIC

BROWN-VANN PAINTS

14 E.Orange, Lake City
Phone 752-3420

For all your wall and floor covering needs

CLAY ELECTRIC CO-OP
752-7447

‘’Call the District Office Today to Request
A Program for Your Church Group’

DELTA FARM CENTER

Feeds * Pet Food * Hardware

EES

a" "i Ag

241 W. Franklin St.
752-3775

EASTSIDE BAPTIST
CHURCH
“Church with a great fellowship’
WON'T YOU VISIT WITH US
James Street - 752-2860

“global

“Affordable Manufcatured Housing’’
US Hwy 90 West
752-0250

Congratulations, graduates! You have moved
from ‘‘Hassles to Tassels.’” And what a
movement

The hassles of late-night study; term papers
overdue; unexpected too-low grades squeezing
tears from disappointed eyes, and the hundred-
and-one other hassles that have caused stom-
achs to churn and sleep not come have now
turned to tassels, those little stringy wads that
hang from mortar board hats (and no one ever

14:15-31

Tuesday
John
15:26-16:15

Wednesday
Acts
1:1-14

Thursday
Acts
2:1-12

Friday
Acts
2:29-42

Saturday
Galatians
5:16-26

Scriptures Selected by

The Amencan Bible Society

remembers which side they go on).

Today, there may be tears—mixed tears;
tears of joy and sadness. Old gangs breaking
up. Friendships are writing their last lines on
chalkboards as Time takes erase: and reduces to
white dust chapters that took years to write.

And those bulky academic gowns! So big, so
unfamiliar, belonging to another era of human
history. Why so big?

Here is one theory.

Your graduate’s gown is oversized because
many, many people belong in that robe with
you. Your parents, family, scores of teachers
who have nourished and nurtured you into and
through life belong in there with you. You would
not be who you are and what you are had they
not loved, taught, and sacrificed for you.

Congratulations to you (and everyone inside
your robe). (Footnote: Keep the ‘hassle’ going
when you lay aside the tassel. That is, *‘Study to
show yourself approved unto God, a workman
that needeth not be ashamed." Il Timothy 2:15)

Copyright 1986, Keister-Williams Newspaper Services
P. O. Box 8005, Charlottesville, VA 22906

Says

Hassles To Tassels

Come let us go into
/ the House of the Lord \

AL'S AUTOMOTIVE
REPAIRS
Radiator Repairs & General Auto Repairs
74 W. Montgomery St.
Phone 752-2665

BIELLING
TIRE SERVICE

“WE CARE"

Providence-Lake Cify-Lake Butler]
752-6568-752-0248-752-2120

BURGER KING

US Hwy 90 West & I-75
Lake City, Florida

COLUMBIA COUNTY
BANK

Lake City, Florida 752-5646
MEMBER FDIC

DUVAL
AUTOMOTIVE, INC.

Auto
Body Repair
1201 E. Duval

Wrecker
Service

755-0245

4
FULL GOSPEL
BUSINESSMEN'S

) FELLOWSHIP
) INTERNATIONAL

Meets each Wed. at noon
at Golden Corral. 752-1733

I IN a

07

GOLDEN STATE

GRANGER LUMBER

Chevron G.w. HUNTER

Gleason’s Corner Mall 755-4775

Lake City 755-0570

CHRISTIAN ACADEMY HOLIDAY
Grade ie Reasonable S UPPLY CoM PANY INN ce . ou ny RON ;
. evron Produc
K-12 [[ Rafes P.O. Box 1299, Lake City, 752-1637 US Hwy 90 West & I-75, Lake City es Snevion Prodi)
Call 752-5565 A Dependable Source of Supply 752-3901 HWY 90 WEST
: : For the Home Builder
An understanding of knowledge through Christ 752-5890
whey
’ : LAKE CITY
K J S +allwmark_ SHOP LAKE CITY LAKE CITY Honda/AMC/Jeep/Renault
ATHLETIC :
"WHEN YOU CARE ENOUGH TO SEND THE | ’ EMERG CENTER
VERY BEST" Gleason's Corner Mall “WE CARE"

1601 US 90 West 755-1976

We make it simple.

US Hwy 41, State Rd. 47, 755-4440

Your hospital

1701 W. Duval
ke City, FL 32055

A health care

center of &° =]

Lake City Medical Cénter

LAKE CITY
MOTOR PARTS, INC.

Phone 752-6433

LAKE CITY
OFFICE SUPPLY

COMPLETE OFFICE OUTFITTERS
Copies, Rubber Stamps, Repairs

18 E. Orange, 752-1721

LAKE CITY
PAINT CENTER

Tillman Watson-Owner
1701 S. First St. 752-1070

MARTIN
CAMPERS

2950 US Hwy 90 West, Lake City
Phone 752-3723

MIKELL'S
. POWER EQUIPMENT

| —_—— Full Service

& Repair on

Most Makes

"WE SERVICE WHAT WE SELL"
2060 Hwy 90 W., 752-8098

POWERS

CADILLAC + OLDSMOBILE - PONTIAC - NISSAN

3000 BREWER Highway (US 90 W)
Lake City, 752-5050

Dining at it’s bfinest. Seafood & freshwater
including alligator tail, catfish & frog legs.

Hwy 90 E. across from Airport
Phone 752-7504

ROBERT'S DOCK SEAFOOD

RUSTY ACRES AUTO PARTS

We Buy Junk & Salvageable Cars & Trucks
232 HOUR TOWING
MINOR REPAIRS * TUNE-UPS
755-3951 or 752-0601 EVES/
HWY 341 & SISTERS WELCOME

THOMAS GROCERS
AND HARDWARE

Langdale Post - Wolverine Boots
Providence, FLorida 752-8608

WALMART

“LOW PRICES EVERY DAY"
US 90 WEST
755-6304

THIS PAGE IS MADE POSSIBLE BY THE ABOVE PEOPLE
\ WHO ARE 100% INTERESTED IN THIS COMMUNITY



LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986 3-B (

(Buy 1 with each filled S&H (Buy 1 with each filled S&H
Stamp Price Special Certificate) Stamp Price Special Certificate)

ADC, Regular or
Electric Perk Coffee

(Buy 1 with each filled S&H
Stamp, Price Special Certificate)

Unsalted or Regular
Dry Roasted or Cocktail

Planters

(Buy 1 with each filled S&H
Stamp Price Special Certificate)

Fla. Grade "“A"’

Large
Eggs

Dozen

Stam Price Special Corticate)

Ragu Assorted

Spaghery
Sauces

15%-0z. jar

(Buy 1 with each filled S&H
Stamp Price Special Certificate)

Northern Prints

(Buy 1 with each filled S&H
Stamp Price Special Certificate)

Italian or Recipe

Progresso

From Concentrate, Publix

Maxwell Tomato

Tomatoes House Juice

46-0z. can

Peanuts

24-0z. size

(Buy 1 with each filled S&H
Stamp Price Special Certificate)

Des.gner, Microwave
or White & Assorted

& (Buy 1 with each filled S&H
Stamp Price Special Certificate)

SERGI
Frozen (12-inch)
17-0z. Pepperoni or

(Buy 1 with each filled S&H
Stamp Price Special Certificate)

Dairi-Fresh 2%

(Buy 1 with each filled S&H
Stamp Price Special Certificate)

Olde Smithfield
(No Sugar Added)

Florida ‘‘New Crop’

18.25-0z. Deluxe
Paper Bounty Red Lowviat Chef Saluto
Napkins Towels Potatoes Milk
140-ct. pkg. large roll ; : Gallon
e
g Stroh’s
I Stroh’s Light
e 6pk.-120z. N.R. Btl.
=
- Plus tax
Old Milwaukee
Old Milwaukee Light
6pk.-120z. Cans
Make this Mother’ Day one she'll never forget. Cook Mom
her favorite meal with fine foods from Publix. And while 4
you're picking out all the right ingredients, remember to
pick up a fresh bouquet and Mother’ Day card too. It5 all Ve |
here at Publix, to make Mothers Day her pleasure. Plus tax
: X 1 ] Pepsi, Diet Pepsi, Mt. Dew,
Use the convenient 2 the ie as fps n Pepsi Free, Pepsi Free Diet,
automated teller at § ppmg a Wsuchapeasure. Dr. Pepper, SIF Dr. Pepper,
Publix, it’s... Sunkist, Sunkist Diet
we ; THIS AD EFFECTIVE: 2 Lit. N.R.
Pesto. /¢ ZL ~2Q8 PUBLIX RESERVES THE RIGHT THRU WED., MAY 14, 1986...
TO LIMIT QUANTITIES SOLD &)
; § 1 09
’ AT MOST PUBLIX Gyr ]
‘Young 'n Tender’ Pls oe
Publix Beef, JiX-Y-Yo] g (=Yo M@Zo] lo] £° Gov't inspected.
Gov’t.-Inspected And Varieti 10nsp ——
ov 1. P n EEE Shipped D&D, Younce 4 Pres
G 'o (4-Inch Pots) Fresh Not Frozen, nd American :
(golV |g) Y Nig r:12 Premium Grade "A ) 2 : Ni
Chuck Violet comisp
per Ib. ON 409 gi ig
| % ;
Chops
per |b.

Publix Beef, Gov’t.- FORKS
Inspected Boneless VEL IN gd dol 1 J 6Te]y [0

. : i
Chuck fopicana Chilled SEVACR AL GR a [| ET Te EIR

479
Roast Orange Sauce, Fresh Tender

$ 447 Juice Asparagus Soi ams

half oF:11 Try our Honey Kut Ham, spiral
sliced for easy serving. It's
| C Publix’ highest quality graded
ham. Also, it's completely
\_ y. prepared and ready to be

enjoyed immediately; choose
J \

from a half or whole ham.
=) (Ham Holder FREE With Whole Ham Only)

Kraft Parkay (Twin-Pk. or Bowl) %
Soft Margarine.... zz 99°¢

Save 40¢, Red Lambrusco, Lp
Bianco, D’oro or Rosato
( Danish = J Save 30¢, Riunite Wines...... 35" $289 per 1b. |

iYYYo] 8 (=1o RR EEN £5

_ where shopping is a pleasure 7days a week
ig Dairi-Fresh Pomambes Wom sn Wetlads Dos

od 99, Ice Cream Sunday, May 11th

half gal.

ord S$ 29 US HWy 90
Assortment Should Consist 1 Mile East of I-75

Gleason's Corner Mall

of at Least Four varelieoa

Open Mon.-Sun.

Publix

Items Above Available at all Publix Stores

J with In-Store Bakeries Only. THIS AD GOOD AT THESE LOCATIONS ONLY

a a A rl ah wm aw ww vel Wwe a



, 4 B LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986

i
Peanuts !
I'M AMAZED AT HOW COME WE DON'T IF WE HAD UNIFORMS I VOTE WE
A Tk HOW SUCH 15 THAT 7 ary SD HOW YOU FALL FOR HAVE UNIFORMS? WITH NAMES AND NUMBERS STAY ANONYMOUS
| YOU UNTOLD WEALTH... THESE THINGS. VEC ONE py

1986 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

YOUVE NO, THE RECIPE
DISCOVERED | |FOR APPLE PIE /
THELAW | ~—
OF GRAVITY, A
SIR BUNNY!

THATS NOT VERY

SPORTSMANLIKE,
POC!

IT CAME

TFWE CANT | | LETS
BEAT HIM... | | EAT

oc Pr ; © 1986 by Warner Bros. inc. Al Rights Reserved. ; Slo
LET ME PUT IT - BANK ral IT WouLpN'T BE ovERPDRAWN
ANOTHER WAY : | —_ ~~
YOUR BIOLOGICAL cLOck : £€ ) ~~ ALL THE TIME IF You
ANP YOUR BEEPER a - WEREN'T IN sucH A HURRY

ill ai L GO OFF AT THE SAME
2 ——— TIME, WHICH ONE
. dy | WILL You ANSWER?

©1986by NEA, Ic. Ty AVES 5-9

To cLEAR ALL THE cHECFs!

oussryNea ie. THAVES 5-10

Andy Capp
® HE STILL REFUSES TO) : FORGET IT, FLO. YOU'VE |E HE was MY i
mmm) || fT SN | ST ee !
WHILE T/MAT IT... 8g WHAT AM I GOING E. Jl 2%
23 TO BO ABOUT IT ? ir
23 3p
a 5 Sly iz
TAP 3g |] 4]
BANG! 3s WIE==7/— 28
BANG & =o — H
TTAP 25 5
[~~ “a
L 5-9] 5-10
Winthrop
I CAN'T WAIT TO I HAVEN'T HAD A YOURE A REAL BORE WELL, AT LEAST MY DAD WAS ONCE BLT THEYONLY HAVE MY DAD SAYS HE JUST WANDERED
GET HOME AND BATH SINCE I GOT ON THE SLIBJECT OF I’M A CLEAN "BACHELOR NUMBER 4" | THREE BACHELORS IN WHILE HE WAS | OOKING FOR
TAKE MY BATH. hor THIS MORNING. BATHS, YOL KNOW THAT?Z ON "THE DATING GAME" ON AT A TIME. THE REST ROOM.

hv lao fm

A

i
IMA (ec gutais\ Las ad vi Utasn p) 3750, vp lo

mad Poi seal Maal

LE SL

© 1986 by NEA, Inc

Garfield

WOULDN'T YOU KNOW IT? THERE'S WHAT DO OU HAVE TO
A CAT HAIR IN M& LASAGNA | SAY FOR YOURSELF ?

ANU © 1986 by NEA. Inc.

Feature Syndicate, Inc.

5-10 : FM PAS
Blondie
WHAT A { THE WORST IT WAS AN INSULT TO |:|IT WAS WORSE caN you UI{ WHAT'S THE YOU MEAN LN SURE i]. [I'M NOT THAT )/
ROTTEN ) I'VE EVER SEEN P17 MY INTELLIGENCE |:|THAN WE THOUGHT HELP ME, ) \ MATTER ? £ [HUNGRY !!
MOVIE ! ~ or ¢ BUDDY ? — S= Mm 4
Em i wr = NT < §
le = 0 ; : zd I» :
4 A NCE
& ji :
It i [I] i
URE §
111 DUI LUSEIT
? L PCKED THES (PATSARS DARN.....ARE YOUR ARMS RAISED Z ; MASK. KEEPS
’ ;
: RRS] | SLIPPING CONN!

BUS

© 1986 by NEA. Inc

Alley Oop

VERY | WHERE WILL WE ( FROM THE
GET ENOUGH \ PEOPLE,

AN' FOOD T'PAY
THIS ELITE
GUARD UNIT?

LET'S SEE... [ SHHH! WE | WHATCHA | JUST WHAT WE
THERE MUST| PONT WANTA\ GOT? NEED! A SPARE
BE SOME- WAKE TH' = CROWN AND AN
WIZER! AA OLD SPOTTED SKIN!

A Z Z

Ai
< ~)
AS

OF WHAT EACH
INDIVIDUAL OWNS
1, IS GIVEN TO THE 4

CROWN!

TAKE IT FROM
THEM BY FORCE!

AND YOU WERE 50 CERTAIN
RAPIO CONTACT, THE SUB WOULD WORK
SIR. _ PERFECTLY EH, McKEE %

WE'RE SLIPPING 777 1 THERE'S TOO
BACK EASY. / 71 MUCH WEIGHT IN ) 7, ~
4 / _ THE STERN! / 7

MEANWHILE,
BACK ON

ana

NN
*\ ARI.. Feber,



yum

A

SEE EA

~

PAGE 12 LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI, MAY 9, 1986

Happenings

SPECIAL EVENTS

Free blood-pressure check: are
provided each Wednesday from 10
a.m. until 2 p.m. in the lobby of Lake
City Medical Center, located on Us.
90 West near Gateway Shopping
Center and in the lobby of Lake Shore
Hospital on Tuesdays from 11 a.m.
until 2 p.m., as well as through the
Columbia County Health Depart-
ment. Also, free blood pressure
checks are given from 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. on Thursdays at DeSoto Drug
Store, 204 N. Marion St., downtown.

The 34th Annual Florida Folk
Festival is scheduled May 23-25 at the
Stephen Foster State Folk Culture
Center in White Springs. The festival
will feature hundreds of performers
in its continuous celebration of tradi-
tional music, song, dance, tales,
skills and knowledge. For more infor-
mation write: Florida Department of

State Bureau; Florida Folklife Pro-
grams; P.O. Box 265; White Springs,
Fla. 32096.

The Eighth Lake Butler Berry
Blossom Bluegrass Festival is
scheduled May 16 and 17 about one
mile south of Lake Butler on
Highway 121. The festival will
feature “Jim and Jesse,” Chubby
Wise, ‘Bluegrass Parlor Band,”
“The Dixie Jubilees,” ‘“Beachville
Bluegrass,” and the ‘‘Carolina
Rebels.” The festival will also
feature ‘Suwannee River Cloggers,”’
and “Beaumont Family.” Tickets for
the event are $8. For more informa-
tion contact: Lake Butler Bluegrass
Festival; Route 3, Box 712; Lake
Butler, Florida 32054.

The Suwannee River Bluegrass
Association sponsors a “Jam and
Picking Session” every Saturday at
the Spirit of the Suwannee Cam-

pground between Interstate 10 and
Interstate 75 on 129 North of Live

VIDEO BEAT

Tuning in to rock

Ethlie Ann Vare

Pat Metheny boosts videos

By Ethlie Ann Vare

When avant-garde jazz guitarist
Pat Metheny hosted VH-1's “New Vi-
sions” program, he also got to pick
which videos would be played on the
music cable’s latest adult-oriented
segment.

It was, he discovered, easier said
than done.

“The main problem is that there’s
not that much to choose from,” says
Metheny, 31, a three-time Grammy
Award winner. “Of all the artists I
like, virtually none have video prod-
uct available.

“I had to go through the 100 or so
videos that are available in the jazz
category — or whatever category this
is that we're talking about — and pick
out the stuff that came closest.”

Metheny ended up using videos by
artists ranging from Miles Davis to
Kate Bush, Philip Glass to Art of
Noise.

“New Visions,” a recent addition to
MTV's “older sister” station, serves
as one of the new outlets for what's
become known as New Age music, a
categor: that includes Metheny him-
self as well as groups like Tangerine
Dream and Shadowfax. These artists
make few videos, only partly because
there has been, in the past, no place to
show them.

“If you're a pop artist who sells bil-
lions of records,” says Metheny, hy-
perbolically, “the amount of money it
takes to make a video is kind of a drop
in the bucket. But for an artist like
myself, the cost of making a. video is
usually more than the cost of making
the whole record. It’s a difficult deci-
sion: Make a video of one tune on your
new record, or go and make another
record.”

Metheny has made 14 albums and
two videos. He also did the soundtrack
for the well-received movie “The Fal-
con and the Snowman.”

As an instrumental artist, he never
has to structure his own videos with
plots taken from the song.

“Instrumental music is a different
kind of a challenge,” he says. “There
isn’t a story line that has to be fol-
lowed in such a strong way. That frees
up the director creatively, but makes
it harder in another way, since he’s
got to come up with all the good
parts.” The right director is vital to
Metheny, because, he says, “each art-

ist has to ask himself how much talent
he has personally for the visual medi-
um. In my case, I have none
whatsoever.”

Although video and jazz-fusion may
not be the ideal marriage, for a num-
ber of logistical reasons, Metheny
still feels it’s important that someone
within his field continues to go out
there and give it the old college try.

Pat Metheny

Oak. For more information contact
Tom Herndon in Live Oak at
1-364-1776.

OUTDOORS

0’Leno State Park on the Santa Fe
River offers swimming, picnicking
and a walk in the woods. An entrance
fee of 50 cents per person is levied for
day use of the recreation area near
High Springs. The park is located on
U.S. 41 in Columbia County, just
north of High Springs.

The Stephen Foster State Folk
Culture Center in White Springs of-
fers daily boat tours on the Suwannee
River, buildings with exhibits inter-
preting Stephen Foster and his
music, picnic areas, carillon con-
certs and the Springhouse — the re-
mains of the old health resort. An-
nual special events include the
Florida Folk Festival in May, an Old-
Fashioned 4th of July celebration and
the Jeanie Auditions. Every Friday,
Saturday and Sunday, programs are
given on Quilting and Naval Stores.
Located on U.S. 41, 3 miles from In-
terstate 75 in White Springs, the
center is open from 8 a.m. until sun-
down year-round; building hours are
9 to 5 p.m. For fees and information

call 397-2733.

River Road Inc., a professional
canoe outfitter managed by native
Floridian Stephen Williams, is
located along the Suwannee River.
River Road Inc. is designed to
enlighten users about the natural en-
vironment of the Swannee. Minitrips
along the Suwannee are $6 per canoe.
Half-day trips are $11 per canoe and
full-day trips $15 per canoe. River
Road Inc. also has maps, overnight
parking and accurate up-to-date in-
formation on river conditions and ex-
act water levels. It is located along
State Road 136 on White Springs
Road. For information call
1-397-2945.

Ee ——-. eAn eN

NIGHTLIFE

Tom’s Place, 1830 S. First St.,
features “The Tom Cats.” The band
performance begins at 8 p.m. There
is no cover charge.

Nancy’s Rebel Retreat, located in
Olustee on U.S. 90, sponsors pool
tournaments every Saturday night at
8 p.m. On Friday evenings, happy
hour is from 4 to 6 p.m. There is no
cover charge.

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Betty’s Place, located on U.S. 90
West pass Interstate 75, will feature
“Curly Ray and the Fugitives” this
weekend. The band performance
begins at 9 p.m.

Happy hour is scheduled Friday at
“Whistles” located at the Lake City
Holiday Inn from 5 to 7 p.m. A free
taco bar will be open from 5 to 9 p.m.
and the top 40 hits are played at the
lounge along with the showing of
videos. On Saturday, two-for-one
Crown Royal is scheduled from 7
p.m. until 10 p.m. A $50 cash ballon
drop is also scheduled for midnight
on Saturday. There is no cover
charge.

Weggie’s Saloon, located on U.S.
441 North, will feature the band
“Shine” this weekend. Band perfor-
mances begin at 8 p.m. There is no
cover charge.

The Gleneagles, located off of U.S.
90 west of Interstate 75, will feature
“The Night Riders” Friday and
Saturday nights. There is no cover
charge.

Drew’s Lounge, located on U.S. 90
west, will feature “Rebel Yell Band”
from Live Oak Friday and Saturday
nights. There is no cover charge.

Moose Lodge 624 on Montague
Lake features bingo each Wednesday
and Friday at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, the
Moose Lodge will feature Silver
Eagle Express,” in the lounge from 8
to 12 p.m.

tainer

What's happening on the tube & on the town e Supplement to the Lake City Reporter

May 9, 1986

UNRECOGNIZED
PINCHED NERVES

Pinched nerve is a
term utilitzed by
the Chiropractic
profession describ-
ing an irritation dis-
#4 turbance of a spinal
1 nerve. Falls, auto
| accidents, lifting
# wrong, may cause
a displacement of
a spinal bone, which then can pinch
nerves and interrupt normal nerve func-
tion. Some of the more common com-
plaints that may develop from pinched
nerves are: dizzyness, headaches, ner-
vousness, pains in the chest, stomach,
neck or back. Often, a person may not
associate his condition with pinched
nerves thus allowing these conditions to
go unrecognized until an advanced stage
of illness develops. A competent
Chiropractic examination will lead to ear-
ly detection and the application of care
will aid prompt recover.

RADKE
CHIROPRACTIC
CLINIC

752-2252

1112 West Madison St.
Lake City

Or. LF. Radke

Mon.-Wed.-Fri. 9-12, 2-6
Tues. 9-12

No Appointment Necessary
For Emergencies

Mary Crosby stars as Isabel Hazard in
the miniseries “North and South:
Book II.” The final episode of the six-
part series airs Sunday, May 11 on
ABC.

Happenings

12

TV Listings

3-11
UD rea——,



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PAGE 2 LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986

9861 '6 AVW "1d dd1a0dada ALID JAV I UL JJVd

LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986 PAGE 11

J 4 w
4 |
orin an utn: 0 enas naay nig THURSDAY EVENING May 15, 1986
By Lynn Hoogenboom the role of Isabel Hazard (originally played by Wendy Ful- ! ag he says a Larry Hagman bagi Ine how eh Ho iv 7:00 7:30 8:00 | 8:30 9:00 | 9:30 10:00 | 10:30 | 11:00 | 11:30 | 12:00 | 12:30 1:00
; ton). un it is to a bad guy. I'm very careful no 0 play too ) Wheel Fortune | Ent. Tonight Simon & Simon Bridges To Cross Knots Landing News d Ni i
The Mains and the Hazards are at it again! “Talk about getting your cake and eating it, too,” Crosby many of them, because that’s all I'll be offered if I'm not. WUFT (PBS) BG) | AtATime fay nr : Jeopardy ight Heat Movie
This time, in “North and South: Book II” the Civil War says. “I got to pop in for a couple of weeks, be absolutely But when I do play them, I sure enjoy them.” a 2 Le The Galaxy | Fawity Towers | MacNeil / Lehrer Newshour Today In The Legislature
serves as the backdrop. The two families have been thrown viscious, wear these wonderful clothes and then leave.” Crosby is the daughter of a genuine superstar, Bing Cros- WCTV (CBS) 6) (6) | Wheel Fortune | Ent. Tonight | Simon & Simon Bridges To Cross Knots Landing News Night Heat Movie: “The Sea Wolves”
asunder by virtually every emotion known to man — from Crosby escaped location shooting entirely. Asked about the by, but she claims that her childhood was minus most of the WJCT (PBS) 7] (@) |Business Rpt. | Out The Door | MacNeil / Lehrer Newsho i i
grand passions and noble aspirations to jealousy, greed and oft-repeated tales of weary “North and South” actors mak- glamour and glitz that people often associate with her. “I : Ce) 7, ener Newshour Nova Today In The Legislature Business Rpt. | Capitol Jl. | Tony Brown
plain old-fashioned lust — and it’s all building up to the ing futile attempts to hold up under the heat, while being didn’t grow up in Los Angeles,” she says. “My father didn’t WTLV (ABC) Pyramid $1 Mil. Chance | Ripley's Believe It Or Not! The Colbys 20/20 News Barney Miller | Nightline SCTV | Rea People
weighed down by heavy costumes and bombarded by think it was a good place to raise children. I grew up in San WJKS (NBC) A ee San [ aS j : :
Swarms of fncsquitoes, she lughs. Francisco, We were a very quiet, very private family.” nson nford Cosby Show Family Ties Cheers Night Court Hill Street Blues News Tonight David Letterman
On the Cover “It snowed in Natchez,” she explains, “so they came home But being Bing’s daughter has left her a bit jaded in one WCJB (ABC) (1) | Barney Miller | Benson Ripley's Believe It Or Not! The Colbys 20/20 News Nightline Hollywood Comedy
two weeks early. I shot at Burbank studios. I don’t know respect. It’s rather hard for me to be star struck consider- WAWS (IND) (@ | 3sCompany | Too Close Movie: “Psycho” : : 7 :
Mary Crosby stars as Isabel Hazard in the what the situation was like on location, but it sure was easy ing who I grew up with,” she admits. “I know that the biggies . "Psy H's Heroes Get Smart Night Gallery Boris Karloff Presents Thriller Solid Gold
miniseries ‘North and South: Book II.” The final inL. A" are human beings just like the rest of us.” WNFT (IND) Matt Houston Movie: ““Yellowbeard”’ Archie Bunker | Maude Bizarre Gunsmoke “Demon And The Mummy”
episode of the six-part series airs Sunday, May 11 Jebel Hogind bas been a paticnlarly Jrickiy thorn) foto WTBS (IND) (8) | Gunsmoke Sanford Movie: “Fast Break” Movie: “The Biggest Bundle Of Them All" “Night Of Dark Shadows”
on ABC. -in-law, the honorable and upstanding ia STi oct Shi z
George Hazard (James Read), but Crosby fave : CBN (IND) (9) | Alias Smith And Jones Wackiest Ship In The Army 700 Club TBA Man From UNCLE. Grouchc Bill Cosby | Dobie Gillis
—— lan ET | cor Nedwslr : Em —
£ : ) : on’t want it to e only thing I do, i es "
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; veThers ave, of SOUS 8 3 few Y ohahges ot a) with relish? TheyYe wore interesting than your average ry a ESPN SportsCenter. | SpeedWeek Auto Racing | Boxing: From Merrillville, Ind. SportsCenter | Superstars Fishin’ Hole
3 mber, erican ingenue, which I never rea ayed, ; : ae 7 ; :
: miniseries of the year. Costumes and makeup have been first came to town. I think ‘Dallas’ rr ve Wien classified ad! le pe Mle? ere The Surman ick Nove oaRYy
a] i i i “« 0) : i : od ; , ly ; JAE : ”
g toned down. More care has been taken to insure the histori- Dallas” may have ruined Crosby as an ingenue, but it Home Box Office Movie Cont'd | Movie: “The Incredible Shrinking Woman" Movie: “Angel” Not News Philip Marlowe, Private Eye Movie: “Nickel Mountain”
Tl ca SccRCY of the Lew Sinise, And a new face has guaranteed her a place in television history — as the woman Muriel
: appeared among the Hazards. : who shot J.R. Ewing 755-644 uriel’s former boyfriend stops by ly assorted characters into a winning : Grr
; 2 i R. Ewing. THURSDA' : : : : attend the funeral of a “dear friend” wrongly im ned husband; F. tT
; he new face belongs to Mary Crosby, who has taken over The role on ‘Dallas’ was obviously the biggest break that es Y i Sop dine rand directs his attention to. basketball team. they both hated. os Abraham (“Amadeus”) hosts.
; - ” 2) NFL SUPERSTARS Profiled: Joe
4 EVENING ® SANFORD AND SON Fred : B30 Nits 11:00
£1 : donates a collection of rare jazz al- 3 FAMILY TIES Nick's image- (7) gy NIGHT GALLERY A beautiful Namath.
3 rr ——————————————TTmSSSSSS——————————————71o1 6:00 bums b 2 fuse Hurary a order 0 ¢ Marlory oi Sia girl regains hor syetight an Simest : 13.9
: MONDAY — FRIDAY MORNING : get a tax write-off. excep Ty. NG loses her life. @ € SOLID GOLD Scheduled: Ste-
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/ FCC Cable] 7:00 | 7:30 | 800 | 8:30 9:00 | 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 | 11:30 12:00 12:30 pr lesen a oh oy resbunsible for TONIGHT An interview with Jimmy (3) (@ CHEERS Janet pressures Sam terpreter; Super Dave stunt with an Barry Manilow, Janet Jackson, Ani-
: WJXT (CBS) @ @ | c8s Morning News SY ; 2 . . : of a scientific out- Stewart; Cannes Film Festival re- to make a permanent commitment to 11-ton ball; a sperm bank. motion, Graham Nash, Smokey Rob-
: Sgn ® : Pyramid Card Sharks Price Is Right News Yng. & Rest. © LAVERNE port, memorable sports moments. their relationship. (Part 3 of 3) In (® MAN FROM UNCLE. With a inson (interview). In stereo.
: (PBS) Farm Day Body Electric Cooking Sesame Street Mister Rogers 3-2-1 Contact Animals Wild America Dr. Marc Cooki isiti & SHIRLEY While [9 @ BENSON Clayton sues Benson stereo. secret THRUSH code in their posses- MOVIE * %% “The Demon And
: WCTV (CBS) O @ | ootvomng os Ee : Hel : ing bi Laverne’s grandmother in for slander when Katie’s record of @ @ ® ©@ BRIDGES TO CROSS sion, Illya and a French stewardess The Mummy” (1975) Darren McGa-
i Pyramid Card Sharks Price Is Right Midday Yng. & Rest. ew York, Shirley finds romance and their argument makes the front page. Peter and Tracy defend a bag lady wind up in the service of a flamboy- vin, Keenan Wynn. A Chicago report-
1 WJCT (PBS) (@) | Sesame Street | Mister Rogers | 3-2-1 Contact [Educational Programming Educational P ; Laverne gets “engaged” to Squiggy. BOB NEWHART Bob has his who claims to be a once-wealthy ant Foreign Legion commander er interested in the occult becomes
! WTLV (ABC) Goud Noming Americe SE pes ; : 3l Hrogramming (Part 1 of 2) . hands full with Carol’s amorous hus- woman who has been victimized by (Howard Da Silva). involved in two murders.
‘ i 5) gazine Joker's Wild Tic Tac Dough | Lifestyles New Love Ryan's Hope Loving ® DOCTOR WHO “The Mutants” band, poker parties and allegedly her devious relatives. (3 MUSIC AFTER MAO A documen- (3 @ LATE NIGHT WITH DAVID
l Mech Joey Love Conn. [ perfect Match | Family Ties Sale Of Cent. | Wheel Fortune | Scrabble People’s Court | Search T fi scrolls reveal that the mutation fixed bingo games. (® @ HITCH HIKERS GUIDE TO tary look at previously repressed mu- LETTERMAN Scheduled: actress
; WCJB (ABC) @D | Good Morning America Volos : ples arch Tom. of the Solos is natural. (Part 4 of 6) 7:35 THE GALAXY Arthur and Ford are sic and musicians in China as wit- Bernadette Peters, Sun Records
1 ons Divorce Court | Ryan's Hope Lifestyles New Love News Loving @ @ WILD AMERICA 40 explora- ®@ i7: SANFORD AND SON When held prisoner aboard the demolition nessed by Viadimir Ashkenazy founder Sam Phillips. In stereo.
WAWS (IND) @) | Woody MASK. Bugs Bunny Muppets CHiPs Bonanza Jim And Tammy Hove Lucy er id % Americas wilguseo TSS Posi socohves Snot Inj A spacecraft by the ill-bred, heartless, during a concert tour. (® SCTV Sketches: Screenwriter
| vie rom the smallest in Florida to the i
! WNFT (IND) He-Man Voltron Scooby-Doo Pink Panther Richard Roberts 700 Club Knots Landing Fantasy Isl largest in Alaska. (R) QJ mishap, Lamont hires a housekeeper slimy pom Vy (Pan 2 9 7) 11:30 Soap y (aswell (Themes) Gsoovers
; WTBS (IND) (8) | Funtime Flintstones Jeannie Bewitched Hazel I Love Lucy Movie: = Lh ® GREEN ACROS "The Welding tonnpo from “Return of the Jedi, “Indiana a A 44 jp Shanks’ (andy) grandson disappears
; : ’ woman's 0 7 :
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NICK ® lo u | Amer. Baby Bill Cosby | boris Day 6:05 @ MOVIE * kk “Psycho” “2010” are examined in this behind- 4aath by the guillotine is to kill his (1980) Lee Marvin, Mark Hamill. A
ms Lossie Belle Special Pinwheel Pinwheel @® 47: ANDY GRIFFITH Barney MOVIE ** “Yellowbeard” the-scenes look at the art of cinemat- gyecytioner. tough Army sergeant leads four
WGN (IND) Muppets MASK. Bet ilies [ators Ta valey . = runs for sheriff when Andy seems @ @ COSBY SHOW Cliff and his fa- '¢ illusion. (R) 3) GUNSMOKE A contemptible fa- oe Jngtpelenead rectus ae
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3 Sy Sloniene | sportLook Aerobics | Fashion 6:30 Denise should attend. In sierso. (R) 20d Zach dagegs 14 3 Olmacic pat heart When thres nuns Coriffomt fim oe
The Movie Ch. @3 | Movie Cont'd Movie: ; : 0 tle; Fallon reveals a secret; Sable’s : :
: ovie: | Movie: HAPPY DAYS The leader of the ; et hor With the care and custody of his two 12:40
Home Box Office Minors Cont'd Fraggle Rock Movie: Movi Dukes gang befriends Richie after he pos DA) SIMON s MON A Sig § DisDs Sackiire on ber dquuren (5 (I MOVIE + # “The Sea Wolves
: vie: Movi ne ; i Z ith an aptitude for sign @ (® TONIGHT Host: Johnny Car- iF: * * “Ni
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rm —— ————— —_— rar nl Mark is stricken tho only clues to solving a murder. rillville, Ind. (Live) and JoBeth Williams, jazz pianist Joe 110 =
Se Si SE — -— : (R) 9:30 Bushkin. In stereo. Ef “Ria -
: MONDAY — FRIDAY AFTERNOON ——— 6:35 ® @ STAR TREK The Enterprise 3) @ NIGHT COURT A suicidal ® @ NIGHT HEAT Giambone goes > @ MOVIE xx “Bimini Code
. FCC Cable| 1:00 1:30 92:0 . : : 3 . > @ :i7: GUNSMOKE When a young omes a ship of hatred as the offi- rock star decides to give away all his undercover to investigate the use of 1:30
— o . 0 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 | 9:30 6:00 6:30 woman begins a romance with a cers battle Klingons and each other. money. In stereo. (R) drugs in boxing. ®@ FATHER KNOWS BEST T
(CBS) (@) |[Yng &Rest | As The World Turns Capitol Guiding Light Trapper John, M.D. Hawaii Five-0 News c drifter, her brothers plot his death so (J RIPLEY'S BELIEVE (5) @ FAWLTY TOWERS Basil at- BARNEY MILLER Barney Andersons are bewildered when Te
WUFT (PBS) (5) | Nature | Nor Fiction Television Computer | Motorweek Sesame Street Mister Rogers News Doct a ne ig Te A I DN eae fompts +o conver Pewliy Towers on fe gen wy Gow the re nds dog that rings their doorbel! in
WCTV (CBS - octor Who Lassie servant. uthor into a gourmet’s paradise. cinct’s door one last time as they (he middle of the night.
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(ABC) @2 | Ai My Children One Life To Live General Hospital Diff. Strokes Diff. Strokes Divorce Court | Newlyweds N 2 owe 0 ie (E)} FIDELIO Beethoven's only opera, Mixes real ammo with blanks for up- jpg Trapper’s birthday, mysterious (1969) Louis Jourdan, Anne Baxter.
WJKS (NBC) CD | Days 07 Ow Lives I : ews ABC News ; © Wo girls performed in 1979 at the Glynde- coming German war games. symptoms in many patients make the .
er World Santa Barbara having an affair with Jack. ; : HILL STREET BLUES 2:40
Welk sec Quincy Jeffersons Jeffersons News NBC News Ma bourne Festival. Elisabeth Soder- & BL day anything but happy. Guest star: 17: MOVIE. * A “The Ki ;
(AEC) (LD) | Al My Children One Life To Live General Hospital Dukes Of Hazzard Diff. Strokes Sanford a TT HOUSTON A frustrated se- grom and Anton de Ridder star in @ @ & @ KNOTS LANDING Ben Selma Diamond. oy : 1956) Joseph C e Killer Is
WAWS (ND) @ | More : anfor News ABC News cret admirer (Marjoe Gortner) sets the story of political repression and a and Cathy leave town; Mack and the 5271956) Joseph Coiten. Wendel}
Flying Nun Tom And Jerry | G.I. Joe ThunderCats Transformers Beaver Brady Bunch Star Trek out to kill C.J. woman determined to free her police find Karen’s borrowed car -- 12:00 : Corey.
WNFT (IND) M.T. Moore | caro Burnett | Jeannie Heathcliff Insp. Gadget Jayce He:Man She-Ra GoBots Haoor 0 : z hd BENSON Benson buys a Con" wrongly imprisoned husband; F. but she’s nowhere to be found. ©) @ £ NIGHT HEAT Tommy and Ni- 3:00
Wis ovo) Move. Serseri’ Bugs Bunny And Friend Fl yen Res ope Days rs Ee i tit isn't Murray Abraham (“Amadeus”) hosts. @ @ 20 / 20 Scheduled: coun- COle'S : Hr a hou art gallery is 5) MOVIE * * “Return Of Wildfire"
ugs Bunny And Friends intstones Munsters Rocky Road Safe At H 2 . MOVIE *%% “All That Jazz” seling designed to hel ople deal marred when a disturbance occurs. 1948) Richard Arlen, Patricia Morri-
CBN (IND) (®) |F. Daughter | Patty Duke Father Knows | Eddie's Father | 700 Club Face Music Name Tune Tic Tac Dough | Go! I Eom i oe ba Mies bein @) AUTO RACING IHRA Drag Rac with the loss of a pet. 0 po @ @ TONY BROWN'S JOURNAL A ) Hann om
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WGN (IND) Midday REE PRR I = Sg ; x . Wizar NICK Rocks Srv the day with his bad jokes. ham, N.C. (Taped) on Iie Biggest LaRouche and his candidates. tary look at previously repressed mu-
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Remember When | Movie: Movie: 7:30 a-lifetime chance to become a major stolen. the story of political repression and a Grand National, from Hampton, Ga
@ & TOO CLOSE FOR COMFORT success by organizing a group of odd- @ MAUDE Maude forces Vivian to woman determined to free her (R)



IL 39Vd 9861 ‘6 AVW “18d 33130d3d ALID INV

PAGE 10 LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986

_ EE ————————— I,

WEDNESDAY EVENING May 14, 1986

FCC Cable | 7:00 | 7:30 | 800 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30 | 11:00 | 11:30 | 12:00 | 12:30 | 1:00
WJXT (CBS) 14] (@) | Wheel Fortune | Ent. Tonight | West 57th Movie: “Stark: Mirror Image” News Jeopardy T.J. Hooker Movie
WUFT (PBS) ® Drinking And Driving Great Space Race Black Champions MacNeil / Lehrer Newshour Today In The Legislature
WCTV (CBS) [6] ® Wheel Fortune | Ent. Tonight West 57th Movie: “Stark: Mirror Image” News T.J. Hooker “My Kidnapper, My Love”
WJCT (PBS) @ ‘| Business Rpt. Black Family MacNeil / Lehrer Newshour Black Champions Today In The Legislature Business Rpt. | Noise: The Invisible Risk
WTLV (ABC) Pyramid $1 Mil. Chance | MacGyver Dynasty Hotel News Barney Miller | Nightline SCV | Rea People
WJKS (NBC) (&))} Benson Sanford Highway To Heaven Blacke's Magic News Tonight David Letterman
WCJB (ABC) (0) | Barney Miller | Benson MacGyver Dynasty Hotel News Nightline Hollywood Comedy
WAWS (IND) @ 3's Company Too Close Movie: “Hooper” H's Heroes Get Smart Night Gallery Boris Karloff Presents Thriller Outer Limits
WNFT (IND) Matt Houston Movie: “Revenge Of The Pink Panther” Archie Bunker | Maude Bizarre Gunsmoke “Crime Knows No Age”
WTBS (IND) ® Gunsmoke Sanford NBA Basketball: Playoffs Baseball: Atlanta Braves at Montreal Expos Movie
CBN (IND) ® Alias Smith And Jones Born Free 700 Club Snapshots Man From UN.C.LE. Groucho Bill Cosby Dobie Gillis
NICK You Can't Danger Mouse | 20th Century | Air Power Africa Icebound In The Antarctic Great Detective 20th Century | Air Power Africa
WGN (IND) Barney Miller Bob Newhart | Movie: “10” News Trapper John, M.D. “The Seven Year Itch”
ESPN SportsCenter NBA Today Stanley Cup Playoffs: Campbell or Wales Conf. Champ. Game 7 Auto Racing SportsCenter | Baseball's Hits | NFL Films Tennis Mag.
The Movie Ch. @3 | “Back In The U.S.A.” Cont'd Movie: “Days Of Heaven” Movie: “Blind Date” “Give My Regards To Broad Street"
Home Box Office “Ladyhawke” Cont'd Movie: “Heavenly Bodies" Movie: “Gotcha!” Movie: “Silent Rage”

EVENING

6:00

p)) STAR TREK Captain Kirk
lays a game of death with a mania-
al alien who plans to use the En-
arprise as a space toy.

2 LAVERNE & SHIRLEY When
hirley finds out that Carmine is dat-
'g other girls, she decides to play
"ie field herself.

.) @ DOCTOR WHO “The Mutants”
r. Who gives the box to Ky, and it
rns out to be scrolls written in the
nguage of the Old Ones. (Part 3 of

) @ HEART OF THE DRAGON A
ok at the family life of a railway
Jliceman in a northern Chinese in-
istrial city, including footage of the
cal hospital, mental health facility
nd prison. (R) OQ
(® GREEN ACRES “Star Witness”

6:05

mantles a car in the sheriff’s office.
6:30

HAPPY DAYS Richie discovers

that the stranded “beatnik” he has

brought home is also pregnant.

(® RIFLEMAN Lucas becomes in-

volved in a revenge fight when he be-

friends a young Easterner.

6:35
involved with a wounded bank robber
and is accused of being his partner.

7:00 -
(@ & THREE'S COMPANY Furley
tries to impress his childhood rival
by introducing Chrissy as his bride.
MATT HOUSTON Matt's father
(David Wayne) is the next victim on a
crazed hospital orderly’s (Lou Fer-
rigno) list.
(3 (@ BENSON Murders abound on a
working vacation aboard a yacht, but
Benson saves the day. (Part 2 of 2)
® DRINKING AND DRIVING:
THE TOLL, THE TEARS The impact
of alcohol-related accidents on the
victims, their families and the drunk
drivers themselves is examined
through interviews and reconstruc-
tions of individual accidents. CJ
(3) ALIAS SMITH AND JONES After
they're falsely accused of robbing a
bank, Heyes and Curry search for the

real culprit. Guest stars: Jessica Wal-

ter and Ann Sothern.

(1) € BARNEY MILLER The Bicen-
tennial sparks some complications
when a horse thief strikes and a pros-
titute beats an affluent tourist.

(3 YOU CAN'T DO THAT ON TELE-
VISION A lighthearted look at family
life.

BARNEY MILLER While Bar-
ney’s lawyer and the judge seek a
compromise, Barney is left in a cell
with a neurotic murder suspect.
(Part 2 of 2)

7:30
@ €D® TOO CLOSE FOR COMFORT
Henry and Muriel’s table doesn’t in-
clude a setting for a lion that wand-
ers into their dinner party.
® (BD SANFORD AND SON Fred's
buddies turn his house into a pool hall
when Lamont buys him a pool table.
®@® ® OO ENTERTAINMENT
TONIGHT An interview with actress
Ally Sheedy, Cannes Film Festival
report; memorable sports moments.
(1) é BENSON An Arab sheik with
plans to build headquarters in the
state develops a passion for Kraus.
BOB NEWHART Bob deals with
an improbable paternity case and a
phone-paging service that never pag-
es him.

7:35
is offered a grand piano by a wealthy
eccentric if he will move it out of his
apartment.

8:00
@ MOVIE *%% “Hooper”
(1978) Burt Reynolds, Jan-Michael
Vincent. The ‘greatest stunt man
alive” plans a spectacular car leap
with a younger rival, thus jeopardiz-
ing his romance and his life.
MOVIE * %x % “Revenge Of The
Pink Panther” (1978) Peter Sellers,
Dyan Cannon. The bumbling Inspec-
tor Jacques Clouseau attempts to
smash an international crime ring
which wants to eliminate him first.
€) HIGHWAY TO HEAVEN
Jonathan and Mark attempt to spark
a relationship between a lonely blind
woman and a badly disfigured artist.
In stereo. (R)
(5 © GREAT SPACE RACE Ameri-
can and Soviet scientists attempt to
answer questions about the nature of
the universe arising from recently
acquired knowledge.
(® BORN FREE A young Masai war-

rior (Ewart J. Walters) and a wealthy
hunter (Glenn Corbett) ignore game

- laws when they set out to track down

a magnificent lion.

(WD) MACGYVER
MacGyver squares off against Hun-
garian authorities and the KGB to
help free a band of Gypsies who have
been imprisoned for unwittingly
stealing classified information. (R)

0

(3 TWENTIETH CENTURY ‘“Sui-
cide Run to Murmansk,” in which a
convoy is destroyed on a North At-
lantic run to Russia. Walter Cronkite
hosts.

MOVIE * % *x “10” (1979) Dudley
Moore, Bo Derek.

STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS
Campbell or Wales Conference
Championship Game Seven, if neces-
sary. (Live) (NOTE: Starting time is
tentative. Game is subject to black-
out.)

8:05

(Teams to be announced)
8:30

‘®3 AIR POWER “The Japanese Per-

imeter” The Battle of Midway
spurred by the Japanese bid to con-
trol the Pacific.

9:00
@ © (® O MOVIE “Stark: Mirror
Image” (Premiere) Nicolas Surovy,

® (7) @ BLACK CHAMPIONS
(1) DYNASTY Alexis and
Ben make a bold move to thwart
Blake’s attempt to take over Colby-
co; Sammy Jo’s romantic involve-
ment with Clay Fallmont is inter-
rupted by Amanda. ©)

3 AFRICA

10:00
@ HOGAN'S HEROES Hogan
schemes to rob a bank to get the cash
he needs to buy secret information.
3 BLACKE'S MAGIC The
Blackes take off to Florida where
sightings of a ghost ship have been
reported by deep-sea divers. (R)
(() @ HOTEL Rebuffed by
Peter, Christine decides to leave the
hotel; Peter’s estranged older brother
surfaces as a bodyguard for a Cen-
tral American leader. Moses Gunn,
Earl Holliman and Bianca Jagger
guest star. CO)
(03 ICEBOUND IN THE ANTARC-
TIC: SHACKLETON “Cape Horn - or
South Georgia?” Shackleton’s fright-

ened and exhausted crew begins an
800-mile journey in an open boat.
(Part 4 of 4)

10:20

Montreal Expos (Live)

10:30
@ GET SMART Max discovers
that 338 KAOS agents have slipped
into the country.
MAUDE Maude panics when she
finds out why the ex-convict she
hired went to prison.

11:00
(@ 0 NIGHT GALLERY A business-
man receives letters tying him to the
mysterious death of a go-go dancer.
BIZARRE Sketches: women’s bo-
dybuilding; scared thin.
(® MAN FROM U.N.C.LE. Waverly
joins Solo and Illya in England as
they continue their search for
THRUSH’s rejuvenation machine.
Guest stars: Maurice Evans, Vera
Miles. (Part 2 of 2)
GREAT DETECTIVE Cameron’s
rowing competition turns into a
death match.
AUTO RACING Highlights of the
’69 Indianapelis 500.

11:30
@ BORIS KARLOFF PRE-
SENTS THRILLER The frightening
darkness of the human mind is un-
covered when a doctor is murdered.
GUNSMOKE A run on the Dodge
City bank forces three desperate
farmers to resort to robbery.
® (@ TONIGHT Host: Johnny Car-
son. Scheduled: country music group
the Oak Ridge Boys, NBC News cor-
respondent Linda Ellerbee. In stereo.
(® © T.J. HOOKER Radicals plan
on killing people to build a better so-
ciety.
NOISE: THE INVISIBLE
RISK
@ BARNEY MILLER After
being told they have 30 days to va-
cate the precinct, the detectives air
their resentment of being shoved out
after so many years. (Part 2 of 3)
TRAPPER JOHN, M.D. A profes-
sional figure skater suffering from
heart disease learns she must hang
up her skates.

12:00
@ @ T.J. HOOKER Hooker fears
that Corrigan and Stacy’s budding ro-
mance will interfere with their police
duties.

i ' Fuel dy gals vag fd

TWENTIETH CENTURY “Sui-
cide Run to Murmansk,” in which a
convoy is destroyed on a North At-
lantic run to Russia. Walter Cronkite
hosts.

BASEBALL'S GREATEST HITS
"78 World Series highlights.

12:30
(@ €O OUTER LIMITS A radio engi-
neer (Cliff Robertson) experimenting
with a 3-D TV receiver tunes in a
being from Andromeda.
MOVIE *% “Crime Knows No
Age” (1973) Mitchell Ryan, Wayne
Maunder. A policeman takes the
place of an unidentified man who
was killed by a bus while carrying
$200,000.
® LATE NIGHT WITH DAVID
LETTERMAN Scheduled: actor Ron
Silver, bandleader Cab Calloway, stu-
pid pet tricks. In stereo.
SCTV Sketches: Al Jarreau
plays the son in “The Jazz Singer”
spoof, Lola Heatherton’s (O’Hara)
new show “Way to Go Woman.”
(3 AIR POWER “The Japanese Per-
imeter” The Battle of Midway
spurred by the Japanese bid to con-
trol the Pacific.
MOVIE * %% “The Seven Year
Itch” (1955) Marilyn Monroe,
NFL FILMS PRESENTS Pro-
filed: Randy White.

12:40
(© © MOVIE ** “My Kidnapper,
My Love” (1980) James Stacy,
1:00
(3 AFRICA In “The Legacy,” Basil
Davidson concludes his series with a
perspective on the aftermath of Colo-
nial rule and the problems faced by
independent nations.

1:05

Train To Rob” (1971)
1:10

(@ @ MOVIE ** “Breakthrough”
1:30

(® FATHER KNOWS BEST

2:00
(3 ICEBOUND IN THE ANTARC-
TIC: SHACKLETON “Cape Horn - or
South Georgia?” Shackleton’s fright-
ened and exhausted crew begins an
800-mile journey in an open boat.
(Part 4 of 4)

2:30
MOVIE * * “Death Follows The
Psycho” (1973) Lorne Greene, Ben
Murphy.
17 art nt

20 A RIOD GY OB)

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FRIDAY EVENING

LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986 PAGE 3

May 9, 1986

mission, the Enterprise takes shore
leave on a seemingly Earth-like plan-
et. :
LAVERNE & SHIRLEY Lenny
discovers that he is a Polish count.
(3 © DOCTOR WHO “The Sea Dev-
ils” Dr. Who is forced to help the
Master repair machinery which will
revitalize Sea Devil colonies all over
the world. (Part 6 of 6)

(® GREEN ACRES “Son Of Drobny”

6:30
@ HAPPY DAYS Richie reluctantly
agrees to go on a blind date with a
girl who towers over him.
® RIFLEMAN Lucas becomes the
target of a young gunslinger.

7:00
®@ THREE'S COMPANY Furley
misunderstands when he overhears
Jack and Chrissy laughing in the
bathroom.
@ MATT HOUSTON A good friend
and ex-cop is facing charges that he
stole cocaine from the police vault.
® @@ BENSON When the governor
is replaced by an impostor, Benson
becomes suspicious.
(® ALIAS SMITH AND JONES Two
armed groups battle for the opportu-
nity to bring Heyes and Curry to jus-
tice. Guest star: Keenan Wynn.
@ é® BARNEY MILLER Wojo and
Detective Janice Wentworth go un-
dercover at a hotel to track down a

clever robber.
BARNEY MILLER A librarian is
arrested for threatening to silence

noisy patrons with a gun.

7:30
@ TOO CLOS! FOR CCMFORT
Sara’s reputation 's on the iine when
she accepts a dini er date and a pro-
motion from the b:nk manager.
©) SANFOR!' AND SON Fred
witnesses a burglary at Julio’s house

but is too scared to identif+ ' ie crim-
inals for the police.

@ ©@ © OO ENTERT: NMENT
TONIGHT A report on t' Cannes
Film Festival; leading wor: n in ro-

mantic films.
(1) BENSON Benson hires a
crotchety old plumber to fix his sink,

Be ra me we BL ae

; 8:00
@ @ MOVIE *** “Bad Boys’
@ MOVIE **%% “Under Fire”

@ (@ KNIGHT RIDER Members of
a rowdy motorcycle gang force a
computer hacker to program the
theft of a deadly weapon. In stereo.

(R)
@ © THORN BIRDS With Ralph
(Richard Chamberlain) unattainable
in Rome, Meggie (Rachel Ward)
agrees to marry sheep shearer Luke
O'Neill (Bryan Brown). (Part 4 of 7)
® © CHARLIE & COMPANY Jun-
ior skips classes and decides to enlist
in the Army. CO)
(® DORIS DAY'S BEST FRIENDS
Guest: Kaye Ballard.
(LL) WEBSTER Webster
takes off for California to visit Uncle
Phillip. (Part 1 of 2) (R) 3)
OXBRIDGE BLUES ‘“He’ll See
You Now,” starring Susan Sarandon
as a neurotic, oversexed singer-ac-
tress seeing a psychoanalyst (Barry
Dennen). Writer Frederic Raphael di-
rects.
MOVIE **% “Kelly’s Heroes”
8:20

8:30
® WALL $TREET WEEK “Are
the Banks Out of the Woods?” Guest:
Harry V. Keefe Jr., president of
Keefe, Bruyette & Woods Inc.
(6 © LEO & LIZ IN BEVERLY
HILLS Leo and Liz cope with a bus-
load of tourists at a housewarming
party. ’
0) 0 @ (B® MOVIE * * * “Thund-
erball” (1965) Sean Connery,

9:00
(€) LAST PRECINCT The cops
from the 56th precinct vanish under
mysterious circumstances at a bi-
zarre party thrown by Night Train.
@ @ © © DALLAS Though his oil
empire is on the brink of collapse,
J.R. finds happiness in Sue Ellen’s
arms. J
® HEART OF THE DRAGON
Four interwoven stories about
modernizing rural China, set in the
village of Maoping, reveal the

Duncan.

9:30
@ WALL $TREET WEEK ‘“‘Are
the Banks Out of the Woods?” Guest:
Harry V. Keefe Jr., president of
Keefe, Bruyette & Woods Inc.

10:00
(@ EO HOGAN'S HEROES The Ger-
mans replace Col. Klink with a more
capable camp commander.
(©) MIAMI VICE Calderone’s
daughter arrives in Miami to warn
Tubbs that her brother is out to
avenge their father’s death. In stereo.
@ © © O FALCON CREST Jeff
holds Maggie hostage in a remote
cabin; Emma and Dwayne make
plans to get married in Nevada. 0)
SHORTSTORIES “The Silver
Crown,” a Bernard Malamud story
about the illness of a Jewish busi-
nessman’s father and the old rabbi he
calls on for help.

10:25
devises an officers’ club for Stalag
13.

10:30
@ € GET SMART KAOS plans to
use Max to assassinate the Chief.
@ MAUDE Maude discovers that
her nephew’s “free and easy” life-
style is just a cover-up for his lack of
responsibility.
@) AUTO RACING Highlights of the
’64 Indianapolis 500.

10:55

PLAY In stereo.

11:00

(@ EO NIGHT GALLERY A brilliant
scientist is held to reality by the illu-
sion that his daughter is still alive.
@ BIZARRE Sketches: clothing for
race car drivers; Super Dave in a
guillotine stunt.

® MAN FROM U.N.CLE. The
agents set out to find a quartet of ex-
Nazis who are trying to sell priceless
stolen paintings back to their original

owners. Guest star: George
Macready.
(3 CHICO HAMILTON AT THE VIL-

a eo i RW EE ee Ra ee

’65 Indianapolis 500.

11:30
@ BORIS KARLOFF PRE-
SENTS THRILLER A macabre
painting of the Grim Reaper brings
death to the home of a mystery writ-

er.
GUNSMOKE When Festus helps a
woman schoolteacher get to Cimar-
ron territory, they both become hos-
tages of a family of hide thieves.

3 (@ TONIGHT Host: Johnny Car-
son. Scheduled: Zippy the Chimp and
trainer Jack Rynsky, actors Steven
Berkoff and Bob Uecker. In stereo.
® © MAGNUM, PI A friend of
Magnum and Higgins snares them
into a sting operation. (May be pre-
empted for coverage of the NBA
playoffs.) (R)

@ AUSTIN CITY LIMITS Fea-
tured: Freddie Powers (‘“Daddy’s
Honkytonk”); Willie Nelson and
Merle Haggard play some of their fa-
vorites. In stereo. (R)

(2 (® BARNEY MILLER A part of
Dietrich’s days as a radical student
returns when his college girlfriend
visits the precinct.

TRAPPER JOHN, M.D. The hos-
pital fears a new synthetic virus may
be spreading; Riverside starts up a
hospital newsletter.

11:55

12:00

@ @ MAGNUM, P.I. Magnum in-
vestigates a murder at a lavish cos-
tume party. (May be pre-empted for
coverage of the NBA playoffs.) (R)
(3 OXBRIDGE BLUES ‘“He’ll See
You Now,” starring Susan Sarandon
as a neurotic, oversexed singer-ac-
tress seeing a psychoanalyst (Barry
Dennen). Writer Frederic Raphael di-
rects.

12:30

MOVIE * %% “The Counterfeit
Green” (1971) David Janssen, Nor-
man Lloyd. A US. Treasury agent
pursues an elusive master coun-
terfeiter.

® FRIDAY NIGHT VIDEOS
Hosts: Howie Mandel, Ted Danson.

RAR A

FCC Cable | 7:00 | 7:30 | 8:00 | 830 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30 | 11:00 | 11:30 | 12:00 | 12:30 | 1:00
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WTBS (IND) Baseball: Phillies at Braves Cont'd Movie: “House Of Dark Shadows” H's Heroes Night Tracks - Power Play Night Tracks Night Tracks
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with unexpected results. strength of tradition and the effects LAGE VANGUARD The composer- Videos by Madonna (“Live to Tell”),
F RIDAY BOB NEWHART Bob joins the of change. (R)C) drummer, backed by a four-member Billy Ot (“There Will Be Sad
a EE I Coins TONIGHT Coss
EViunG ) STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS New Gighs (John Bird, os Lumley) Soon,” “Clinton Avenue,” “Andy’s he i ogg
York Rangers at Montreal Cana- once-rocky marriage is again threat- Walk” and “We Make Music.” Taped Straw.
6:00 : diens, if necessary. Wales Conference ened when word comes about the in New York City, 1981. SCTV Sketches: the results of
(@ EO STAR TREK Following a long Championship Game Five. (Live) breakup of close friends Tory and AUTO RACING Highlights of the Caballeros forgery, Jerry Lewis

(Short) stars in “Scenes from an Idi-
ot’s Marriage.”
(@ STRONG MEDICINE

! 12:40
® OO MCGARRETT A man who
possessed damaging evidence against
an aspiring politician is murdered.
(May be pre-empted for coverage of
the NBA playoffs.) (R)

12:55

1:00
(1) MOVIE ** “French Quar-
ter” (1978) Virginia Mayo,
(3 OXBRIDGE BLUES “That Was
Tory” The stability of Clive and
Gigi’s (John Bird, Joanna Lumley)
once-rocky marriage is again threat-
ened when word comes about the
breakup of close friends Tory and
Duncan.
ACTION SPORTS OF THE 80S
Highlights of the Spenco 500 Bicycle
Race. (Taped)

1:10
@ MCGARRETT A kidnap vic-
tim’s husband resents Hawaii Five-
0’s involvement in the case. (May be
pre-empted for coverage of the NBA
playoffs.) (R)

1:30
@ € PUTTIN’ ON THE HITS Lip-
synced renditions of George Benson's
“On Broadway,” Taco’s “Puttin’ on
the Ritz” and Chubby Checker’s “The
Twist.”

1:55
®) :i7: NIGHT TRACKS In stereo.

2:00

(2 €O FTV Musical guests: Lisa-Lisa
& Cult Jam with Bo-legged Lou and
Paul Anthony of Full Force (“All
Cried Out”).

(3 SHORTSTORIES “The Silver
Crown,” a Bernard Malamud story
about the illness of a Jewish busi-
nessman’s father and the old rabbi he
calls on for help.

2:15
@ MOVIE ** “The Shanghai

Chest” (1948) Roland Winters, Man-

tan Moreland.



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PAGE 4 LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI.. MAY 9, 1986

May 10, 1986
eee ——————————————————— ee ——
SATURDAY MORNING : : ;
FCC Cable| 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 | 9:30 10:00 | 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 | 12:30
WIXT (CBS) @ Polka Dot Captain Bob ~ Wuzzles B'stain Bears Muppets, Babies, Monsters Hulk Hogan Richie Rich Dungeons Man From UN.C.L.E.
WUFT (PBS) @ | Am. Story Am. Story Am. Story Health Bodywatch | Lassie Golden Years Of Television Gourmet Fr. Dining 0ld House | Woodwright
WCTV (CBS) © (© |Bsulwinke Voltron Woody B'stain Bears | Muppets, Babies, Monsters Hulk Hogan Coca-Cola Centennial Celebration Parade
WJCT (PBS) (@) | sesame Street Mister Rogers | 3-2-1 Contact | Nature Down To Earth | Out The Door | With Animals | Bridge Drinking And Driving
WTLV (ABC) ; Hit Neighbor Kidsworld Kids Inc. Littles Bugs Bunny Laff-Lympics Ewoks & Droids Super Powers Small Wonder Hillbillies
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WTBS (IND) ® H's Heroes Get Smart Wrestling National Geographic Explorer Movie: “The Hill”
CBN (IND) ® Club Cont'd Flying House Be Thinner Catch Spirit J. Robison Zola Levitt Movie: “Count The Clues” Broken Arrow Laramie
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| FCC Cable] 1:00 | 1:30 | 2:00 | 2:30 [ 3:00 3:30 | 400 | 430 | 500 [ 5:30 6:00 6:30
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The Movie Ch. “Electric Dreams" Cont'd Movie: “Some Kind Of Hero" Movie: “Sacred Ground” Movie: “Back In The U.S.A.”
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SATURDAY EVENING :

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WNFT (IND) Blue Knight Movie: “The Black Stallion” Movie: “Hot Stuff” "| Telephone Auction Route 66
WTBS (IND) ® Wrestling Baseball: Philadelphia Phillies at Atlanta Braves | Portrait Of America Night Tracks: Chartbusters Night Tracks
CBN (IND) ® Campbells Will Sonnett Movie: “The Maverick Queen” Child. Of Brokenhearted | Success J. Ankerberg Miracle Of Love J. Swaggart
NICK ad You Can't Danger Mouse | Movie: “Spitfire” Movie: “Clouds Over Europe” Movie: “Spitfire”
WGN (IND) It's A Living At The Movies | Movie: “Tom Horn" News Twilight Zone | Lifestyles | Police Story
ESPN @Y) | SportsCenter Auto Racing Stanley Cup Playoffs: St. Louis Blues at Calgary Flames SportsCenter Wrestling
The Movie Ch. Movie: “Father Of The Bride” Movie: “Brewster's Millions” Movie: “Some Kind Of Hero” “She”
Home Box Office 24) | “Rhinestone” Cont'd Movie: “Gotcha!” Howie Mandel Movie: “The Terminator” Movie

LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986 PAGE 9

TUESDAY EVENING May 13, 1986 :
FCC Cable | 7:00 | 7:30 | 800 | 830 | 9:00 | 9:30 [ 10:00 | 10:30 | 11:00 | 11:30 | 12:00 | 12:30 | 1:00
WJXT (CBS) [4] @ Wheel Fortune | Ent. Tonight Orphan Animals Of Tsavo Movie: “Second Serve” News Jeopardy Simon & Simon “Five Of Me"
WUFT (PBS) ® Reflections Nova Frontline | MacNeil / Lehrer Newshour Today In The Legislature Am. Story
WCTV (CBS) [6] (6) | Wheel Fortune | Ent. Tonight Orphan Animals Of Tsavo Movie: “Second Serve” News Simon & Simon “Treasure Of The Amazon”
WJCT (PBS) (@) | Business Rpt. | City Council Meeting Today In The Legislature Business Rpt. | Pride Of Place
WTLV (ABC) Pyramid $1 Mil. Chance | Who's Boss? | Growing Pains | Moonlighting Joe Piscopo Special News Barney Miller Nightline SCTv | Real People
WJKS (NBC) (&))] Benson Sanford A-Team Hunter Stingray News Tonight David Letterman
WCJB (ABC) (D)] Barney Miller Benson Who's Boss? Growing Pains | Moonlighting Joe Piscopo Special News Nightline | Hollywood Comedy |
WAWS (IND) ®@ 3's Company Too Close Movie: “Rosemary's Baby” Get Smart Night Gallery: | Boris Karloff Presents Thriller Start Of Something Big
WNFT (IND) Matt Houston Movie: “Car Wash” Archie Bunker | Maude Bizarre Gunsmoke “Love Is Not Enough”
WTBS (IND) ® Gunsmoke Baseball: Atlanta Braves at New York Mets NBA Basketball: Playoffs Movie
CBN (IND) (©) | Aiias Smith And Jones Daktari 700 Club Chefs | Man From UN.C.L.E. Groucho | Bill Cosby Dobie Gillis
NICK You Can't Danger Mouse | Pickwick Papers Actor Storytelling Pickwick Papers Actor
WGN (IND) Barney Miller Bob Newhart | Movie: “Vertigo” News Trapper John, M.D. Movie: “Wild River”
ESPN SportsCenter Supercross Roller Derby Wrestling Indy Racing | In The PGA SportsCenter | Boxing: Doug DeWitt vs. Charlie Boston
The Movie Ch. Movie: “Gotcha!” Cont'd Movie: “Electric Dreams” Movie: “The Shooting Party” Movie: “The Arrangement”
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Tl JESDA business and drive Fred to skid row. feels responsible for the apparent or motives when he gets a job as pi- Greek (Candy) provides an analysis.
—— \Y a @0® ENTERTAINMENT death of his practical-joke playing ano player in the Long Branch. MOVIE *%%% “Wild River’
TONIGHT Reports on “Star Trek IV: uncle.) @ TONIGHT Host: Johnny Car- (1960) Montgomery Clift, Lee Rem-
The Voyage Home” and the Cannes 9:00 son. Scheduled: boxer Marvelous jck The Tennessee Valley Authority
EVENING Film Festival, memorable sports @ ® HUNTER A news reporter be- Marvin Hagler, singer Jennifer Holli- faces many conflicts while attempt-
moments; comes a prime suspect in a series of ° Jay Il! Stereo. ing to build a series of dams.
® 17: BASEBALL Atlanta Braves at P © © SIMON & SIMON A surgeon
” sto New York Mets (Live) EO 3 MOVIE “Soran Serve» hires the Simons to prove that a man 12:40

taken over by the will of children
beamed on board.

LAVERNE & SHIRLEY Frank
gets jealous after seeing Mrs. Babish
with her ex-husband.

(® © DOCTOR WHO “The Mutants”
The Marshal attempts to find out the
contents of a box which Dr. Who is
guarding. (Part 2 of 6)

® #7: ANDY GRIFFITH Barney de-
cides to dabble in real estate as a
sideline.

(® GREEN ACRES “The Carpenters’
Ball”

HAPPY DAYS Potsie and Ralph

are both in love with a new student
who only has eyes for Richie -- as a
tutor.

spreads in Dodge City when a private
rail coach is quarantined because of
a case of “spotted fever” aboard.

® RIFLEMAN Lucas and Mark find
themselves caring for a six-month-
old baby.

7:00
@ THREE'S COMPANY The
girls fight over which of them is to
join Jack on a week-long cruise.
@ MATT HOUSTON Matt is enticed
to a remote island with the hope of
finding his fiancee’s murderer.
@ (D BENSON A working vacation
on a yacht involves murder. (Part 1
of 2)
(® ALIAS SMITH AND JONES
Heyes and Curry bring in four holdup
men and their loot only to be thrown
in jail themselves.
@) @ BARNEY MILLER A rat
scampers around the precinct while
the detectives search for ten missing
bags of confiscated marijuana.
BARNEY MILLER Harris takes
command of the squad when Barney
is jailed for contempt of court. (Part
1 of 2)

7:30
@ &@ TOO CLOSE FOR COMFORT
Henry and his boss set out to capture
the crooks who stole Sara’s purse.
@ SANFORD AND SON Lamont
and Julio go into the used auto parts

again attracted to a young woman he
had a crush on in high school.
BOB NEWHART Howard's game-
warden brother comes to Chicago
and sets out to win Ellen away from
him.

8:00
@ 0 MOVIE * * x12 “Rosemary’s
Baby” (1968) Mia Farrow, John Cas-
savetes. A young woman is horrified
to discover that her husband has
promised their unborn child to a co-
ven of witches.
€) MOVIE * %% “Car Wash” (1976)
Richard Pryor, George Carlin. The
crazy, mixed-up, daily routine of a
deluxe Los Angeles car wash is inter-
rupted by several unusual customers.
® @ A-TEAM Fulbright promises
the A-Team total freedom if they
successfully retrieve a Vietnam pris-
oner of war. 0)
@ © © O ORPHAN ANIMALS
OF TSAVO A look at the responsibili-
ty and dedication of Daphne Shel-
drick who, along with her husband,
tended to the needs of numerous wild
animals in Kenya's Tsavo National
Park.
® © NOVA The creation of scenes
from “Return of the Jedi,” “Indiana
Jones and the Temple of Doom” and
“9010” are examined in this behind-
the-scenes look at the art of cinemat-
ic illusion. (R) 3)
® DAKTARI Poachers steal ani-
mals from Dr. Tracy’s study center.
Vera: Virginia Mayo.
o WHO'S THE BOSS?
Two women (Donna Dixon, Fran
Drescher) compete for a spokesmo-
del job.)
PICKWICK PAPERS Based on
Charles Dickens’ classic. Pickwick
and fellow club members decide to
tour England. (Part 1 of 6)
MOVIE * % % * “Vertigo” (1958)
James Stewart, Kim Novak. A re-
tired San Francisco detective with a
fear of heights is hired to trail a
wealthy shipowner’s wife and finds
himself falling in love with her.

8:30
@) € @ B GROWING PAINS Mike

(® © FRONTLINE Comparing the
fantasy of the Hollywood myth with
the realities of American filmmak-
ing; interviews with agents, casting
directors and studio executives.
(i) ® MOONLIGHTING
ACTOR Based on the life of actor
Paul Muni, this musical play depicts
a theatrical family’s tribulations dur-
ing the early 1900s. Stars Herschel
Bernardi.

10:00
® @ STINGRAY

o JOE PISCOPO NEW
JERSEY SPECIAL Eddie Murphy
and “Wise Guys” co-star Danny DeV-
ito are scheduled to join the comic
actor for an evening of comedy in-
cluding parodies of “The Flintstones”
and “Miami Vice.” 0)

10:15

(Teams to be announced)

10:30

®@ GET SMART Max and 99's
plan to trap KAOS backfires, and
they themselves are trapped.
MAUDE Maude feels rejected
when a noted literary authority
chooses to lunch with Vivian.

(® CELEBRITY CHEFS Guests:
Lainie Kazan and Lucie Arnaz.

11:00
@ €® NIGHT GALLERY Practition-
ers of black magic try to scare a
woman to death.
BIZARRE Sketches: darts mime;
White House shoe-shine man; wres-
tler’s funeral; plastic surgery.
® MAN FROM UNCLE. Has
THRUSH developed a rejuvenation
formula? Solo visits a Parisian fash-
ion salon, Illya a London lab, to find
out. Guest stars: Maurice Evans,
Vera Miles. (Part 1 of 2)

11:30
@ BORIS KARLOFF PRE-
SENTS THRILLER A man who feeds
off of human lives imprisons a writer
and a beautiful girl in a mirror.
GUNSMOKE People suspect ex-
gunfighter Jake MacGraw has ulteri-

@D PRIDE OF PLACE: BUILD-
ING THE AMERICAN DREAM An
examination of the skyscraper’s
function as a corporate monument.
Guests: Gerald Hines, Phyllis Lam-
bert.)

(® BARNEY MILLER While
dealing with a robbery case, Barney
and his staff learn that the precinct
may be sold to a private business.
(Part 1 of 3)

AMERICAN STORYTELLING
Storyteller Michael Parent narrates
“Why Cats Eat First” and “Come
Again In the Spring.”

TRAPPER JOHN, M.D. When he
learns that the hospital owns a de-
crepit apartment building, Gonzo
wants to renovate it to save it from
the wrecking ball.

12:00
@ @ SIMON & SIMON Rick and
A.J. contend with a smuggler who
uses celebrity look-alikes as a cover
for his underhanded dealings. (R)
® AMERICAN STORY “Life In
The Colonies”
PICKWICK PAPERS Based on
Charles Dickens’ classic. Pickwick
and fellow club members decide to
tour England. (Part 1 of 6)
TOP RANK BOXING Doug
DeWitt (26-2-3, 16 KOs) vs. Charlie
Boston (11-1, 5 KOs) in a
middleweight bout scheduled for 10
rounds, from Atlantic City, N.J. (R)

12:30

(@ ED START OF SOMETHING BIG
Profiles of Glen Campbell, Andrew
Stevens, Zsa Zsa Gabor and Susan
Richardson. (R)

MOVIE *%% “Love Is Not
Enough” (1978) Bernie Casey, Stu
Gilliam. A widowed father of five
moves his brood from Detroit to Los
Angeles in search of a better life.

(€) LATE NIGHT WITH DAVID
LETTERMAN Scheduled: comedi-
enne Joan Rivers, actor Anthony Ed-
wards. In stereo.

SCTV Sketches: Newsmen
Camembert (Levy) and Robertson
(Flaherty) discuss the Melonville
election outcome and Jimmy the

Amazon” (1983) Stuart Whitman,
Bradford Dillman. A group of adven-
turers must contend with piranhas
and savage headhunters while
searching for a fortune in diamonds.

(R)

12:45
® ii7: MOVIE * * “The Proud And
The Damned” (1972) Chuck Connors,
Jose Greco. Five Americans consent
out of fear to fight for a Latin Ameri-
can dictator.

1:00
ACTOR Based on the life of actor
Paul Muni, this musical play depicts
a theatrical family’s tribulations dur-
ing the early 1900s. Stars Herschel
Bernardi.

1:10

@ MOVIE *%* “The Five Of
Me” (1981) David Birney, Dee Wal-
lace. Five personalities plague a Ko-
rean War veteran through his post-
war life and marriage until he seeks
help from a psychiatrist. Based on an
actual case history. ®,

1:30 Te,

® FATHER KNOWS Bud is
struck with puppy love when he sees
a beautiful woman in the supermar-
ket.

2:30
0) MOVIE * %% “Love Is Not For-
ever” (1974) Gary Frank, Debralee
Scott.

2:45

(1941) Ronald Reagan, Ann Sheridan.
3:00
(® MOVIE * % “Detour” (1945) Tom
Neal, Ann Savage.
BILLIARDS Caesars Tahoe Clas-
sic, seniors’ final, from Lake Tahoe,
Nev. (R)
3:30
AMERICAN STORYTELLING

4:00
MOVIE * kx % “The Foxes Of
Harrow” (1947) Rex Harrison, Mau-
reen O'Hara.

STRNITRP Cry CRAPS



7:00

7:30

8:00 | 8:30

9:00 - 9:30

10:00 | 10:30

11:00 | 11:30

WJXT (CBS)

Wheel Fortune

Ent. Tonight Scarecrow And Mrs. King

Kate & Allie Newhart

Cagney & Lacey

News Jeopardy

Remington Steele Movie

WUFT (PBS)

Conversation

Animals Nature Of Things

American Playhouse

MacNeil / Lehrer Newshour

‘| Today In The Legislature

Am. Story

WCTV (CBS)

Wheel Fortune

Ent. Tonight Scarecrow And Mrs. King

Kate & Allie | Newhart

Cagney & Lacey

News

Remington Steele

Movie: “Cracking Up”

WJCT (PBS)

Business Rpt.

Down To Earth

MacNeil / Lehrer Newshour

Pride Of Place

Today In The Legislature

Business Rpt. | Courage

Reunion

WTLV (ABC)

Pyramid

$1 Mil. Chance

Hardcastle And McCo mick

Movie: “Convicted”

News Barney Miller

Nightline SCTV Real People

WJKS (NBC)

Benson

Sanford

NBC's 60th Anniversary Celebration

News Best Of Carson

David Letterman

WCJB (ABC)

Barney Miller

Benson

Hardcastle And McCormick

Movie: “Convicted”

News Nightline

Hollywood Comedy |

WAWS (IND)

3's Company

T. Knight Movie: “10”

Get Smart Night Gallery

Boris Karloff Presents Thriller

Outer Limits

= {£522 |S)
eBBeese000

WNFT (IND)

Matt Houston

Movie: “The Blues Brothers”

Maude Bizarre Gunsmoke

Movie: “Mandrake”

WTBS (IND)

Gunsmoke

Baseball: Atlanta Braves at New York Meis

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National Geographic Explorer

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Alias Smith And Jones

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Jack Benny Man From UN.C.LE.

Groucho | Bill Cosby Dobie Gillis

NICK

You Can't

Danger Mouse | Breaking Away

Diana One By One

Missing From Home

Diana

Breaking Away

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Barney Miller

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| News

Trapper John, M.D.

| “The Poseidon Adventure”

Beeee® Eee ®

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SportsCenter

In Baseball TBA

| Stanley Cup Playoffs: Calgary Flames at St. Louis Blues

SportsCenter

Skiing | Skiing

S

©

The Movie Ch.

“Bloodbrothers” Cont'd

Movie: “Paris, Texas”

Movie: “Just The Way You Are”

Movie: “Exposed”

&

Home Box Office

Movie Cont'd Fraggle Rock

Movie: “Bachelor Party”

Movie: “Act Of Vengeance”

Movie: “The Purple Rose Of Cairo”

| “Hardcore”

a MONDAY,

EVENING

6:00
(@ EO STAR TREK The Enterprise is
captured by a beautiful Romulan
commander.
LAVERNE & SHIRLEY Laverne
dreams that she and Shirley are 80
years old.
(® © DOCTOR WHO “The Mutants”
Dr. Who investigates mutations on an
Earth colony called Solos, a planet
far in the future. (Part 1 of 6)
(@ @ INNOVATION A visit to vine-
yards in New Jersey and New York's
Finger Lakes region.
® i7: DOWN TO EARTH “Wish I
May, Wish I Might” In stereo.
(® GREEN ACRES “Lisa, The Psy-
chologist”

6:30

HAPPY DAYS Richie and his
friends set out to conquer their finan-
cial woes as a rock and roll combo.
(@ @ DINING IN FRANCE The cu-
linary secrets of Pierre and Michel
Troigros; a visit to the Charolais cat-
tle market.

gunfighter is hired to kill a Dodge
City businessman, now courting the
gunfighter’s wife.
® RIFLEMAN The three Malakie
brothers appear in the saloon and
start breaking up the place.

7:00
@ THREE'S COMPANY Jack
gives a cooking lesson to the seduc-
tive wife of a mobster.
€@ MATT HOUSTON A psychiatrist
(George Maharis) uses his confiden-
tial taped interviews with patients as
tools for blackmail.
@ @ BENSON Benson learns the
meaning of faith as a result of his
mother’s visit.
(® ALIAS SMITH AND JONES When
Heyes and Curry visit a friend who is
sentenced to hang, everyone believes
they know where he hid $100,000 in
gold.
(1) BARNEY MILLER Chal-
lenges surround the precinct as Bar-
ney offers compassion to a suicidal
man and a homosexual claims that a
cop assaulted him outside a bar.
@ YOU CAN'T DO THAT ON TELE-
VISION Foreign countries -- their
customs, cuisines and currencies.

BARNEY MILLER Barney is
worried when his daughter has a date
with Wojo, and Harris deals with a
lawsuit lodged against him.

7:30
@ EO TED KNIGHT SHOW Henry's
peaceful day in bed is ruined when
everyone expresses concern over his
health.
@ @@ SANFORD AND SON Grady
invites cousin Emma to the Sanfords
hoping that she will do the cooking
and cleaning.
@ ® © ENTERTAINMENT
TONIGHT On location at the Cannes
Film Festival, memorable sports
moments on television.

New York Mets (Live)

(W) BENSON Benson poses as
Kraus’s husband when her mother
visits from the old country.

BOB NEWHART Bob has his
hands full with Carol's amorous hus-
band, poker parties and allegedly
fixed bingo games.

8:00
@ @ MOVIE *%%x “10” (1979)
Dudley Moore, Bo Derek. A success-
ful songwriter, disturbed about
reaching middle age, decides to
chase after a beautiful girl on her
way to her wedding.
MOVIE * % * “The Blues Broth-
ers” (1980) John Belushi, Dan Ay-
kroyd. Two blues singers must con-
tend with the Chicago police, the CIA,
neo-Nazis and the U.S. Army to put
together a benefit concert to raise
money for their orphanage.
@ @ NBC'S 60TH ANNIVERSARY
CELEBRATION More than 100 ce-
lebrities help the network look back
at its entertainment, sports and news
broadcasts, including highlights from
“I Dream of Jeannie,” “Kraft Televi-
sion Theatre,” “The Cosby Show,”
“Rowan ‘& Martin’s Laugh-In,”
“Bonanza,” “Your Show of Shows”
and various Bob Hope specials. In
stereo.
@ ® © SCARECROW AND
MRS. KING The Agency investigates
when the Russians express an inter-
est in backing an avant-garde play-
wright’s new show.
® NATURE OF THINGS Fea-
tured: how man threatens the Great
Lakes ecosystem.
(WL) (® HARDCASTLE AND
MCCORMICK When the judge is un-
justly imprisoned on a rape charge,
McCormick arranges a spectacular

prison escape. (R) 0)

BREAKING AWAY The guys’
mutual friendship is threatened when
each tries to attain the “American
dream.”

MOVIE *%%% “The Sting”

8:30
STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS Cal-
gary Flames at St. Louis Blues, if
necessary. Campbell Conference
Championship Game Six. (Live)

9:00
@ © © O KATE & ALLIE Kate's
jealous of the budding relationship
between her ex-husband’s girlfriend
and Emma. (R)
(® © AMERICAN PLAYHOUSE “A
Case of Libel” Edward Asner stars as
an attorney who takes on a Pulitzer
Prize-winning columnist (Daniel J.
Travanti) in an emotionally charged
libel suit brought by a war corre-
spondent in the 1950s. C)
@ PRIDE OF PLACE: BUILD-
ING THE AMERICAN DREAM An
examination of the skyscraper’s
function as a corporate monument.
Guests: Gerald Hines, Phyllis Lam-
bert.)
(1) MOVIE “Convicted”
DIANA Diana is sent away after
she’s discovered following four days
in an idyllic hideaway.

9:30
@ @ © © NEWHART Mr. Van-
derkellen asks Michael to sign a pre-
nuptial agreement if he plans to mar-
ry Stephanie. CJ

10:00
@ ® @ CAGNEY & LACEY
Thieves steal a potentially deadly
vial of plutonium from a parked car.

=!

ONE BY ONE Hypnosis for three
tiny alligators? Zoo vet Donald
Turner will try anything in his efforts
to treat exotic animal patients.

10:15

10:30
@ @ GET SMART The diary of a
retired CONTROL agent disappears
and Max is assigned to the search.
MAUDE Carol discovers she’s got
to show her boss more than just pro-
ficiency if she wants to get a promo-
tion. 3
® JACK BENNY Jack tells a re-
porter about his childhood.

11:00
@ NIGHT GALLERY A young

man falls in love with a mysterious
girl who lives on a barge but will not
allow him to come aboard.
BIZARRE Sketches: karate
mime; God’s press secretary; child
giveaway.

(® MAN FROM U.N.CL.E. In North
Africa, Solo and Illya search for a
pouch containing the funds to finance
THRUSH’s plan to rule the continent.
Guest stars: Victor Buono, Daniel
Travanti.

MISSING FROM HOME A
surprise phone call could bring Jerry
home at last. (Part 6 of 6)

11:30
@ BORIS KARLOFF PRE-
SENTS THRILLER A pianist’s in-
sane jealousy of his deceased rival
causes him to desecrate the man’s
grave and steal his hands.
GUNSMOKE A pretty, blind girl
influences Deputy Newley O’Brien’s
efforts to arrest a horse thief. :
(€)) BEST OF CARSON From
March 1985: James Stewart and Nad-
ja Salerno-Sonnenberg join host
Johnny Carson. In stereo. (R)
(® © REMINGTON STEELE Thugs
try to kidnap two youngsters to pre-
vent a man from testifying against
them. (R)
@ @ COURAGE TO CARE Efforts
by non-Jews in Nazi-occupied Europe
to rescue and protect Jews during the
Holocaust are chronicled in this
Academy Award-nominated film
with commentary by author and
Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel.
BARNEY MILLER The detec-
“tives contend with an Indian protest-
ing a museum’s plan to exhibit his
ancestors’ remains.
@ TRAPPER JOHN, M.D. Gonzo
falls in love with a wealthy woman
who uses her money to lure him
away from the hospital corridors to a
private practice.

12:00

@ @ REMINGTON STEELE Laura
and Steele pose as circus performers
to investigate a murder that oc-
curred years before. (R)

@ REUNION Chuck Ellington,
an American soldier who participat-
ed in the liberation of the Mau-
thausen concentration camp, and
Holocaust survivor Bronka Kohn
share their memories. 0)

EXPLORER Featured: the making
of a wildlife documentary; archival
footage of Theodore Roosevelt's trip

into the Amazon basin; the making of
Tabasco on Louisiana’s Avery Island.
Tom Chapin hosts.

BREAKING AWAY The guys’
mutual friendship is threatened when
each tries to attain the “American
dream.”

SKIING Subaru World Cup Free-
style Championships from Lake
Placid, N.Y. (R)

12:30
(@ € OUTER LIMITS The survivors
of a Pacific plane crash find them-
selves sitting motionless on a seem-
ingly solid sea.
MOVIE *% “Mandrake” (1979)

®@ LATE NIGHT WITH DAVID

LETTERMAN Scheduled: Cincinnati

Reds owner Marge Schott. In stereo.

3) © AMERICAN STORY “Pil-

grims And Puritans”

@ SCTV Sketches: Mayor Tom-

my Shanks (Candy) seeks reelection;

Libby Wolfson (Martin) hosts the

“You” show.

MOVIE * 1% “The Poseidon Ad-

venture” (1972) Gene Hackman,
12:40

® ©@ MOVIE *% “Cracking Up”

1:00

DIANA Diana is sent away after

she’s discovered following four days

in an idyllic hideaway.

1:10
@ @ MOVIE * * * “A Midsummer
Night's Sex Comedy” (1982)

1:30
® FATHER KNOWS BEST Betty
takes up the cause to save a popular
restaurant from being closed.

morrow” (1946) Ann Sheridan,
Dennis Morgan.

ONE BY ONE Hypnosis for three
tiny alligators? Zoo vet Donald
Turner will try anything in his efforts
to treat exotic animal patients.

2:30
MOVIE *% “My Love” (1975)
Glenn Ford, Christina Raines.

3:00
(® MOVIE * % 2 “Rocketship X-M”
(1951) Lloyd Bridges, Osa Massen.
MISSING FROM HOME A
surprise phone call could bring Jerry
home at last. (Part 6 of 6)

3:30
@ TOP RANK BOXIN

SATURDAY

AFTERNOON

12:00
@ @ MOVIE **% “The Terror”
(1963) Boris Karloff, Jack Nicholson.
(® @ THIS OLD HOUSE Converting
an attic into a bedroom and bath.
@D DRINKING AND DRIVING:
THE TOLL, THE TEARS The impact
of alcohol-related accidents on the
victims, their families and the drunk
drivers themselves is examined
through interviews and reconstruc-
tions of individual accidents. 0)
(1) WEEKEND “Zack
and the Magic Factory” Zack and
Jenny combine their talents to make
Aunt Daisy’s magic factory a profita-
ble enterprise. (Part 2 of 2) (R) 3)
YOU CAN'T DO THAT ON TELE-
VISION The kids test the strategies
of supply and demand and other mar-
keting ploys.
HORSESHOW JUMPING Valley
Forge Military Academy Grand Prix
from Wayne, Pa. (Taped)

12:30
@ @ HOLLYWOOD CLOSEUP
Scheduled: interviews with Alan Alda
and Joan Rivers; a report on the
resurgence of sitcoms.
(3 © WOODWRIGHT’S SHOP How
to lay out and carve the claw and ball
foot.
(0) AMERICAN BANDSTAND
Guests: the Bangles (“Manic Mon-
day,” “If She Knew What She
Wants”), Nu Shooz (“I Can’t Wait”).
MOVIE * %% “The Young Guns”
(1956) Russ Tamblyn, Gloria Talbott.

1:00
MOVIE * * % “The Long Riders”
(1980) James and Stacy Keach, David
and Keith Carradine.
® BASEBALL Cincinnati Reds
at New York Mets (Live)
(® © VICTORY GARDEN Planting
corn seedlings and potatoes in the
New England garden; Victory Gar-
den South host Jim Wilson visits New
Orleans’ Longue Vue House and Gar-
dens.
(@ @ HEART OF THE DRAGON An
examination of modern political
doctrines and ancient spiritual be-
liefs, including Daoism, Buddhism
and Confucianism. (R) 3)

1:30
(@ € MOVIE % % “The Blob” (1958)
Steve McQueen, Aneta Corseaut.
® CATS AND DOGS Pets as
therapy for elderly hospital resi-
dents; home dental care for dogs. CJ

1:40
@ i7: MOVIE * x % “Some Came
Running” (1959) Frank Sinatra, Shir-
ley MacLaine.

2:00
@ © ® © PGA GOLF Byron Nel-
son Classic, third round, from Irving,
Texas. (Live)
(® @ AUSTIN CITY LIMITS George
Strait sings “Does Fort Worth Ever
Cross Your Mind?” and “Marina Del
Rey”; singer-songwriter Dwight
Yoakam performs songs influenced
by pure mountain music.
@ BODYWATCH A common-
sense guide to babyhood; the perils of
dieting while pregnant; negative as-
pects of intensive learning tech-
niques. OJ
3 WITCHES AND THE GRINNY-
GOG After an ancient stone idol is
moved, a portal to the past is opened
and the guardians of the idol, three

gentle witches, return.

2:30
(@ @ VICTORY GARDEN Corn and
potatoes are planted in the western
garden; landscaping continues and a
mini fruit orchard is established at
the Lexington (Mass.) garden.
MOVIE *%% “Abbott And Cos-
tello Meet The Invisible Man” (1951)
Nancy Guild, William Frawley.
SKIING Subaru World Cup Free-
style Championships from Lake
Placid, N.Y. (R)

3:00
@ €@ MOVIE * %% “Beneath The
Planet Of The Apes” (1970) James
Franciscus, Kim Hunter.
€@ MOVIE *%%% “The Magnifi-
cent Seven” (1960) Yul Brynner,
Steve McQueen.
o TENNIS Tournament of
Champions, from West Side Tennis
Club in Forest Hills, N.Y. (Live)

3:30
@ © ® © NBA BASKETBALL
Playoff Game (Teams To Be An-
nounced)
TOP RANK BOXING Doug
DeWitt (26-2-3, 16 KOs) vs. Charlie
Boston (11-1, 5 KOs) in a
middleweight bout scheduled for 10
rounds, from Atlantic City, N.J. (R)

4:00

@ ( MOVIE * x % “Battle Beyond
The Stars” (1980) Richard Thomas,
John Saxon.

@ NOVA David Attenborough,
Alvin Poussaint and Air Force Capt.
Michelle Johnson join returning
champion Edwin Newman to test
their scientific knowledge in areas
examined by “Nova” episodes. (R) 3)

4:30
(3 WAGON TRAIN Cooper learns
that his girlfriend’s brother (Ross
Martin) is a Brooklyn criminal. Rose:
Annette Funicello.

5:00
(5 © DOCTOR WHO “The Masque
Of Mandragora” Doctor Who travels
to Renaissance Italy to confront an
underground religious cult planning
to enslave mankind.
@ CATS AND DOGS Bladder
stones in cats; a diet and exercise
program for out-of-shape pets; deal-
ing with dog dandruff; Welsh corgis.

m]

FTV Musical guest: Meli’sa Mor-
gan (“Do Me Baby”).

PGA SENIORS GOLF Dominion
Invitational, second round, from San
Antonio, Texas. (Live)

5:30

@ PUTTIN’ ON THE HITS
Lip-synced renditions of Elvis Pres-
ley’s “A Fool Such As 1,” Steve Mar-
tin’s “King Tut” and Cab Calloway’s
“Minnie the Moocher.”

@ DINING IN FRANCE This
look at the champagne-making pro-
cess includes a tour of France's
champagne region and a champagne
tasting lesson by Gerard Boyer.

EVENING

6:00

@ € SOLID GOLD Scheduled: Ste-
phen Bishop, Greg Kihn, Alabama,
Barry Manilow, Janet Jackson, Ani-
motion, Graham Nash, Smokey Rob-
inson (interview). In stereo.

FAME A case of mistaken identi-
ty leads Chris to an audition. In ster-
€o.

® BLAKE'S 7 Servalan and

Travis try to defeat the Freedom
fighters by using a clone of Blake.

@ SNEAK PREVIEWS Jeffrey
Lyons and Michael Medved look at
movies in which “children know
best.” In stereo. (R)

(® FAME An eccentric teacher (Kev-
in McCarthy) substitutes for Miss
Sherwood. In stereo.

7:00
@ €@ BLACK SHEEP SQUADRON
Pappy and his squadron bask in glory
after they rescue Eleanor Roose-
velt’s plane from enemy attack.
(©) STAR SEARCH Guest: John
Ritter. In stereo. (R)
@ @ THORN BIRDS A neglected
wife, Meggie (Rachel Ward) seduces
Luke (Bryan Brown) and becomes
pregnant in an attempt to settle him
down; miserable after her daughter’s
birth, Meggie goes alone to an island
retreat where Ralph (Richard
Chamberlain) surprises her. (Part 5
of 7)
® THE TRIPODS Will, Bean-
pole, Zerlina and Papagena meet
Fritz at the games and take part in
the opening ceremony.
D PRIDE OF PLACE: BUILD-
ING THE AMERICAN DREAM
Washington, D.C.’s Capitol building,
New York City’s Grand Central Sta-
tion, Houston’s Galleria and Frank
Lloyd Wright's Marin County (Calif.)
Civic Center illustrate how architects
use interior space. Guests: Paul Gold-
berger, Cesar Pelli. 0)
(® CAMPBELLS A skeleton found
buried on the Campbells’ land leads
to a murder investigation.
HAW Guests: Willie Nel-
son, Kris Kristofferson, Ben and
Butch McCain, J.T. Jackson. (R)
IT’S A LIVING The restaurant is
turned upside down when a scene
from Dot’s acting class turns into a
real-life drama.

7:30
® SNEAK PREVIEWS Jeffrey
Lyons and Michael Medved host an
informative look at what's new at the
movies.
AT THE MOVIES Scheduled re-
views: “Jo Jo Dancer, Your Life Is
Calling” (Richard Pryor, Debbie Al-
len); “Short Circuit” (Steve Gutten-
berg, Ally Sheedy), “The Last Re-
sort” (Charles Grodin).
AUTO RACING Highlights of the
’66 Indianapolis 500.

lies at Atlanta Braves (Live)

8:00
@ MOVIE **% “American
Guerilla In The Philippines” (1950)
Tyrone Power, Tom Ewell. An Amer-
ican leads Filipino patriots on daring
World War II espionage missions.
MOVIE **% “The Black Stal-
lion” (1979) Kelly Reno, Mickey Roo-
ney. Based on Walter Farley's “Black
Stallion” books. After being rescued
from the island on which they were
shipwrecked together, a boy and a
horse become involved in the race of
the century.
@ ( GIMME A BREAK! Nell gets
involved in a zany scheme to retrieve
her stolen purse. In stereo.
® ALL CREATURES GREAT
AND SMALL “Practice Makes Per-
fect” Tristan fails his exam, James
uncovers a guilty secret and Sieg-
fried embarks on a physical fitness
program.
® ©@ CRAZY LIKE A FOX The
president of a country club is found
murdered on the golf course. (R)

LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986 PAGE 5

@ @ AUSTIN CITY LIMITS Fea-
tured: Gary Morris (“Headed for a
Heartache,” “The Love She Found in
Me”), Gail Davies (“Someone Is
Looking for Someone Like You,”
“You're a Hard Dog to Keep Under
the Porch”). In stereo. (R)

® MOVIE *%% “The Maverick
Queen” (1955) Barbara Stanwyck,
Barry Sullivan. A hotel owner in-
volved with a gang of rustlers falls in
love with the detective racking the
thieves.

M @ @ @ MR SUNSHINE
Leftwich falls in love with a schem-
ing woman who's after his job. 0)
MOVIE **'% “Spitfire” (1942)
Leslie Howard, David Niven. A plane
and its pilot single-handedly save the

British platoon during World War II. -

(@® MOVIE * *% “Tom Horn” (1980)
Steve McQueen, Richard Farns-
worth. In early 20th-century Wyo-
ming, a bounty hunter hired by a
group of ranchers to track down rus-
tlers is set up for a hanging by his
employers. Based on a true story.

STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS St.
Louis Blues at Calgary Flames, if
necessary. Campbell Conference
Championship Game Five. (Live)

8:30
@ @ FACTS OF LIFE Natalie and
Tootie learn that apartment life isn’t
all they thought it would be. In ster-

€0.0)
o JOE BASH Joe's girl-
friend Lorna is arrested by the vice
squad. 0)

9:00
® GOLDEN GIRLS The room-
mates recall the circumstances that
prompted them to live together. In
stereo.
@ ® © AIRWOLF Caitlin be-
comes romantically involved with a
thief who plans to steal Airwolf. (R)
® BUTTERFLIES Ria and the
men in her life come down with a se-
vere case of boredom.
@ AMERICAN PLAYHOUSE
“Rocket to the Moon” Based on Clif-
ford Odets’ play. As his career stag-
nates, a Manhattan dentist (John
Malkovich) is persuaded by his
overbearing wife’s estranged father
(Eli Wallach) to pursue an affair with
his young secretary (Judy Davis). 0)
(UL) 20] HOLLYWOOD
PAGEANT Hosts Alan Thicke and
Emma Samms welcome Miss Holly-
wood 1985 Christina Jensen and the
25 finalists competing for this year’s
title, live from the Wiltern Theatre in
Hollywood, Calif. CO)

9:30
@ @@ 227 Mary fears she’ll be evict-
ed if Sandra inherits the apartment
building. In stereo. (R)
® MOTHER AND SON Arthur

discovers that his mother is the un-

deserving recipient of charity.

10:00
(@ @ MOVIE * x% “Thief” (1981)
James Caan, Tuesday Weld. A pro-
fessional crook gives up his independ-
ence for a big score that he hopes
will secure his family’s future.
MOVIE *%% “Hot Stuff” (1979)
Dom DeLuise, Suzanne Pleshette.
Three Miami cops get in over their
heads with the mob when their un-
dercover fencing operation becomes
conspicuously successful.
@ (@ REMINGTON STEELE Laura
learns sordid facts about the future
Mrs. Remington Steele. In stereo.
@ ® MAGNUM, PI. Mag-
num investigates when the passen-
gers aboard a chartered fishing boat

seem to vanish into thin air. (R)

(® © AGONY When Jane decides to
leave Laurence, she moves in with
her gay neighbors.

@ MOVIE * %x% “Clouds Over Eu-
rope” (1939) Laurence Olivier, Valer-
ie Hobson. A test pilot helps Scotland
Yard solve the disappearance of new
bombers.

11:00

@D FRONTLINE American and
British film records of the liberated
Nazi death camps made during the
Allied invasion of Germany in April
1945 and edited under the direction
of Alfred Hitchcock. (R) 0

(® TWILIGHT ZONE The man who
tries to con the people of Happiness,
Arizona is in for a big shock.

11:20
@ 17: NIGHT TRACKS: CHART-
BUSTERS In stereo.

11:30
® SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE
Guests: Paul Simon, Penn & Teller.
In stereo.
@ @ DANCE FEVER Judges: Jack-
lyn Zeman, John Matuszak, Pamala
Stanley. Performance by Adrian
Zmed. In stereo. (R)
® BLAKE'S 7 Servalan and
Travis try to defeat the Freedom
fighters by using a clone of Blake.
@) E MOVIE *% % “The Invisible
Man Returns’ (1940) =
MOVIE *%% “Saturday
Night Fever” (1977) John Travolta,
LIFESTYLES OF THE RICH
AND FAMOUS Featured: Victor
Borge; Loretta Swit in Monte Carlo;
producer Danny Arnold; Lisa Whel-
chel (“Facts of Life”); Hollywood
photographer Dick Zimmerman.

12:00
MOVIE *%% “Spitfire” (1942)
12:20

12:30
® @ MOVIE kx * “Call Of The
Wild” (1935) Clark Gable.
POLICE STORY With an out-
standing record behind him, a 20-
year veteran (Howard Duff) is
accused of indecent exposure by a
psychotic murderer.

1:00
@ € WILD, WILD WEST West and
Gordon investigate a mysterious
malady which paralyzes the popula-
tion of entire towns.
ROUTE 66 Tod and Buz help a
Chicago man and woman who have
fallen in love on the telephone but
are afraid to meet each other in per-
son.
®@ STAR SEARCH Guest: John
Ritter. In stereo. (R)

1:20

1:30
@ MOVIE “The Gambler” (No
Date)
IN SEARCH OF... “The Loch Ness
Monster”

2:00

MOVIE *%% “Remember”

MOVIE * x “Clouds Over Eu-
rope” (1939) Laurence Olivier, Valer-
ie Hobson.

TALES FROM THE DARKSIDE
Nightmares haunt a dying mobster
(Abe Vigoda) who accepts a strang-
er’s (David Chandler) offer of an
eternal dream.



a eA hr e, J Bol = T= J == 0 Se = Se SC SS SE an Shen Sh Si St he aion Sam Sanam S88 C = RS i
PAGE 6 LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986
May 11, 1986
: SUNDAY MORNING
FCC Cable| 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
WJXT (CBS) @ For Qur Times | Heaven Info Discussion Sunday Morning Face Nation Agronsky Healthmatters Wall St. Jrnl. Essence
WUFT (PBS) ; [5] ® “Come On, Rangers” S. Previews The Tripods | Butterflies Agony | Mother & Son Dave Allen Nova
WCTV (CBS) [6] ® Jimmy Swaggart David Paul Oral Roberts Sunday Morning J. Whittington Family Bible Hour World Tom. Face Nation
WJCT (PBS) @ Sesame Street Sesame Street Sesame Street Firing Line Wash. Week Wall St. Wk.
wives) Jery Falwell LRobison |OralRoberts |lstCoastlife |WordTom. |Larrylones |R Roberts | First Baptist Church David Brinkley
WJKS (NBC) ® Kenneth Copeland Ernest Angley Robert Schuller Discovery Make A Deal Wrestling Wrestling
WCJB (ABC) (LL) Health Jimmy Swaggart | David Paul World Tom. Oral Roberts Telephone Auction Sunday Praise David Brinkley
WAWS (IND) @ Assembly W.V. Grant Jimmy Swaggart Temple J. Kennedy Voyagers Daniel Boone Eight Is Enough
WNFT (IND) Bible Class Bible Voltron W.V. Grant Spider-Man Dolly Harrell David Epley He-Man Greatest American Hero Movie: “The End"
WTBS (IND) ® It Is Written Bugs Bunny And Friends Bugs Bunny And Friends Andy Griffith Good News Movie: “Anzio”
CBN (IND) ® Jimmy Swaggart James Kennedy Kenneth Copeland Lloyd Ogilvie Davey Superbook Club Shari Lewis Flipper
NICK Powerhouse Kids Writes Out Of Control Belle Little Prince Mr. Wizard Lassie Turkey T.V. Danger Mouse Star Trek You Can't NICK Rocks
WGN (IND) Spts. Legend Three Score J. Kennedy R. Schuller Sunday Mass Church Bugs Bunny Jem Rawhide Wild, Wild West
ESPN SportsCenter Stanley Cup Playoffs: St. Louis Blues at Calgary Flames Fishin’ Hole SportsCenter | superstars
The Movie Ch. @3 | “Ladyhawke” Cont'd Movie: “The Old Maid” Movie: “The Little Foxes” “Beyond The Forest”
Home Box Office 24) | Movie: “Rocky” Cont'd Movie: “Talk To Me" Fraggle Rock Movie: “Brewster's Millions” Movie: “Baby Blue Marine”

ee ————
SUNDAY AFTERNOON

FOC Cable] 1:00 | 1:30 2:00 | 2:30 | 3:00 3:30 | 4:00 | 4:30 5:00 | 5:30 6:00 6:30
WJXT (CBS) (@) | NBA Basketball: Playoff Game PGA Golf: Byron Nelson Classic News CBS x
WUFT (PBS) ® Great Performances | Stone Carvers Capitol Jrnl. | Firing Line Tony Brown Money World Newton Wild America
WCTV (CBS) © (©) | NBA Basketball: Playoff Game PGA Golf: Byron Nelson Classic News CBS News
WJCT (PBS) 7 J @ Capitol Jrnl. Moneymakers | Great Performances Ming Garden Sky Disk . Drinking And Driving | Academic Super Bowl Tony Brown Black Family
WTLV (ABC) Tennis: Tournament of Champions Baseball: Yanks at Rangers or Dodgers at Expos News ABC News
WJKS (NBC) (€))] Kung Fu Kojak Boxing SportsWorld: Frankie Warren vs. Gene Mad Dog News NBC News
WCJB (ABC) @ Tennis: Tournament of Champions Baseball: Yanks at Rangers or Dodgers at Expos News ABC News
WAWS (IND) @) | Movie: “The Muppet Movie” Movie: “The Thrill Of It All" Movie: “The Graduate”
WNFT (IND) Movie: “The End” Cont'd Movie: “Hide In Plain Sight” Movie: “Ice Castles” Fame
WTBS (IND) ® Portrait Of America Baseball: Philadelphia Phillies at Atlanta Braves Gymnastics Gunsmoke
CBN (IND) (9) | Gentle Ben Kids Inc. Movie: “Great Day In The Morning” Wagon Train “Under California Stars” Alias Smith And Jones
NICK : (LK) Rocks Cont'd Lassie Big Henry & Polka-Dot Kid The Boy Who Never Was Standby Route 66 1 Spy
WGN (IND) Twilight Zone 1 Step Beyond | Lead-Off Man Baseball: San Diego Padres at Chicago Cubs Movie: “Live A Little, Love A Little”
ESPN PGA Seniors Golf: Dominion Invitational Auto Racing Auto Racing Auto Racing: IMSA Grand Prix | Salt Water
The Movie Ch. 23) | “Beyond The Forest” Cont'd Movie: “The Catered Affair” Movie: “White Mama" Movie: “The Old Maid”
Home Box Office 24) | Movie Cont'd Movie: “Ladyhawke” Movie: “Ghostbusters” Fraggle Rock Movie: “Rocky”
SUNDAY EVENING

FCC Cable] 7:00 | 7:30 [ 8:00 | 830 | 9:00 [ 9:30 [ 10:00 | 10:30 | 11:00 | 11:30 | 12:00 | 12:30 | 1:00
WJXT (CBS) [4] (@) | 60 Minutes Murder, She Wrote Movie: “Trapped In Silence” News Entertainment This Week Music City Harry 0
WUFT (PBS) (5) | Language | bats Army | Nature Masterpiece Theatre | Mystery! Mapp & Lucia
WCTV (CBS) [6] (& | 60 Minutes Murder, She Wrote Movie: “Trapped In Silence” News CBS News Pvt. Benjamin Entertainment This Week
WJCT (PBS) Courage Reunion Nature Masterpiece Theatre Mystery! Non-Fiction Television
WTLV (ABC) Disney Sunday Movie North And South: Book II News At The Movies | Taxi 0dd Couple The Prisoner
WJKS (NBC) ® ®@ Silver Spoons P. Brewster Amaz. Stories | A. Hitchcock Movie: “Dalton: Code Of Vengeance II” News Cannon Meet Press Break Bank
WCJB (ABC) @) | Disney Sunday Movie North And South: Book II News It's AlLiving | Route 66 ABC News
WAWS (IND) ®@ Lifestyles Star Games Movie: “Vertigo” Start Of Something Big
WNFT (IND) SWAT. Switch J. Robison J. Ankerberg Bapt. Church Calvary W.V. Grant Telephone Auction
WTBS (IND) ® Wrestling National Geographic Explorer Sports Page Jerry Falwell J. Ankerberg Jimmy Swaggart World Tom.
CBN (IND) (®) | Doris Day Chefs Coral Jungle In Touch Ben Haden Rock Alive Ed Young Larry Jones John Osteen Kept Secret
NICK 13 | Bros. Donna Reed | Buffalo Bill Rising Damp | Tony Bennett With Love Evening At The Improv Buffalo Bill Rising Damp | Tony Bennett
WGN (IND) Movie Cont'd Movie: “Shamus” 0dd Couple | News Tales 1 Lou Grant Fame
ESPN SportsCenter | Stanley Cup Playoffs: Montreal Canadiens at New York Rangers Auto Racing | SportsCenter Baseball's Hits Arm Wrestling
The Movie Ch. “The Old Maid" Cont'd Movie: “DARY.L" Movie: “Ladyhawke” Movie: “Soldier Of Orange”
Home Box Office 24) | Movie: “Rocky” Cont'd Philip Marlowe, Private Eye | Movie: “Brewster's Millions" | Movie: “Ladyhawke” Movie

Ee

SUNDAY

AFTERNOON

12:00
€ MOVIE *% “The End” (1978)
Burt Reynolds, Dom De Luise.
® NOVA David Attenborough,
Alvin Poussaint and Air Force Capt.
Michelle Johnson join returning
champion Edwin Newman to test
their scientific knowledge in areas
examined by “Nova” episodes. (R) 3)

12:30
@ @ WALL $TREET WEEK “Are
the Banks Out of the Woods?” Guest:
Harry V. Keefe Jr., president of
Keefe, Bruyette & Woods Inc.
NFL SUPERSTARS Profiled:
Earl Morrall.

1:00
MOVIE * % *% “The Muppet

‘Movie” (1979) Voices by Jim Henson,

Frank Oz.

@ @ KUNG FU Caine is forced to
repay a family debt by teaching a
peaceful man how to kill.

@ @® © NBA BASKETBALL
Playoff Game (Teams To Be An-
nounced)

® GREAT PERFORMANCES
“Grown Ups” Jules Feiffer’s loosely
autobiographical play examines rela-
tionships within a family whose
members are incapable of expressing
their love for one another. Resenting
his parents’ (Martin Balsam, Jean
Stapleton) preoccupation with his
success as a New York Times report-
er, Jake (Charles Grodin) vents his
frustrations on his wife and daughter
(Marilu Henner, Kerry Segal). 0)

I) & @ B TENNIS Tournament of
Champions, final match, from West
Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills, N.Y.
(Live)

(® TWILIGHT ZONE A man resolves
to make his plant the most automat-
ed manufacturing establishment in
the world.

PGA SENIORS GOLF Dominion
Invitational, final round, from San
Antonio, Texas. (Live)

2:00

MOVIE *%* “Hide In Plain
Sight” (1979) James Caan, Jill Eiken-
berry.

(€)) KOJAK Crocker’s dedication
to duty struggles with his loyalty to
an old high school chum suspected of
being involved in a protection racket.
@ GREAT PERFORMANCES
“Dance in America: Choreography
By Jerome Robbins With the New
York City Ballet” Two of choreogra-
pher Jerome Robbins’ works -- “Fan-

cy Free” and “Antique Epigraph”

are performed by the New York City
Ballet. In stereo.

(@ MOVIE * %% “Great Day In The
Morning” (1956) Virginia Mayo, Rob-
ert Stack.

BIG HENRY AND THE POLKA
DOT KID A young orphan tries to
save the life of a blind dog.

2:05

2:15
BASEBALL San Diego Padres at
Chicago Cubs (Live)

3:00
@ MOVIE * %% “The Thrill Of
It All” (1963) Doris Day, James
Garner.
@ @ BOXING Meldrick Taylor (11-
0, 7 KOs) vs. Harold Brazier (35-6, 22
KOs) in a lightweight bout scheduled

for 10 rounds, from Corpus Christi,
Texas. (Live)

(® © THE STONE CARVERS This
Academy Award-winning film ex-
plores the traditions and accomplish-
ments of immigrant artisans, featur-
ing views of their work on the
Washington Cathedral. (R)

@ MING GARDEN This film
documents the installation of the As-
tor Court at New York's Metropoli-
tan Museum of Art, a permanent cul-
tural exchange between China and
the United States. (R)

o BASEBALL At press
time, scheduled games were New
York Yankees at Texas Rangers or
Los Angeles Dodgers at Montreal Ex-
pos. (Live)

THE BOY WHO NEVER WAS An
unlikely group of kids outwit a pair
of villains in an assassination at-
tempt against the president of
Burundi.

AUTO RACING NASCAR Winston
Grand National, from Hampton, Ga.
(Live)

3:30
@ © ® O PGA GOLF Byron Nel-
son Classic, final round, from Irving,
Texas. (Live)
@ SKY DISK Sculptor Howard
Rosenthal’s dream of creating a
means to experience the sky is chron-
icled from initial inspiration through
completion of the sculpture. CO)

4:00
MOVIE * * “Ice Castles” (1979)
Lynn-Holly Johnson, Robby Benson.
(€)) SPORTSWORLD Scheduled:
Frankie Warren (18-0, 14 KOs) vs.
Gene “Mad Dog” Hatcher (24-3, 19
KOs) for the USBA junior wel-
terweight title, scheduled for 12
rounds, from Corpus Christi, Texas
(Live); Ms. Olympia Bodybuilding
Championship from New York.
(Taped) |
® © FIRING LINE “Resolved: We
Should Move Toward Privatization,
Including the Schools” William Buck-
ley Jr. and economists Milton Fried-
man and Thomas Sowell debate edu-
cators Albert Shanker, Paul Starr
and Bill Honig. (Part 2 of 2)
@ DRINKING AND DRIVING:
THE TOLL, THE TEARS The impact
of alcohol-related accidents on the
victims, their families and the drunk
drivers themselves is examined
through interviews and reconstruc-
tions of individual accidents. CJ
AUTO RACING NASCAR Atlanta
Invitational, from Hampton, Ga.

(Taped)

5:00
@ € MOVIE * % x % “The Gradu-
ate” (1967) Dustin Hoffman, Anne
Bancroft.
® TONY BROWN’S JOURNAL
Should the black community con-
demn actors who continue to portray
black stereotypes in film and televi-
sion? Guest: actress Beah Richards.
(® MOVIE *% “Under California
Stars” (1948) Roy Rogers.
@ AUTO RACING IMSA Grand
Prix, from Riverside, Calif. (R)

5:05
@ 7: GYMNASTICS Top gymnasts
(men and women) compete In an ex-
hibition meet at Nassau Coliseum in
Uniondale,
Goodwill: US/USSR Games.

5:30
MOVIE *%'%2 “Live A Little,
Love A Little” (1969) Elvis Presley,
Michele Carey.

EVENING

6:00
FAME An eccentric teacher (Kev-
in McCarthy) substitutes for Miss
Sherwood. In stereo.
(® © NEWTON'S APPLE How sci-
entists are learning to fight cancer;
“sweet spots” on a tennis racket;
sneezing; a badger. CO)
@ TONY BROWN’S JOURNAL
Should the black community con-
demn actors who continue to portray
black stereotypes in film and televi-
sion? Guest: actress Beah Richards.
(® ALIAS SMITH AND JONES Jed
“Kid” Curry starts up an investiga-
tion when a few poker players fall
victim to a murderer’s bullets. Guest
star: Joseph Campanella.

6:30
® WILD AMERICA Tips on
tracking and getting close to foxes,
moose, bears and birds. CJ

7:00
@ @ LIFESTYLES OF THE RICH
AND FAMOUS Featured: Victor
Borge; Loretta Swit in Monte Carlo;
producer Danny Arnold; Lisa Whel-
chel (“Facts of Life”); Hollywood
photographer Dick Zimmerman.
@ S.W.AT. Hondo and his team
move in to save a professional bas-
ketball team that has been taken hos-
tage by a group of terrorists.
@ @@ SILVER SPOONS Kate takes
over as president of Edward's toy
company. In stereo.
® MIND YOUR LANGUAGE
Misinterpretations present problems
when Jeremy tries to help a student's
wife with marital problems.
(@ @ COURAGE TO CARE Efforts
by non-Jews in Nazi-occupied Europe
to rescue and protect Jews during the
Holocaust are chronicled in this

‘Academy Award-nominated film

with commentary by author and
Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel.
® DORIS DAY'S BEST FRIENDS
Guest: Loni Anderson.
(1) DISNEY SUNDAY
MOVIE “Young Again” A man re-
lives the days of his youth and ro-
mances his high-school sweetheart.
Stars Robert Urich and Lindsay Wag-
ner.)

7:30
(€))] PUNKY BREWSTER Punky
and Cherie launch an anti-drug cam-
paign at school. In stereo. (R) 0)
® DAD’S ARMY “Fallen Idol”
Mainwaring loses his popularity with
his men when the platoon is assigned
to grenade practice.
@ REUNION Chuck Ellington,
an American soldier who participat-
ed in the liberation of the Mau-
thausen concentration camp, and
Holocaust survivor Bronka Kohn
share their memories. CO)
(03 DONNA REED Donna wants to
surprise Alex with a new hair color.
Guest stars: Cloris Leachman, John
Astin.
MOVIE * %% “Shamus” (1973)
Burt Reynolds, Dyan Cannon.
STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS
Montreal Canadiens at New York
Rangers, if necessary. Wales Confer-
ence Championship Game Six. (Live)

8:00

(@ € STAR GAMES Sports competi-
tion featuring cast members from
“Still the Beaver,” “Days of Our
Lives” and “Dance Fever.” Guests:
Mitch Gaylord, Rich Hall. Semifinal
round. (R)

@ SWITCH Mac seeks to avenge

LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986 PAGE 7

Pete’s severe beating by a mobster.
@ (@ AMAZING STORIES A janitor
rocks the scientific world by sudden-
ly being able to speak fluent French
and compute difficult mathematical
equations. In stereo. 0)

@ @® ® OO MURDER, SHE
WROTE Jessica investigates when
patrons at a Cabot Cove restaurant
fallill. (R) OQ)

® © @ @ NATURE Midway Is-
land viewed from a historical and
ecological perspective, including a
look at the thousands of gooney birds
that breed there. In stereo. [J
BUFFALO BILL Despite Carl's
feelings about the issue, his teen-age
son becomes one of Bill's adoring
fans.

8:05

® 17: NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
EXPLORER Featured: the making
of a wildlife documentary; archival
footage of Theodore Roosevelt's trip
into the Amazon basin; the making of
Tabasco on Louisiana’s Avery Island.
Tom Chapin hosts.

8:30
(® @ ALFRED HITCHCOCK PRE-
SENTS A traveling salesman intimi-
dates a vengeful man on a deserted
highway. In stereo.
RISING DAMP Alan schemes to
sneak a woman upstairs while the
landlord’s napping.

9:00
@ MOVIE *%%% “Vertigo”
(1958) James Stewart, Kim Novak. A
retired San Francisco detective with
a fear of heights is hired to trail a
wealthy shipowner’s wife and finds
himself falling in love with her.
® (® MOVIE “Dalton: Code Of Ven-
geance II” (Premiere) Charles Tay-
lor, Donnelly Rhodes. As a favor for
a friend, Vietnam veteran David Dal-
ton helps locate his former com-
manding officer, who's currently aid-
ing a paramilitary organization. CJ
@ © ® O MOVIE “Trapped In Si-
lence” (Premiere) Marsha Mason,
Kiefer Sutherland. A psychologist
tries to break down the walls of si-
lence behind which an emotionally
disturbed 16-year-old has retreated.

0

(® © @ @ MASTERPIECE THE-
ATRE “By the Sword Divided” Sir
Martin Lacey is dead and Tom is im-
prisoned in Swinford; Cromwell has

ruthless plans for Arnescote despite

the Parliamentary order for its sale.
(Part 8 of 9)

@ &@ @ B® NORTH AND SOUTH:
BOOK II George travels with Lincoln

"to meet Grant and Sherman; Charles

is reunited with Augusta; in the after-
math of the war, Orry and Madeline
return to a disastrous scene at Mont
Royal. Stars James Read, Patrick
Swayze and Lesley-Anne Down. (Part
6 of 6) 0)

(3 TONY BENNETT WITH LOVE
Direct from the Sahara Tahoe in
Reno, Tony Bennett performs stand-
ards from Porter and Berlin to Ger-
shwin and Ellington.

9:30
ODD COUPLE In the throes of a
hangover, Oscar throws Felix out of
the apartment.

10:00

® @ MYSTERY! “Agatha
Christie's Partners in Crime”The
Beresfords investigate a murder af-
ter Tommy receives actress Gilda
Glenn's note requesting a meeting on
supposedly haunted Morgan's Ave-
nue.)

10:30
AUTO RACING Highlights of the
’67 Indianapolis 500.

11:00
(® © MAPP & LUCIA Tilling’s so-
cial leader, Miss Elizabeth Mapp, re-
jects a painting done by Lucia’s
friend Georgie without consulting the
other members of the Tilling Art
Committee. (Part 2 of 4)
(@ @ NON-FICTION TELEVISION
David McCullough narrates this sur-
vey of two centuries of Shaker life,
featuring interviews and archival
material. (R)
EVENING AT THE IMPROV
Host: Doc Severinsen. Guests: Denny
Johnson, Scatman Crothers, Maurice
LaMarche, Dottie Archibald.
TALES FROM THE DARKSIDE
A young doctor (Patrick Kilpatrick)
makes a house call and discovers
that his patient is a vampire.

11:30
START OF SOMETHING BIG
Profiles of Glen Campbell, Andrew
Stevens, Zsa Zsa Gabor and Susan
Richardson. (R)
3 @ CANNON Cannon meets with
hostility when he goes to a small cat-
tle community in order to clear an
old friend accused of murder. (Part 1
of 2)
@ ENTERTAINMENT THIS
WEEK An interview with Jaclyn
Smith; a look at romance in film,
with host Linda Gray. Co-host: Pa-
trick Duffy.
@) €D IT’S A LIVING The restaurant
is turned upside down when a scene
from Dot’s acting class turns into a
real-life drama.
(® AT THE MOVIES Scheduled

reviews: “Jo Jo Dancer, Your Life Is

Calling” (Richard Pryor, Debbie Al-
len); “Short Circuit” (Steve Gutten-
berg, Ally Sheedy); “The Last Re-
sort” (Charles Grodin).

(@ LOU GRANT Charlie fears his son
has been lost to a Hare Krishna reli-
gious sect.

12:00
@ é ROUTE 66
BUFFALO BILL Despite Carl's
feelings about the issue, his teen-age
son becomes one of Bill's adoring
fans.

12:15
@® © ENTERTAINMENT THIS
WEEK
; 12:30
(3 RISING DAMP Alan schemes to
sneak a woman upstairs while the
landlord’s napping.
FAME Leroy suffers a serious
knee injury during a dance demon-
stration. In stereo.
@) BASEBALL'S GREATEST HITS
Baseball’s unnofficial handbook, part
1

1:00
(3 TONY BENNETT WITH LOVE
Direct from the Sahara Tahoe in
Reno, Tony Bennett performs stand-
ards from Porter and Berlin to Ger-
shwin and Ellington.
ARM WRESTLING Major League
baseball teams compete.

1:30

@ MOVIE 2 “The Magic Voyage
Of Sinbad” (1962) Edward Stolar,
Anna Larion. Sinbad sets sail for
faraway lands in search of the mean-
ing of happiness.

2:30
(® AT THE MOVIES Scheduled re-
views: “Jo Jo Dancer, Your Life Is
Calling” (Richard Pryor, Debbie Al-
len); “Short Circuit”

TY VER CRO NC



CLASSIFIED WANT AD INDEX

Lake City Reporter, 126 E. Duval/P.0. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056

AD DEADLINES

Deadline is 5:00 p.m. two working
days prior to publication. LEGAL
ADS in addition to revisions must be
received two working days prior to

‘fpublication. Cancellations will be

taken up to 10:00 a.m. one day prior
to publication.

ADJUSTMENT CLAIMS

Claims will be allowed only when
notice is given by advertiser on same
day ad error occurs. The Lake City
Reporter will not be responsible for
more than two incorrect insertions. If
your ad appears in the paper after
you have cancelled, please notify the
classified department immediately.

HOURS

Classified ads are taken Monday
through Friday from 8:00 a.m. until
5:00 p.m.. The office is closed on
Saturday and Sunday.

ACCEPTABLE
ABBREVIATIONS

These abbreviations are accepted on-
ly if the customer requests them.
They still do not reflect good copy. It
is our responsibility to sell good
readable copy to our customers.
GENERAL: Assistant-Asst., And-&,
Apartment-Apt., Appointment-Appt.,
Approximately-Approx., Bath-BA,
Bedroom-BR, Building-Bldg.,
Company-Co., Condominium-Condo:,
Words Per Minute-WPM, Central
Heat & Air-CH&A, Doctor-Dr.,
Furnished-Furn., Unfurnished-
Unfurn., Incorporated-Inc.,
Miscellaneous-Misc., Graduate-
Grad., Refrigerator-Ref.
MEASUREMENTS & DIRECTIONS
Feet-Ft. or (’), Inches-In. or (”),
Yard-Yd., Mile-Mi., Square Feet-Sq.
Ft., Highway-Hwy., Street-St.,
Avenue-Ave., Road-Rd., Drive-Dr.,
Boulevard-Blvd., Route-Rt., State
Road-SR, County Road-CR,
Hour-Hr., Minute-Min., Month-Mo.,
Week-Wk., Year-Yr., North-N,
South-S, East-E, West-W, (NE, NW,
SE, SW), Equal Opportunity

Employer-E.0.E., Male, Female,
Handicapped-M-F-H.

OUT OF TOWN
ADVERTISERS A

Out of town advertisers are required
to prepay. Payment by check, money
order, Mastercard or Visa are ac-
cepted. Prices can be quoted by
phone prior to insertion.

CLASSIFICATIONS:
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Legal Notices

1-Lost & Found

2-Personals

3-Card of Thanks

4-In Memorium

5-Services -

6-Rewards

7-Travel

8-Carpools
9-Announcements.

EMPLOYMENT
10-Help Wanted

11-Sales Help Wanted
12-Medical Help Wanted
13-Work Wanted

FINANCIAL
16-Investments
17-Business Opportunities
18-Money to Loan
19-Mortgage Money

SCHOOLS/CHILD CARE
20-Babysitters

21-Daycare Facilities
22-Schools/Education
23-Tutoring

PETS & LIVESTOCK

* 30-Pets & Supplies

31-Grooming

32-Pets Wanted
33-Livestock & Supplies
34-Livestock Wanted

MERCHANDISE

40-Wanted to Trade
41-Household Goods
42-Antiques
43-Garage Sales

44-Musical Instruments
45-Auctions
46-Miscellaneous
47-Wanted to Buy
48-Fresh Produce

MARINE, FARMING,

‘INDUSTRIAL

50-Office Equipment
51-Farm Equipment
52-Boats for Sale
53-Marine Supplies
54-Industrial Supplies
55-Building Materials

MOBILE HOMES

60-Mobile Home Lots for Rent
61-Mobile Home Lots for Sale
62-Mobile Homes for Rent

63-Mobile Homes for Sale
64-Mobile Home Services

RENTALS

70-Rooms for Rent
71-Unfurnished Apts. for Rent
72-Furnished Apts. for Rent
73-Unfurnished Homes for Rent
74-Furnished Homes for Rent
75-Business & Office Rentals
76-Wanted to Rent

77-Condos for Rent

78-Condos for Sale

REAL ESTATE

80-Homes for Sale
81-Lots for Sale
82-Farms & Acreage
83-Commercial Property
84-Out of Town Property
85-Recreation Property
86-Waterfront Property
87-Investment Property
88-Real Estate Wanted

TRANSPORTATION

90-Auto Leasing

91-Auto Parts & Supplies
92-Towing & Hauling
93-Motorcycles for Sale
94-Trucks & Vans for Sale
95-Cars for Sale
96-Moving & Storage
97-Campers & Trailers

120

130

Backhoe Service Errands
Dump Truck Lake City
Service Care Service

Septic tanks installed.

Land clearing. Fill dirt.
Reasonable rates. Call Bill
or Lola 1-454-4047, Ft. White

State reg. daycare worker
will help w/shopping, doc-
tor visits or pick up your
child after school. 752-5114.

124

132

Carpentry Florists
Repair and Colonial
Remodeling Florist

All repairs & remodeling on
homes or mobile homes, in-
cluding ceramic tile. Call
755-2250.

125

Carpet Cleaning

Adra’s
Steamatic

#1 Clean Across the Nation.
Call 752-5200.

127

Construction

G..C
Construction

Commercial, residential &
agricultural bldgs. Car-
ports, MH additions, much
more. Free est. 362-4893.
State Lic. & Insured.0

129

Drafting Services

Drawngs & Designs
Your Ideas or Mine

* House plans * Renderings
* Design sketches

* Technical drawings
John at 755-5180 or 497-1188.

master charge

A-BO-KAY for every occa-
sion. Come by our shop or
call 752-7437. S. Hwy 41.
Jilene Dicks, Owner.

133

Furniture Refinishing

Vintage
Wood

Furniture refinished.
Quality work at reasonable
rates. Call 755-6915, if no
answer, call after 6 p.m.

145

Home Improvements

General
Carpentry

Homes built, remodeled,
decks, slabs, MH additions,
gen. carpentry. Insured.
Free est. 752-6608
#CRCO33500

Graham's
Home Maintenance

M.H. repairs, electrical,
plumbing, insulation. No
job too large or small.
Please call 755-0978.

Jay Murry
Good Handyman

Due to certain laws, you
buy the materials and pay
me by the hour. Call
755-2210 or 752-2918.

Home
Maintenance Service

All types of home repairs.
Hourly rates. All work
guaranteed. Call 752-1809
for more information.

RATES: 1 DAY RATE-69c PER LINE. 5 DAY RATE-55¢c PER LINE.
10 DAY RATE-48c PER LINE. 15 DAY RATE-42c PER LINE.
20 DAY RATE-35¢ PER LINE.
(We have a 4-line minimum. These rated do not reflect various monthly specials.)
i CALL 755-5440 or 755-5441 FOR MORE INFORMATION

immediately.

LEGAL NOTICES

Registration of Fictitious Names

We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons in-
terested in the business or profession
carried on under the name of Truck
Parts of North Florida at P.O. Box
3026 (Arrowhead Rd.) Lake City,
Fla. 32056 and the extent of the in-
terest of each as follows:

Daniel G. Devereux 50%
Gloria A. Devereux 50%

-s-Daniel G. Devereux
-8-Gloria A. Devereux

STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA

Sworn to and subscribed before me
Pehis 15th day of April, A.D. 1986.

-s-Sherri P. Douglas

SHERRI P. DOUGLAS

NOTARY PUBLIC, STATE OF
FLORIDA

My Commission expires January 16,
1989

#5411

Lake City Reporter
Classified Dept.
Adjustment Claims

Claims will be allowed only
when notice is given by adver-
tiser on same day ad error oc-
curs. The Lake City Reporter
will not be responsible for more
than two incorrect insertions. If
your ad appears in the paper
after you have cancelled, please
notify the classified department

JR ad special Place them above your ad to make it
Put in two or three to make it Extra Special

* FA ®t, &

* We are now offering stars for your ad for

ol oT gir= [oP oT FARM O11 IR fo 1 gl a a Lo I f= a} {oY @ aa Fo Alo [A R= 10 10.
RESERVE YOUR

JSRERY: YVR] gi SR RY: VY

LEGAL NOTICES

April 18, 25, 1986
May 2, 9, 1986

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR COL
UMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA

PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-92-CP
Division

IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARGARETTE WOODS

Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION

The administration of the estate of
MARGARETTE WOODS, deceased,
File Number 86-92-CP, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is MARY B. CHILDS,
Clerk of Courts, Columbia County
Courthouse, Lake City, Florida. The
names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.

WE WILL RUN YOUR
4-LINE BUSINESS AD

ONE MONTH FOR ONLY ..

145

Home Improvements

158

Land Clearing

Kirk's Home

Repairs

Mobile home repairs, sun
decks, porches, concrete
work, plumbing, elec., pain-
ting. Free est. Call 755-6137
General

Masonry

Stone, brick, block, con-
crete. Fireplaces, patios,
porches, houses. Free est.
38 yrs. exp. 904-752-7038.

Harrington

Maint. & Repair

Elec., carpentry, roofing &
remodeling. Free info.,
hourly rates. Call 752-1097
after 6 p.m. please.

150

Insurance Service

Crews
Insurance

*Auto *Homeowner *Mobile
Home *Motorcycle *Boats
*Motorhome/RV *Business
*Farm. All you insurance
needs, Diane Crews 755-1666

155

Karate Instruction

Free Style
Karate School

“No nonsense’ karate in-
structed by Joel Willis.
Opening new location,
Country Club & Baya *Self
defense *Physical condi-
tioning *Character develop-
ment *PKA full contact
training. Classes Tues. &
Thurs. 56:30 & 7-8:30 p.m.,
Sat. 10-11:30 a.m. Come try
a free class?

J Ap
Changing lifestyles?
SELL IT IN

CLASSIFIED!
755-5440

Dick Bruland
Land Clearing

Bulldozing Road Grading
Limerock Driveways
Fill Dirt Culvert Pi
Septic Tanks Drainfields
Asphalt 755-4474.

Stumps

Removed

Tree Stumps Removed.
Any size, 1 - 100,
Reasonable Rates. Call
Dick at 755-4474.

159

Lawn Service

Jim’s Lawn
& Tree Service

Complete lawn care from
trimming hedges to fertiliz-
ing. Good work done.
Reasonable rates. 752-2666.

Mack & Washington

Lawn Service

Complete lawn care. Hour-
ly rates. Free estimates.
Call 752-7278 or 752-6351.

Ron’s
Lawn Service

Complete lawn care. Now
booking for Spring and
Summer. Free estimates.
Call 755-3583.

160

Limerock Hauling

Limerock
Hauling

Call after 6 p.m.
755-3754.

161

Mobile Home Moving

Columbia Mobile
Home Movers

Complete moves and set up.
Doublewides & singles. In-
sured. Free estimates. Call
752-4210.

161

Mobile Home Moving

Buck North

Mobile Home Moving
Mobile home moving, ser-
vice & set-ups in including
doublewides. Free
estimates. Call 752-2254.

162

Mobile Home Repairs

Graham's

Home Maintenance
M.H. repairs, electrical,
plumbing, insulation. No
job too large or small.
Please call 755-0978.

163

Musical Services

Turney Piano Co.
Home of Baldwin

Will now rent you a new or
repossessed Baldwin Piano
for 6 mos. at only $27/mo.
This is to apply to purchase
if you so desire. We have
over 75 new and used pianos
and organs. Call Valdosta
1-912-244-0242.

165

Painting Service

All Types

Painting

Brush or spray. By the hour
of by the job. Also cool seal-

ing and pressure washing.
Bobby Williams at 752-0450.

180

Telephone Answering

Intella Communication
Services, Inc.

A complete Telephone
Answering Service 24 hours
a day. Pagers. State-wide
toll free 800 number.
Telephone systems & in-
stallation. Personalized
service. Call 755-2255.

LEGAL NOTICES

TODAYH

LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986 5- B

4

Â¥
SS r=1al0 MelVit |

]

LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICES

All interested persons are required
to file with this court, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE:
(1) all claims against the estate and

2) any objection by an interested
person to whom notice was mailed
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the per-
sonal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.

ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.

Pulbication of this Notice has
begun on April 25, 1986.

Personal Representative:

WALTER W. WOODS, JR. and
WILLIAM H. WOOD

3304 McFarlene Ave.

Lake City, FL 32055

Attorney for Personal Represen-
tative:

STEPHEN M. WITT

P.O. Box 2064

Lake City, FL 32056-2064

Telephone: (904) 755-2863

#5433
April 25, 1986
May 2, 9, 16, 1986

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR COL-
UMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA

PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-84-CP
Division Probate

IN RE: ESTATE OF
ELTON CLYDE CURRAN

Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION

The administration of the estate of
ELTON CLYDE CURRAN, deceas-
ed, File Number 86-84-CP, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Columbia
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is P.O. Box 1965,
Lake City, FL 32055. The names and
addresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative’s attorney are set forth below.

All interested persons are required
to file with this court, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS OF THE FIRST
PUBLICTION OF THIS NOTICE:
(1) all claims against the estate and
(2) any objectioin by an interested

*25

184

Tractors

Tractor

Work

Seeding, sod, sprigging,
planting, cultivating, mow-
ing, harrowing, bottom
plowing, blade work, fer-
tilizer spreading. Low
rates. 752-7109 or 752-0475.

J.R.’s Custom
Tractor Work

* Mowing * Bottom Plowing
* Harrowing * Blade Work *
Fertilizer & Seed Spreading
Free Estimates. 755-1831.

185

Tree Service

Nettles & Son
Tree Service

Tree work. Stump Removal
and Firewood. Please call
752-8862 for more info.

186

T.V. Service

Fernando’s T.V.
Sales & Service

Free estimates on all T.V.
repairs & antenna systems.
752-9382. Across from Sears
& Foodway on E. Duval.

188

Video Taping

Love
That Video |

Will video tape your wed-
ding with Love. Call Lake
City 752-9274 or Starke
964-4582.

190

Well Drilling

Hughes’

Well Drilling, Inc.
Well drilling for 2” deep
wells. Also 4’ wells. Call

752-2061 for further infor-
mation.

person on whom this notice was serv-
ed that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the per-
sonal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.

ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.

Publication of this Notice has
begun on April 25, 1986.

Personal Representative:
-s-Nancy Hartman Curran
NANCY HARTMAN CURRAN
P.O. Box 805

Lake City, FL 32056

Attorney for Personal Represen-
tative:

-s-Donald B. Linsky, Esquire
DONALD B. LINSKY, ESQUIRE
LINSKY and LINSKY

Suite “B”

1509 Sun City Center Plaza

Sun City Center, FL 33570
Telephone: (813) 634-5566

#5434
April 25, 1986
May 2, 9, 16, 1986

PUBLIC NOTICE
ON
INVITATION TO BID
BID 8586-044

Sealed bids will be accepted by the
City of Lake City, Florida, until 11:00
A.M. on MAY 16, 1986, in the City
Manager's Office located in the City
Hall, 150 North Alachua Street, Lake
City, Florida. At which time, all bids
will be opened and publicly read
aloud for the construction of ONE
NEW ONE TON WALK-IN VAN.

Specifications may be obtained from
the Purchasing Agent, P.O. Box 1687,
U.S. #41 North & Gum Swamp Road,

“METAL DRAIN PIPE”

Prices quoted on all items are to be
firm and in effect for a period of
twelve (12) months from award of
bid. Bids must be placed in a sealed
envelope and be plainly marked on
the outside “SEALED BID - METAL
DRAIN PIPE”.

All bids must be submitted in the of-
fice of the County Commissioners at
the Courthouse Annex, P.O. Drawer
1529, Lake City, Florida, 32056-1529
no later than 11:00 A.M., Tuesday,
May 27, 1986. All bids submitted must
be on official bid forms.

Additional information and bid forms
may be obtained from the Commis-
sioners Office in the Courthouse An-
nex, (904) 755-4100, Ext. 206.

The Board reserves the right to re-
ject any and/or all bids and to award
a bid which will be in the best interest
of the County.

Dated this 6th day of May, 1986.

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS

COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
-s-Kenneth E. Witt

Kenneth Witt, Chairman

#5467
May 9, 16, 1986
1 Lost &
Found

IMPOUNDED: ONE COW
Picked up on I-10 for
Sheriff’s Dept. Call to iden-
tify. Must pay pick-up
charges & feed bill. Call
752-2921.

Lake City, Florida, 32055. Teleph
Number (904) 752-2031 Ex. 74.

#5463
May 9, 1986

PUBLIC NOTICE
ON
INVITATION TO BID
BID 8586-043

Sealed bids wiil be accepted by the
City of Lake City, Florida, until 11:00
A.M. on MAY 27, 1986, in the City
Manager's Office located in the City
Hall, 150 North Alachua Street, Lake
City, Florida. At which time, all bids
will be opened and publicly read
aloud for the construction of:
DRAINAGE IMPROVEMENTS
FOR FOREST HILLS.
Specifications may be obtained from
the Purchasing Agent, P.O. Box 1687,
U.S. 441 North & Gum Swamp Road,
Lake City, Florida, 32055. Telephone
Number (904) 752-2031 Ex. 74.

#5464
May 9, 1986

IN THE COUNTY COURT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CASE NO. 86-363-SP

Verndale Auto Sales
Rt. 10, Box 388

Lake City, Fla. 32055
Plaintiff.

VS

Clare F. Saltz

P.O. 2557

Clearwater, Fla. 33517
Defendant

A law suit has been filed to determine
owner ship and title of a certain vehi-
cle described as a 1977 Ford LTD 4D
with serial #7U63H157063 located in
Lake City, Columbia County,
Florida.

The following person(s) may have
some right title or interest therein:
Verndale Auto Sales.

If you have a claim, interest, or
defense in this cause, you must file
your written answer or objection
with the Clerk of Court of Columbia
County within 10 days.

MARY B. CHILDS
Clerk of Courts

BY:-s-Wanda B. Jones
Deputy Clerk

#5465
May 9, 16, 23, 30, 1986

IN THE COUNTY COURT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CASE NO. 86-364-SP

Morris Scarborough
Rt. 3, Box 268

Lake City, Fla. 32055
Plaintiff.

VS

Bill Kerman
Address - Unknown
Defendant

A law suit has been filed to determine
owner ship and title of a certain vehi-
cle described as a 1969 Buick 4D with
serial #484399H267183 located in Lake
City, Columbia County, Florida.

The following person(s) may have
some right title or interest therein:
Morris Scarborough.

If you have a claim, interest, or
defense in this cause, you must file
your written answer or objection
with the Clerk of Court of Columbia
County within 10 days.

MARY B. CHILDS
Clerk of Courts

BY:-s-Wanda B. Jones
Deputy Clerk

#5466
May 9, 16, 23, 30, 1986

REQUEST FOR BIDS

Notice is hereby given that the Col-
umbia County Board of County Com-
missioners request sealed bids on the
following:

2 Personals

WAR
GAMES

1-3734518 or 495-2357.

HUNTING LEASE
WANTED
Starting this season. Prefer
no dogs. Would like camp-
ing on property. Call collect
813-754-4867 days for Bud or
write to Ron Allen, 1715
Staunton Ave., Lakeland,

FL 33803.

5 Services

BECOME A NOTARY
For details, 1-800-432-4254.
Florida Notary Association
BOOKKEEPING SER-/
VICE Small & medium size
businesses. Call 755-3144. -

LY) Announcements |

TALLAHASSEE MALL
Arts & Crafts Show, July
18-20. 12x12 ft. sp. $50. In-
terested exhibitors contact
Diana Redner, Tallahassee
Mall Office, 1-385-7145.

1 QHer Wanted

Real Estate Licensing
Only 4 Weeks?
Call 755-4040

N. Fla. Real Estate College

BE YOUR OWN BOSS
Choose your hours. Good
pay & benefits. All this from
Avon. Call Sally, 755-0396.

EXPERIENCED
TRACTOR TRAILER
DRIVER

Wiley Sanders Truck Lines,
Inc., Troy, Alabama, needs
experienced tractor trailer
drivers for over-the-road. If
you're at least 21 yrs. of age
and have a good driving
record with a minimum of
two years over-the-road
tractor trailer experience
and want a good job with
good pay and benefits, call
1-800-633-1510, ask for the
safety department.

MARRIOT CORP. seeking
motivated individual to fill
relief manager position. 4
nights, 40 hrs. Transporta-
tion & phone a must. Apply
to Howard Johnson's, I-75.
FEDERAL, STATE & Civil
jobs now available. Call
1-201-586-2556 ext 9A9 25
hours for info.

TEACHERS
Looking for 2 or 3 ambitious
self-motivated people with
desire for parttime income.
Please reply to: Teachers,
P.O. Box 1709-CH, Lake Ci-
ty, FL 32056-1709.

SECRETARY/
RECEPTIONIST
Immediate opening for ex-

perienced secretary/rece,
tionist. Duties include
answering telephone, typ-
ing, filing, etc. Computer
exp. desireable. Apply in
person btn 10 am & 1 pm,
880 E. Baya Ave, Lake City,
FL.



6- B LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986

Help
Wanted

LADY WANTED TO CARE
for elderly lady. 24 hours.
Salary, room & board &
time-off. 752-4820 or after
5:00 p.m. call 752-4191.

PARTTIME HELP needed.
Fri., Sat. & Sun. Apply in
person at Gateway KOA.
Call 752-5721 for info.
CHAIRPERSON ON THE
GOLF COURSE
OPERATIONS &
LANDSCAPE DESIGN &
MANGEMENT PROGRAMS

Master’s degree in Plant
and Soil Sciences, Business
or Public Administration
and two years’ experience
in Golf Course and/or Land-
scape Operations. Earned
Doctorate preferred.
Responsibilities include
student recruitment, ad-
ministration, public rela-
tions with industry, student
placement, supervision of
faculty and staff, minimal
teaching. Salary: $24,000
minimum + Chairperson
supplement, salary is
negotiable based on ex-
perience & qualifications.
Deadline: Open.

RETENTION
COORDINATOR & HEAD
BASEBALL COACH
STUDENT SERVICES
(10 MONTH POSITION)

Bachelor's degree and prior
coaching experience.
Responsibiulities include
coordinating a retnetion
program for the College
and coaching and College
baseball team. Salary:
$14,340.80 + based on ex-
perience and qualifications.
Deadline: Open.

CUSTODIAN
PHYSICAL PLANT

Completion of eight grade
or any equivalent combina-
tion of training and ex-
perience. Salary: $3.93
hourly, plus benefits.
Deadline: Open.

To apply, contact Lake City
Community Colege, Rt. 3,
Box 7. Lake City, Florida
32055. (904) 752-1822 ext.
313. EA/EOEMPLOYER
GOVERNMENT JOBS
- $59,230/yr. Now
Call 805-687-6000

Ext. R-10091 for current
federal list.

LJ

DO YOU

FRESH PRODUCE
FOR SALE?

IF SO, LET US HELP FIND YOU BUYERS!

The Lake City Reporter will now publish a
FRESH PRODUCE ‘‘cut-out’’ in our
Classified section. No matter how many
ads are placed, they will be displayed in
such a way that will make them more visi-

ble to your prospective buyer.

1 (QHer Wanted

INSURANCE CLERK
needed for established
agency. Applicant must be
personable & responsible.
Send resume to: Ins. Clerk,
P.O. Box 1709-WG, Lake Ci-
ty, FL 32056-1709.
EARLY MORNING route
avail. Excel. earnings,
must be able to post cash
bond. Call 752-5121.
$1000-$2000 COMMISSION
per week plus overrides.
Steel building co. is looking
for a state manager. Must
be a reliable & mature in-
dividual with managerial
experience. Will train in the
field. Call collect:
904-389-5616, M-F', 8 to 4
Ask for Mr. Lee.
SERVICE ADVISOR
Fulltime position open im-
mediately. Compensation:
salary plus commission.
Excellent benefits. Ex-
perience a plus but not
necessary. We will train
you. Requirements: high
school graduate, very legi-
ble writing, good physical
health. Apply in person at
Summer's Chevrolet-
Chrysler, 500 South First St.
SEWING MACHINE
operator needed. Fulltime
position. Benefits. Apply in
person at Sunstate Sport-
swear, 450 Turner Rd.,
Lake City.
LEGAL SECRETARY Ex-
perience preferred. Must
type at least 60 cwpm, shor-
thand preferred. Must be
able to deal with the
general public. Send
resume to: Legal
Secretary, P.O. Box
1709-SW, Lake City, FL
32056-1709.
IMMEDIATE OPENING
for semi-retired stable man
for permanent parttime
position. Apply in person at
903 Perry St., Lake City.
ARC WELDER Fulltime
employment. Apply:
Hester Plow Company, E.
Washington St., Lake City.

MIG WELDERS &
ASSEMBLY WORKERS
Needed. Come by Anderson
Industries, West Gate for
application. West Lake City

Hills Avenue.

—

H

10 Help

Wanted
MARKETING/

NEWCOMERS DIRECTOR

To sell the bank programs
and services to prospective
newcomers. Must be able to
make presentations,
prepare letters and be able
to communicate well with
people.

Please send resume to:
Personnel Director
P.O. Drawer 1058

Lake City, Florida
320456-1058

An Equal Opportunity
Employer
EXPERIENCED BRAKE
& front end automotive
mechanic. Must have own
tools. Excellent salary plus
commission program,
medical benefits available.
Apply in person at Lake Ci-

ty Tire, 19 W. Nassau.
SENIOR CLERK
BUSINESS OFFICE
HALF-TIME

High school graduate or
equivalent plus two years’
business office experience.
Salary: $4.82 hourly.
Deadline: May 16, 1986.

To apply contact Lake City
Community College, Rt. 3,
Box 7, Lake City, Florida
32055, (904) 752-1822, Ext.
313.

EA/EO EMPLOYER
EQUIPMENT OPERATOR
The City of Lake City Gas
Department is seeking the
following personnel.
Equipment Operator who
must be able to operate one
of the following equipment:
Front Ednd Loader, Dozer,
and Backhoe. Must be ex-
perienced in pipeline laying
and responsible for the con-
tinous safe and efficient
operation of construction
and maintenance equip-
ment. Applications may be
obtained at the Receptionist
Desk at City Hall, 150 N.
Alachua St., from 8:30 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Accepting applica-
tions until May 23, 1986.

Equal Opprotunity
Employer

755-5440

VE

WHAT'S THE COST?
This is the best part. This service is free,
costing you nothing more than the regular
price of an everyday classified ad.

Call 755-5440 or 755-5441 for more info.
Lake City Reporter
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Medical
Help Wanted

12

RNs, GNs needed for CCU,
all shifts, ACLS certified.
Experienced basic EKG in-
terpertation. Apply in per-
son or call 1-362-1413,
Suwannee Hospital, Inc.

RN
Immediate fulltime posi-
tion available in a. pro-
gressive health care facili-
ty. Night shift. Medical
surgerical experience re-
quired. Apply to: Person-
nel, Lake Butler Hospital
Hand Surgery Center, SR
121 & 100. Lake Butler, FL
32054. 904-496-2323. Equal
Opportunity Employer.

1 3 Work Wanted

YOUNG BOY 15 yrs.old
would like to do yard mow-
ing. Call 752-0029.
EXPERIENCED Mature
lady needs clerical or
secretarial work. Call
1-362-2565 in the A.M.

17

5 STATION BEAUTY
Salon. $5500. Earn 16-5/8%
APR on your investment.
755-2607 after 6 p.m.

Business
Opportunities

Complete training, excel.
income, w/opportunity to
own your own business. Call
Decorating Den, 1-787-9253.
MURRAY
BAKERY PRODUCTS
One of the world’s largest
cookie & cracker manufac-
tgurers has an opportunity
in Lake City, Fla. market
for an aggressive, am-
bitious person established
territory route distributor-
ship with the option to own.
For appt. call Fred
Schumm, 752-9369, btn. the
hrs. of 6 & 9 p.m.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY
EMPLOYER
ADDITIONAL INCOME
More infor.: Miss Edwina
N. Carson, 435 Tabor Dr.
W., Jacksonville, FL 32216

18

LOANS/VISA/MASTER-
CARD
Guaranteed!
neededt

Call 1-813-747-6309, 24 hrs.

22

Train To Be A
TRAVEL AGENT
TOUR GUIDE
AIRLINE
RESERVATIONIST

Start locally, full time/part
time, train on live airline
computers, home study and
res. training, financial aid
available, job placement
assistance, national head-
quarters LHP, Fla.

A.C.T. TRAVEL SCHOOL

1-800-432-3004
Accredited member NHSC

Money
to Loan

No credit

Schools/
Education

REGISTER NOW
for Columbia County Adult
and Community Education
classes beginning May 12th
at the Lake City Jr. High,
East Campus. Mon. thru
Thurs. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Ask
about our FREE Communi-
ty Education Classes.

30

DOBERMANS, shepards,
rotts, poodles, all ages,
AKC, training .. stud ser-
vice avail. $250 .. up.
1-454-3184.

Pets &
Supplies

FREE KITTENS to good
homes. Call 397-2513.

AKC DOBERMANS Champ
bloodlines both sides. Black
& rust. Shots, wormed, tails
docked. Both parents on
premises. Will be big dogs.
$150 & up. 1-387-2717 aft 5
AKC ENGLISH BULLDOG
20 months old. $450. Call
752-0996 after 6 p.m.

FREE TO good homes.
Mamma cat & 6 kittens.
Call 755-0529.

2 TINY TOY black poodles
& 2 tiny toy red poodle pup-
pies. CH lines. Call
1-786-6808. Aft 7 p.m.
FREE TO GOOD HOME. 8
mo. 1/2 Golden Retriver &
1/2 Springer Spaniel. Great
with kids. Call 755-2307.

FREE Puppies & kittens to
good homes please. Puppies

wormed & shots. Call

752-6810 after 6 p.m.

AKC BASSETT HOUND
puppies. 6 wks. old.
$200/each. Call 963-2249.
FREE PUPPIES Mid-size
black & white puppies. 7

wks. old. Dewormed. Come

by the Columbia County
Jail for the pick of the litter.
or call Lee, 752-3581 btn. 8
am. &8 p.m.

his, WEES

— Don’t Miss These Specials™

AMERICAN CANCER
SOCIETY CARPORT SALE
at Church of Christ carport,
1st & Madison, Sat. May 10.
8 a.m. until. All proceeds go
to local chapter.

OVERSTOCK SALE:
Everything must go. Fri. &
Sat. Stereo, tapes & more.
Corner of Dade & Baker Sts

YARD SALE Saturday,
May 10. Hwy 47, 1/2 mile
south of I-75. Baby items
and miscellaneous.

ATTIC SALE Sat., May 10.
8-3. Hernando & Nassau Sts.
Books, furn., clothes, misc.
Entertainment & doll raf-
flet Proceeds go to the
Historic Preservation
Board.

YARD SALE Fri. & Sat. 9
until. Refrig., washer,
hospital bed, many
household items, some
clothes. Old Valdosta Hwy,
3 mi. out. Follow signs.

YARD sale leftovers or spr-
ings hour cleaning? Give a
tax-deductible donation to
Historic Preservation
Board for May 10 Attic Sale.
752-1086, 752-6473, 752-5377

Livestock
& Supplies

33

Mobile Homes
For Rent

62

Mobile Homes
For Rent

62

Mobile Homes
For Sale

63

FLA. SHERIFFS BOYS
RANCH has good coastal
Bermuda hay for $1.50 per
bale. Disc. to a $1.25 per
bale for a thousand or more
bales. Call 1-842-5555, btn
8:30 am to 5 pm weekdays.

46 Miscellaneous

Call State Farm Insurance
Office-John Burns for best
buy on hositalization &
home owners ins. 752-5866.
MOVING-MUST SELL
Complete T.V. Channel
Master pole. Used 3 mos.
Good as new. $275. 755-3266.
LOGGING EQUIPMENT
for sale by owner. Skidder,
loader, trucks & saws. Call
397-2617.

WATER HEATERS

Commercial Electrical
Used
120 Gallon 54,000 watts
TEXGAS CORP.

Lake City 752-5445
25” CONSOLE TV Wood
cabinet, $150/cash. 19’ por-
table, $200/cash. 755-2446
after 5 p.m.

34,000 EATON Front &
rears, 7.17 ratio with walk-
ing beams & springs. $1,000.
Call 755-3754 after 5 p.m.
USED TIN 50 sheets 2'x 12’.
Good shape. (2) 38x52
awning-type roll-out win-
dows, & misc. 755-0410.

TIRED OF GIVING THE
SAME OLD THING FOR
MOTHER'S DAY?
Then come to Mary Lou’s
Greenery for something
new & different. 1205 E.
Monroe. 755-1842 Frank &
Mary Lou Williamson-owner

MOVING SALE All things
must go incl. furn, Kit.
utensils, brick-a-brack, bed
linens & spreads &
blankets. Call 752-9237.

REFRIGERATOR with ice
maker for sale. $200. Call
752-1545.

Wanted

47 to Buy

JUNK CARS

Top prices paid.
Call 752-4434.

WE BUY TOOLS

Antiques and household
goods. Call 752-2485.

51

2 & 4 ROW ROLLING
cultivators. Also, 2 row
power tiller. Call 752-8689 or

755-5369

ALL STEEL BUILDINGS
At Dealer’s Invoice.
3,000 to 50,000 sq. ft.

(305) 291-8281, collect.

Farm
Equipment

Building
Materials

* * * ARROWHEAD * * *
Under new mgt. Now ren-
ting shady lots & 1,2 & 3 BR
furn. & unfurn. MH. Pool,
laundry, playground, cable.
No pets. Children welcome.
Conv. located off I-75 & SR
47 by Pepsi plant. 752-6422,
10 am - 6 pm.
2BR MOBILE HOME.
Adults only. Call 755-4573.

ARROWHEAD

Under new mgt. Now
renting shady lots & 1, 2
& 3 BR furn. & unfurn.
MH. Pool, laundry, play-
ground, cable. No pets.
Children welcome. Cen-
trally located off I-75 &
SR 47 by Pepsi plant.

752-6422

10am-6pm

IMMACULATE 2 BR, 1%
BA, reasonable rates.
752-4380.

2 BR 13 mi. south of town.
Water & mowing furn. No
kids or pets. $175/mo. plus
dep. 752-2644 after 4:30.

BRAND NEW 3 BR 2 BA
dbl. wide. Jacuzzi, FP, W/D
hookup, CH&A, w-w carpet,
drapes, appl., Jen-air,
stereo thru-out. Util shed,
porch, yard maint. avail.
No pets. Kids okay. 400/mo.
$250/dep. 755-4433, ask for
Gary or 752-1293 btn. 12 & 4
p.m., ask for Robin.
2 BR 1 BA singlewide. Un-
furn. central AC. Couple, no
pets. Call 755-0927.

60

Mobile Home
Lots for Rent

PARADISE
VILLAGE

MOBILE HOME PARK
Swimming Pool,
(oC ATA |: 0)

[a T-F: T3800

Approved for FHA & VA
Financing
Welcome Senior Citizens
oddushamathifessboredballiidalid)

752-8433

TIMBER ;
LANE

MOBILE HOME COMMUNITY
Now Renting Lots
*Trees *10x20 Patios
*Free Yard Care
Country Living Close
LCR ETT
2.5 Mi. W. on Troy Rd
Off Branford Hwy
7558795 DAY OR NIGHT

SHADY, QUIET LOTS
Water & sewer furnished.
Adults only please. Call
755-5714.

Pondview Mobile
Home Space

Approved for FHA & VA LALEDTT
Large lot, very nice park
CTR AVA
Welcome Senior Citizens

Call 755-0927

North Florida's Finest All Adult
Manufactured Home Community

If You're Looking For A Clean, Safe, Active, Grow-
ing Community With Activities Geared To The

Mature Adult

VISIT EASTSIDE VILLAGE
East Baya at Hwy 100 - (904) 752-8267

We Bring Great Neighbors Together!
ID No. 85DA01993

2 BR 1 BA CH&A, lg.
private wooded lot in town.
Water & sewer includ.
$175/mo. + dep. 755-0895.

2 BR furn., AC, water furn.
No pets. Call 752-4348.

2 BR FURN OR UNFURN
close to town & Aero. By
week or month. Dep. No
pets. Call 755-4556.

3 BR mobile home for rent.
Call 755-4235 for more info.

$145/mo. all sections of
town. Call 752-6183.
CLEAN 2 BR, 1 BA, AC, Ig.
lot w/trees. W. 90 & I-75
area. 752-6269, 9 a.m. to 12
noon.

12x60 MOBILE HOME with
AC. Close to town. Call
752-1675.

2 BR TRAILER for rent.
Has private entrance.
Water furnished.
$100/month. Call 752-9755.

COUNTRY PEACE & quiet

2 BR 1 BA, dbl. wide. No

pets. Real clean. $200/mo.
plus dep. Call 755-0545.
CLEAN 2 BR w/AC, color
TV avail. Water furn.
Adults only. No pets. Patio
porch. $45/wk. 752-3363.

2 BR trailer w/AC near
Kmart. By month. Also
small trailer renting by the
week w/util. furn. 755-0506.
1 BR with AC. $37.50/week.
Rents weekly or monthly,
plus deposit. Call 752-5174.
1 BR trailer by week or
month, plus deposit. Call
755-5379. Quiet park near
Aero.

CLEAN 2 BR patio
w/cover. Paved drive.
Mowing furnished. Couple,
no pets. Call 752-6040.

63

Mobile Homes
For Sale

SPECIAL SALE
New 14x52.
8,750 - *109.87/Mo.
New 14x70 3BR, 2B

*950 down-*136.67/mo.
NEW HORIZON
MOBILE HOMES
Hwy 41 North
752-6811

* Rent to Own *

Double or single wide star-
ting at $179/mo.
1-800-423-2003
Eves. 622-2226
TAKE OVER PMTS.
Down payment already
made. 14x70 Fleetwood 3/2,
1 mo. old. Transfer fee &
$169/mo. Free delivery &

set-up. Call James collect

0-328-9608.

12x60 2 BR, 1 BA, on 1 acre.
Screened porch, double ce-
ment block garage. By
owner. Call 752-8396.

Double or single wide star-
ting at $179/mo.
1-800-423-2003
Eves. 622-2226

va Molo] UN

NEW
24x64 4BR, 2BA

Set-up & Del.
#200 per mo.
Call NOW 755-5114

(od {oe RIO) [0]," 13
US 90 W. - Lake City

CLOSE-IN COUNTRY LIV-
ING. By owner 2% ac., 3/3,
sm. barn, workshop,
garden area w/irrg. sys., &
extras. Call 755-6563 aft 5
p.m. & wknds.

BC

0 Ee

New 14’ Wide
Set-up & Del.

With Furn.
*25.68 per wk.

E-Z FINANCING
Call 755-5114

NO TURN DOWNS
We finance. Everyone
qualifies. Low down. Low
monthly. Call Curtis or
Gene at 1-351-1131.

33; ACRES FENCED Dbl.

wide 3 BR, 2 BA, pool, 2 out

buildings, large oaks.

$42,500. Call 397-2266.
NEW HORIZON

. MOBILE HOME

REPO OUTLET
*195 Down On

All Homes
60 to choose from -
81-84 Models 2 & 3BR
HWY41N. 752-6811

* STOP *

New in area? Not much
credit? Call anyway. We
finance. New statewide
plan. Call Mr. Max, collect,
0-904-351-8514, Ocala.
OWNER MUST SELL 1982
dbl. wd. Like new. No cash
needed. Call 755-4008.
HAVE REPO REPO Bank
must move several 2 & 3
BRs. Call 755-4008.

NEW 14x70 2 or 3 BR $11,895
or $160/mo. New 24x44 3 BR
$11,995 or $167/mo. Call
752-8082.

NEW, USED & REPO
Don’t be jerked around:
Call us today for free credit
check. Florida’s largest
dealer has the power to put
you in a home today. Call
1-351-1131, Gene.

2/1 14x65 83’ River Oaks.
Ready to move into. Assm
mtg. of $225/mo. w/nothing
dn. Call 755-5879.

1981 14’ WIDE mobile home
for sale. Assume payments
of $176.01/mo. Call 752-6682.

*

OWNER SAYS SALE
On the lot financing. Free
delivery & set. Singles,
doubles, low down. Easy
credit. Circle B Ocala,
904-351-2126.

95 2 BR 1 BA trailer. Cent.
AC. Refrig., stove, exc.
cond. $7,500. Call 935-3600.

New 14x70, 3/2, $11,900.
Pay transfer fee & $135.95
per month. Free credit
check by phone. Call Mr.
Max, collect, 0-904-351-8514.
3/2 DBL. wide, FP, sunny
kit.,, bay window, porch,
nice park w/pond. Live
Oak. Call 1-362-3666.

* Doublewide *

Wood siding, shingle roof.
$199/mo. as low as $700/dn.
1-800-423-2003. Eves 622-2226

MUST SELL 24x64 1984
Fleetwood dbl. MH. 4 BR, 2
BA, Ig. LR, DR, ceiling
fans, CH&A, skirting.
$19,900. $16,500 mtg. Down
pmt in cash or trade for
anything of value. 752-4773



1.
it

R
11

ne
ts

63 Mobile Homes
For Sale

*

STOP
Call Circle B before you buy
any mobile home. Your
volume giant. Homes star-
ting at $2995. Free credit
check by phone. 904-351-2126
Ocala.

FREE!
CREDIT CHECKS

By phone or in per-

son. Call 755-5114.
VTTaV70To T-N « ITIVE JF
new home at Circle
® Inc., Lake City, Fl.

USED HOMES as low as
$3,500. 12x60’s. Call
755-4573.

1983 14x70 Brigadier, 2/1,
Ig. kit., 1g. LR, w-w carpet,
CH&A, BW, built-in stereo,
stove, ref., DW, pantry,
bar. $1500/dn. $212.87/mo.
CAll 752-5931.

12x70 4/2 with air. $5900
financing avail.. Call
752-0089.

12x65 MUST SEE to ap-
preciate. Financing avail.
Call 752-0089.

14x60 BELOW MARKET.
With air cond. Will finance.
Call 752-0089

14x56 MUST SELL 2/1. Will
finance. Call 752-0089.

14x70 SINGLE 1984 2 BR, 2
BA mobile home. Exc.
cond. CH&A. No down pay-
ment. Call 397-2409.

BUY HERE - PAY HERE
We finance. Now is the time
for your new home.
Everyone qualifies.
Easy terms.

Call 1-351-1131, Curtis.
71 Unf. Apts.
For Rent

2 BR CH&A, fully carpeted.
Security deposit required.
No pets. 752-5086.

2 BR townhouse and 1 & 2
BR apts. Fully equipped
kit., pool & Ind. facilities.
755-2423.

1 & 2 BR unfurn., drapes,
carpet, stove, refrig.,
CH&A, Ind. & pool. 752-7388

2 BR 1 BA, all appl

$240/mo. $150/sec. &
$204/mo. $150/sec. at
Lakeview Apts. Call
752-8617.

2 BR APTS. now available.
Starting at $202.50. Lake Ci-
ty Villas. 755-5996 or
755-5345. Equal Housing Op-
portunity.

UNDER NEW
MANAGEMENT
VILLA de MODE

APARTMENTS

1 & 2 Bedroom

Adult Units :
Close to V.A. Hospital

GREENTREE
TOWNHOUSES
2 Bedroom
Family Townhouses
Close to Kmart
BOTH HAVE
Swimming Pools
Fully Equip. Kitchens
& Laundry. .

755.2423

2BR, 1BA, all appl.

$240/mo. $150/sec. &
$204/mo. $150/sec. at
Lakeview Apts. Call
752-8617.

short term lease. 2 BR, 1
BA, kit. equipped, W/D
hookups, pest control.
$260/mo. 755-4037.

CLEAN 1 BR DUPLEX in
town. No children. Call
752-4348.

NICE 2 BR APTS. AC,
refrig., stove, . W/D
hookups, water furn. No
pets. $235 & $245/mo. Sr.
Cit. Disc. 752-2318 or
752-5825 aft. 6 & on wknds.

TRI-PLEX APT. Nice2 BR,
1% BA, heat pump, carpet,
range, refrig., DW,
disposal, W/D hookup in
sep. util area-off kit., you
pay utilities, lawn maint.
provided. No pets. Corner
Ponce DeLeon & Michigan.
752-0765 aft 6 p.m.
weekdays, or anytime. Sat.
& Sun.

1 BR FURN. Clean & com-
fortable. Elec. kit. No pets.
Like private home. Mature
person please. Reasonable.
Call 752-0497.

LIKE NEW

2 BR, 1 BA duplex, CH&A,
DW, W/D hookups, cable
TV, encl. garage. Call
755-6560 or 755-5109. If no
answer, call collect after 6
p.m., 1-362-6605.

2 BR 1 BA CH&A, in town.
$250/mo. Call Barbara at
752-5198 aft 6 p.m.

Unf. Apts.
For Rent

71

LG. ENERGY EFFIC.

2 BR dup., CH&A, all appl.,
carpet & drapes, W/D
hookup. No pets. 752-6806.

5 ROOM brick duplex apt.
Adults. No pets. Call
752-1249.

72 Furn. Apts.
For Rent
SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE
Efficiencies. $99 a month.

1 BR $139, 2 BR $159.
Please call 752-6183 9-6 PM

1/2 BR APTS. by day, week
or month. Utilities includ-
ed. Executive Inn, US 90
West. Call 755-5770.
HOPKINS/McFARLANE
apts. 2 BR, 1% BA
townhouse. 1839 McFarlane
Ave. Call 755-2890.

LARGE CLEAN furnished
efficiencies. New color
cable T.V., I. Limited
electric. $25/dep. 752-1624.

QUIET SINGLE STORY
Beautiful furn 1 BR apts.
Just bring you linens &
dishes. $359/mo. Must see.

AMBERWOOD APTS.
3001 McFarlane 752-8848

NICE 1 RM apt. Free util.,
furn. except kit. $150/mo.
Recently renovated. Week-
ly rates avail. Sm. dep. req.
755-2322.

THE OAKS Quiet energy ef-
fic. 1 & 2 BR near LC Plaza.
No kids/pets. furn. $185.
Unfurn. $165. Effic. avail.
Call 752-7494 or 752-5795.
1 BR CH&A. $235/mo. Real
nice. Call Barbara at
752-5198 aft 6 p.m.
CLEAN 1 RM EFFICIEN-
CY. Util. & bed linen. Holi-
day Motel South 41.
OPENING SOON
Ideal location. New single
story apts. Amberwood
Apts. See us at 3001
McFarlane or call 752-8848.
1 BR 1 BA apartment near
Columbia County Bank.
Call 752-6268 for info.

73 Unf. Homes
For Rent
1, 2 & 3BR HOUSES for

rent. All on Ig. lots. Water
furn. No pets. Call 752-4348.

COUNTRY SETTING 3 BR,
double carport, 6 miles
from town. CAll 752-2011,
ext. 501.

3 BR 2 BA brick home.
Lovely setting. $600/mo.
$500/dep. Call 752-3225.

2 BR, 1 BA home with living
room, Fla.. fm., Kit.
Available May 1. Call
752-9158 for more info.

LAKE JEFFREY FRON-
TAGE Larger home, new
carpet & paint. Dock &
sunsets. 752-4330 or 752-9505.
P.M.

CLEAN 3-BR. 2 BA. stove,
ref., CH&A, carpet, drapes,
carport, patio, storage.
Good neighborhood in Gwen
Lake area. $400/mo.
755-1785 or 752-5565, ask for
Dave.

3 BR 1 BA, stove, refrig.,
w-w carpet, CH&A, carport,
garage, W/D hookups, fenc-
ad yard. Good location.
$350/mo. 3 references. 1st,
last & $100/sec. for appt.
Call 1-388-8359.

heat, etc. $300/mo. $150 sec.
Call 752-1947.

COUNTRY PERFECT 10
ac./private lake, 3 BR, 2
BA, CH&A, lg. LR w/FP,
DR, kit. & breakfast rm.
Screened porch & 1g. deck.
$500/mo. $300/dep. 752-2081
or 755-5015.

74 Furn. Homes
For Rent

NICE FURN HOME in
town for rent or sale. Close
in. Call 752-5520.

1 BR home. Furnished.

Rents monthly plus deposit.
Call 755-5379. Near Aero.

7 5 Business/
Office Rentals
PROFESSIONAL OR
business office space. 900
sq. ft. Ample parking. Oak

Hill Bldg. 3810 S. First St.
Call 1-963-4671.

space. 600 sq. ft. storage,
good parking, just off 90 W.
Attractve bldg. at 225 Burk
St. $400/mo. 752-3814.

NOW LEASING New office
& warehouse space.
1000-2000 sq. ft. loca-
tion off US 90 West 752-6806
600 SQ. FT. & UP. Price
$300 & up. New & existing
space available. Call
Charles Kalb, Hometown
Agency, Inc., Realtors.
755-4220.

75 Business/
Office Rentals

80 For sarc

8 Homes
For Sale

OFFICE SPACE RENTAL
12x12 room $75/month.
12x21 room $125/month
Utilities furnished. 109 Old
Country Club Road. Call
752-0067.

80 For sare

Real Estate Licensing
Only 4 Weeks?
Call 755-4040
N. Fla. Real Estate College

3 BR 2 BA, fam. fm., DR &
kit, lg. LR, dbl. garage,
many extras. Nice lot
w/trees. $61,900. Donald Cr.
in Country Village see
signs. 1 mi. S. on SR 47.

HomeTown

AGENCY INC REALTORS

: YOUR FAMILY WILL ENJOY THE spaciousness of this 3BR,
3BA home in Chapel Hills S/D. Over 2300 sq. ft. features formal
LR, DR with FP plus a huge FR, comfortable deck in the fenced
back yard. House features a loft, intercom and stereo throughout.
$73,000. For appointment, call Patti Mackey at HomeTown Agen-
cy, Inc. 755-4220 or after hours 752-5133.

750 S. First St.

3 BR 2 full BA, energy effic.
brick home. Incl. fireplace,
1g. sunken den, Ig. kit., in-
door util. on spacious lot.
$3500/dn. + closing.
752-6087 or 755-1655 after 5
p.m.

BY OWNER 3 BR, 112 BA,
on 1 ac. in good quiet sub-
division. 7 mi. so. of city.
Block & brick, CH&A,
carpet, kit. equip. $31,800.
752-1947.

3 Br., 2 Ba. on quiet street in lovely Lake Forest.
WHEN: Sat., 5/10 & Sun. 5/11 - 1pm-5pm
WHERE: 1044 El Prado Street

Follow signs starting at corner of McFarlane &

Grandview.

HOMES:

RENTALS:

$650.00 mo.

ACREAGE:

755-3675.

3 BR HOUSE By owner. 350
E. Howard St., Five Pts.

area. Like paying rent
w/sm. dn. pmt. Call HA.
Wilson at 752-1236.

BY OWNER 4 BR 2 BA
brick home on beautiful lot.
Pine Knoll area off Hwy 47.
Call 755-2841.

BY OWNER 5 rm frame
home w/1 BA, front porch,
util. & tool rms., big back
yard, shade, fruit trees &
shrubs 471 Lamond 752-0606

HomeTown

AGENCY, INC. REALTORS

(RS 195) UNIQUE AND AFFORDABLE! 3/2
brick A-frame home. Large eat-in kitchen, spiral
staircase, large deck. $72,900. (shown above)

(RL 150) JUST REDUCED OVER $2,000. Large
corner lot 200x112 on paved road. Huge beautiful
trees. Near Annie Mattox Park. Call today. $5,800.

atts

above)

(RS 189) BEAUTIFUL HOME with lots of

privacy. 3/2 built in ‘84. Brick and frame construc-
tion. Storage shed, huge oak trees on 2.36 acres.

Century,

(RS 214) 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, block home on
1/2 acre south of town. Asking $35,500. (shown

Lo

(RS 140) NEW HOUSE! Let us show you this uni-
que 3/2 brick home with spacious country kit-
chen, heat circulating fireplace, cathedral ceiling
and a master bedroom that opens to a covered
porch. $72,500.

(RS 280) LOVELY HOME IN CHAPEL HILL
SID. 3/2 with loft, fireplace, fenced yard. Im-

mediate occupancy. $73,000.

AFTER HOURS: Barbara 755-3852 or Kay 752-4600

CALL NOW FOR FREE FINANCING CONSULTATION
(Rates Starting As Low As 8%% ADJ. - 9%% Fixed Rate Conv., FHA, VA.

755-4220

750 S. First St.

| 752-6575
|

1101 W. Duval St.
Lake City, FL

The DARBY-ROGERS Co.

RESIDENTIAL

$67,000

Jump off your horse and go swimming. This pool home offers
1750 square feet of quiet, country living.

NEW LISTING...

A country home of your dreams designed to perfection. Country
style kitchen with desk, bar, and all imaginable built-ins. High

70's.

FISH UNTIL YOU RUN OUT OF WORMS...

$37,000

Secluded area, nice mobile home on 3 acres with 5 small ponds,
one stocked pond, satellite dish and much more.

Quiet homesite on dead-end street. Buy all or half. Call us today!!

LOVELY BRICK Board &
Batten on 3 lots. Foyer, LR,
great rm., FP, 1g. kit., 3
BR, 2 BA, 13 closets, patio,
outside storage, CH&A, Ind.
hookups. Call 752-0155.

UTiLity | Kilcher

GOVERNMENT HOUSING
from $1.00, you repair. Also,
delinquent tax properties
and foreclosure properties.
For info., call (refundable)
1-315-736-1610, Ext RLF-20J

paric | a Peepiict
—t

3 DinINy

2 CAR

MAsiE wack | Great
LESET

GARAGE Maste &

BED RocM

Neva

Now under construction. 1808 sq. ft. on cor-
ner lot in Picadilly Park. Approx. 1 acre with
8 fully grown pecan trees and large oaks.
3BR, 2BA, fireplace, greatroom, kitchen &
dining, carpet, CH&A. Buy now and pick

colors.

67,900
755-6087, 755-1655, 752-6087

CROWN

Real Estate, Inc.

Open 8:00 to 6:30pm M-F

ON 41 SOUTH- With plenty of room inside & out. 3BR, 1BA,
familyroom, den, kitchen with eating area, 2 porches, large
28x38’ workshop (barn) area. 1 Acre MOL. Financing available
to qualified buyer, ONLY $35,000.00. After hours Don 752-5061. .
WALK ON THE BEAUTY OF WOOD- This home features oak
floors, buck stove, 3BR, 2BA, and French doors off familyroom.
ALL THIS COULD BE YOURS FOR $64,500.00.

OWNER ANXIOUS TO SELLII- Frame 2BR, 1BA, house with
apartment in back. Carport, carpet, and ceiling fan. Only
$28,000. After hours Betty 752-5762.

NEW HOME-LOW PRICE- 3BR, 2BA, home split bedroom
plan. Large beautiful lot. South of town. MUST SEE AT
$46,000.00. After hours Cindy 752-2589.

ONE OF THE LAST LAKE FRONT BEAUTIES- Beautiful 2
story Chalet type homes, scenic view of lake. Great fireplace
with DR, large master bedroom & bath. Screened porch and
very, very private. 5 or 25 acres. After hours Connie 755-5178.

For rent or lease- close to Jr. College, 5BR, 3%2BA, on 8% acs.

Convenient to town. 3BR, 2BA, with pool. $550.00 month.

BEAUTIFUL HOMESITES- 9.25 Acres MOL, on paved road
frontage off C-133, only minutes from city limits. $3,900.00/acre.
After hours Emaline 752-3053.

BUILD YOUR DREAM HOUSE- On this high wooded lot in
Eastwood. Nice corner lot. Priced at $6,900. After hours Evelyn

8 Homes
For Sale

REALTORS
752-4883

4

Sat. 8:30-5, Sun. 1-5

Rme@

REALTOR 755-8852
202 W. Duval St.

6 Room house. Central heat & air, zoned
commercial.

mEmREEEEE
No. 134 i

8 First Florida I
i Realty & Auction X
- 75 & 90 West 1

§ 752-HOME (4663) -

[J2-STORY APARTMENT:
gE unit has 2BR-1BA. |
Recently renovated inside
and out. New roof. Situated
on prime investment tract
downtown. Owner financ-
Bing, $55,000. i
110 ACRES: Reduced:
EoD istely fenced: All i

Cropland, $82,500.
JDIAMOND IN THE
jj ROUGH: New home under

construction on 2.59 acres.

Secluded wooded lot, 3BR, [
JA large kitchen, Hdw

floors. Owner will sell at any [|
Bstage of const., at
[J negotiated price. Finished
$49,900.
Bwe have rentals available [ |
I (Including trailers & lots)
Be have listings on small & |
large farms.

See us for custom built
B homes in Columbia County.

Jackie Taylor Licensed Broker
B After Hours: 7552632, i
i 752-1267, 752-8651"

752.4036
Hpi

9 5 tole

9 5 ols

‘84 Cutlass Supreme Brougham

2 Door, electric windows, door locks, cruise, wire covers plus much more.

‘83 Olds Delta Royal Coupe

Come See The Best Selection of Clean Used

Cars in our 50 Year History.
‘86 Dodge Caravan SE

Electric windows, door locks, tilt cruise, stereo, only 9,000 miles. Looks like new.
BA PONAC STE... ..... ...i.. cei avis ssivesvsns acne sunnier arena inns $9,895

Hard to find, limited edition Pontiac 4 door, fully equipped plus stereo cassette, and alloy wheels.

‘84 Cadillac Sedan deVille

Dual seats, tilt, cruise, landau roof, wire covers.

‘83 Olds Cutlass Supreme Brougham

4 Door, soft white finish with contrasting burgandy velour interior, and matching vinyl roof. This automobile is loaded & like

‘83 Buick LeSabre Limited

4 Door, power windows, door locks, 6 way seat, wire covers, plus much more.

A local one owner, mid-size automobile, a/c, stereo, tilt, cruise & wire covers.

‘81 Cadillac Sedan deVille

A one owner fully equipped, like new full size luxury car.

3000 Brewer Hwy

In Addition 10 More Select Models Have Just Arrived...

All Cadillac luxury features, plus leather interior, dual seats, cruise control, wire covers & only 19,000 miles.

‘84 Olds Cutlass Supreme Brougham

A 4 door loaded mid-size luxury car with almost every power feature & only 17,000 miles.

‘84 Chrysler Fifth Avenue

A stunning 4 door dark blue with matching leather luxury group, only 31,000 miles.
‘84 Nissan Sentra Deluxe

4 Door, fuel economy plus comfort with AT, A/C, AM-FM stereo, and only 35,000 miles.
‘84 Buick Century Limited

4 Door, a loaded mid-size automobile with Olympia Sedan package, V-6 engine plus all power equipped.

[
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J
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pom
180 Bush REGAN... asi -1h ss svnn sis stnarsunnassnansaihviisss ins bunnanins $5,495
ndamEencsnsussnss Yusiisesisnsnions $5,995

POWERS

CADILLAC - OLDSMOBILE - PONTIAC - NISSAN
US 90 West

LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986 7- B

80 For sarc 80 For sate

A MEMBER OF THE SEARS FINANCIAL NETWORK

ANLITIIT 752-4211

2003 S. First St.

BANKER QO

SSHOP REALTY IC. IY mE
OF LAKE CITY

REALTORS *

An Independently Owned and Operated Member
of Coldwell Banker Residential Affilidles. Inc

ONLY 17 MILES TO LAKE CITY. This four acres lot on paved
road, huge oak trees, small stream, near air strip. $20,000.
PRICED TO SELL! 2300 sq. ft. HIA, two story home. Excellent
condition, close to town, city amenities. $44,500.

3 PRETTY LOTS ON S. MARION STREET available at $18,000.
Perfect for homes, at a really convenient location.

LIKE THE RIVER? We have 3 acres with 150 ft. river frontage, 2
mobile homes, one to live in, one to rent, space to park campers,
2 wells of good tasting water and septic. $36,000.

SEALTIFUL WOODED 5 ACRES in Suwannee County.
2 STORY, 4BR/2%:B ON TWO LOTS AT LAKE CITY COUN-
TRY CLUB. Over 3,000 sq. ft. with large in-ground pool, huge
recreation room as well as familyroom. Call today for appt. to see.
$150,000.

BEAT THE HEAT THIS SUMMER. Beautiful 2.02 acres with
swimming pool, TV tower, well, septic tank. Owner is motivated
to sell. $13,000.

95 als 95 Co io

Spring Is Busting
Out All Over!
BEST USED SELECTION

In Tri-County Area.
If We Don’t Have It --
We'll Try To Get It -

IMPORTS TRUCKS

BUDGET CARS

Several Finance Plans
ONE STOP SHOPPING!

Most Units Carry Our 3 Mo.
3,000 Mi. Warranty At No Cost To You.

NO REASONABLE DEAL
EVER REFUSED!

EEESEEN (r1Amc
755-4440

US 41S. | ¢ RENAULT
Up The Hill
To

The Best Values
Open Til 8PM Starting Mav 1st

CAR)



8- B LAKE CITY REPORTER FRI., MAY 9, 1986

Homes
For Sale

80

Homes
For Sale

80

Gort

755-5110

NEST

DANIEL CRAPPS
ae], [od G1) [oF 2]. YR [0]

ATTENTION VETERANS!

Interest Rates are at 92%.
We have homes that qualify.

RESIDENTIAL
GET AWAY FROM IT ALLII

$12,100

4 Acre tracts, good cleared land. Owner financing, 10% down.
Terms. After hours call Linda Page 752-6002.

BEAUTIFUL ROLLING COUNTRYSIDE!!

$2,000/ac

Picture your new home overlooking a lazy stream and a rolling
countryside! Buy 13 acres, 26 acres, 66 acres MOL. After hours
call Gail Barlett 496-2776 or Sara Joyner 752-6879.

MODERN COUNTRY DECOR!

$31,500

Charming older home renovated better than new! Seller even
VACUUMED the attic! Central air and heat. After hours call Betsy

Tyler 755-1617.
CUSTOM BUILTIN

$68,900

Complete, better than new, lovely 3 BR brick with familyroom,
study and gorgeous landscaped yard. After hours call Janet
Sweat 755-0824 or Linda Page 752-6002.

INVESTMENT/ACREAGE

DYNAMITE LOCATIONIII

$49,000

Neighborhood store with NO competition for miles. Call for more
details. After hours call Connie Vadnal 755-3569.

COUNTRY LIVING!

$68,000

17 Acres MOL close to town. Owner financing at 8%.$27,000
down, or 5 plus acres at $5,000 an acre. After hours call Linda

Page 752-6002.

port. $49,900.

3 BR 2 BA, brick in conve-
nient Lake Forest. $57,500.
Call 755-3696.

Aggressive REALTOR
would like to market

your property. Call to-
day for FREE market

analysis.

CENTURY 21
Daniel Crapps Agency
755-5110
Sherri W. Woodley
Realtor/Associate

OPEN HOUSE

Friday, May 9, 12 til 7:30
Saturday, May 10, 10 til 5

Cedar & stone on corner lot. Approx. 1/2
acre in Suzanne Subdivision. 3BR, 2BA,
CH&A, fireplace, carpet, LR, DR, wallpaper
in kitchen & bath, large utility room & car-

Can get 9%:% fixed rate.
755-6087, 755-1655, 752-6087

Cliff Martin
Realtor 755-5344
LAKE CITY
COUNTRY CLUB
CONDO- On golf course,
3BR, 2BA, carpeted, no

maintenance, just easy liv-
ing. $69,500.

OWNER FINANCING-
3BR, 2BA near clubhouse,
low maintenance yard, large
lot, $89,900.

We have other homes and
vacant investment property.
Call today for details.

AFTER HOURS
Gin - 752-5910
Cliff - 755-5344

Edgley Realty

3 br, 1% ba. brick home,
almost new carpet & vinyl,
large fenced back yard. Only
$38,000.

WELLBORN- walk to chur-
ches, store & P.O. Lovely
one owner MH, 12 wide,
large add-on utility & car-
port, 170 ft. on U.S. 90, ex-
tra MH hookup, $23,900.
Enjoy the good life!! on 5
acres lake front property,
restricted & very private,
call to see.

AFTER HOURS:
MARILYN 75620773
MEMBER NO. FLA. MLS

Lots

8 1 For Sale

BY OWNER 1 acre lots so.
of Lake City. $100/dn.,
$60/mo. w/new well & sep-
tic tank. $104/mo. 752-4597.

BY OWNER 5 acre lots
w/well & septic. 11 miles so.
of Lake City. $100/dn.
$224/mo. 752-4597.

SPRING HOLLOW
2 lots, corner of Spring
Hollow & Palmetto Blvd.
$19,500. Call 752-8466
1 ACRE lot for sale. Call
752-3422 after 6:30 p.m.

Farms &
Acreage

WANT TO BUY OR
LEASE TOBACCO
POUNDAGE
Call 752-5997.

521, ACRES High & dry. By
owner. Call 904-641-1830.

WANTED

HARDWOOD TIMBER
Including (Pine & Cypress)
904-792-1688.
NORTH CAROLINA
MOUNTAINS

1 acre located in the moun-
tains, good access, Ig. trees
cover this tract. Owner
needs to sell. $6500.00 pay
$1000.00 down, assume loan.

Chalet, 3 BR, 2 BA, two
levels, 1 mile from town,
lovely setting, large deck
overlooking mtns., ex-
cellent location. Built-in
cabinets, very private, all
for $55,000.00 pay $5000.00
down, assume loan.

2 acres short distance from
Murphy, good garden spot,
ready to build on. Owner
said sell $9800.00 pay
$1800.00 down, assume loan.

These are a few of over 2000
listings. We have all types

of property from $700 per -

acre and up. We have small
tracts. We also have
several cabins, houses, old
farms, etc. Write or call to-
day for a free listing
brochure. You can call free
by dialing 1-800-438-7421.
Write or call today.

CHEROKEE LAND CO.

1734 ACRES off SR 47 on
Cannon Creek Rd. Loaded
w/beautiful oak trees. All
or part. 10%/down. Low
monthly pmts. Call 752-2081

83

COMM. BLDG for rent
down town. Store & ware-
house sp. 7000 sq. ft. All or
part. 752-6354 or 752-7709.
Recreation

8 5 Property

SMOKEY MT. RENTAL

Lovely 2-story cottage at
Thunderbird Mt. Resort.
Boating, fishing, skiing,
sight seeing. Sleeps 6
adults. 2 BR, 1% BA.
752-8975 for more details.

Commercial
Property

85 Recreation 95 Erste Oak 08 Cr ie 95 orate
RENT OR SALE 12x60 2 BR
smaewnosc | THERE'S 3 SIDES HARD TOPS
50/mo. 752-4453 btn. 8 & 5.
— TO OUR STORY!
es i
87 Mosman HONDA-JEEP-RENAULT

NEW STOCKS ARRIVING
WHILE THEY LAST

Z L a
— : - my // 100 TS
ni —

EXCELLENT RATES for

prime income producing

Jreperes. $250,000 and up.
hone 755-5943.

94

1984 MAZDA SE-5 pickup.
Has AC. Assm. balance of
$5000. Call 752-9101 days or
755-6847 after 7.

1973 VW BUS New motor,
brakes, tires, shocks. Ask-
ing $1,200 or best offer. Call
935-3600.

Trucks
& Vans

A picture says a 1000 words but a
demonstration ride in this fabulous
new vehicle tells it all. Just ask Frank
Blackwell, you'll like it!

77 FORD 4x4 V-8, w/AC,

COMPANY CAR $AVINGS

power steering & brakes Hs : % i Wogen sAVE $2,000 | Visit Our Air Conditioned
: Jig -'86 Civic Si $AVE $1,000

ey 1 H1712-'86 Civic Si HB savesiop | Showroom And Shop In

‘ SEMI - : ’

he Ford ip) whet 6 H1798 - ‘86 Accord DX $AVE $1,000 Comfort!
‘71 Datusn pickup. i i

Call 523689 or 755599 SEE THE LIMITED EDITION Tost Dive Yinnglr : Sonmncte
— PRELUDE Si IN STARTLING Joneer.

95

77’ AMC PACER

68,000 act. miles. Very good
cond. $1250. Aft 6 p.m.
752-7730.
75’ BUICK Electra 4 dr. Ex-
cel. mech. cond. $700 Call
752-2081 or see next door to
Ken’s BBQ SR 100 East.

INVOICE PLUS $50

"ie

PEARL BLACK - ONLY (1) IN
STOCK AND A REAL “SPOILER”.

For Sale

1985 Alliance D/L Convertible
Company Car - Loaded

$1500 CASH BACK

LAKE CITY

Honda Prelude Si

Lake City ERNEEN

“Buckle Up” & Come See Us
Up The Hill UsS41S. 755-4440
Open Til 8PM Starting May 1st

"Buckle
Up”

RENAULT

adler
BRUCE GLUECK
(o1, 137 {0103

Jasper, Fla. 1792-1111 (Up The Hill)

SR47S Open Til 6

Rountree-Moore

HAS THE VALUE
Lake City WANTS!

Hl NO INCREASE IN CAR Hl UNLIMITED MILEAGE
PRICES POWERTRAIN WARRANTY

Hl LOW ANNUAL PERCENTAGE HE FACTORY SAVINGS

RATE FINANCING '2¢ 6.9% Hl DEALER DISCOUNTS

6.9% A.PR.—RANGER 79% A.PR.—THUNDERBIRD
7.9% A.PR.—F-150/250 PICKUPS
79% A.PR.—TEMPO

7.9% A.PR.—MUSTANG
7.9% A.PR.—ESCORT & ESCORT EXP
79% A.PR.—BRONCOII 9.9% A.PR.—VANS/CLUB WAGONS

THE BEST-BUILT AMERICAN CARS AND TRUCKS

5.0 EFI V8 Engine
Electronic Digital Clock
oTilt Steering Wheel
Speed Control
¢AM/FM Cassette
ePower Seat
eAir Conditioner

TOTAL SHIGE *1 3,988 .68

ESCORT

Pin ribby ast

No. 7010

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ea

ePower Steering

eTinted Glass

oElectronic Digital Clock
eAM/FM 4 Speaker Stereo

e Air Conditioner

A e|nterval Windshield Wipers
eDual Elect. O/S Mirrors
e|nstrumentation Group
eFront & Rear Bumper Guards

*7,656.74

e Automatic Tranmission
*Speed Control

eRear Window Defroster
eAir Conditioner

eStyled Road Wheels
eTinted Glass

We know what you want.

ROUNTREE-MOORE

FORD LINCOLN MERCURY
Cord 1(0) 4011"

~~ 4 ~~

U.S. 90 West 755-0630

Lake City

fo TS . [a at oa sm tt, oA Sw A at cs mi
TN AT rod 0 PE ve Ro oo

Cars
For Sale

NEW 2 BR 2 BA Fleetwood
in nice MHP. Low dn.
$224.78/mo. Lot $60/mo.
Furn. 755-5432, leave
message.

85 MAZDA RX7 GSL 5 spd.
Loaded. 12,000 mi. Exc.
cond. Too small for recently
acquired family. 752-6436.

PB...LOADED! Excellent
condition. Call 752-1386.

1985 CAMARO 6 cyl.
AM/FM, AC. 21,000 miles.
Extra nice. $8,800. Call btn.
1 & 5 p.m. M-F, 755-2796

81 CADILLAC diesel. 1
owner. 57,000 mi. Exc.
cond. AC, AT, PS. $4500.
Call 935-3600.

1978 CHEVY MALIBU V-6
engine. Runs good. $1100.
Call 963-3614.

79 MAZDA RX-7 Sun roof,
AC, auto., good cond. 74,000
miles. $3,700. 752-7851 after
6 p.m.

68 MUSTANG CLASSIC
Treasured, at sacrifice.
$3000. 752-2081.

86° VOLVO 240 GL 4 dr.
Loaded: $18,000. Call days
752-9327 or evenings call
752-2508.

VW Bugs. Good, bad or
otherwise. Market Place,
High Sprigs, FL 1-454-1575.

97 Campers

& Trailers

‘85 WILDERNESS 28’ trav.
trlr. Used very little Like

new cond. See at #13 Sandia
in Eastwood S/D. 755-0971.

HAVE
TRUNKS
FULL OF

WHITE
ELEPHANT
ITEMS
YOU
NO LONGER
USE?

Turn them
into

QUICK
CASH

with a
classified ad!

155-9440