Citation
"I'm not about that life": Student perceptions of open access on the open web

Material Information

Title:
"I'm not about that life": Student perceptions of open access on the open web
Series Title:
Researching Students' Information Choices
Creator:
Cataldo, Tara
Putnam, Samuel R
Buhler, Amy G.
Faniel, Ixchel M.
Connaway, Lynn S.
Brannon, Brittany
Publisher:
Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL)
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
Poster

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
RSIC

Notes

Abstract:
As academic librarians, we often think about open access within the limited frame of the scholarly conversation. However, students have a broader frame of reference for open and accessible information. Students often start with an open web search, which retrieves everything from peer-reviewed journal articles to preprints, blog posts, and sponsored websites. Faced with all these choices, how do students perceive, access, and evaluate this content? In this poster, we present the resources that generated the most attention around access and reflect on students’ perceptions of full-text access and paywall access to resources, and the desirability of each option. We examine students’ decisions and rationale around the helpfulness, citability, and credibility of the open resources included in the simulation, such as preprints, Wikipedia articles, and YouTube videos.
Funding:
Funder: Institute of Museum and Library Services
Funding:
Fund number: IMLS LG-81-15-0155-15
Acquisition:
Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Tara Cataldo.
General Note:
Poster presented at the 2023 Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) Conference in Pittsburgh, PA

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the submitter.

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"I'm not about that life": Student Perceptions of Open Access on the Web Samuel R. Putnam, Brittany Brannon, Amy Buhler, Tara Cataldo, Lynn Silipigni Connaway, Ixchel Faniel As academic librarians, we often think about open access within the limited frame of the scholarly conversation. However, students have a broader frame of reference for open and accessible information. Students often start with an open web search, which retrieves everything from peer reviewed journal articles to preprints, blog posts, and sponsored websites. Faced with all these choices, how do students perceive, access, and evaluate this content? In this poster, we present the resources that generated the most attention around access and reflect on students' perceptions of full text access and paywall access to resources, and the desirability of each option. We examine students' decisions and rationale around the helpfulness, citability , and credibility of the open resources included in the simulation, such as preprints, Wikipedia articles, and YouTube videos. Abstract In this project, students engaged with simulated Google results pages where they interacted with and evaluated resources within the context of a research project prompt. F or this poster, we focused on 90 higher ed students : 30 graduate, 30 undergraduate, 30 community college. Each student was shown a short video news clip introducing them to the research topic (the Burmese python in the Florida Everglades), given a prompt correlating to their educational stage, and asked to conduct an initial search within the simulated Google interface which then presented the results pages. Each participant then proceeded through five tasks in which they (1) selected helpful resources for the research topic and explained why they were helpful, (2) judged the citability of their selected resources, (3) explained why they did not select other resources, (4) assessed the credibility of their selected resources, and (5) identified the container of a preselected list of resources . Scan for a short demo of the simulation (or go to https://go.ufl.edu/rsicvideo ). In this poster, we examine higher ed students' comments related to access, with a specific emphasis on comments related to full text access and paywalls. In examining this theme, we identified 9 resources that are representative of academic open access as well as openly available information on the web. These nine resources include open internet resources Wikipedia and YouTube, open access journals PLOS and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), preprint servers PeerJ and BiorXiv , paywalled journals and monographs from Wiley and Springer, and the partially open resource Google Books. Upon selecting these resources, we also examined task decisions of students representing their perceptions of helpfulness, citability , credibility, and accuracy of identifying the resource container. Methods Format Assumption So I don't think I'm able to access information on this one because it looks like it's a book . É I don't think I've ever actually got an online book and used that as a source before. (Community College S30, Springer) This looks like the full article right here. Sometimes it's already on there, depending on where you're getting it from, especially on the campus. (Graduate G12, Proceedings of the Royal Society B) Brand Assumption I honestly did not choose this one because Google Books . I know Google Books usually gives me a part of the book, but usually, it's long books and normally shows you a few pages. (Community College S07, Google Books) " PLOS ONE is open access, but it's pretty famous because the!! it is peer review, but it's open access to everyone to read." (Graduate G29, PLoS ) Payment "I don't want to pay $23 for research, so I'm not going to choose it." (Community College S01, Springer) Yeah. Anytime that I had to buy an article then I wouldn't use it." (Undergraduate U26, Wiley) Preview "Éin their private research project, they don't really give the information out. They usually just put up the abstract and what it actually is talking about, but it doesn't ever show the information itselfÉI think this is general info because it doesn't really give any information out." ( Community College S20, BiorXiv ) "The abstract looks good, but I don't think I have access to the actual pages, do I? Oh, I do [laughter]. GreatÉwould definitely look more into this" (Undergraduate U16, Wiley) Library " in reality I probably would have clicked on it and then gone back or written down the ISBN number, whatever , to go and look for it at the actual library and go through it " (Community College S11, Wiley) So this paper looks like Burmese pythons have done so well in South Florida, it looks like. YeahÉSo this would be a good resource too. From Integrative Zoology, I imagine that the library has a subscription so I can access that for free. (Graduate G26, Wiley) Actions to Access "I could either check out the book, download the book, get a PDF of it. Yeah, so I would say that's helpful." (Community College S32 , Google Books ) Unable to Determine Path to Access "Because I looked on the side and it doesn't say to download the pdf . And I've looked under and it didn't give me a direct link. Maybe there is if I look into it more, but at first glance , I wouldn't recognize it and I'd just exit out ." (Undergraduate U03 , USGS) Barriers and Enablers How do library centered definitions of access differ from student definitions of access? In what ways does this affect discussion between the two about access? What barriers and enablers do students attend to when determining access? How might understanding these help instructors teaching students? How might understanding these influence technical services concerned with discoverability? How do students' perceptions of access influence their perception of a resource's helpfulness, credibility, and citability ? How does it influence their ability to correctly identify a resource? Discussion Findings Key by Soetarman Atmodjo from Noun Project (CCBY3.0) barrier by ProSymbols from Noun Project (CCBY3.0) This project was made possible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services grant number LG 81 15 0155. !"# !"# For more information about Researching Students' Information Choices, visit our website at https:// guides.uflib.ufl.edu / rsic