Citation
The Florida cattleman and livestock journal

Material Information

Title:
The Florida cattleman and livestock journal
Abbreviated Title:
Fla. cattlem. livest.
Creator:
Florida State Cattlemen's Association
Florida Cattlemen's Association
Place of Publication:
Kissimmee, Fla
Publisher:
Cody Publications
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Edition:
Volume 45 no.5, February 1981
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 30 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Cattle trade -- Periodicals -- Florida ( lcsh )
Cattle -- Periodicals ( lcsh )
Dairying -- Periodicals ( lcsh )
Cattle ( fast )
Cattle trade ( fast )
Dairying ( fast )
Florida ( fast )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marc )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with vol. 8, no. 7 (Apr. 1944).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 8, nos. 7-11 (Apr.-Aug. 1944) are misprinted v. 7, nos. 7 -11. Vol. 9, no. 2 (Nov. 1944) misprinted as v. 8, no. 2.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 11, no. 5 (Feb. 1947) misprinted as v. 11, no. 4, but then from v. 11, no. 6 through v. 12, no. 1 the misprint is 2 issues off until it was corrected with v. 12, no. 3 (Dec. 1947), for instance, v. 12, no. 2 is misprinted as v. 11, no. 12.
Numbering Peculiarities:
In January 1974, two issues were published: v. 38, no. 4, and a "progress edition" numbered v. 38, no. 5. That issue throws off the numbering of the issues for the rest of the volume, so v. 38, no. 12 is August instead of September. They fix it by having both the September and October 1974 issues called v. 39, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 52, no. 10 (July 1988) was misprinted as v. 52, no. 11.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 53, no. 12 to v. 54 no. 8 were misprinted one issue off as v. 53, no. 11 to v. 54, no. 7. This was corrected with v. 54, no. 9 (June 1990).
Issuing Body:
Official publication of: Florida State Cattlemen's Association, <Mar. 1945->; of: Florida Cattlemen's Association, <Oct. 1960->
Funding:
Funded by Project Ceres, a collaboration between the United States Agricultural Information Network (USAIN), the Agriculture Network Information Collaborative (AgNIC) and the Center for Research Libraries (CRL).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Florida Cattlemen's Association
Rights Management:
Copyright, Florida Cattlemen's Association. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
09105128 ( OCLC )
sc 88010916 ( LCCN )
0015-3958 ( ISSN )
ocm09105128
Classification:
637 ( ddc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida cattleman and dairy journal

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FLORIDA CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION
CATTLEMEN'S A report from FCA headquarters ASSOCIATION
(305) 846-6221, Box 1929, Kissimmee 32741 Market News-305/628-0412
President
W. G. Welles, Arcadia Phone 813/494-2471 First Vice President E. D. Ned, Chipley Second Vice Presidents Ralph W. Cellon, Jr., Alachua Al Bellotto, Lakeland Secretary
Joe Marlin Hilliard, Clewiston Treasurer
Bayard Toussaint, Punta Gorda WELLES NEEL Executive Vice President
Executive Director, Fla. Beef Council Ron Stephens, Kissimmec Home Economist
Polly Golden
Past Presidents
SCA'S RECENT REQUEST FOR ACTION IN SETTING UP AN G. H. Prather (Deceased)
FC S RP. E. Williams, Davenport educational seminar designed to inform law enforcement agencies and Dave rner. Deceased)
an rlo Bronson, (Deceased) others about the imminent danger faced by Florida regarding exotic BHs. Radbfgh. .,(Decesedo)
exoicBen Hill Griffin, Jr., Frost proof
diseases being carried into the state by drug smugglers and refugees Jay B. Starkey, St. Petersburg
B. J. Alderman (Deceased) has resulted in the program being set for February 11-12 at the Holiday J. 0. Pearce, Jr., Okeechobee
Alto Adams, Jr., Fort Pierce Inn on International Drive in Orlando. The announcement of the seminar Louis GLilbreath, Ocala
has been made by Commissioner of Agriculture Doyle Conner who said, George Kempfer (Deceased)
"We have become genuinely concerned with the real threat and wD aRoHerts, Imsokalee
potential devastating effects that a foreign disease outbreak would have Charles Lykes, Tampa
R. D. Bennett, Greenwood on our consumers and our agricultural industries." FCA President Thomas J. Sloan, Fort Pierce
Pat Wilson, Frostproof W. G. "Kayo" Welles said the seminar is coming none too soon as the Gilbert A. Tucker, Cocoa
Cedrick M. Smith, Jr., Wacahoota agencies involved need to know more about the danger faced by both Henry Douglas, Zephyrhills
the livestock and plant industries of Florida. The seminar is designed to Harvey A. Dahl Melbourne
- State Directors
alert law enforcement personnel to the dangers of foreign diseases, Fred Clark, Alachua
E. L. Crews, Jr., Baker establish guidelines for handling agricultural refuse at crime scenes and J. W. Lowrey, Bay
Fred Mueller, Bradford open communications between lawmen and producers for a more Andy Tucker, Brevard
cooperative effort in reporting illegal entries and clandestine operations. Martin Woodward, Broward
Gerald Cayson, Calhoun President Welles urges all local association officials to contact their law Bayard Toussaint, Charlotte
Mike Van Ness, Citrus
enforcement representatives and inform them of the vital importance of S. D. Saunders, Clay
R. A. Roberts, Collier their attending this seminar. Bud Fraser, Columbia
John DuPuis, Jr., Dade Lloyd Ryals, DeSoto PRESIDENT WELLES RECENTLY ANNOUNCED THE ASSOCIATION John 0. Osteen, Dixie
E. D. Gregory, Duval had retained the services of L. M. "Buddy" Blain as legislative Alfred R. Tucker, Flagler
Howell E. Lancaster, Jr., Gilchrist representative. We are all aware of the importance of having an able and Billy Peeples, Glades
Robert Ray Smith, Hardee capable contact in Tallahassee and the association is fortunate to have Joe Marlin Hilliard, Hendry
D. S. McAteer, Hernando the services of Buddy Blain. An attorney, he maintains offices both in Dan Childs, Highlands
AneloiMas, Hilasoog Tampa and Tallahassee. A warm welcome is extended to this native Angelo Massaro, Hillsborough
Jack Calloway, Jackson John E. Hawkins, Jefferson
Stanley E. Bainter, Lake Nat Hunter, Lee
THE RECENT BEEF GRADING CONFERENCE IN AMES, IOWA, Charles Field, Leon
John Pendray, Levy INDICATED that changes in beef grading standards are likely. It o.B. Shuler, Liberty
Ronnie Smoak, Madison appeared there was general agreement that the beef business faces Tom Christian, Manatee
financial problems. There are other problems such as the production of Jack Cullison, Marion
Jim Cowen, Martin excess fat and it appeared the trend is to change the system to reduce Curtis G. Quarrier, Nassau
Bryan Jernigan, Northwest this production and encourage leaner beef. Changes might be coming Marion Tidwell, Northwest
Jeff Adams, Okaloosa
about in the next two months or so. Attending the meeting from FCA Elwyn Bass, Okeechobee
Joe Walter, Orange were executive committee members Andy Tucker, chairman, Florida Irlo (Bud) Bronson, Osceola
Beef Council; D. S. McAteer, feedlot committee chairman, and Polly Dave Young, Palm Beach
oy Joe Barthle, Pasco
Al Bellotto, Polk
Golden, home economist. Also in attendance were Mrs. JoAnn Smith, Al Tilto, Plk
W. W. Tilton, Jr., Putnam Herschel Parrish, St. Johns NCA's beef promotion and consumer relations chairman, and A.Z. Wayne Carton, St. Lucie
and Z.Wayne Carlton, St. Luode
Palmer, meats specialist from the University of Florida at Gainesville. B.T. Longino, Sarasota
Wayne Jacobs, Seminole C. Aubrey Caruthers, Sumter BE SURE AND MAKE YOUR PLANS TO ATTEND THE QUARTERLY Frank Garrard, Suwannee
Robert Ezell, Taylor meeting on March 12-13, Thursday and Friday, in Arcadia. Full Ray Crawford, Union
Elmer McDonald, Volusia information will be coming soon on this homecoming meeting for Jerry Spears, Wakulla
Earl Brogdon, Walton President Kayo Welles. U. S. Harrison, Washington-Holmes
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 3




Calenldar e
FEBRUARY
1-6-NCA Convention ....................Phoenix AZ
4-15-Florida State Fai ....................... Tampa
7-Beefalo Sale ............................ Tampa
9-12-Range Mgmt. Meeting ...............Tuls O FEBRUARY, 1981
ll-12-Exotic Animal Dixease Seminar ......... Orlando
11-14-SE Angus Futuristic Event .............. Bartow VOL. 45, NO. 5 AND LIVESTOCK JOURNAL
13-Rush Bros. Hereford Sale ................. LakelandAN LIE T C JO R L
14-Lovana Farms Sale ............... Clarkesville GA
19-Florida Feedlot Clinic .................. Wauchula
20-22-Silver Spurs Rodeo ..................Kissimmee
23-27-ABS School ............................ Ocala Editor-James J. Flanagan, Deputy Editor-Donald E. Berry, Advertising
23-27-ABBA Annual Meeting ............ Houston TX
25-AgriBusi ness Institute Meeting .............Hou Tampa Coordinator-Mrs. Lou Allen. Circulation-Mrs. Kate Smith. Write Box 1403, Kis26-National Brahman Sale............... Houston TX simmee, Florida 32741. Phone (Area 305) 846-2800. Florida Toll Free (800) 432-9192.
26-28-10th American Farriers Cony.. Albuquerque NM
28-Sans Souci Charolais Sale ................... Ocala
28-Goswick Beefmaster Sale ............ El Campo TX Owned and Published by the Florida Cattlemen's Association
MARCH
5-7-SGBI Annual Meeting .......... Lake Buena Vista
6-FSGA Florida Festival Sale Lake Buena Vista
7-Alabama Brangus Breeders Sale ........ Cullman AL 4 his fLonth's Contents
7-Ky. Limousin Ass'n Sale ...........Winchester KY
12-13-FCA Directors Meeting ............... Arcadia
13-15-All-Florida Champ. Rodeo ............ Arcadia
17-Graham Angus Open House ........... Albany GA
20-Bull Hill Ranch P'Hereford Sale ........ Laurens SC Regular Departments... Dairy News...
21-Ga. Limousin Ass'n Sale ............... Tifton GA
21-SA Beefmaster Sale ..............San Angelo TX FCA Reports ................... 3 All-Breeds Show Held at Bartow.. 92
27-High Field Farm Angus Disp......... Statesville NC Editor's Desk .............. 6
28-Carolina Angus Futurit ............. Clemson SC Latest Statistics.............. 6 Special Features ..
29-Adams Braford BullSa Latest Statistics ................. 6"
30-Santini Angus Sale .............. Lawrenceburg TN Now It's History .............. 34 Control Pollution!-Boggess ..... 42
APRIL FCA Special Page ............. 48 General News ...
10-SE Beefmaster Ass'n Sale ............... Tifton GA Livestock Roundup ............ 53 Animal Disease Seminar Set. 36
11-So. Carolina Simmental Sale .......... Clemson SC Wash R58 Animal Disease Seminar Set ..... 36
20-Briarhill Angus Sale ............. Union Springs AL Washington Report ............ 58
25-Santa Gertrudis Sale ................. Laurens SC President's By-Lines ............ 76 FuturCA Nam es Blain to Post ...... 36
MAY Stories By-Stancil ............. 90 Futures Contracts Revised ...... 38
1-Harloff Limousin Sale...................Bradenton Diagnostic Lab Notes-Rubin .. 96 Feedlot Seminar Scheduled ......41
1-2-Brahman Futurity & Sale ............ Wharton TX State Fair Slates Ag Expo ......45
2-Sunup Farms Angus Sale ........... Smithville MO Editorials ..................... 98 FBCIA Elects Sexton ........... 52
4-Angus Breeders Sale ............Bowling Green KY
6-Single Tree Angus Dispersion ..........Staunton VA Florida Farm Sales in Billions ... 54
6-8-Beef Cattle Short Course...............Gainesville Horse, RodeoNews Urban Encroachment Told......64
9-No. Carolina Chianina Sale ........... Asheville NC ....
14-15-FIATC Trade Show..................Tampa Florida Cutters Compete .......38 Strain 19 Status Given ........66
16-"Pace Setter" Sale .................. Cullman ALBeef Price Increase Predicted .. 78
16-Florida Limousin Breeders Sale .............. Ocala Spurs, Arcadia Rodeos Slated ... 40 Beef Price Increase Predicted .... 78
23-Hutchinson Limousin Sale...........Thomson GA Beef Seminars Held in State.....82
26-28-LCI Annual Meeting ............. St. Louis MO Field Labs Open Around State .. 83
30-Rogers P'Charolais Sale .............. Collins MS Shows and Sales... FIATC Trade Show Announced. 86
JUNE Bulls Sell Strong at Chipley ...... 37 Gama Grass Could Help ...... 87
I-Ozark Angus Classic ...... .... Diamond Me FSGA Sale Averages $1227 ..... 37 Hl
6-Starr Valley Angus Dispersion ....... Fayetteville AR
10-12-LMA Marketing Congress ..... Minneapolis MN Ocala Has Anniversary Sale ..... 74 Breed Information...
24-26-FCA Annual Convention .........Marco Island P'Hereford Pen Sale Told.......60 Angus Sire Program Grows ......46
JULY Bulls Sell Well at Seffner ....... 63 Beefmaster Program Underway .. 70
l l-Cajun Limousin Steer Sale .............. Lake City S'Gertrudis Sell at Georgia Event 89 Florida to Host SGBI Meeting .. 88
AUGUST
3-4-American Angus Futurity ...........Louisville KY
26-28-Brahman Clinic VII .............. Houston TX
29-Clover Hills Angus Sale .............. Spencer IN
29-Brahman Sale of Sales................Houston TX
30--Beefmaster Prod. Sale ............ San Antonio TX
SEPTEMBER The Cover for February 1981
5-LJ Bar Beefmaster Prod. Sale ........Pleasanton TX
19-SE Beefmaster Ass'n Sale ............. Jackson MS Our cover picture for this annual Florida horse and rodeo edition shows the late J. O.
30-BBU Annual Convention ......... San Antonio TX Pearce, Sr., Okeechobee, on the range in south Florida in years gone by. The original
OCTOBER painting was done by cowboy artist Buster Kenton of Kissimmee, who named the
10-Hidden Valley Red Angus Sale ......... Brooksville scene, "Taking a May Colt to Water."
12-Bear Creek Beefmaster Sale .......... Franklin TN
17-Barfield Farms Beefmaster Sale..........Immokalee
19-The Confederacy Beefmaster Sale ........... Tampa
19-Gore Farms Angus Sale ..............Carthage TN
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION
Florida Cattlemen's Association, W. G. Welles, President, Arcadia Eastern Brahman Association, Andy Tucker, President, Service Issues of Rockledge, Georgia Ga.-Fla. Charolals Association, Bill Casey, President, Cedartown, Georgia Southeastern Brangus
Association, R. A. (Pete) Griffin, President, Talledega, Alabama Florida Angus Association, J. R. Thompson, President, The Florida Marianna Florida Santa Gertrudis Association, Troy M. Burrell, President, Morriston 0 Florida Shorthorn Breeders
Association, Jack Hooker, President, Plant City Florida Hereford Association, Ron Smoak, President, Madison C attem Florida Meat Packers Association, Joe Teijerio President Florida Beef Council, Andy Tucker, Cocoa, Chairman *
Florida Cutting Horse Association, R. D. Welles, President, Arcadia Florida Association of Livestock Markets, L. H. for 1981 Thompson, Jr., President, Gainesville Florida Simmental Association, J. Pat Corrigan, President, Vero Beach *
Association of Florida Rodeos, J. C. Bass, President, Okeechobee Florida Polled Hereford Association, Dexter Douglass, January ............ American Breeds President,Tallahassee FloridaLimousinAssociation,MaynardOsborne, President, Davie.
February ........ Horses and Rodeos The Florida Cattleman and Livestock Journal (ISSN 0015-3958); is published monthly for $5.00
March ....................... Brahmans for 1 year at Cody Publications, Inc., 410 West Verona Street, Kissimmee, Florida 32741. Second
April .............. Performance Class Postage paid at Kissimmee, Florida 32741. Postmaster: Send address changes to The
May .................. Animal Health Florida Cattleman and Livestock Journal, P. O. Box 1403, Kissimmee, Florida 32741. Rate Card
June- .... .Florida Pastures mailed on request. Closing date 5th of preceding month. In circulation 25th of preceding month.
................. ure Member Agricultural Publishers Association, American Agricultural Editor's Association,
July....................... Better Bulls Florida Magazine Association, Livestock Publications Council, Audit Bureau of Circulation.
August .................... Marketing
September ...... Continental Breeds c.,
October ............. H&P Herefords
November .............. Angus _PC
December ....... Santa Gertrudis LIVESTOCK
S PUBLICATIONS I oemacaneassocuran COUNCIL
4 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




ENERGY
Lick Wheel USSC'S
Liquid Feeds Suga-Lik No. 5
Moisture 32% 25%
Protein 32% 16%
NPN 28% 9%
Molasses 71% 90%
Ash 12% 11%
Total Sugars 32% 40%
If Not, ThenFEED USSC'S SUGA-LIK NO.5
16% PROTEIN total
16% PROTEIN shoids and sugars
United States Sugar Corporation
Telephones: 813/983-8121, 983-7946 CLEWISTON, FLORIDA 33440
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 5




4Editor's GPeek
New subscriber added
Please start sending me your fine
U r magazine, The Florida Cattleman and
Livestock Journal.
Steel Buiiuzng I happened to find a July 1978 issue
and was extremely impressed with the
CALL TOLL-FREE depth and scope of your articles ...
1-800-342-6301 Frederick B. Peters
Author commented on
his recent article
La Verne, California
26 Gauge Steel 30 x 20 x 12 $ 2,624 L Vef Cow ifornia
Open Span I Beam 50 x 40 x 14 $ 4,996 ... Saw "Beef Cow-Forever" in Construction 60 x 50 x 16 $ 7,597 your last (November 1980) issue. It read
Acessones Extra real good. I hope it will help.
Retirement is tremendous-no more
seven day weeks... I enjoy Florida Cat- DEMOCRAT Kika De La Garza (Texas), tleman; you do an excellent job has been selected to be chairman of the Tony Cunha U.S. House Agriculture Committee. He is
shown here when he was the featured
FIATC prexy comments speaker at the opening of USDA's export
office in Coral Gables in the fall of 1978.
ALL STEEL Other 30 x 48 x 12 $ 4,433 on promotional event Sizes Available 50 x 72 x 14 $ 8,926
Limited Quantities 60 x 75 x 16 $11,916 Winter Haven
21 F.O.B. FACTORY Thanks for the promotional folder 7/Mr. David, who heads up the Florida
LOCAJ, ZONING MAY AFFECT PRICES about the Trade Fair of the Americas in International Agricultural Trade Coun;M .1AIM- Miami ... I hadn't seen it. cii, is probably right in his closing
Nae Nice to have that much money to sentence. His group, with its annual trade
ss spend, and a professional management show, does a top job of helping export
- State company to do the work, but I guess some of Florida's agricultural comhone Zip we'll just keep plugging along in our modities. The 11th annual event is slated
own way. Maybe our return per dollar for May 14-15 at the State Fairgrounds spent is better than their's ... in Tampa. See article on page 86 of this
Ed David issue.
KANAPAHA BEEFMASTERS Latest Statistics
Coming in the 1980's
Commercial Slaughter and Average Weight (USDA)... We are upgrading with 18 Lasater Cattle Calves Swine Sheep
M Head Wt. MHead Wt. M Head Wt. M Head Wt.
Beefmaster Bulls. Nov. 1980 (Fla.) 24.0 967 8.3 265 16.3 224 -Nov. 1979 (Fla.) 32.7 1042 9.8 307 17.8 215 .1 80
We have 10 more Lasater Ranch Nov. 1980 (U.S.) 2711.0 1070 214.2 248 7706.4 246 432.7 114
Beefmaster Bulls contracted for Nov. 1979 (U.S.) 2798.4 1071 240.0 235 8499.2 245 403.2 114
delivery in 1981.
Slaughter Under State Inspection, Head (AITC)...
We have Lasater Ranch Beef- Cattle Calves Swine
master Bull power in Florida for December 1980 3688 71 16,630
the 1980's. December 1979 3774 14 14,347
Brucellosis Testing (AITC)...
-The 6 Tested Reactors Vaccinated
Essentials Cales Adults
DISPOSITION Beef Cattle, December 1980 85,605 1246 8772 2986
*FERTILITY 'Ctl,1A
I WEIGHT Dairy Cattle, December 1980 33,415 222 2646 1374
* CONFORMATION Swine, December 1980 .. ....
0 HARDINESS 3
* MILK
PRODUCTION Livestock Prices Per Hundred (USDA)...
Cattle Cows Strs. Hfrs. Calves Swine Chickens
Fla., Dec. 15, 1980 $53.90 $45.80 $61.90 $ 64.80 $43.50 $28.50
Fla., Nov. 15, 1980 54.90 44.00 61.10 65.60 45.00 28.50
KANAPAHA U.S., Dec. 15, 1979 64.40 47.20 69.00 84.30 37.50 25.20
BEEFMASTERS U.S., Dec. 15, 1980 59.10 41.70 64.70 70.80 43.90 29.70
Ranch Lcation, W. of 1-75, Gainesville, FL Field Crop Prices Per Bushel and Ton (USDA)...
Office P.O. Box 479, Jacksonville, FL
Ph: 904/354-5652 Corn (Bushel) Hay, Baled(Ton)
Mr. & Mrs. Lewis S. Lee
Member, Foundation Beefmaster Ass'n. U.S., Dec. 15, 1980 $3.20 $74.20
U.S., Dec. 15, 1979 2.38 61.00
6 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




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Spencer and Welch join in cattle business enterprise George S. Spencer and John W. Welch have announced the formation of a new company, Summit Cattle Enterprises, Inc. the Denver, Colorado-based firm, a ........ ._ ..... I- -- f joint venture with Bob Refenacht of
Phoenix, Arizona, will be
involved in several
ow n. aspects of the beef
cattle business.
Spencer, who
will be president
Harvestore of the company,
was executive vice
president of the
National Cattlemen's Associa- Spencer
tion (and the
former American
National Cattlemen's Association) for 10 years prior to resigning last August.
Welch, also a former NCA staff member, has been in cattle manageAdmit it, you'd like to own one but wonder if you'd be ment, risk management and commodable to pay for it. ity brokerage work for the past three (3)
able. e tol payce rforen it.h But have you ever wondered if you're paying for a years. He will be vice president of the
Harvestorec" system and still don't have one? Paying for new firm.
it with the high cost of protein.., and storage losses... modity brokerage business, Rufenacht
and sweat and strain.., and poor results when you are Commodities, and he is also involved in
forced to feed rain-damaged crops. his own cattle operations.
Maybe you're paying for a Harvestore system Spencer said that a principal part of
without owning one. Find out. Start by filling out the Summit operations will be a commodcoupon below and mailina it to us. ities office, as the Colorado branch of
Rufenacht Commodities. The new comi i ii.h pany also will offer marketing manageI'm ready. Please send me additional information about Harvestore storage systems and 1 ment services for cattle producers and feeding equipment. feeders. Services will include buying and
To: Georgia-Florida Harvestore, Inc. selling cattle, forward contracting and
Tobacco Road, Attapulgus, GA 31715 hedging. In addition, Summit will
Name provide order-buying services through
Address
Town County
State Zip Phone) r
Area Code Number W ant M ore
Acres farmed Dairy Hogs BeefWMo
(Number) (Number) (Number) (Number) Information?
The Florida Cattleman
Georgia-Florida Harvestore, Inc. Drawer 1403 I
Tobacco Road Kissimmee, Florida 32741
Attapulgus, Georgia 31715 Please get me information on the I
* AC (912) 465-3987 I material below. (Check more than
U M 1 l / l -l-l-l- one box if you wish.)
] Offer good
O I until May 1, 1981. I
L- 101. Cunha Book I
l 102. Swiss Clipper I
LYKES PASCO 0I 103. Wadler Baler I
Li 104. Franklin Ramrod i Li 105. Biodry Treatment I
I [L 106. Agri-Fan I
Pasture Grove I
Fertilizer Division Name .......................
For your pasture or grove materials, write or call: j Address ......................I
P. 0. Box 97, 904-567-5622, Dade City, Fl. 33525 Phone .......................I
W W City .........................
WE STRIVE FOR REPEAT CUSTOMERS State ...... ZIP ............
L Stte...... "
8 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




Herd Reduction Sale
We're reducing our herd numbers due to owners age
and to selling some of our pasture land.
The following items for sale at private treaty
Dr. Jan Bonsma type Herefod
* 25 heifers available by March 1. Bred heifers, yearling
heifers, and 10 month old heifers. Top quality foundation
breeding stock.
* 40 cows, some with calves at side available April 1.
* A good selection of yearling bulls and weaned bull calves
now on feed efficiency test. Herd bull prospects and
commercial bulls.
* A few top quality 3 & 4 year old bulls.
(All are firm foundation breeding stock)
SEMEN AND FERTILIT7Y: Mr. Don Schiesier, Box 26088, Jacksonville, Florida 33218. Phone 904/757-1533. Don has been collecting semen and semen testing for over 20 years. He has a reputation for absolute honesty. Last year, when he started collecting and freezing semen for us, after collecting from our first bull, he started shouting for me. When I walked over to his portable lab, he told me that it was
some of the best semen by far he had ever seen and he was very much excited as to how the cattle were bred.
Special: Kelly Duplex 1 YTon Feed Mixer with Molasses Blender. Conveyors, gauges, etc. all intact. In very good condition. Save approximately 40% on feed
bills by operating your own mixer-blender.
DORADO
HEREFORD FARM
Shown by appointment only. We do not have hired help so to make sure someone can meet you call after 7:00 p.m.
Lorin and Gladys Anderson, Owners 904/567-3413 4301 S. Hwy. 301, Dade City, Florida
THE FLORIDA CATITLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 9




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Feature
mining
Salt
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* Dried Molasses* Salt for all agricultural needs, bulk/bag
* Dried Distillers Molasses Solubles (Super-Ferm) Ingredients for feed mixing
* Protein Blocks* Bicarbonate of Soda
* Livestock Minerals* 0 Urea
* Hi-Mag Blocks (aids in preventing grass tetany) 0 Trace Minerals
* Other Blocks Vitamins
*Available under private label. Other Agricultural items
MU00I lAtO, muls mIVIIQ
Processed Minerals, Inc.
Super-Mol Products
Toll Free: 800/282-9149 P.O. Box 1478 Tampa Salt Distributors
813/677-9181 Gibsonton, FL 33534 813/677-8477
YOUMAD.
You'll be mad. Absolutely mad. So, call us names if you want. Or call us
numbers. MJust call us an order.
Mad about, that is, the custom imprinted
eartags from AiD Laboratories. You'll also We promise not to get mad.
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imprint your logo or practically anything 1800 East North Park Street
for a nominal charge. Initial ord.er.s will Okeechobee, Florida 33472
take twoI weeks, reorders just 72 hours.
10 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




Day and night, horn flies pierce hides Bak
and extract blood. Often 500 to 1,000
live on an unprotected animal. In 24
hours, entomologists estimate 600
horn flies bite an animal 4,200 to
13,800 times. Daily blood loss and
harassment may cut milk production
as much as 20%, according to the
USDA, and reduce weight gains on
growing cattle as much as 1/2 lb per
head daily.
Don't let bloodsucking horn flies
tyour grazing cattle
Start feeding MoorMan's IGR before the fly season starts
It's easy to stop horn flies before they develop wings, For about 5 per head daily, you can stop horn flies thanks to the insect growth regulator in MoorMan's and supply your grazing cattle a scientific combinaIGR products for grazing cattle. tion of base and trace minerals, plus vitamins
IGR passes through their digestive tracts to A and D.
manure. There it stops horn fly development in the IGR's full-time action keeps horn-fly numbers harmless pupal state. They never mature into adult from ever building up. They have not developed flies that torment cattle, suck blood, cause cattle to resistance, as with organic-phosphorus feed-through waste energy or grazing time. products, in customer's 5-season IGR use. It stops
This amazing insect growth regulator is available development of horn flies resistant to sprays and exclusively in MoorMan's IGR mineral products. It's dusts. IGR does not harm fish, wildlife, etc. the selective pesticide methoprene (Altosid*). You have a choice of four IGR products to feed freechoice to your grazing beef cattle:
Trademark of Zoecon Corp. U.S. Patents 3,904,622 and 3,912,815. o oor grzineef cte
* MoorMan's IGR Minerals comes in loose, processed form.
* MoorMan's IGR Mineral Block.
Potential IGR benefits o MoorMan's Special Phos IGR Minerals-high in
phosphorus and in loose, processed form.
khrn ie MoorMan's Hi-Mag@ IGR Minerals-high in
These are for an average horn-fly season and magnesium and in loose, processed form.
population in the U.S., with IGR fed continuously for Get details from our representative on IGR products 150 days-starting before horn flies appear: and on our Wind-Vane Feeder, ideal for feeding IGR.
Cows and calves: $7 to $10 of IGR can save as much as 40 to 50 lbs weaning weight per calf. Reasons to order IGR now:
Stocker cattle: $4 to $6 of IGR can save up to 75 lbs (1) Have it on hand to begin
weight gain per head. feeding before the fly season.
Dairy cows: $8 to $10 of IGR can save as much as (2) Preseason discount.
750 lbs milk per cow. 0,ma, Co Qu,, IL 62j31
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / II




one of Rufenacht's companies, Cactus
Cattle Company.
Another activity will be the comFARM EQUIPM ENT AUCTION pany's own pasturing and feeding of cattle. Summit Cattle services and operaEQUIPMENT BELONGING TO McKINSTRY FARMS tions will be national in scope.
The commodity brokerage services,
McKinstry Farms has discontinued their Cattle & Swine Feeding Operation. Welch said, will involve all types of
They have also discontinued their Hay & Row Crop Farming Operations. futures contracts, including grain, liveMcKinstry Farms has commissioned Miller Equipment & Auction Co. to dis- stock and financial instruments.
pose of their equipment at public auction. fSummit Cattle Enterprises opened
for business on January 5, 1981. Its
AUCTION DATE: February 7, 1981, 10:00 A.M., near Blackshear, Georgia. offices will be located in the Inverness
LOCATION: From Blackshear, take Hwy. 203 N, 4 miles to Country Store, office complex southeast of Denver. The
address is 8 Inverness Court East,
turn left on County Rd., go 3 miles, sale on right. Englewood, Colorado. The phone is
From Alma, take Hwy. #1 S, to Radio Station Rd., turn left, go 303/779-0952.
app. 18 miles to Lees Grocery, turn left, go 2 miles, sale on left. Before joining the former ANCA in
WATCH FOR AUCTION SIGNS! 1970, Spencer was in public relations
and packing plant management posiTRACTORS toswt wf opn.Erirh
4386 Int. w/Duals, 1978, 1000 Hrs. Airco Portable Welder tons with Swift & Company. Earlier he
1130 MF w/Duals, less Tires, 1972 1000 Gal. Nurse Tank was a vocational agriculture teacher in
1100 MF, 1972 Ford Pumping Unit his native Utah.
504 Int., Diesel 35 MF Parts When he
35 MF, Diesel Roller Packer resigned
35 MF, Diesel Bermuda King 20" Grass Digger from NCA,
840 AC 4 W D Loader w/Root Rake Bermuda King 2 Row Grass Sprigger Spencer indicated
DBH Caterpillar w/Hyster Winch & Hyd., Sprayer that he wanted to
Angle Blade, SN# 35A4615, Rome KG Blade, Several Rolls New 12 Strand Fence Wire
Root Rake, Stump Head w/Splitter Several Hundred New Fence Post devote more time
815 Int. Combine, Diesel, Hydro, w/15 550 Irrigation Gun to his family and
Ft. Grain, 843 Corn, 844 Corn Head 20 Ft. Cattle Body
1973 Ford Service Truck remain in Denver,
FARM EQUIPMENT while being
8Ton New Holland Spreader HAY & FEEDING EQUIPMENT involved in the
61 Ft. Jet Flow Auger Feed Wagon M
29 Ft. Bush Hog Hyd. Fold Harrow (2) Crop-Carrier 8 Ron Silage Wagon livestock busi6 Row 300 Gal. BoMac Nitrogen App. Farr Hay Tedder ness.
9 Ft. Southern Offset Harrow New Idea Hay Rake Welch, an Welch
Howard Rotovator, 130" 850 New Holland Hay Baler
B Row 30" W & A Ripper Planter w/ New Holland Hay Bine agricultural eco(8) 71 ID Planters 352 New Holland Feed Mill nomics graduate of Texas A&M Uni200 Gal. Johnson Sprayer (2) 27 New Holland Silage Blowers versity, was with Cattle-Fax, the mar5 Bot. MF Plow 3 Heads
8 Row 30" Lilliston Cult. Hay Lift keting analysis service associated with
12 Ft. MF Harrow Service Rake NCA, and with NCA for several years.
12 Shank Athens Chisel Plow 15 Ton Feed Body, 22 Ft.
UtilityTrailer 320 Gehl Tub Grinder Mixer w/Scales Later he was with Triple G Feedlot,
5 Ft. Rotary Mower Kuhn Disk Hay Mower Brighton, Colorado, in charge of risk
PTO 4" Irrigation Pump 1972 Dodge Truck w/Silage Body management. Most recently he has been
Post Driver Several Cow Feeders
(2) 200 Gal. Saddle Tanks Several Hay Racks in cattle management and commodity
Miscellaneous Items, Too Numerous to List. brokerage, as a vice president of Taurus
Corporation, Boulder, Colorado.
INSPECTION: Thursday, Feb. 5 until Sale Time Rufenacht was a founder and prinTERMS: Cash or Company Approved Check cipal in Rufenacht, Bromagen & Hertz,
SALE CONDUCTED BY: a commodity brokerage firm, before the
GAL #392 MILLER EQUIPMENT & AUCTION COMPANY GAL #374 firm was sold in 1977. In 1978 he estabHazlehurst, Georgia lished Rufenacht Commodities, and he
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL: acquired cattle ranching and feedlot
Miller Equipment & Auction Co. lackie Jordan, Farm Manager properties which are part of Rufenacht
912-375-2322 912-449-6198 Land & Cattle Company, which also
Sale Rain or Shine-Lunch Available-Not Responsible For Accidents operates Cactus Cattle Company, an
order-buying business.
101-Horse feeding and nutrition
LOW COST book authored by Cunha
B BULDA 300 page text devoted entirely to
VG +horse feeding and nutrition has been
S written by Dr. Tony J. Cunha, dean
___ emeritus and horse nutrition authority
P Box 3335 from California State Polytechnic Uni44 48.. FOREST CITY 61 versity at Pomona. Cunha previously
TERMS AVAILABLE was chairman of the animal science
FLORIDA 32751 ,y department at the University of Flor0 ,ida, Gainesville, for 25 years and retired
there in 1975 as Distinguished Service
1% Professor Emeritus.
HAY STORAGE ,The book has 50 photographs and 20
chapters. The book discusses the future
4. \e, of the horse industry, myths in feeding,
% relative value of feeds, vitamins,
60 24 W..-... AC O P I' S H minerals, protein, amino acids, carboASSATATAGE hydrates, fiber, fatty acids, fat, volatile
12 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




SUGAR'S
PRPOTENT PEMALE
At ugalaI Ranch we place emphasis, on the superior meat type qulte of ur emaes as well. as our, bulls.
The pepotecy of, the cow and'her consistent production is by far 1h ot impotan trit 'in our herd.
Capialie o the potential of Sugar's females and inject the ultimate i perormnceinto your herd.
JGARLAN RANCH
'Ot~d~nd Operated by United States Susgar Corporato 81/83 121 Clewiston, Florida340




fatty acids, energy, water, antibiotics, pastures, hay, hints on feeding, feeding behavior, and other related topics.
The nutritional requirements of the horse and deficiency symptoms of nutrients are discussed. The practical application of the basic information presented in the book is discussed in chapters on feeding the foal, the growing horse, the performance and race horse as well as the stallion and the mare during gestation and lactation. Sample rations are given and discussed. They can be used as guides for developing other rations for horses.
The book is written in a fashion which is very easy to follow and undera O stand. It is designed to be valuable for
Is Beginners in horse production, to estabCattle Wor .lished horse owners and trainers; and to
OBLETS 4. those who are concerned, either directly
or indirectly, with horse feeding, nutrition or ration formulation. The book is Tramisor also designed to be especially helpful for
INJECTABLESOLUM .county agents, farm advisors, vo-ag
teachers, veterinarians, pharmaceutical soluble drnch powder companies, university and college
teachers and students, lending agencies and firms which produce nutrients, products and services for the feed and horse industries.
For more information check number 101 and return the form on page 8. (And it~ the only wormer that does.) Modern production practices
Modern production practices
On thmostcom, and df To get control of ah ,the increase need for vitamin D
all catIle wont is Oopxea (small intestinal well known 'tier, you need their standard
Norm). Tramnisol' lcvamisolc is the only leading dos, plus anhcr In sh. u ind up As more and more cattlemen move to denrmcr that can claim ellcctityncss(90-1(0l% palijngmilorcandgettingless.Tranisol isalso ce confinement housing and feeding of
rcnioal in all instances) against ('or rial with only rnxiryiu can hbu thatgts nll itcn major
.ns.andarddose. omi in cattle. CNeAlo high concentrate rations, silages and
s artifically dried forages, cattle will need
Traisol gets all the orms orth getting supplemental vitamin D. Under these Only Tramisol gets all the worms worth getting conditions, cattle are robbed of adequate amounts of vitamin D from natural sources such as sunlight and sun-cured forages. Cattle which are fed high energy rations to increase growth rates have a greater metabolic demand for vitamin D, according to spokesmen with the department of agriculture and and SUPPLY COMPANY animal health, Hoffman-La Roche, Inc.,
Nutley, New Jersey. of FLORIDA INC. Vitamin D, one of the essential
vitamins for proper growth, regulates "C 1300 N.W. 9th St. the metabolism of calcium and
M Fla. Hwy. 579 & Main St. Okeechobee, FL phosphorus. It promotes calcium
.. Thonotosassa, Ph: 813/986-2491 Ph: 813/763-0261 absorption from the intestine and aids in
calcification of bone by increasing the uptake of minerals by bone tissues.
LOOK WHAT WE Without adequate vitamin D, bone
... .... development is impaired and poor
HAVE TO F R growth results. Cattle will eat less and
digestive problems may occur. Often Complete Palmetto Removal cattle will walk with a stiff gait, show
Dozer, Loader, Grader, Heavy labored breathing, irritability, weakand Light Discing Two Rotovators ness and occasionally tetany and conModified for Sod Fields vulsions.
Vitamin D deficiencies are also PARKS BROTHERS characterized by enlarged joints, arching
S of the back, bowing of legs and erosion
Land Clearing of joint surfaces, all of which cause difDAVID or GLEN ficulty in moving. In severe cases, fracCall us Collect 813/322-1269 813/322-1582 ture of the vertebrae and paralysis may
Due to the tremendous response occur. Even though severe vitamin D
another Palmetto Removal Machine Route 1, Box 80D deficiencies are seldom fatal, lack of the
has been added to our Fleet of Machinery. Myakka City, Florida vitamin does predispose cattle to other
diseases.
14 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




R
T AMI OL
S
17wPa-Yoff. *Trami ;ol,'Icvan sol i, f- h4t s 4
3N, V
I c ttve against all 9 ni bruit worms in- V Vo I
- 0 -a an
spinal and lutignmL
6uding stomach, inte,
single treatment level controls all dtjgro _,s, UC 'Simp Y- use I -,p ebe
Of Iffectior, nip a d
Go atible v 4h othenst IY'T -a"! o -gq -byb, jor ga 6ffie ,pr
ry,
Men O"t
k, "Y
-anirnalsAri in6rb, added val &At' wxlet, me., I"
th
So tmityour c g,. t
vausOaL Aunso just'a f t 'the Trar- 4
W*WMA y
7




Supplemental vitamin D can help
maintain optimum performance and
help reduce the effects of stress in cattle.
Adequate amounts of vitamin D
usually cannot be supplied by feedstuffs
alone. It is important to review the
E LE10TfOUiA vitamin supplementation needs of range
POW ERHOUSE and feedlot cattle periodically to assure
that supplemental vitamin levels are sufficient to offset conditions that can
cause even marginal deficiencies and
hinder optimum performance.
THE AUSTRALIAN SYSTEM OF CATTLE CONTROL 102-Clipper offered for
cattle and horses
Did you know that one ELECTRA POWERHOUSE Available from The Coburn Company,
Electric fence charger can control all the fences on Whitewater, Wisconsin, and manua 2000 ACRE RANCH. factured in Switzerland comes a heavyr duty electric animal clipper called the
Florida and Australia have similar weather uty Universal/Swiss clipper.
conditions: very dry and sometimes very
wet. The Electra Powerhouse has been
especially developed to cope with Aus- It's made to exacting specifications
traiia's very big ranches to cut fencing costs and has a patented rotor which
and provide complete control not available eliminates the major cause of breakfrom any other fencing system.
downs. Despite its high initial cost, over
80,000 Universal/Swiss clippers have
been sold throughout the world in the
The Electra Volt meter reads up to 6000 past 12 years.
volts and gives you complete technical For more information check number
control of your Electric fencing system. 102 and return the form on page 8.
Swift goes to
ELECTRA Stand off will beef A complete range of Electra accessories is available boxed beef up your fencing. Clips on to to transform your fencing system with lower costs any two wires in an existing for maintenance and Bull Proof Subdivisional Swift Independent Packing Company fence and puts the electrified fencing. Pant
wire where it should be, will open a boxed beef plant at Des
12" out from the fence line. *IBREMAX. FIBREGLASS POSTS & DROPPERS. Made of galvanised heavy Moines, Iowa, in its first major expangauge spring steel with ELECTRA FENCE STRAINERS to keep your wires sion move, it was announced today by Pinlock insulator. permanently tight. John A. Copeland, president and chief
* HIGH tensile wire. Costs less and means less posts, executive officer.
* COMPLETELY NEW Fencing technology. Developed The facility will process some ELECTRA Nail-On Insulator over 30 years to suit Australia's tough conditions. 300,000 head of cattle a year acquired in for all wood posts. We have units ready for Immediate Delivery right here the Iowa area for approximately
in Florida. $230,000,000.
* Full technical Information and Service Facilities. Copeland said beef production in Des Moines will be initiated by early
January at a former Swift & Company
The Stockyard Dick Kearley Phil Griner beef plant that was closed in July, 1979,
1010 Cattlemar Road Route 3, Box 55 Rt. 1, Box 703 due to economic conditions.
Sarasota, Florida 33582 Hawthorne, Florida 32640 Haynes, Florida 33844 He estimated operations in the city
813/371-6462 904/481-3998 813/439-4698 by Swift Independent Packing will
create jobs for 500 employees at full production and generate an annual payroll
in excess of $10,000,000.
Swift Independent Packing consists
OAKE UTRALA (U AE INH. of key assets of the former Fresh Meats
FLA. 329 1 TEL. 305-727-3469. Division of Swift & Company. It commenced operations as a separate corporate entity on October 27.
Copeland said the opening of beef
Major Animal Health Products operations in Des Moines was prompted
aby increased fed cattle marketings in A complete L Iowa, and anticipated cost efficiencies to
line of the new Swift Independent Packing
western wear I Company.
i SAs a free standing corporate entity, Gainesville Stockman Supply Swift Independent Packing has 13
5001 N.W. 13th St. (Stockyards) modern processing plants for beef, pork,
Gainesville, Fla. 32601 lamb and broilers, and holds a unique
904/372-8916 position in the meat industry with a
m Nationwide complex of 77 retail and Stockman Supply Co.The food service sales and distribution
Hwy. 27 South, 3 miles re centers.
(Agri-Civic Center) that Swift Independent Packing has
Sebring, Fla. 33870 Service annual revenues of approximately $2
813/382-2526 built billion. Of this, approximately 80 per"Your most dependable source of supply" cent represents sales to retail outlets and
further processors, and 20 percent sales
16 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




IP ce- whe yo fetiiz wit Sue aibw Fist Sue Rano omlain oti
Rainbow~~he the seodr an 0irntrt tht6r
vialt t03p prdcin And foag ladta
forary ~ ~ 6 0 Secnd Supe Rano is eseial
mor inforatio Yo'l be moe 0 ahead usin tS prmu 0 etlzr Sue Rai0bw.
S 44 *L If A&,RAINBOW
0 63 S I
3 a %
6 6
. ...




M PHENOTHIAZINE
REGULAR DRENCH MM
For Removal of stomach M
Worms, Nodular Worms, Large-Mouth Bowel Worms M and Hookworms in Cattle, M
Sheep & Goats. M
M WADLER MANUFACTURING Company's
big bale handler mounts on pickup trucks in seconds and fits any vehicle.
" M to institutions, making the new comINGULR pany one of the largest suppliers of red
M meat to the food service market.
M M 103-Bale handler fits
M on pickup truck
M A big bale handler that fits any pickup
truck is now being produced by Wadler Economical and Effective Manufacturing Company of Galena,
Worm Control in Cattle, Kansas.
The rig mounts in all truck beds and Sheep and Goats. (M is outfitted with a portable, 12-volt
winch that has a 3000-pound capacity. SDependable -FOR A bale can be speared, lifted, moved and
SSince 98 removed by remote control from the
P.O. BOX Y0AR truck's cab.
The pickup bale handler is designed for fast assembly and removal. Either
THE
AFFORDABLE
SYSTEM
SAVES YOUR VALUABLE FORAGE, RAIN OR SHINE
The highest hourly capacity and most __economical sealed storage system available ~ fl3 Forage is perishablewith unlimited total capacity. Stores all forage UJJJ cut it green,
crops as well as high moisture grains. 8 ))) store it green,
For more information, contact Ag-Bag Corp. of Fla. feed it green
L. E. (Book) Cunningham 904/795-2025, 904/795-4436 with the Ag-Bagger.
Route 1, Box 7008, Crystal River, Florida 32629 M IN
18 / THE FLORIDA CA'11'LEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




More nutrition,
pound for poundfank top to bottom.
Unlike conventional liquid feeds, Purina formed conventional liquid supplements on Sup-R-Lix@ brand supplement is homogen- all important counts. Helped cows produce ized So it can carry more more early calves, heavier
and a better balance of nu- calves at weaning, breed
trients-like water insoluble back faster. This winter,
minerals and high energy balance the nutrition defifat. And the nutrition stays ciencies in forages with Supuniform, won't separate out. R-Lix-get the performance
Your cows get a complete, o of highest quality dry supbody-conditioning, appetiz- SOP plement with self-fed, liquid
ing supplement every time ap convenience. Have your
they lick the wheel. In cow/ d Purina Dealer fill your tanks
calf operations across the with the superstar of liquid
country, Sup-R-Lix outper- supplements: Sup-R-Lix.
X Purina
Ralston Purina Co., 1980
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 19




job can be done in seconds. The side
rails, bale spear and rear frame are
secured with quick hitch pins and an
Fento 's -The bale spear also can be used on a
Fibe glas Aarthree-point hitch. The entire unit weighs
219 pounds and is load rated at 2000
Liquid The portable winch comes equipped
with a 50-foot cable and a snatch block
for double cable hook-ups.
Feeders For more information check number
Backedby 38103 and return the form on page 8. Backedby 38Cattleman faces problems years of Pictured is the 350 gal. model. Also available in 250 with growth of his ranch
Fenton Quality gal. model Both come with four lick-wheels. As if the effects of drought, parasites
and sparse vegetation don't pose enough
challenges for the managers of the
Putnam ranch near Bartow, they also
* Reinforced with a steel brace for a Field tested by selected Florida have undertaken the added pressures of
maneuverability cattlemen for one year. expansion.
* Wheel brackets remove from 9 Fully assembled. Owner Dudley Putnam began his
top or asymainenace.expansion in 1978 with the purchase of topfo eay aitennc. Free delivery on volume orders. 109 Brahman heifers in the 500-pound
" Lick-wheels can be placed range. He has continued in recent years
vertically or horizontally, by purchasing additional land in Hardee
County, bringing his present total
acreage to 3000.
EN T O N"We've got a lot of decision-making EN TO N 'to do around here because of our expansion," he says. "So we've got to have a
sound management program to keep on
E E DE349-72,Re1 o 2 "First of all, we had to decide
Ph.R13494272, FLRute 31,o 2 whether we wanted to start raising our
ARCAIA, LORDA 3821own heifers or continue buying them,"
vas"I'~oG Jennings Multi-Purpose Equipment
Hinge type hookup holds rear of fork to bucket. Take front and Long ribbon line of hay is shown for easy access by cattle for rear mounts off and on in 5 minutes. feeding in pasture or for baling old hay in square bales.
Handles 4' and 5' wide bales.
JENNINGS & SON MFG.
Member, Florida Cattlemen's Association
Route 2A, Box 163
Phones 904/629-4127 & 732-3574 MORRISTON, FLORIDA 32668
20 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




Ancestry animals are not eligible for registration as Beefalo, but under certain circumstances, their offspring may be.
r4S Presenting ...
BEEFALO ANCESTRY
CATTLE
from Florida
Dear Cattleman,
There is a revolution among the consumers of Americal No longer can we afford to pay the price for that good "Red Meat" being produced by "Conventional Cattlemen", breeding "Conventional Cattle", finishing them for market at 2-3 years old on high "Conventional Feeds."
The successful infusion 22 years ago of the American Buf* falo blood into our domestic cattle was the beginning of a new
era for the industry. Feed tests confirm that Beefalo will produce a superior carcass in less than 2 years that will yield more high quality red meat at a remarkably lower cost than the conventional Bovine.
The "Flying M" is dedicated to the development of these great Beefalo. We have selected some of the best foundation cattle in the country for our breeding program and have mated them with the Super Sires of the future. Many of our cattle are safe in calf to our own 3/4 Buffalo Bulls (Revolution I and 11) to produce 3/8 Bison calves.
Our program is one of continuing research and development as we will never let prejudice and ignorance prevent improvement and progress. The Buffalo influence into our industry is destined to be the most important advent of the century and "Flying M" is proud and excited to be a part of it.
We have designed our breeding programs to allow selected sales at private treaty this fall and winter of 1980.
(1) From the top end of our foundation herd bred to our "Revolution I or 11" to drop 3/8 Bison calves.
(2) 3/8 Bison calves by the "Revolution" Bulls.
(3) 1/2 and 3/4 Beefalo cattle bred and open.
Our purpose for making these superb cattle available is to encourage a few more solid, dedicated people into the Beefalo Fold so that our growth in other geographical areas may benefit all of us.
Come to see us. You are always welcome! Sincerely
S. E. MONTGOMERY
* VISIT US AT THE TAMPA FAIR
amipwThe Florida Chapter of American Beefalo Association Sale will be at the Florida State FairgroundsTampa, Florida.
SHOW: Friday, February 6, 1981 at 4:00 P.M. SALE: Saturday, February 7, 1981 at 4:00 p.m. A WE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU THERE!
S. E. MONTGOMERY 1001 Montgomery Lane, Leesburg, FL 32748
(904) 787-0773 (904) 748-3482
Ranch Off ice-S. E. or Wanda
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 /21




High floatation custom application Soil, leaf and water testing along with a complete consulting service S. .Florida's most experienced personnel over 100 years total experience all new fluid lime and fertilizer combinations feed and weed .
complete line of injector pumps, tanks and fittings...
call and find out why so many growers depend on us
to solve their production problems, we are experts in LIQUID SUPPLEMENT has helped
plant nutrition three convenient locations. Dudley Putnam, right, maintain profits
patnrtodespite economic and weather setbacks.
FIELDMEN: Going over records with him are his wife,
Sally, and Ed Weink, farm manager.
North: Steve Dubose 904-497-2635
Central: Tom Dorman 305-889-3212 he recalls. "When we bought our
(Citrus) Brahman heifers, our goal was to get
Tom Lockhart 904-383-0294 them into shape for breeding and to get
as many good-gaining, healthy calves as (Crops and pasture) we could." To get a consistent daily
South: Donnie Yeomans 813-983-6791 gain, the firm utilized a feed supplement
P. 0. Box 790 during the colder months.
Ze d F d 39 A liquid user for years, Putnam is
F loZellwoo, Florida 32798 unhappy with most varieties because of
hthe high moisture content he found in
"I've fed liquids as long as anybody around here, and I've bought a lot of In Florida Call: 1-800-432-6928 or 305-886-7900 water because the products didn't do
"The Florida Connection"
* Florida Owned, Florida Operated and Manufactured.
* 80,000 sq. ft. of Manufacturing
Area.
* Over 30 years of Experience with
Sales Throughout Southeast U.S.
and Puerto Rico.
A Complete Line of Quality Assured Buildings.
m8
Steel Buildings, Inc.
2942 PALM AVE. FT. MYERS, FL 33901 (813) 334-1051
"YOUR BETTER
I__iU METAL BUILDING BUILDER"
22 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




i!w)m K, 11 Yl
1" fiN'
MV g
Wile.
.10 g g
MR.
AjeV,
-q g
rr,
AMR
'n
Os
pq
.. ... ......
NO,
ilg g
IMP 11; fa tR xig
...........




what they were supposed to do," he says. "I wouldn't mind paying for water if it was in the form of rain, but not in my feed supplement."
Putnam learned of a new hoR A K E Smogenized liquid supplement, Sup-RFOR Lix, from his local feed store manager
FRONT ND LOADERS/BULLDOZERSL.M. Smith, which contains only 30
3E percent moisture. Research results have
shown that Sup-R-Lix can provide daily gains that are 10 to 15 percent greater than conventional liquids with a seven to 10 percent improvement in feed efficiency and gives performances similar to high quality dry supplements.
"Our heifers really went after it," says Putnam. "They had no problems making those lick tank wheels sing. We came in with better than 85 percent calf crop that year. It was a highly successful feeding program and our cows consumed just about what we expected."
In September of 1978 Putnam sold the calves as the weather turned dry. He estimates the average weight at sale was 450 pounds. Pleased with the results, Putnam now provides the supplement to his cattle year-round instead of just during winter months.
Putnam faced another decision ,1 Dlruna|LUP created by the land expansion when
ALLIS-CHALMERS, CASE, CATERPILLAR, JOHN local veterinarians began advising preDEERE, FIAT-ALLIS, FORD, IHC, CLARK, PIIMDERTON, IINC. ventive worming. With the size of his
TEREX, YALE, TROJAN, MF P. O. Box 899- Longwood Industrial Park land and no significant freezes to kill the
............ Longwood, (Orlando), Florida 32750, USA worms, he faced the possibility of
SEE YOUR DEALER jTWX/TELEX 810-853-5034 9 305/831-6688 serious health problems if infestation
occurred unnoticed.
MR. FARM AND RANCH EQUIPMENT DEALER,
Would You Like to Increase Your Export Sales?
,Join
The Florida International
Agricultural Trade Council
Exhibit in the
ELEVENTH FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL AGRIBUSINESS TRADE SHOW May 14 & 15, 1981 Florida State Fairgrounds, Tampa, Florida
Co-sponsored by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
Doyle Conner, Commissioner
Write: FIATC, Room 430, Mayo Building, Tallahassee, Florida 32301
24 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




... .- -- .1*. .
t
14A,
im X
Selling 6 Lot
THR PRDCTO SAL
Mavi Nich l Sal Coslat559439
2651 N.W 54CutMrkRyod
90/2252 Ferur 28, 1 190/2945




structuranl posn
STRONGPOST STRUCTURES
1629 N. Ohio Ave.
Live Oak, FL 32060 Call collect 904/362-2548
for building quotes
BUILDING SPECIAL
30x50x12 erected in Florida 4.
$7,995. Includes one slide door
J RAMROD from Franklin Laboratories feaAGRICULTURAL tures heavy insulated wires in a flexible
shaft.
1. Cattle 2. Swine
3. Horse "I started a comprehensive program
4. Poultryi to help rid my cattle of worms 12 years
INDUSTRIAL ago," he says. "We've used different
COMMERCIAL wormers, on our vet's advice, to cut
TURNKEY or down worm resistance."
BUILDING PKGS. Adtoal Punm takes stool
samples regularly which his vet
examines under a microscope for
worms. This is a major project and
PUREBRED & COMMERCIAL CATTLE "THE BEST FOR LESS" becomes even more difficult each year as
Suporer o Fa.Cattlemen, Poultrymen, Pork and the Putnam herd continues to grow. R A N C N upreso Dairy Producers But he is not deterred. The drought
W-W quimen W N N DI X I Ethis past year and the market squeeze
[A0 16. WW Eqipmnt W N N -D X IEhave taught this experienced cattleman
Off: 904/629-5050 4900 N.W. Blichton Rd. STRS N.that there is no shortcut to proper manJ. Wlson: 694-4322 OCALA, FLORIDA 32671 SO EIC gmn n lnig utgood
F. Ouane 622-3561 (Hwy. 27, west of 1-75) General Offices: Jacksonville 32203 faghemen ad planing Jus oodold
Strickler joins Coleman
sales management staff
Charles Strickler of Banco, Virginia has
Promote BEEF Support Your joined the staff of Coleman Sale Management Service, Inc., Charlottesville,
every day. .. Florida Beef Council Virginia, as an agent of the company in
their service to livestock producers in
t sale management, herd sire selection,
consultation, and tent rental facilities.
r CL- an SEN TO: ----- ----- Strickler has been actively working
CLIP nd SED TO livestock events since his graduation
Florida Beef Council I from VPI. His experience in Angus
P. 0. Box 1929 breed publication work and ring service
Kissimmee FL 32741 I gives great dimension to CSMS, Inc.,
I reports Paul Coleman.
Would you like to be reminded that it's time to send in your direct j Strickler, a recent graduate of the
contribution to the Florida Beef Council? (Circle one.) Superior Auction School, will work out
YES NO ~ of Banco.
YES N 104-Franklin has low-cost
I ramrod on market
Name ____________________________ Livestock handling is easier and faster
Name With the new high voltage "Ramrod,"
Address ____________________________ I the "take charge" cattle prod from
city__________________________ Franklin Laboratories, Denver,
Colorado. The wide-spaced electrodes
L -- --- --------- ------------i prevent shorting out and allows the
26 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




The imitators
keep trying.
Allflex perfected the very first a day of tagging go by fast and easy. because the special polyurethane is
successful two-piece eartag system. Other big Allflex features are: mak- stabilized against the effects of ultraAnd patented it. The patented tag ing the hard tip of brass and having violet rays and temperature extremes
has a flexible shaft and a hard tip. the applicator pin extend through the to stay flexible and colorfast.
This hard tip provides a solid fit with brass crown. The Allflex pin pierces The imitators can try. But their
the applicator pin so wobble is elimi- the ear so the tag can slip through performance can't match the Allflex
nated. Once in the ear the flexible cleanly, virtually eliminating bleeding system for cattle, sheep and hogs.
shaft bends if the tag gets caught. and damage to ear tissue. And that's one reason livestock proAnother Allflex patent covers the Allflex tags stand up to weather, ducers bought over 53% more Allflex
easy-to-use applicator. It locks the tags last year.
two parts of the Allflex tag together
fast, just like a pop rivet. The applica- Eastern Marketing Agent: G.C. Hanford Mfg.
tor fits your hand comfortably ..makes Co., Box 1017, Syracuse, NY 13201 (315) 476-7418
They go in fast... and go in for good Registered trademark of Allflex Tag Co.,
Culver City, CA 92030
< i
But unless your eartag
system is Aliflex,
you can't get
AlIflex performance.
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 27




shock" to get through heavy dirt and matted hair. The activator buzzer If your lender "sounds off' so you can hear it workthinks Brangus and Braford iDesigned for tough use, the Ramrod
features heavy insulated wires in a flexible shaft with a high-impact polycarbonate handle and tip. Unique switch guard protects against accidental e bturn-on when laid aside or stored. Easy
to use too, as the 36" Ramrod is almost
-4F perfectly balanced.
at thLwaow initial cost is combined with t tlow operating cost in that only four "C" 49F size batteries are needed.
For more information check number
W e speak BeeCat- profitable, including re- 104 and return the form on page 8.
tle. Our loan offi- placements, Al service, Thomas named to
cers know beef farm buildings, additional inspection post
cattle production and mar- land- and other financing Dr. F. L. (Frank) Thomas has been
keting. They know what needs of cattlemen and named chief of the bureau of meat
you're up against. their cooperatives, inspection in the division of animal
yu 're p erag ais Calindustry by Florida Agriculture ComWe're America's Call or come by to- missioner Doyle Conner.
farmer-owned, farmer- day and talk to the peo- Thomas, a native of Alabama and a
controlled cooperative ple who speak your graduate of Auburn University where he
received his degree of Doctor of lending institutions. We language. Veterinary Medicine in 1944, will fill the
make short and long term vacancy created when Dr. R. H. Bennett
loans to farmers and their retired after 23 years of service with the
farm supply and market- Florida Department of Agriculture and
ingoopuros ves o ma Consumer Services.
ing cooperatives for many ~Thomas, who himself recently
purposes to help make F RI Gretired from the U.S. Department of
their operations more sp1 hre_. Agriculture after 22 years, joins the staff
of Division Director Dr. C. L. Campbell after serving the past 12 years in Tallahassee with the Federal Meat and Poultry Inspection Program. He has spent the past nine years in Florida as area supervisor. During that time he managed all aspects of the inspection program in Florida, including all imports and exports.
"We are delighted to have a person of Dr. Thomas' talents with the division," Dr. Campbell said. "We know that with the confidence and esteem which he commands in the meat industry, Florida will continue to have one of the nation's outstanding inspection programs."
105-Biodry mastitis treatment
- introduced by Upjohn
Biodry, a dry cow mastitis treatment, is available in a new 18 cow pack carton from TUCO, division of The Upjohn Company. The new size carton is designed especially for the convenience of the 20- to 40-cow herd operator. id ~ gd~l llm, -- The new carton contains 72 plaster
syringes of Biodry nestled in a foam tray. Individual alcohol pads are also u provided with each 10 ml. plaster in this new Biodry package. Q? Biodry is also available in a 4-cow
,6, carton (12-10 ml. plastets) for the convenience of the small producer, and for the large dairyman, a case of 144-10 ml. plastets that will treat 36 cows. The three package sizes of Biodry dry cow
Financing for Short-and Long-Tern Joint Land Bank
Farmer Intermediate Term Farm Credit and mastitis treatment are available from
-MM, Cooperatives Farm Credit PCA Services farm supply stores.
Biodry consists of 400 mg. of the
28 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




antibiotic novobiocin in all oil suspension. Novobiocin is indicated for dry cow treatment of the two most common mastitis-causing organisms
-Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus.
Recommended dosage of Biodry is treatment in all four quarters by infusing the contents of one tube in each quarter after the last milking, prior to the initiation of the dry period. Prior to administration, milk the udder dry. Fo
Wash and dry the teats thoroughly.
Using the alcohol pads provided, wipe each teat with a separate pad. Warm the Biodry antibiotic to body LAKEL
temperature and shake thoroughly. FLA.
Remove the cap from the tip of the tube and insert tip into the canal. Infuse the entire contents of the tube into the quarter, and massage the udder after LIVESTOCK TRAILERS
treatment to distribute the Biodry throughout the quarters. Dip all of the teats following Biodry treatment with a suitable teat dip.
Biodry should be used at least 30 days prior to calving, and withdrawn 30 days before slaughter.
Further information concerning the new Biodry 18 cow pack, check number 105 and return the form on page 8 of this issue.
Buffington named 1980 young educator by ASAE Dennis E. Buffington, associate professor, agricultural engineering department, University of Florida, Gaines- This model comes in 16, 20, 24, 28 and 32 foot lengths. Widths of either 5' ville, has received the A. W. Farrell or 6' with the following standard equipment: solid bow construction, sandYoung Educator Award from the blasted, primed and painted with two coats of enamel, spare wheel and
American Society of Agricultural tire, brakes on all wheels, pressure penta treated two inch flooring, clearEngineers (ASAE). ance, stop, directional and tail lights, 10,000 lb. heavy duty dropleg jack,
The award is presented annually by hub caps, 2-5/16" ball hitch column, split tailgate, one center gate on 16 the society to honor ASAE members and 20 foot trailers, two center gates on 24, 28 and 32 foot trailers, 750 by
under 40 years of age "for outstanding 16" 8-ply rated tires, the 28 and 32 foot trailers have three axles, the 16, 20 contributions to the advancement of the and 24 foot trailers have two axles. All trailers have 8 hole wheels and all profession and to stimulate profes- trc hoo ars. sional achievement" in education. truck hookup parts.
Buffington was named the 1980 Young Educator during the society's winter meeting, held at the Palmer House, Chicago, Illinois, December 2-5, 1980.
Buffington began his career in education in 1966, as an instructor and graduate assistant at Pennsylvania State University. He was a National Science Foundation trainee and graduate assistant at the University of Minnesota from 1968 to 1971, and became assistant professor at the University of Florida in 1971. He was elevated to associate professor in 1976.
A registered professional engineer in
Florida, Buffington has been active in This rig is just the thing for economy. It is 32' long by 6' wide which gives numerous continuing education this trailer the ability to save you time, effort and money. Please note the
activities and scientific societies. He has walkways running the length of the trailer and the three axles. received several educational service honors and awards.
Buffington obtained his bachelor's CONIBEAR EQUIPMENT CO., INC.
degree and master's degree in agricultural engineering from Pennsylvania P. 0. Box 376 Lakeland, Florida 33802
State University, University Park, and a doctoral degree in agricultural engineer- 7 Miles North on U.S. 98* Ph: 813/858-4414 ing from the University of Minnesota, St. Paul.
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 29




5 AGRI-FAN was designed and built to meet
the tough demands of agri-industry, the
as goodmanufacturer says.
asA goodo-roi, ehncl
sei a ndconroiet cnial mitted to improving agriculture through as the the application of engineering principles. Headquartered in St. Joseph, Michigan, the society's membership best andincludes 9000 full members and 2300 best andstudent members in 50 states and 90
foreign countries.
bettr than most 106-Air circulating fan offered
for ag buildings
Agri-Fan is a newly developed type of All ingredients used are of the finest quality and our air circulating system which is changing
prices are very competitive. conventional thinking on internal air
movement in the ventilating industry for various types of agricultural structures, according to an announcement by Give us a call and we will prove what we claim. Northwest Environmental Systems,
Oshkosh, Wisconsin.
Normal fan ventilation systems do a good job moving air horizontally through the structure, either by "intake" or "exhaust," but in many instances, horizontal air movement is
SOUTHEASTERN MOLASSES not adequate.
Conversely, Agri-Fans move air vertically inside the structure, at up to 650 FPM or 24,000 CFM per unit, pro& SUPPLY CORP. viding air circulation where it's needed
most, from floor to ceiling. Agri-Fans For EXCELLENCE in liquid feeds and! ENERGY without wagte, we tan"o our products to ad your needs improve existing ventilating systems by dispersing stagnant air, gases, odors and P. 0. BOX 1IM6 OKEECHOBEE, FLORIDA 33472 PH: 813/763-311S humidity, thus speeding up the ventilation rate in a building.
Agri-Fans circulate and dispense air
____________________________________________________ at 24,000 CFM creating a continuous air movement that speeds drying of floors, bedding, walls and ceilings, thereby A GRI-GUARD b "Ole Aggie" reducing seasonal condensation
problems.
High Protein Liquid Supplement Agri-Fan is manufactured exclusiveWe fll te federsly for Northwest Environmental The cows feed themselves Systems by Envirofan Systems' Inc., of
Buffalo, NY. Completely moisture resistdairy, beef, poultry, hog, equine and
_____D other types of agricultural buildings.
FEED Testimonials from Agri-Fan users
___________ verify payback of investment on Agri0L THE Fan installations in less than one year
Telephone P. 0. Box 923 ..kK.Wf EL ______ officials say, and claim much improved
813 LakeandFL W conditions in their buildings, for their
688-325 3302 Llivestock and themselves.
"Visit our Feed Store now open at 3340 U. S. Hwy. 92, East." According to Northwest EnvironA COMPLETE LINE OF ANIMAL FEEDS ..mental Systems, Agri-Fan Systems are
30 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




less than .60 watts at normal speed.
For more information check number
106 and return the form on page 8. CATTLE FEEDING
USDA issues yearbook on EQUIPMENT
how to cut energy costs
"Cutting Energy Costs," the 1980 Yearbook of Agriculture, was issued
December 16 by USDA. MINERAL FEEDER
The 408-page book is designed to
help bring down energy costs of farmers, NO MAINTENANCE. Large
foresters, homemakers, communities capacity. Advanced design rain
and the food industry. guard cover. Durable as our liquid
"Every American should find some- feeders! Molded cross-link
thing worthwhile in this volume," Secre- Polyethelene will stack or "nest"
tary of Agriculture Bob Bergland said in for shipping. Molded of black
the book's foreword, "... All of us are material for extra durability.
well aware of how the increases in
energy costs have cut into our incomes.
"Farmers especially have been
struggling to hold down their production energy requirements so that
Americans can continue to get their NEWEST TROUGH
food at reasonable cost," he said. "In
fact, a new agricultural revolution may Toughest yet! be in progress-one in which agriculture's own renewable energy supplies REINFORCED molded Polyethelene. may be used increasingly to fuel farm Used in series or individual trough. machinery, heat farm buildings, dry Designed to skid in pasture. 24" deep,
grain and serve many other purposes. 10 ft. long, 40" wide.
"Some of agriculture's renewable
energy supplies already are being used in LIQUID FEEDERS
gasohol to fuel the family car." 3 w m
A copy of "Cutting Energy Costs"& 4 wheel models
A coy o "Cutin Enrgy ost" Special design lick wheel assembly.
may be purchased by sending a check or Salesi l wheel asebly
money order for $9.50 to Super- 0 Stainless steel wheel hangers &
intendent of Documents, Washington, Designed with special rain guard to
D.C. 20402. Sales copies also are avail- eimne dition of mo asses.
able at U.S. government bookstores Ente itily remoleses.
which are located in a number of cities. 6 Entire unit easily removable from
Members of Congress have limited outside.
allotments of the book for free distribu- Units easy to move and clean.
tion to constitutents. USDA has no Larger capacity, long life. Special
copies for distribution. provisions for gravity fill models.
The four sections of the new yearbook are: agriculture and forestry,
family living, communities and alter- Our "Big Black Liquid Feeders" in stock. 3 or 4 wheel models. native energy sources. Authors are
specialists mainly from USDA and the Call or write for brochure.
state land grant universities. The book ADSIT DURA-CAST PRODUCTS
has 48 chapters and many illustrations.
Special quantity discounts available P.O. Box 812
Amber glass protects Manufactured in Lake Wales, Florida Lake Wales, Fla. 33853
cattle virus vaccines Fully assembled, delivery available 813/676-4116 (day)
When you buy cattle virus vaccines-for Dealer Inquiries invited 813/285-8874 (night)
IBR, BVD and PI3-consider where you
work cattle, and how long it takes.
Then consider the color of the vaccine bottle. It makes a difference, says ATrLE,[N'Dr. Mark Keister, technical service ONS T RUTION TURN-KEY
veterinarian for Anchor Laboratories, a _--11OATRUC|O N TUR -KE
division of Philips Roxane, Inc., St.O--.PROJ ECTS Joseph, Missouri. CATTLE SWINE DAIRIES FEED
"Certain portions of sunlight FACILITIES HOUSING MILLS
spectrum can kill live and modified-live SY, !"-AILTE METANG MSLR
virus vaccine in clear vials," Keister ANIMAL WASTE 0 METHANE GAS SOLAR
says. "But amber glass filters out the RECYCLING PRODUCTION SYSTEMS
damaging rays and substantially reduces CATTLE FEEDLOT EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES
loss of potency." SPECIALIST MANAGEMENT & CONSULTING SERVICES
If you work cattle outside, Keister
says, choose virus vaccines in amber CONFINEMENT ENGINEERING.DESIGN & DRAFTING SERVICES
bottles. OR CALL TODAY: P.O. BOX 1536
"Our tests show that a clear vial of CONVENTIONAL
virus vaccine left in the sun begins to 813/6G5-2424 BARTOW. FL. U.S.A. 33830
lose potency pretty fast," Keister
explains. "An animal vaccinated toward
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 31




the end of a multi-dose clear vial may not be protected. But vaccine in an amber vial can be left in the sun for several hours and still provide adequate Established 1946 protection."
IBR vaccines in clear bottles can drop to minimum government standards for potency after only 30 minutes of Our sunlight exposure, according to a recent
study by Anchor Laboratories. Anchor's IBR vaccine in amber vials exceeded government standards for s More than four hours of sunlight exposure.
In the test, eight vials of reconPlease call before driving to Ona. stituted modified-live IBR vaccine were
Our inventory is low on some sizes. exposed to sunlight to determine its
effects on virus vaccines in amber glass and clear glass vials. Anchor tested its vaccine in amber and clear glass vials FLORIDA FENCE POST CO., INC. plus six competitors' vaccines in clear
Open 7 a.m.-5 p.m. glass vials. The vaccines were tested for
_ Monday thru Friday E potency at 0, 5, 30, 120 and 240 minutes.
PLANT and SALES OFFICE After 30 minutes of sunlight
P.O. Box 645-Ph: 813/735-1361 exposure, more than half of the IBR
0 ONA, FLORIDA 33865 vaccines in clear vials dropped below
minimum government standards for release. By the end of two hours, all seven vaccines in clear glass vials failed to meet the minimum government Designed for Almost Every Farming Use standards for IBR vaccine.
In contrast, the amber vial of Anchor IBR vaccine remained above the minimum government standard, and maintained a constant level of potency through four hours of sunlight exposure. See Us for Planning Assistance, Proven The amber vial effectively filtered out
harmful rays of sunlight and substanProducts and Construction Service tially reduced long-term potency loss.
"If you're doing very much with Frank Anderson your cattle when you work them, it's
Sales & Service Inc. almost impossible to go through a 50B L eum--dose bottle in thirty minutes," Keister
1315-5th Ave., Tampa, FL 33605 says. "You could cover a clear bottle of
AGRI-BUILDER Phone 813/247-5649 virus vaccine to protect it from sunFrank Anderson 813/961-5048 Harold Still 813/949-7154 light. That is fine, but it's not human
nature. It's simpler and safer to buy virus vaccines in amber vials."
All of Anchor's live and modifiedPo ale C atle e live virus vaccines for cattle are
Portable C attle Feeders packaged in amber vials. Bacterin vaccines are killed-virus products, not as susceptible to sunlight, and don't require the same protection, Keister Built of heavy guage steel, says.
all welded seams, ready NALF names
to use. 31/4 and 8 ton communications director
capacity. The North American Limousin Foundation (NALF), Denver, Colorado, has Hay Feeders-Silage selected Burt Rutherford of Fort
Collins, Colo. to serve as communicaTroughs and Molasses tions director.
Tanks. "We are pleased to have a young
man of Burt's background and experience coming to work for us," Choice Dealerships Available stated Greg Martin, NALF's executive
vice president. "Burt worked for us
part-time last summer on a job-internGeorgia Livestock Equipment ship program with Colorado State University. We were impressed with his Route 1, Box 297 enthusiasm for his work and the knowlLyons, Georgia 30436 edge he has in journalism and animal
science. He will definitely be a strong Office 912/526-8593 Res: 912/526-3376 addition to our staff," Martin concluded.
32 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




FRM HELPS YOUR
LIVESTOCK GROW. AND
THAT HELPS YOUR
PROFITS GROW.
/4
A fully grown animal is a profitable animal. your livestock's growth in mind. FRM can help with a wide range of complete Choose from a full line of quality FRM prodfeeds, minerals, and supplements for your beef ucts; from Vitaminde Minerals to FRM Horse cattle, dairy cows, horses, swine and poultry. Nuggets, from Pig Popper FRM also offers small animal and specialty Pellets to FRM Poultry Mix. feeds. FRM products are an investAll FRM products are especially designed for ment with a payoff that grows, f-R-f the Georgia, Florida and Alabama area, so you and grows, and grows... can rest easy knowing that your livestock's See your FRM dealer.., he'll nutritional needs are being satisfied. FRM show you how your profits can FEES
NlfI~f ~l$ K.
knows what makes them grow because our re- thrive along with your animals. search and development is focused in this area. Flint River Mills, Inc. That means all FRM products are designed with Bainbridge, Georgia
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 33




"We Can Do NOW IT'S HISTORY
More For You"
Aeschynomene Tifleaf-1 Millet Hairy Indigo
Ayce Coveo 1938: Florida cattle showed improvement
Alyce Clover Bermudas
Millets The 144 head of Florida-raised cattle entered at the Florida State Fair,
Bahias
Peas Tampa, showed the greatest improvement of any feature of the entire fair,
-OTHERS- according to onlookers... It was noted in a marketing report that during the
Florida Distributor month of December and January, cattle prices in Chicago dropped on top
CATTLEMAN'S CHOICE grades from six to seven cents per pound live weight.
Sorghum Sudangrass Hybrid 1943: Cover showed P. E. Williams
SHARE/HARVESTING
The cover picture of the February issue showed P. E. Williams, Davenport, Arcadia ... call us to schedule the president of the state cattlemen's association astride his fine Palomino
harvesting of your Bahias, Millets, Judge for the Southeastern Fat Stock Show and Sale at Ocala was L. V.
Aeschynomene, Indigo, Alyce Clover, Starkey of Clemson College... T. J. Durrance of Brighton was named presietc. dent of the Highlands County Cattlemen's Association ... A Brown Swiss
"Since 1933" cow weighing 1205 pounds sold at $11.35 for a gross of $136.77 at the
Arcadia Livestock Market.
Haile-Dean 1948: Brahman heifer brought top price
Seed C o., I ne. A Brahman heifer sold for a record price at the fourth Southeastern
Brahman Sale at Ocala with $3100 being paid by M. C. Stallworth, Jr., of 1333 W. Church St. Vinegar Bend, Alabama for the Norris Cattle Company consignment ...
[ P.O. Box 5517"'
Ph. 305/425-3426 The first livestock show was sponsored by the Nassau County Cattlemen's
Orlando, Fla. 32805 Association at Hilliard... D. E. Cannon was elected president of the Pasco
County Cattlemen's Association.
1953: 'Vacation Sale' was promoted
OLD SOUTH Sun Lake Ranch at Lutz promoted its Angus "Vacation Sale" with three
pages of advertising in The Florida Cattleman... S. N. Smith of Nocatee was MILLS, Inc. elected president of the DeSoto County Cattlemen's Association... Florida
independent slaughterers were on record saying the state should pay all costs Serving you from two locations, with of meat inspection ... It was noted Florida agriculture's value amounted to
" Great Southern Minerals more than $500 million annually in income to the state.
" Range Pellets
" Cattle Feed Horse Feed
" Medicated Custom Premixes
Sebring, FL Kissimmee, FL IN
813/655-1335 305/846-4285
"WIK-A-WEED"
for
Dog Fennel-Bull Grass
Smut Grass and
Other Weeds
ECONOMICAL WEED CONTROL WIK-A-WEED, Inc.
DIPPING WAS THE RECOGNIZED TREATMENT for ticks and cow crews worked at it back in the 30s. The crew shown here in the Big Pine area in 1930 were from left, Buf J. B. Starkey, Jr., 813/920-5288 Thomas; Will Long; Sam Story; Charlie Thomas; Oscar Tyson; Wash Hart; El Tyson; Vance
Rt. 3, Box 1400, Odessa FL 33556 Tyson; Warren Mann, and Gay Story. The picture was sent in by Early Story of Deer Park.
The Cattleman needs old pictures for this space and will return the photo undamaged after use.
34 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




Mr. Beef Producer,
it makes a difference when you let your local livestock auction market manager sell your cattle. He not only sells livestock, but PROMOTES their sale. And that brings you a better return usually than selling direct.
Why? Because there is competitive bidding under the livestock auction market system and the difference is between what livestock might just "sell" for, and for what they are actually worth under the conditions of competitive bidding. Your marketman works at "selling" livestock.
Check with him and you just might find that you will get the little extra return that will mean
the difference between profit and loss in your operation. Check with YOUR local marketman!
The Auction Market Way is the Best Way!
CONTACT ANY OF THESE MARKETS, ALL MEMBERS OF THE STATE ASSOCIATION
Arcadia State Livestock Market* Kissimmee Livestock Market West Florida Livestock Market* Edwards Livestock Company*
Auctions Every Wednesday Auctions Every Wednesday Sale Every Thursday Hog Auction Every Monday
Pat Kelly, Mgr., Dorothy Norris & Buddy Williams, Mgr. Cattle Auction Every Wednesday
Ph. 813/494-3737, 1808, 3250 Johnny Bronson, Mgrs. Ph. 904/482-2229, 482-8684 0. W. Edwards, Jr., Mgr. 904/627-9584
ARCADIA, 33821 305/847-3521 MARIANNA, 32446 QUINCY, 32351
KISSIMMEE, 32741
cioy LiverusoCmay Columbia Livestock Market* Mills Auction Market* Hardee Livestock Market, Inc.
E. D. (Buddy) Neel, Mgr. Hog Auctions Every Monday Hog Auction Every Wednesday Auctions Every Monday
Ph. 904/638-0267, 638-4498 Cattle Auctions Every Thursday Cattle Auction Every Thursday Mgrs: Doyle Canlton, III, Robert Ray Smith
CHIPLEY, 32428 H. Tom Willis, Mgr. Ph. 904/755-2300 Emery Mills, Mgr. Phones 813/773-9747, 773-9560
LAKE CITY, 32055 Ph. 904/732-4454 WAUCHULA, 33873
DCALA, 32670
Gainesville Livestock Market, Inc.*
Cattle Auctions Every Mon.-Wed. Cattlemen's Livestock Markets*
Hog Auctions Every Wednesday Monday Sales Tuesday Cow Palace* Interstate Livestock Market*
Mgrs., L. H. (Tommy) Thompson, Jr. Bill Hamilton, Mgr. Sale Every Sat. Auctions Every Tuesday
an .W Buddy" Clark Tampa 813/626-5184 e Lakeland 813/665-5088 W. T. (Bill) Wells, Mgr. Jay Mueller, Mgr.
Ph. 904/372-3442 TAMPA, 33609 and LAKELAND, 33802 Ph. 813/858-6253 81 EFFNER42, 3354 5
GAINESVILLE, 32601 LAKELAND,- 33802 SFNR 38
Tindel- Livestock Market* Suwannee Valley Livestock Market*
Auctions Every Monday Auctions Every Wednesday Monticello Stockyard, Inc.* Sumter County Farmers Market
Clyde Crutchfield, Mgr. Kiah Eubanks; Cecil Moore e Ph. 904/362-1702 Auctions Every Monday Auctions Every Tuesday
Ph. 904/263-3224 LIVE OAK, 32060 J. E. Hawkins, Mgr. Ph. 904/997-5711 Gene Babbitt Ph. 904/793-2021
GRACEVILLE, 32440 MONTICELLO, 32344 WEBSTER, 33597
Jay Livestock Auction Madison Stockyard Inc.*
Auctions Every Tuesday Hogs-Monday; Cattle-Tuesday Okeechobee Livestock Market Jacksonville Livestock Auction Market*
Horace McCurdy, Mgr. George Townsend, Mgr. Auctions Every Monday & Tuesday Auctions Every Monday
Ph. 904/675-4795 904/973-4094,929-4605 Pete Clemons, Mgr. o Ph. 813/763-3127 Thos. W. Waldrop, Owner 904/781-4677
JAY, 32565 MADISON, 32340 OKEECHOBEE, 33472 WHITEHOUSE, 32095
L hR*-Indicates Subscriber to Livestock Marketing Association
For Further Information about Florida Livestock Auction Markets, Contact
9k06iiafASSOCIATION OF LIVESTOCK MARKETS
P.O. Box 1403, Kissimmee, FL 32141
THE FLORIDA CAlTrLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 35




Danger is great for foreign disease outbreak
Seminar slated to stress disease safeguards
for Florida's agriculture industry
Florida Agriculture Commissioner
Doyle Conner has announced dates and
site for a seminar aimed at safeguarding
Florida livestock and plant industries scenes and open communications beagainst exotic diseases and pests being tween lawmen and producers for a more carried into the state by drug smugglers cooperative effort in reporting illegal and refugees. entries and clandestine operations.
The Exotic Agriculture Threats Conner said all law enforcement and plant diseases invading the state's
Seminar (EATS) will be held February agencies in our state would be invited to vast citrus and winter vegetable areas. 11-12 at the Holiday Inn on Interna- the seminar, which was requested by the "For example," Conner said, "just tional Drive in Orlando. Florida Cattlemen's Association and is one mango could conceal the eggs of the
"We have become genuinely con- being conducted jointly by the Florida West Indian Fruit Fly, and an infestacerned with the real threat and poten- Department of Agriculture and USDA. tion in Florida could devastate our tial devastating effects that a foreign dis- The program also will include repre- citrus industry." ease outbreak would have on our con- sentatives of Senator Lawton Chiles' The West Indian Fruit Fly is just one
sumers and our agricultural indus- office, the Florida Department of Law of the many pests which are widespread tries," Conner said. Enforcement, Florida Sheriffs Associa- throughout the Caribbean area.
Conner said the main concern was tion, Florida Association of Chiefs of "We feel the seminar will greatly with the animal diseases Foot-and- Police, Florida Game and Fresh Water help us reduce the threat of foreign disMouth Disease, African Swine Fever Fish Commission, Florida Department eases and pests entering Florida," and Exotic Newcastle Disease. "All of Natural Resources, U.S. Customs, Conner said. three. are running rampant at our door- U.S. Border Patrol and the U.S. Coast During FCA's board of directors step in the Caribbean and South Guard. meeting at Crystal River last SeptemAmerica," Conner said. "We are making an all-out effort by ber, Dan Childs, Lake Placid, chairman
The diseases are highly contagious. involving a wide spectrum of concerned of the animal health and technical comThe virus, in addition to being spread agencies because of the wide implica- mittee, emphasized the imminent danger from animal to animal, can be carried tions and seriousness of the matter," existing on the entry of foreign diseases on clothing and footwear, on tires of Conner said, into Florida. He specifically referred to
vehicles and in undercooked meats from There are no cures for animals African Swine Fever and Foot-andinfected animals. infected with Foot-and-Mouth Disease, Mouth Disease, and explained the
"Our concern has heightened greatly African Swine Fever or Exotic New- several ways the diseases could be introin the last few months because of in- castle Disease. Infected and exposed duced into Florida, expecially FMD. creased numbers of clandestine land- animals must be slaughtered and the Pointing out the last outbreak of
ings in Florida pastures of aircraft carcasses destroyed. FMD was in 1929 in California, when
loaded with drugs from South America, "An extensive outbreak would result 120,000 head of cattle had to be killed, with the influx of refugees from Haiti," in widespread depopulation of our herds Childs warned that with the disease Conner said. of cattle and swine and flocks of poul- there is no marketing of cattle; they are
The seminar is designed to alert law try," Conner said. "That would leave us subject to immediate slaughter and disenforcement personnel to the dangers of with a short supply of meat and, in turn, posal. foreign diseases, establish guidelines for drive up the prices at the supermarket." At the Crystal River meeting, Childs handling agricultural refuse at crime There also exists a threat of pests introduced a resolution which was adopted and later distributed to state
and federal government levels. It stressed the vulnerability of Florida to these
Legislative representative named diseases and urged that more stringent
precautionary measures be taken. AddiIn a recent press release, W. G. "Kayo" Welles, Arcadia, president of the Florida tionally it was recommended that FCA, Cattlemen's Association, announced that L. M. "Buddy" Blain, Tampa, has along with the Florida Department of been retained as FCA's legislative representative. .Agriculture and USDA, join in working
Blain is an attorney with the firm of Blain & Cone, Tampa. He will monitor toadaglofeutig nvvd
the interests of the cattle industry in Florida during the coming session of the oardnie ao gomal ofe ieduastinoved
legislature. agp penet v mba h easestrog
Welles said that Blain also maintains an office in Tallahassee, which will give prerrvntemase.
the industry on-the-spot representation. This action by FCA resulted in the
Blain is a graduate of the University of Florida, Gainesvilie, where he received move to conduct the seminar, noted
his bachelor's degree in education. He later returned to the University's law W. G. "Kayo" Welles, Arcadia, presischool where he received his law degree. He served in the Attorney General's dent, who said it was vital that local office in Tallahassee for a number of years prior to joining the Gibbons law firm association leaders take action to ensure in Tampa. Later he opened his own practice. that law enforcement agencies from
A native Floridian, he was born and raised in Plant City. At one time he was their areas be represented at the two-day
engaged in farming and ranching and was a member of the Hillsborough County session.
Cattlemen's Association. He currently holds the post of general counsel for the Welles pointed out the danger of Southwest Florida Water Management District at Brooksville. these foreign diseases pose an economiWelles said that FCA was very fortunate to be in a position to retain Blain to cally devastating threat to the country's
monitor those legislative activities "which have direct or indirect impact on Flor- livestock industry. "The programming ida's multi-million dollar cattle industry." of this seminar is a positive step in the
I right direction," Welles remarked.
36 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




Solid sale! DON'T FIGHT RUST
The sixth annual bull sale at the Chipley Livestock Market, USE
Chipley, December 13 had 129 bulls sell for an average of $1325,
according to E. D. "Buddy" Neel, 4q
market operator.
Buying power was steady with
six breeds represented at the annual sale event which drew a
standing room only crowd. 0o
The Simbrah consignments
averaged $1275; Simmental bulls $1319 Limousin $1425; Angus/Limousin crosses (Angusin)
$1377; Brahman $882, and Brah- HEAVY DUTY WOOD TROUGHS
mousin bulls $1313.
Top selling bull went to J. D. All material two-inch pressure treated
Swearingen, Marianna, who paid pine. Available in 8'-12'-16' lenghts.
$1950 for the Brahmousin sale topper. CALL
Neel, who also auctioneered
the sale, is first vice president of the FRANK WILLIAM S
Florida Cattlemen's Association
and president of the Washington- Day or Night 904/528-5278 or write
Holmes Cattlemen's Association. Rt. 1, Box 61, Morriston FL 32668
18th annual Power
S'Gertrudis sale Chutes
aver ages $1227 Best for cattle and cowboys.
The 18th Annual Florida Santa Gertru- Three sizes. Triple duty chutes.
dis Association sale held at the South- Can be portable.
eastern Livestock Pavilion in Ocala on January 17 brought a gross of $90,800 to M ACHINERY AN LIVESTOCK Eauirums,
average out at $1227 per head. S.ECIAL137
High buyer at the sale was Diamond B Ranch, Morriston, with purchases of five lots for $8550 to average $1710. Second high buyer was Joe Wattlesworth, Williston, with an outlay of $7900 and an average of $1129 on seven lots.
High selling individual was a polled bull consigned by K. D. Eatmon of Pompano Beach bought by Diamond B Ranch for $4200. Second high individual was a female consignment from FAR .
Eatmon and purchased by C&S Ranch, Dunnellon for $3500. TAMPA, FLORIDA
Sale manager was Carl Stevens of Phone collect (813) 248-6238 P.O. Box 172
Dunnellon. Gerald Bowie, West Point, Tampa, Fla. 33601
Georgia, was auctioneer.
Buyers at the sale with number of Come see us at 33rd st. and East 7th Ave., Tampa
head purchased, if more than one shown Largest Inventory of Fencing for Farm & Ranch in Florida
in parentheses, and amount spent FARM FENCING GATE HARDWARE
follow: BARBED WIRE ELECTRIC FENCE
Joe Wattlesworth, Williston (7) $7900; B. 0. Padgett,
Perry (4) $3425; Diamond B Ranch, Morriston (5) $8550; GAUCHO BARBED WIRE SYSTEMS Stage Coach Ranch, Dade City (3) $6850; Winnstead Plantation, Thomasville, Georgia $1250; C&S Ranch, DunnelIon (2) $6600; Sunny L Ranch, O'Brien (3) $2825; Charles POULTRY NETTING AMERICAN POWER PULLS Rowe, MacClenny (4) $4125; Mrs. K. D. Eatmon, Pompano Beach $1100; Double RJ Fams, Georgia $875; Wyecott FARM GATES HI LIFT JACKS Plantation, Midway, Alabama $1050; Markham Brothers, Dunnellon $900; Lovette Farms, Cuspeth, Georgia (6) Galvanized steel, wire WELDED WIRE $6925; Willard Hall, Cairo, Georgia (4) $2825; K. D. Eatmon, Pompano Beach (7) $6775; Nine Bar Ranch, GALVANIZED ROOFING HARDWARE CLOTH
Hempstead, Texas (4) $6050; J. W. Exley, Lake City (3) 5-V-Crimp Bright or
$3575; K Bar 3 Ranch, Okelenta, Georgia (2) $1775; William NAILS i o
Townley, Ocala (2) $2200; Don Brown, Plant City (2) $1875; T. M. Reeves, Okaloosa $500; Elwell Oliver, Ocala $800; FENCE POSTS Steel. galvanized. Robinson Farms, Atlanta, Georgia $1500; Harwell & Harwell, Lakeland (2) $2125; Joe Crocker, Plant City $975; STAPLES John Curls, Lakeland $500; Cox Eland, Citra $675; D. L. W E LV
Thomas, Lake City $650; Rogers Brothers, Arcadia $3000; W DELIVER
Earl Cox, Bradenton $2625.
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 37




Florida riders active in
NCHA cutting events during 1980
Results of the National Cutting Horse Gibbs, Pensacola (2)-$363.70
Association standings for 1980 show a 5. GAY PIPER, Don Beverly, West number of Florida riders participating Palm Beach (3)-$336.70 In the non-pro rider of the year scor- Walls, Fort Pierce (2)-$239.70 ing, Bubba Welles, Arcadia, competed 7. LADY TARI, George Culverin 31 shows and won a total of house (2)-$202.55
$10,229.06 riding Brigand's Breeze and 8. ILLINI VAN, Don Day, Arcadia Brigand.06Sugar.gInrthensameBdivision, (2)-$190.22 Brigand's Sugar. In the same division, 9. COW TROUBLE, Robert de"--Robert Bradley of Pensacola, partici- Bradley, Pensacola (l)-$149.77
pated in eight shows and won $2758.14 10. BILL'S WILL POWER, Rufus riding Cow Trouble and Argentine Hayes, Milton (1)-$131.25
Moore.
R o a e A number of prizes were contrib- Non-Professional
uted by firms and individuals around 1. BUBBA WELLES, Arcadia (3)the country. A saddle was awarded to $1160.70 (Brigand's Breeze and BrigFlorida's Oldest the reserve champion, non-pro rider, by and's Sugar)
Professional Rodeo McLelland's Boot and Saddle, Inc., of 2. SPENCER HARDEN (6)Now Our 67th Lake Worth. $948.86 (Dulcinea Quixote)
Area 16 (Florida) leaders as listed by 3. DON BEVERLY (5)-$903.10 NCHA have points counted for being (Gay Piper) the owner of the contesting horse at 4. GEORGE CULVERHOUSE February 20, 21,22 shows having added purses of $500 or (5)-$465.58 (Doc's Wimpy)
less. Horse, owner, city, number of Area 5. JIM OUSLEY, Loxahatchee Fri., Sat., Sun. 16 shows participated in shown in (2)-$268.20 (Sister Cole)
2:30 p.m. daily parentheses, and amounts won, are as 6. TOMMY WALLS (1)-$205.50
follows: (Vow Back Smoke)
7. CHARLEEN McMANUS, Lake
Silver Spurs Parades: Open Worth (3)-$121.74 (Peako Peake)
10:30 Friday-St. Cloud e 8. ROBERT BRADLEY (1)10:30 Saturday-Kissimmee 1. DULCINEA QUIXOTE, $50.40 (Argentine Moore)
Spencer Harden, Sorrento (7) 9. MARTIN SHARRON, Pensa$1432.94
Silver Spurs Arena 2. LONSUM TIGER, R. D. Welles, cola (1)-$25.20 (Dee's Party Doll)
U. S. 192-441 East of Arcadia (4)-G$1227.76 $1500 Non-Professional
3. DOC'S WIMPY, George CulK verhouse, Fort Pierce (4)-$447.00 1. DONNA LEE CULVER4. BLUE HONCHO, Claude HOUSE, Fort Pierce (9)-$395.80
featuring
" Saddle Bronc Riding
" Bareback Bronc Riding Feeder futures contract revised
" Calf Roping A significantly revised feeder cattle futures contract will be listed for trading on
" Steer Wrestling the Chicago Mercantile Exchange as of January 2, 1981, following approval by
Bull Riding the Commodity and Futures Trading Commission. Designed to keep pace with
" Team Roping changes and needs within the feeder cattle industry, the revisions will take effect
" Cowgirl's Barrel Race with a new January, 1982 contract and subsequent delivery months.
" Silver Spurs Horseback Quadrille Changes in the feeder cattle contract are being made in the grade description,
par contract weight allowable, discounts for grade and weight, maximum horn Announcer length and approved par and discount delivery points.
Clem McSpadden The new feeder cattle trading unit will be 44,000 pounds of feeder steers
instead of 42,000 pounds. The steers will be of Medium Frame and the lower 2/3 of the Large Frame size. In addition, the steers will be of Number One and the top 1/3 of the Number Two Muscle Thickness as defined in the official U.S. 12,000 Reserved Seats Under Roof Standards for Grades of Feeder Cattle.
50 Acres of Free Parking The existing contract calls for 80 percent Choice and 20 percent Good grades
Admission $4.00, $5.00, $6.00 and has now been revised to not more than 13 head of Number Two Muscle
Thickness. A delivery unit can contain up to 23 head or 10 additional steers, of Phone Reservations: Silver Spurs the top 1/3 of USDA Number Two Muscle Thickness at a discount of $4.00 per
Arena, Kissimmee 305/847-5118, also; hundredweight. Streep's, Orlando 305/849-5240. The average per head weight has been increased from 550-650 pounds to 575Fashion Square, Orlando 305/896-1129. 700 pounds. The discount for heavy cattle has been increased from 1.5 cents per Western Gentleman, Dundee 813/439- hundredweight over 600 pounds to 3 cents per hundredweight over 700 pounds.
1033. Western Corral, Melbourne In addition, a delivery unit averaging over 750 pounds up to 800 pounds is deliv305/723-2611. Altamonte Mall, erable at a 5 cent per hundredweight discount.
Altamonte Springs 305/834-3444. The acceptable horn length has been increased from three inches to five
inches.
Mail Reservations: Silver Spurs, Par delivery pounds in the revised contract are Omaha, Nebraska; Oklahoma
Inc., (Tickets), P. 0. Box 1909, City, Oklahoma and Sioux City, Iowa. Delivery may also be made at Kansas
Kissimmee, Florida 32741 City, Missouri and St. Joseph, Missouri at a 25 cent per hundredweight discount.
The 75 cent per hundredweight discount for delivery at Billings, Montana and the $6.00 per hundredweight discount for delivery at Montgomery, Alabama remain unchanged.
38 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




(Doc's Wimpy)
2. SANDY HAYES, Milton (1)- The South's Largest Western Store
$114.10 (Bill's Will Power)
3. MARK HARDEN, Sorrento
(3)-$73.15 (Dulcinea Quixote)
4. CHARLEEN McMANUS (3)$49.65 (Peako Peake)
5. JIM OUSLEY (3)-$37.05 (Sister
Cole)
6. LEE HERB DAVIS, Wauchula
(1)-$34.20 (Tynes War Bond)
7-8. LINDA "SQUEAK" HUBER, Saddles & Tack
Williston (1)-$14.50 (No Return) S d & acS'
7-8. ROY HARDEN, Sorrento Billy Cook
(1)-$14.50 (Dulcinea Quixote) all sze
9. JACKIE TALLEY, Leesburg Longhorn availabe) Tony Lama
(1)-$13.55 (Lee's Holley) Simco Justin
$1000 Novice Textan 1)7 Texas
1. BLUE HONCHO, Claude Frye
Gibbs, Pensacola (2)-$185.45 Bailey and Resistol Hats
2. BILL'S WILL POWER, Rufus
Hayes, Milton (1)-$142.70 l e"CmB Number 1 dealer for Neckover
$500 Novice trailers. Also feature a complete line
1. BLUE HONCHO (5)-$627.73 Nof Vaccines and Health Supplies,
2. BILL'S SAN, Bill Hoecherl, Fort Guns, and Ammunition.
Lauderdale (1)-$190.00 Your Complete
3. DULCINEA QUIXOTE (2)- Ranch Supply Store
$72.20
4. HASTAJOKE, Roy Wellman,
Citra (2)-$58.90 T iH Ee.
5. DOC FESS, John Mitchell, Jay
(1)-$23.75
6. MR. GUNSMOKE 2, R. D.
Welles (1)-$19.00 Telephone INC.
7. DOC SHY DANCER, Rex 904/376-4595 4821 NW 6TH STREET AT HWY. 441
Holley, Fort Pierce (1)-$14.25 GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA
Youth
1. PHILLIP HAYES, Milton (2)-2 STETSON & BAILEY HATS Books open for the 1981 Breeding Seaso
Points (Bill's Will Power) B Now standing in Florida
2. SHANA CULVERHOUSE, RANCH & WESTERN WEAR "HARD TACK TARI'
Fort Pierce (1)-1 Point (Bald Jess) Levis 0 Wranglers 0 Lee Son of the Great Cutting Horse Sire
FortPiece ()-IPoin (Bld Jss)Doc Teri by the Imme al Doc Bar ~.'4~ w w~ 9Dam: King Kay
***** U EU1981 Fee: $500.00 FarrierG to hol L ~ D S YoungDoc Bar bred horses for sale at all times
Farrier's nation brood mares bought and sold
John Lillie Quarter Horses
annual convention Acme. Wrangler Texas* Justin Rt. 2, Box 600, Bushnell, Florida 33513
26 Broadway, Kissimmee, Fla. 32741 305/8474791 904-793-4215
The 10th annual convention of the
American Farrier's Association is slated
to be held in Albuquerque, New Mex- WORLD'S FINEST
ico, February 26-28. ........
Hosting the event will be the New LIVESTOCK TRAILERS
Mexico Professional Horseshoers Asso- FEATURES (ht.um
ciation with the theme of "shoeing the All Steel Construction ,'enui performance horse". Included will be Treated 2" x 8" Floor
lectures and demonstrations, a farrier's 6'4" or 7'8" Wide trade fair, equipment displays, and cash- Divider, Escape and Slide/Swing Rear Doors prize forging and shoeing competitions. Full Roof I 8-Ply Tires Electric Brakes NOl Be Dlon 7'" Wide
For further information contact Many Options Available widir Bemoked. Haul 24 ma
American Farrier's Association, Box
695, Albuquerque NM 87103. Buy Direct From The Call now for E-Z PULL
a actory tour
Pioneer cattleman dies Factory and Save: to se why E-Z TRAILERS
(1) Delivery Charges Pull Trailers
are the world's
James Franklin "Frank" Story of Chu- (2) Dealer Markup finet trailers Rt. 1, Box 1213 0
luota, died at the age of 90 on January Tavares, Fl. 32778
10. Born in Chuluota, he was a lifetime 1-904-343-1000
resident of that community. 1-904-343-2438
Known as "Uncle Frank" to many, 1-305-859-5009
he was a citrus grower in Orange and Call or WriteSeminole counties as well as a cattle- Shown by Appointment Only
man in Osceola County.
Survivors include: son, Herman, 42-Foot Flatbed hauls up to
Orlando; daughter, Mrs. Geraldine 4 tractors or 500 bales of hay.
Story Sharp, Orlando; two grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 39




Florida's top
rodeos slated in
February, March
Florida's two oldest rodeos will be held again in the coming months with the Silver Spurs Rodeo and Arcadia AllFlorida Championship Rodeo slated for February and March respectively.
The Silver Spurs will present its 67th rodeo with performances set for February 2, 21, and 22, Friday, Saturday and Sunday, all at 2:30 p.m. at the 7, ,arena on U.S. 192-441 east of Kissimmee. The Silver Spurs parades will be COP) ei held at 10:30 a.m., Friday, February 19
1in St. Cloud and again on Saturday at
1 10:30 a.m., in Kissimmee.
Arcadia's mid-winter edition, the 72nd performance and the 53rd year, is WESTERN WEAR AND TACK on the schedule for Friday, Saturday
and Sunday, March 13, 14 and 15, all beginning at 2:00 p.m., at the Fenton STORE HOURS Area on South Highway 17.
Both rodeos will feature the regular Monday-Saturday events with saddle bronc riding, bare8:30 A.M. to 7:30 P.M. back bronc riding, calf roping, steer
wrestling, bull riding, team roping, and cowgirl's barrel race. The Kissimmee 1:30 P.M. to 5:00 P.M. event will also feature the Silver Spurs
Horseback Quadrille.
P. 0. DRAWER M PHONE Both rodeos are PRCA approved
DUNDEE, FLORIDA 33838 (813) 439-1033 and will draw nationally ranked rodeo
performers to the competition. U.S. HWY. 27 FCA's board of directors will be
meeting in Arcadia on March 13 and it is expected that a number will attend the performance that afternoon. [. I [eP r Satisfaction The Silver Spurs event will feature
Satisfactionevn
Guaranteed On
Sot Foi d -Odes Good Fur Felts announcer Clem McSpadden from
Oklahoma.
m u- Ralph Thompson
Levi Stetson* ., "leaves Jo-Su-Li
[Le *] Pahnl Slim" Acm FORMERLY OF
* Jti T TEXAS Ralph Thompson, Colquitt, Georgia,
Nocona D Renovations $15 the veteran general manager of Jo-Su-Li
Includes cleaned and Farms, has left that firm to go into
blocked, liner and ribbons, private business. Thompson has purleather sweat band. Allow chased a farm south of Colquitt and is
two to three weeks. Add $4
postage and handling. relocating to start a livestock manageMail to Grady's, Formerly meant service.
Okeehobe. 33 of Texas, 6027 N. Dale
Esabise Mabry, Tampa, Florida 33614 The new company will specialize in
(813) 879-6620. purebred and commercial sales management, consulting, order buying, semen testing, pregnancy testing, and foot WHY SETTLE FOR LESS THAN THE BEST trimming.
Thompson said he will continue to be affiliated with C & T Farm, ColSAVE TIME quitt, Georgia, owned by Clarence
AND MONEY Cross, and T Bar Herefords of Oklahoma, an ownership that is shared with Pre-fab processing areas, hydraulic squeeze Thompson's son Robert.
chutes and dipping vats. Trojan has a one year
warranty on all parts. Trojan chutes have grease The T Bar Hereford Bull Sale will
zerts in all linkage, chutes are available for single continue to be held at the Jennings
phase or three phase electricity. Overstreet Ranch, Kissimmee. A 1981
All sales, service and parts will be handled sale is tentatively planned for October.
through our office and plant at Weatherford, Ok. Thompson said he will now be locating
and order buying bulls of all breeds for TROJAN LIVESTOCK his long time Florida customers.
EQUIPMENT, INC.
P.O. Box 453 Join your local county Cattlemen's
WEATHERFORD, OK. 73096 Plant: 405/772-7724 Office: 405/772-2146 Association.
40 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




Feedlot clinic
slated ARCADIA ALL-FLORIDA
at Wauchula CHAMPIONSHIP RODEO
Jim Hentges, chairman of the 1981 Florida Feedlot Clinic, University of MID-WINTER EDITION
Florida, Gainesville, has announced the event will be held February 19 in Waucae t i on wilheld euderwayin Wat "GRANDDADDY OF 'EM ALL" 72nd Performance-53rd Year
chula. Registration will get underway at
8:00 a.m., in the conference room of the Hardee Agricultural Center. The open- F RDAY, MARCH 13th, 2 .m.
ing session will be presided over by Dr. SATURDAY, MARCH 14th, p.m.
H. D. Wallace, chairman, animal SUNDAY, MARCH 15th, 2 p.m.
science department, University of h 2pm
Florida, Gainesville.
The program will get underway at PRCA Approved
8:45 a.m., with a discussion on struc- Nationally Ranked ICowboys tural and operational characteristics of FENTON ARENA S
the Florida cattle feeding industry pre- SOUTH 17
sented by Jim Simpson of the Univer- ARCADIA
sity staff. At 9:00 a.m., a panel will discuss live and carcass beef marketing alternatives and trends. Moderator will $5.00-$6.00 All Covered Reserved Seats be Kary Mathis, director, Florida Agri- $4.00 General Admission cultural Marketing Research Center, University of Florida. Others heard will R.,o For Information and Reservations
be Pat Wilson, Frostproof, and Jim 4co
Pearson, USDA, Washington, D.C. P. 0. Box 1266
Others appearing on the morning Arcadia, Florida 33821
program will be Roger West, Univer- rcaAdia Phone
sity of Florida, covering beef packer Phone 813/494-2014
processing developments, and Dan Fox, Cornell University, New York discussing meeting the protein needs of feedlot Advance Tickets on sale February 9-March 13 at Rodeo Office on Rodeo Grounds, cattle. Highway 17, South, 124 Heard Street, Arcadia, Florida.
The afternoon session will be presided over by Bill Kunkle of the University staff. A number of topics will be covered by University staffers including TRAIL-RITE Findlay Pate, Sloan Baker, and Glyn Horton. Trailer Mfg. Co.
Hentges said registration fee is $25 presents
per person and pre-registration is requested. Checks should be made out HA YKRADLE
to the University of Florida.
* Completely Manual
Bradford-Union e No Hydraulics 5 Roll with Gooseneck
elects Joyner No Electricity
9 Saves Labor
Royce Joyner, Starke, was elected presi- Virtually H AYo
dent of the Bradford-Union Cattle- Maintenance Free
men's Association for the coming year. Serving as vice president will be James One Man Can Load, A
W. Brown, Lake Butler. Haul, and Unload U.S.
Secretary-treasurer is Ray Norman, Starke. State director from Bradford County is Fred Mueller, Starke, and state director from Union County is Ray Crawford, Lake Butler.
Local Bradford County directors are L. C. Sapp, Starke, J. E. Tomlinson, Starke, and W. F. Andrews, Brooker.
Union County directors, all from Lake Butler, are Neal V. Varnes, Wilford Croft, and A. C. Saunders.
Horse & Stock Trailers Manufactured in Florida
- Horse Trailers-1, 2, 4, and 8 Horse All metal except wood flooring U.S. veal production was 31 million Stock Trailers-16-42 ft., even numbers New tires standard
pounds in November, down six percent Goose neck and bumper hitches Matched paint optional
from November, 1979. Calf slaughter at O apen and closed sides Also custom built to your specifications
214 thousand head was down 11 per- TRAIL-RITE TRAILER MFG. CO.
cent, while the average live weight of 248 T. E. Hall. Owner
pounds was up 13 pounds. Rt. 2, Box 2442 ST. CLOUD, FLORIDA 32769 Ph. 305/892-2498
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 41




An assessment of agricultural
nonpoint pollution controls
by WILLIAM G. BOGGESS thrust of the agricultural element is "to agricultural activities to nonpoint
University of Florida identify those agricultural activities con- source pollutants. Existing state-wide
Fr LORIDA is blessed with an tributing to water quality degradation, data was used to provide consistent
abundancee of natural resources that and to develop beneficial management rankings of the 115 segments, taking not only provide an attractive tourist en- schemes to control and prevent this into account climate, agricultural vironment, but also help make Flor- degradation." In addition, the element activity and terrain variations across the
idas aricltual ndutryoneof he includes sections on implementation state. Based on these requirements, the lagst andimsta idiver ineo theain procedures and provisions for possible DER chose four factors for evaluation:
laget ndmot iere n henaio. federal and state cost-sharing, average fertilizer application rate as
Yet, the warm, humid climate and represented by nitrogen and phosphorus
sandy soils make agriculture in Florida Problem Identification application; average pesticide applicaparticularly dependent upon the use of Numerous studies have been performed tion; animal unit density; and amount of impactcof thesecagriculturaltpracticesTon throughout the nation to identify char- sediment delivered to streams. imth enionmthas beenltra rcgized at acteristic pollutants from agricultural Each of the 115 hydrologic segments the entionlmevel hand feeraegnislat nonpoint sources. These studies have illustrated in Figure 1 was evaluated in
thenatona leel nd edeal egilaton been useful in providing a qualitative terms of these four factors and assigned has been established to provide guide- assessment of the total agricultural non- a numerical ranking of 0.0 to 1.0. The lines for controlling pollution from agri- point pollution problem nationwide, segment's ranking is based on the cultural sources. For example, the EPA has reported that calculated potential nonpoint source
The purpose of this article is to agricultural lands are a major con- pollution from each factor. A value of provide a brief overview of Florida's tributor to the estimated four billion 1.0 was assigned to areas with the agricultural nonpoint pollution control tons of sediment annually washed into greatest potential for problems. Other plan and the guidelines that have been the nation's waterways, with croplands areas were ranked proportionally. A csaled 208 plan."ngteso esosbloroe 50 percent of the final state-wide ranking of hydrologic
caled 208pla."total sediment yield to inland water- segments was calculated by summing
Planning framework ways. For several reasons, however, the the rankings of all pollution factors
DER has maintained that the above within each segment. The purpose of the
On October 18, 1972, the Federal Water estimates are not satisfactory for iden- overall ranking as stated by the DER, Pollution Control Act Amendments tifying local problems. First, since the was to "present a relative picture of all
became Public law 92-500 with the Agricultural Nonpoint Source Element segments within the state, highlighting
primary objective of restoring and main- relies on voluntary cooperation (discus- those which have the greatest potential taining, the chemical, physical, and sed in a later section), local acceptance to have water quality problems stemmbiological integrity of the nation's of a water quality problem is an essen- ing from some type of agricultural land water. The Act also contains two more tial ingredient. Secondly, Florida's agri- use." The shaded segments in Figure 1 specific goals: that by June 1983, wher- cultural nonpoint pollution problems represent the 20 segments with the ever possible, water quality is to be suit- differ in many respects from those greatest potential for water quality able for the protection and propagation typical in most other states. Soil erosion, problems stemming from agricultural of fish and wildlife, and for recreational for example, is considered the major land use. purposes; and that by 1985 discharges of nonpoint pollution source nationwide. Five of the "top 20" segments were pollutants will be eliminated. To achieve In many parts of Florida, though, identified for additional study (see these goals, the Act provides for exten- the highly permeable soils and flat Figure 1). Within each of these five segsive inventorying, planning, and regula- typography result in little erosion. But ments, a smaller watershed was idention to control point sources of pollu- by the same token, because of the rapid tified for more detailed analysis. The tion. In addition, although the Environ- infiltration rates and heavy rainfall in analyses will be the first step in a statemental Protection Agency (EPA) is Florida, dissolved nutrients from animal wide effort to determine:
tprovaiysonsibte fedra aern Pou- wastes, fertilizers, oxidized organic 1) The ability of various best mantion Cronto AtsScion20 of the FdrlWtrPl matter and natural sources can pose a agement practices and/or management
lutonCotrl AtSetin 28 f he significant water quality problem. schemes to reduce pollution levels.
Act requires states to develop and As a result, the DER determined 2) The associated costs and benefits
implement water quality management that a consistent statewide assessment of of implementing these practices. plans. These water quality plans are to agricultural nonpoint source pollution 3) The magnitude and potential include: was needed to identify specific problems effects of nonpoint source runoff
I'a process to (I) identify, if appropriate, adpolmaes eiwo h aa ascae ihvrosarclua
agriculturally and silviculturally related nonpoint adpolmaes eiwo h aa ascae ihvrosarclua
sources of pollution, including return flows from available in Florida has shown that activities common to the major land irrigated agriculture, and their cumulative effects, although there has been considerable resource areas of Florida. runoff from manure disposal areas, and from land monitoring of water quality in the Selection of the five segments was used for livestock and crop production, and (ii) set 9
forth procedures and methods (including land use Okeechobee-Kissimmee Basin, monitor- based on the following criteria: requirements) to control to the extent feasible such ing in other areas has not been suf- 1) Segments exhibited a high potensources ..." ficient to fulfill the problem identifica- tial for agricultural nonpoint source
In Florida the Department of tion goals of a state-wide plan. Faced pollution based on one or more of the
Environmental Regulations (DER) is with time and resource limitations that four factors considered in the state-wide responsible for developing and imple- precluded rigorous monitoring of water assessment. menting the 208 plans. The DER has quality state-wide, the DER has 2) The segments chosen were repreresponded by developing a State Water developed a method to rank the state's sentative of the broad range of nonpoint Quality Management Plan for EPA 115 hydrologic segments with respect to source problems and agricultural land
approval. Included in the overall plan is their potential nonpoint source pollu- uses existing in the state. The informaan Agricultural Nonpoint Source Ele- tion problem (see Figure 1). tion developed in these areas should
ment, the provisions of which are the In developing the method, the DER then have maximum utility, state-wide. major subject of this article. The stated attempted to identify factors that link 3) Areas characterized by private
42 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




land ownership rather than public cor-Flm1Twnyhdooi aotssietfedbFDRih porate land ownership were given Fgres agrTwenturhydolton pegtentsal ars dentied area re wath
preference since it was felt that these greatest aricutal soutinptnilyCoshthdara.r a
areas would have a greater need forIWtdfdealdtdy cost-sharing programs to implement pollution controls.
4) An even geographical distribution over the state was desired to maximize the demonstration benefits and citizen involvement.
5) Areas with existing programs addressing 208 objectives were not chosen, to avoid duplication.
One of the key sources of funding considered for the 208 plan was the costsharing monies authorized in the Rural Clean Water Act of 1977. This act contains a section addressing watershed eligibility for cost-sharing monies which was used in identifying the specific watershed study areas within the five selected segments. The section specified that eligible watersheds should be smaller than 200,000 acres, have a majority of privately-owned farms, have evidence of widespread landowner cooperation and interest, and be dominated by agricultural activities. In addition, preference was given to watersheds with existing data and a documented nonpoint source water quality problem.
Implementation
The DER is responsible for the overall management and implementation of the nonpoint program with assistance from the State Soil and Water Conservation Districts (SWCD's), the U.S. Soil Conservation Service (SCS), the Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service (ASCS), and the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS). sibility of a regulatory approach. best management practices, the
The plan calls for the Institute of The plan itself calls for the DER to Cooperative Extension Service will use Food and Agricultural Sciences to pro- develop a technical manual of agricul- the results from these demonstrations in vide research assistance in carrying out tural best management practices for use state-wide educational programs. In this and evaluating the program, and to by the SWCD's, SCS, and landowners, manner the relative cost and effectiveassist in public education efforts and to coordinate and monitor the ness of the various practices in meeting
through the Cooperative Extension activities of the various implementing the goals of the Federal Water PolluService. Interagency memoranda of agencies. The particular roles of those tion Control Act can be transmitted to
agreement are being drafted to clarify agencies, as proposed in the agricul- other producers and to the public. the specific roles of each of the agencies tural element, are outlined below. These involved in implementing the 208 plan. roles may be clarified and revised in the Funding interagency memoranda of agreement. For the voluntary approach to be effecVoluntary approach The first step in implementing best tive it is recognized that in some cases
In the case of point sources of pollu- management practices will be for the installation of best management praction, the Federal Water Pollution Con- SWCD's to identify problem areas in tices will require financial assistance. trol Act requires a regulatory (permits) their annual plans. The districts will Federal cost-sharing funds for installaapproach. However, the EPA guide- then seek landowner cooperation in tion of best management practices are
lines exempt nonpoint sources from the these areas and direct SCS district authorized under the Rural Clean Water permit requirements. Because there is conservationists to begin site specific Program and the Agricultural Conseruncertainty regarding the effectiveness planning for implementing the practices. vation Program. The Agricultural Nonof best management strategies for con- Each SCS district conservationist will point Source Element indicates that the trolling nonpoint source discharges, the develop a site specific best management SCS, assisted by the FCACS, will DER has not developed specific per- practice workplan for the area and assist administer the Rural Clean Water Promitting requirements for nonpoint extension personnel in transferring gram. However, since the element was
sources at this time. Instead a information to farmers and educating written, responsibility for administering
Cooperative or voluntary program will be them in the application of the practices. the Rural Clean Water Program has conducted and monitored for a period The SCS district conservationist will been shifted by Congress to the ASCS. of three years (phase I). The success of also provide landowners with technical The DER has recently completed a the voluntary program will be judged by assistance. The DER will be respon- revision of the implementation section the cooperation received from farmers, sible for reviewing the site plans and of the Agricultural Nonpoint Source rather than by strict attainment of water monitoring their effectiveness. Element reflecting this change in agency quality standards. If the voluntary pro- in addition to educating farmers in responsibility. The SWCD's are directed gram proves ineffective, there is a pos- the designated watersheds in the use of to assist landowners in preparing appliTHE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 43




cations for cost-sharing funds under both the Rural Clean Water and Agri- Feed Protein and
cultural Conservation programs.
The plan also indicates that state Mineral-Rich
funding would be sought by the FDACS Florida Molasses
in two ways. First the FDACS was to introduce a supplemental budget request to the State Legislature in 1979 for a $90,000 appropriation to assist the SWCD's. This request was not successful and no further efforts are planned. Secondly, the FDACS will introduce legislation providing for state costsharing for best management practice applications. Legislation is to be intro- Florida Molasses Exchange, Inc. duced in the next legislative biennium calling for approximately $300,000 per Phone 305/996-7711, P.O. Box 507
year to provide state cost-sharing. Belle Glade, Fla. 33430
Conclusion
The Agricultural Nonpoint Source Ele- _ment of the Florida 208 program has received preliminary approval from the
EPA as a non-regulatory program. SUBSCRIBE NOW! However, the DER is still waiting for
the EPA's written comments and final approval. In order to obtain final S "
approval, a non-regulatory program Green Cer ins F-oid 32043
must complete the following: 904-284-3982
1) Identify best management prac- Scott Yant
SISAL BALERTWlNE ties; Orang Pak F lord 327
9000 or 10000 feet 2) Agree on a schedule of mile- 904-269-3708
$20.25 per bale delivered in Florida 2)gre onEuashdl o ite
Minimum order 1100 bales stones, such as implementation,
Delthor Americas Corp. monitoring, and program evaluation; 813,63034
1800 Shames Drive 3) Establish an effective educational
Westbury, N.Y. 11590 program to inform the affected public of b plsuppies an e.
(516) 333-3030 (Continued on page 62)
EATON PARK, FLORIDA FEED PLANT
813/682-6144 Main Office 813/665-5722 Delivery P.O. Box 116, Lakeland, Florida 33802
LAKELAND
CASH
]FEED
Where nutrition comes first.
44 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




Initial Ag Expo The Rogers Blend of Charolais
slated at
Tampa fair where domestic, French, and Polled are being blended into a
The first state-wide agricultural prod- better beef animal -performance testing since 1961. ucts exposition Ag Expo will be held
February 10, 11 and 12 during the Remember Our
Florida State Fair at Tampa. Florida Ag
Expo will be a giant agricultural trade 7th Invitational Polled Charolais Sale
show aimed strictly at growers and their Saturday, May 30, 1981 at 2:30 p.m.
families, officials say.
In addition to a special area for
exhibits of agricultural machinery, Harlan & Dorotheann Rogers
chemicals and irrigation equipment,
there will be a demonstration area where Rogers Bar H R
equipment can be seen in operation. Collins, Mississippi 601/765-8848
Computers and windpower displays will
also be included.
Special events and entertainment for CHAROLAIS
families will be held during the three- TON
day Ag Expo show including Commis- and CHARBRAY CATTLE BA T.
sioner of Agriculture Doyle Conner's K RANCH Charolais Ranches
Agriculture Hall of Fame banquet,
scheduled for Tuesday evening, Febru- Henry Douglas Wayne Templeton-Ranch Manager
10. FCA executive vice president 813 782-1571 Ph: 813 782-1936 Rt. 2, Box 267, Abbevllle, SC 29620
ary ZEPHYRHILLS, FLORIDA 33599 Phone 803/4462929
Ron Stephens, Kissimmee, is chairman 8 MI. SW of Zephyrhills On Morris Bridge Rd. Poe8/422
of the Hall of Fame program.
T. Wilson Sparks, executive director of the state fair, and Lisa T. Hinton, DUNCAN CHAROLAIS FARM Crescent J Ranch
assistant manager-Agribusiness, will For Sale Quality Charolais FOR SALE AT ALL TIMES
coordinate all the details of the Florida Open and Bred Heifers Purebred Charolais bulls & beilers
Ag Expo Show. Performance Tested Bulls 3/4 Chlindna bulls & heifers
Dr. John Woeste, dean for exten- Win. J. Broussard, M.D. Tom Sewell, Jr.
sion at the University of Florida, Tom Jackson, Farm Mgr. Bob & Arlene Duncan, owners Owner Foreman
Rt. 1, Box 111 2307 S.E. 14th St. 1355 S. Hickory St. Ranch 8 ml. south
Gainesville, has announced that the Tignall, Ga. 30668 Ocala, Fla. 32670 Melbourne, Fla. 32901 of Holopaw, Hwy. 441
Agricultural Extension Department will Ph: 404/285-2383 Ph: 9041629-2629 305/727-7632 (Office) 305/892-5010 (Ranch)
be participating in the Expo. The 1_._1
department will provide exhibits and Polled French
displays. C PAROlAS GLORYLAND
According to Milton Morris, chair- W AS DI N Charolals Ranch
man of the editorial department, plans
initially call for the department's wood CHAROLAIS RANCH Charolais Cattle
burning tractor and wood powered elec- Ed & Dot Wasdin For Sale
tric generator to be on display. Demon- 1906 Shady Oaks Jim & Frankie Shannon
strations of these two energy saving Tallahassee, Fla. 32303 Phone:912/945-3997
m e lt904/385-9393 P.O. Box 311, Jeffersonville, GA 31044
machines will take place during the __three-day event. TEST and WEIGH
Rush E. Choate, acting chairman of TO MAKE BEEF CATTLE PAY"
the department of agricultural engi- Ask about Joining-Contact
neering at the university, said the wood ,ro
burning tractor was the project of Dr. A ren' y for NEW SUCCESS? You c re rt y T i !HOUSAN DS more under BBSN
Larry Shaw, and was a standard model ourl b r o T aND ore: une BOB SND
our "Fast Str r a.Brochure: JIM s.."~ BI S'y
tractor augmented by the addition of a GRAHAM SCHOOL OF AUCTIONEERING, Rolfe HaU of la.
GRAHA AUCTONEERNG, i, ... Rolfa Hall, U.ofF.
wood burner. After fabrication of a A204 US 1, North Palm BeachFL 3308 GainesvIlle, Florida 32601
wood burner, the conversion could be L
done in a week, said Choate.
DAIR, SUBSCRIBE NOW!
Ag secretary Osborne Cattle Services
chosen by Reagan 4760 SW 82 Avenue FEEDERS KNOW what
John Block, director of the Illinois Davie, FL 33328 305/434-5065 CHAROLAIS can do
Department of Agriculture, has been Limousin-The Carcass Breed Professional feeders know what Charolais
oRepresentatve for sired steers and heifers will do In the
picked by President Ronald Reagan to Carnation ecs-Midwest Breeders feedlot, and the kind of carcass they
be secretary of USDA. produce under today's new grading stanBlock, who is 45 years old, is a grad- dards. The emphasis Is on fast gains, low
uate of West Point and owner of a feed costs and high quality, high cutting
uae fWetPon adowe o 30 carcasses. There's a Charolais breeder
acre farm near Galesburg, Illinois. Andrew Tent Co. Inc., near you ... let him show you how to
Block was quoted as saying he favors KENNEH S ANDREW produce the most from your cow herd.
less government involvement in agricul- Owner and Operator Ga./Fla. Charolais Ass'n
ture, and is against direct government- Catering to the breder who require the Frankie Shannon, Secretary
to-government grain sales and addi- very best in Sale equipment P.O. Box 311
tional bilateral grain agreements. P. 0. Box 4400-Ph: 912/883-4400 Jeffersonville, GA 31044
ALBANY, GEORGIA 31706
Affiliated with American Int'l Charolais Ass'n
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 45




CLARK ANGUS RANCH Angus report higligts
Registered AberdeenAngu registered buls potential
raised in South Florida A comprehensive report on the breed- more of a bull's progeny that were used
ing value of 564 registered Angus bulls to compute the ratio, the higher the FOR SALE was released November 17 by the accuracy figure.
American Angus Association and is Richard Willham, Iowa State Uniavailable to the general public, reports versity, who along with an associate P. Fifteen 2 year old Angus C. K. Allen, executive vice-president of J. Berger analyzed the AHIR data for
bulls, the American Angus Association, St. the 1980 Field Data Report, points out
Fifteen 1 year old Angus Joseph, Missouri. The "Field Data Sire that Angus breeders have made outbulls. Evaluation Report" is the first of its standing progress since 1965 when they
kind ever produced by a long first began keeping AHIR records in
Performance evaluated, established beef breed organization, significant numbers.
Tested for T.B. and Allen said. "The average Angus sire born in
Brucellosis The 60-page bound report shows a 1978 was genetically 34 pounds heavier
dramatic variation in the ability of indi- in yearling weight than the average 15 young bulls now available. vidual Angus bulls to sire calves with Angus sire born in 1965," he said. "The
superior weaning and yearling weights. genetic trend of 2.6 pounds per year in Call for information and inspection The expected progeny differences for the Angus breed represents the response
1600 E. Harbor View Road, yearling weight range from a minus 35 of Angus breeders to the beef industry's
Punta Gorda, FL 33950 pounds to a plus 60 pounds, according desire, first expressed in the middle
to Dick Spader, director of breed 1960's, to have Angus breeding stock
(813) 625-5390 (813) 639-2146 improvement for the association. "This with more growth potential. This
means," he said, "that a breeder who evaluation of a genetic trend is the first I uses the minus bull could expect the reported for a breed of beef cattle.
yearling weights of his calves to be "The genetic trend for the Angus
reduced by as much as 35 pounds per breed for pre-weaning growth (weaning SOUTHSIDE FARMS animal. On the other hand, a breeder weight) is plus 11 pounds from 1965 to
Performance tested Angus since 1959 who uses the top ranking bull would 1978." Willham said. "This is an imporGA BCIA AHIR Herd certified & accredited find that the calves from this sire would tant change, although not as spectacular Box 174 Hawklnevllle, Ga. 31036 average up to 60 pounds heavier than as the yearling weight change.
located 2 mi. s. of Hawkinsville on US 129 calves from other sires in the report. The Some 214,000 yearling weights on Bill Pope, owner potential yearling weight difference in file in the AHIR program were analyzed
912/892-9165 912/892-2651 the calves from these two bulls would be to produce the yearling figures, Willham
95 pounds. Based upon $70 per hun- said. The statistical procedure used was dredweight cattle prices, that would developed for dairy sire evaluation at GRE fBreeders of mean a $66.50 per head difference in the Cornell University.
value of yearling offspring from the two The report represents a "milestone"
superior angus. bulls. in the use of performance records for
P.O. Box 1240 "Obviously this report can have a accurate selection of sires, said Willham.
Ocala, Florida 32670 major economic impact on the Angus "Until now only the newly introduced Day Phone (904)732-4800 breed and upon the commercial cattle- breeds have had sire evaluation proNiygho 904)732-40 men who use Angus bulls in their pro- grams that used existing performance Night (9041 732-3363 grams," Spader pointed out. "Cattle- data. This was possible because the men who use this report to help them breeds were introduced by using sires by select breeding stock to improve specific artificial insemination." Semiema f7a td economic traits in their herds should be The association report was made
Registered Angus and able to increase the productivity of their possible by two factors-one, the open
Ankina Cattle cattle." artificial insemination rule adopted by
Route 4 The new report, available for $5 the Association board of directors in
Swainsboro, Georgia 30401 from the association, is based upon the 1972 combined with the subsequent
more than 1.5 million birth, weaning, widespread use of A.I. throughout the Donald & Gerald Hooka, Bill Aibo, M92 and yearling weight records on perma- breed, and two, the dramatic increase in nent file in the association's Angus Herd recent years of the use of the AHIR proImprovement Records (AHIR) pro- gram by Angus breeders.
gram. Breeders have no choice of Another factor that contributed to
LONG'S ANGUS RANCH whether their bull is listed in the report. the success of the field data report is the
All Angus bulls with sufficient qualified fact that some 250 Angus bulls have Large type registered Angus progeny are evaluated and listed, been evaluated in the designed (strucfor sale. The report on each individual bull tured) Sire Evaluation program that was
P. 0. Box 1057, Rukin, FL 33570 shows the expected progeny difference started in 1974. Some of the sires used in
813/645-3751 for birth weight, when available, and for the designed program, and later used
weaning weight and yearling weight. widely in the breed through artificial These are expressed in plus or minus insemination, tied the AHIR perOver 60 Years Breeding pounds to make it easy to evaluate indi- formance data together and made it posQuality Angus Cattle vidual bulls, and compare different sible to compare sires in all parts of the
bulls. In addition, a maternal breeding country and under various manageHUGHES value is also calculated for each bull. It ment conditions. Only Angus bulls that
Angus Ranch is expressed as an estimated breeding had sufficient numbers of AHIR
Curtis Hughes, value of how daughters of a bull will progeny that could also be tied to
Owner milk. This ratio is also accompanied by reference sires were included in the field
Ph:813/722-3168 an accuracy figure to show cattlemen data report.
P. 1. Box 455 Palmetto, Fa. 33561 how accurate the ratio is. In general the One surprise that came from the
46 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




FFHANNAL SUHASTER
Angu Sho and Sal
Ferur 1114 198
At~ ~ ~ th PokCut giutr ain atw lrd
Sal Dae Ferur 14th
Seln 50 Lots-Of
To Quait Angu Cattl
40 Feae e- 10Bul
Tu sd Ferur 12 Frdy Ferur 13.
9 a. -ot Reitrto Monn opnfrtuso reStrcin
6:0 p0.- la Jr An u -meeting .S I *
BeA sur an tedti vn htwl fe 0had ftebs nu ate
all caefll selected.
SONTACT
* Irwin Sae MaaementI -




Activities in the industry!
Upper left, Commissioner of Agriculture Doyle Conner, emphasizes the importance of brands which help to discourage ': rustlers and he encourages livestock owners to brand their animals. Shown here he puts the "Open A" brand of the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services on a range cow penned at Withlacoochee State Forest.
Second row, Ron Smoak, Madison, center, president of the Florida Hereford Association visits with two of the Southeastern Pen Bull Show judges at Bartow. At left is Lowell Holley, Bowling Green, and Morris Meador, Jachin, Alabama.
At left, FCA President W. G. "Kayo" Welles, Arcadia, gave welcome comments to those attending the recent Southeastern Hereford Pen Bull Show and Sale held at the Polk County Agriculture Pavilion, Bartow.
_Third row, center, A cattle judging demonstration was conducted by Don Hargrove of the animal science department, University of Florida, Gainesville, during the annual winter meeting of the Florida Santa Gertrudis Association held at Ross Brothers Farm and Ranch, Branford.
Third row, right, Visiting during the Santa Gertrudis Association's meeting at Branford were Charles Wolf, Delray Beach, left, longtime manager of K. D. Eatmon Santa Gertrudis, Pompano Beach, and Carl Story of the Florida Division of Cajun's Cattle Service, Lake City.
Bottom, Some of the officers and directors of the Sarasota County Livestock Association from left, are, Buddy Alday; John Albritton; Maurice Combee, treasurer; Arlin Hawkins; Jeff Durrance, and Boyce Blackmon, president.
48 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




report is that despite an increase in yearling weights, there has been a slight decrease in overall average birth weights in the Angus breed since 1965. The decrease has averaged a minus .2 pound per year. Several factors could influence this trend, according to Willham, but he said that it ... does suggest that... Angus breeders are considering calving ease in their sires."
The Field Data Sire Evaluation Offering top quality
Report represents a shift from purely acclimated Angus
subjective evaluation to more objective cattle from a certified
TB & Bangs free
means of evaluating the value of a hera.
breeding animal, according to Willham. "The American Angus Association has provided its breeders with the most cur- Herd Sires: Ankonian Dynamo; Bar Dynamic; Gore rent set of performance programs in the Northern 546. breeding stock industry," Willham concluded. "Angus breeders have responded by developing records that are the base on which a specification product can be offered to the commer- CJB Angus Farm
cial producer." Bill Graham, Owner 813/322-1601
Rt. 1, Box 435, Myakka, Fla. 33551
Angus Group at Bethany off Hwy. 64 on Verona Road
forms foundation
A non-profit foundation to receive and REGISTERED ANGUS Gb J. R
administer tax deductible contributions Featuring
for scientific research and education has CYPRESS GAY JINGO
been formed by the American Angus CC PRESIDENT 345 o m f
Association, St. Joseph, Missouri, CYPRESS CREEK RANCH
reports C. K. Allen, executive vicepresident. Box 2000, Johnston Rd., Dade City, Fla. .
Bill & Melba Straigis, Owners 904/588-2571 M The first contribution to the fund Billy Sanders, Herdsman 904/588-2951 will be some $5000 received by the association from the sale of a registered Western Stock Show. That heifer was ANGUS BULLS ANG
donated by A. F. Flint and Sons, Bard, next January-February Reg Angus Since 1952
New Mexico, and purchased by Jim ( (Please call us) -BULLS FOR SLE
Baldridge, North Platte, Nebraska, to STARDUST RANCH AnknLan Dynam0-Emulus Groveland
provide initial funds for the National Henry and Jeannette Chitty Nolossal-Geordus of Graham
Phone (Gainesville) 904/372-1650 *d Junior Angus Association. The second MICANOPY, FLORIDA 32667 Rudy & Jane Baral
contribution will come from the sale of Ph: 904/429-2992 or 429-2554
another heifer at the 1981 National Western Stock Show. The heifer is Band 053 of Ideal 3163 174, donated by the REGISTERED ANGUS BULLS
Martin Jorgensen Family of Ideal, Service Age and Ready to Work
South Dakota.SevcAganRedtoWr
othaxktie dSuitable for Commercial or Purebred Herds
Tax deductible donations to the fund
may be made by any individual or SOUTHWOOD FARM
organization by sending a check made out to the Angus Foundation, to the Ph: 904/877-1158 TALLAHASSEE, FLA. 32302 P. 0. Box 191
American Angus Association.
The Angus Foundation's charter has been approved by the Internal Revenue Service. The foundation will be administered by a board made up of associa- ADVERTISE
tion officers and members of the board of directors, and the executive vicepresident of the association.
The world agricultural output is BUYIWG ANGUS?
unchanged in 1980, according to USDA. But, that translates into a two Bulls? Cows? Heifers?
percent decline in per capita output- Call John Crouch
the lowest level since 1972. Regional Mgr., American Angus Association
U.S. farm production expenditures for He'll give you professional counsel and help
1979 were $135.1 billion, according to -no cost, no obligation. He understands your
USDA, up from $114.2 billion in 1978. needs, and he's ready and willing to help...
Average farm expenditures came to Contact him today!
$58,037 for the year. Call 803/288-5910 120 Shadecrest Dr., Mauldin, SC 29662 .
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 49




Grow -Watc6
11 th annual
k Graham iegus Farm 0
CU ISpring 06n House
Tuesday, IMch 17, 1981
This year we will be offering approximately 33 progeny-proven cows for sale. Each cow will have The following are some of the cattle to be offered for sale:
a calf at its side born during January or February, 1981. These cows are all of the winter calving cows
in our herd born prior to Oct. 25, 1975. None will be held back. COWS
Available for sale at this time will be 75 performance tested bulls just off test and several herd CoD
srswhaebeusninorhr.Cow's Sire Cow's No. Birthday 205-Day 365-Day
sires we have been using in our herd.
For the first time, we will be offering 12 Fi Brangus bulls raised and performance tested by Big Elban of Graham 43 1257 1/21/73 4/111 4/110
Graham Bardolier 84 1290 1/03/73 6/108 5/109
Graham Angus Farm. BgEbno rhm1113 /87 /1 /1
The objective of Graham Angus Farm is to produce registered Angus bulls that will improve the Big Elban of Graham 131 1330 1/112
economic efficiency of commercial beef herds. We attempt to do this by stressing traits of economic 1 Graham Emulous Par 22 1611 12/25/74 4/108 2/105
importance and only traits of economic importance in our selection of breeding animals. The follow- Big Elban of Graham 250 1714 1/02/75 4/115 3/112
ing are traits we emphasize in our program: Big Elban of Graham 66 1715 12/30/74 4/115 3/109
1. Fertility and Reproductive Ability. We expose cows to bulls for 60 days and insist on a live
calf. Best WPD and Gain after 84 days ever at Graham Angus Farm
2. Mothering Ability. We do not creep feed so we can measure a cow's ability to wean a heavy BULLS ON TEST
calf on her milk alone. Sire Dam's No. 205 DayAdj. Wat. 84 DayGain 84 DayWDA
3. Ability to Grow Rapidly. We have weighed calves since 1955, yearlings since 1961. i
4. Structural Soundness. We don't care about the shape of their heads, but we insist on good Big Elban of Graham 208 1193 583 4.23 3.36
legs and feet. Emulous of Georday 1 1390 626 3.81 3.33
5. Adequate Size. We like large Angus cattle. Dunnedin of Graham 12056 1523 641 3.81 3.22
PRICE Adequate AVAIABL UPON REQUE lDunnedin of Graham 12056 1643 555 4.29 3.15
PRICE LISTS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST. AE Emulous of Georday 1 1725 637 3.86 3.24
FREE DELIVERY WITHIN THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES. r Menteith of Graham 15087 1778 627 3.99 3.17
HERD SIRES
205 Day 140 365 Day Wgt.
Name Age Adj. Wgt. Day Gain Adj. Wgt. 10/30/80
Emulous of Georday 1 7 672 3.68/125 1230/128 2310
Big Elban of Graham 11155 5 599/118 3.18/119 1115/115 1950
_eflt I("OVEMUM
GRAHAM ANGUS FARM GRAHAM ANGUS FARM LREP
BILL GRAHAM BILL GRAHAM
Route 3, Box 587 Route 3, Box 587
Albany, Georgia 31701 Albany, Georgia 31701
Mrs. Floyd Waqner, Office Manager Mrs Floyd Waner, Office Manager
(912) 432-9249 Ms (912) 432-9249
0. T. Watson Mgr. Jimmy Bowles, Cattle Mgr. 0. T. Watson Mgr. Jimmy Bowles, Cattle Mgr.
(912) 432-0229 PERFORMANCE TESTING SINCE 1955 (912) 439-7695 (912) 432-0229 PER(FORMANCE TESTING SINCE 1955 Jimmy 439-7695
50 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




Florida Headquarters For Carlton winds
MARSHALL PRIDES
BELLEMEADE up term as
Farms FBCIA prexy
Rt. 2, Box 53B Greg Carlton, Clewiston, completed his
Lake City, Fl. 32055 term as president of the Florida Beef
IS\ 904/752-2541
9Cattle Improvement Association at the group's annual meeting held in Ocala
Registered Angus Cattle C January 14. He was succeeded by Ralph
Smith, Jr. Farm Sexton of Vero Beach.
J-. 9 I5. Elected vice president was M. E.
LAND & CATTLE CO., INC. Performance Tested (Max) Hammond, Bartow, Secretary is
BERT MICKEL, Mgr. Angus Bulls For Sale. Bob Sand, Gainesville, and treasurer is
P.O. Box 308, Citra, FL 32627 Charles Hardee of Chiefland.
(between Ocala and Gainesvlle) Vayden L. Murphy, Gen. Mgr.
at junction U.S. 301 and Fla. SR 316 P.0. Box 490, Moultrie, Ga. 31768 In his president's report, Carlton
904/595-4761. 4771 4491 Off. 912/985-2889 Res. 912/985-1278 pointed out the growing awareness of
bull buyers toward performance. He
noted that buyers want data that will
BARNETT ANGUS FARM SYKESANGUS RANCH give guidance toward selecting a prep(Since 1947) tent high performing herd sire.
T (LaI nce 6342 Sykes Road Ph: 305/683-5134 Carlton pointed out that buyers
Tested Angus In Georgia WEST PALM BEACH, FLA. 33406 selecting breeding stock are looking to
Teste Ans B net er.,gia Featuring the breeding of Black Watch such data as production records, herd
M. H. Barnett, Jr., Mgr. President 239 son of 1964 Grand Cham- sire summaries, weaning weight/day
Phone: 404/678-2264 pion Ankonian President. And Hidden
Hills OB53, a grandson of famous gain and yearling weights.
WASHINGTON, GEORGIA at Airport Bardoliermere 2. Carlton concluded his remarks by
saying, "The destiny of our organizaLEMMN TE BST N BREDIG SOCK tion depends on the sound judgment of
lE N THE BET IN B Bulls its members and if the past is any indiCP Bas well as cation of the future, our organization
Registered Angus Cattle 100% Wye Bred Angus Bulls will continue to grow and promote the
Nina, Harvey, & Donnie Lemmon l Sagmiir. Farms ultimate in livestock management."
BULL SALE EVERY FALL Elected to the board of directors for
Ph:404/553-5124or404/553-3911 Box 545 Bainbridge, Georgia31717 three year terms were Leroy Baldwin,
P. 0. Box 524 Ocala, Sexton, and Jimmy Chapman,
WOODBURY, GEORGIA 30293 Telephone (912) 246-5964 St. Cloud.
Luncheon speaker was Colville
Jackson of Gloster, Mississippi, past
Baldwin Angus Ranch SIZE-TYPE-QUALITYprsdnofteA riaSmetl
president of the American Simmental
FEATURES ABERDEEN-ANGUS Association. Jackson, in comments
Emulous Pride 1 35 THOMPSON BROS. FARM before giving a slide presentation on
100% J. R. and Bruce Thompson, Owners crossbreeding, stated the industry was in
Golden Certified Meat Sire Rt.6, Box 349 Marianna an "era of crossbreeding" and that
Ranch 5 Miles North of Ocala off 1-75. PH: 904/482-8522 Florida 32446 keeping good records was an important
904/629-4574. Leroy Baldwin, owner, management tool.
GLOVERA GENETIC
GLOVER FARMS DNA OPPORTUNITY The nation's largest farms-those with
Quality Angus Registered Angus Since 1955 gross sales of farm products of $100,000
Using Performance Sires or more a year-account for only 17
Super State Bradley 30. WW 680 pounds. Since 1968 percent of U.S. farms, but account for
YW 1190 pounds. 140 days Rate of Gain 3.87 for sale: 15 3-4 yr. old cows pounds. 5 2 yr. old bulls two-thirds of all farm expenditures,
Wade Glover, Owner, Ph: 813/737-2441; 754-1071. $1500 per head, discounts available USDA reports.
Rt. 5, Box 319-C, Plant City, FL 33566. David N. Acres 813/324-4589
6055 Dunee Road Winter Haven, FL 33880
Lee & Sons *.41 Registered, Top Quality Angus
Headquarters for Performance Bennett's Angus Ranch
R. C. Lee, owner Fty Angus, Chianina, Ankina
904/357-5068 Gordon Johnson, Mgr. Bity Carley. 11Tr. P.O. Box 8, Phone 904/594-5202
Star Route Box 820 For Show 6130 State Route 7 26589 Highway 6DE
Eustis, Fla. 32726 And Sale Lake Worth, FL 33463 Lake Wales, FL 33853 GREENWOOD, FL 32443
Barn-15 Mi. East of Eustis on S.R. 44 L305/965-1473 813/692-1732
100 Performance Tested ANGUS AHIR BCIA Jenkins Angus Ranch
Range Bulls For Sale Annually Phone 813/858-5037
Columbus Adventure T266-by "310"
IRVINGT"ON FARM S, INC.JAR Evolution 107-by "1342" 1978 Fla.
State Fair Champion
Macedon Super Contact 3-by Contact of Wye
BILLY KING- 301/926-0200 RT. 2, Box 280 Blackdot Blue Chip 1029-W. W. 711 Ibs.
BILL& MARY T. HODGE- 404/884393 WEST POINT, GA. 31833 7221 Old Polk Ci Rd., Lakeland. FL 33805
FRED CONE- 404/882-0918 Intersection of GA. routes 219 &' 18 VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME
52 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




ROUNDUP
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 71 7
AND CONSUMER SERVICES
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
ECONOMICS, STATISTICS, & COOPERATIVES SERVICE, USDA
LIVESTOCK OUTLOOK
Fed cattle at Omaha averaged $64-65 in December while Medium No. I's, 400-500 lbs. in Florida averaged $68-75. Overall, fed cattle declined about $1 from the previous month, while feeder cattle were up Average Prices Received through 14 Florida Auctions
about $ 1. Cows remained unchanged. Florida hog prices for 200-230 lb. December 1979 and 1980
No. 1 and 2 barrows and gilts remained virtually unchanged from November, averaging about $45-46.
The December 15 cattle on feed report indicated a 4 percent reduc- Grade 1 1979 11980 Grade 1/ 11979 11980
tion of cattle on feed from December 1979, and 15 percent off from Dollars Per Cwt. Dollars Per Cwt.
December 1978. Net placements of 1.53 million head in November were Slaughter Calves over 250 lbs. Stocker Calves over 300 lbs. off 10 and 12 percent from last year and two years ago. In effect the supply side is tightening up considerably. Choice 77.75 57.63 Medium #1 85.91 70.15
Despite the bullish cattle on feed situation, considerable weight must Good 69.77 55.50 Large #1 81.15 66.89
be given to factors external to the cattle industry such as demand, hog Standard 61.21 49.79 Medium #2 79.96 64.44
supplies, interest rates and government policy. If inflation averaged in Large #2 74.49 60.97
the 14-18 percent area over the next six months, the prime rate fluc- Small #1 71.65 58.49
tuates between 18 and 24 percent, hog slaughter is off 2 percent from the Small #2 67.90 55.76
late 1980 levels, and government appears to seriously be considering All Grades 72.14 56.73 All Grades 81.34 65.53
wage and price controls, then fed cattle at Omaha should average $6972 by March, $74-77 in the second quarter, and $77-80 by late summer. Slaughter Cows Stocker Cows
This would mean Florida Medium No. l's, 400-500 lbs. reaching up to Commercial 55.28 44.79 1 54.74 49.11
the $82-88 area in the second quarter, and the high 80's by late summer. Utility 52.56 45.21 2 52.71 42.84
If, however, the prime rate were to decline 5 points, then both fed and Cutter 46.68 40.54 3 47.80 35.33
feeder cattle prices would likely increase as much as 10 percent at the Canner 39.04 32.84 time this occurred. All Grades 49.91 42.75 All Grades 52.27 41.87
Fed cattle prices should continue to improve throughout the spring SOREFD &CDisonfMaktgBruofakeNw.
and summer with $80 cattle by August.SOREFD &CSDiiinoMaktgBruofakeNws
Feeder cattle prices for Medium No. 1, 400-500 lbs. in Florida
should reach $90 by September. Medium No. 1, 600-700 lbs. steers will Average Prices, Dollars per Cwt.
likely average $70-77 in April-June. A drop of 5 points in the prime at that time could cause them to reach $78-80. Slaughter Steers, Omaha
PRICE RANGES-ACTUAL AND PROJECTED
_ Week Choice Choice I Good
Ended (900-1100 Lbs.) (1100- 1300 Lbs.) (900-1100 Lbs.)
Omaha Florida Ii3J9~ 99 18 99 18
900-1100 400-500 lb. 600-700 lb.19T98179180 99190
pound Feeder Steers Feeder Steers Oct. 25 64.88 66.92 64.72 67.10 60.55 62.80
Nov. 29 67.85 64.97 67.80 64.72 63.20 61.81
'Year SteeslMd.y Dec. 27 68.72 63.83 68.91 63.62 64.50 60.75
and Choice Me.2Md e.2Sltr. _____-________-________________Month 1tes IMd.IIMd Cows Slaughter Cows, Omaha
1980 Dollars per cwt. Week Com'l Utility C utter
June 66-67 70-81 66-76 68-77 62-72 42-50 Ended i1713980I 1979 11980 1 1979 11980
July 70-71 72-79 66-74 61-67 57-64 42-50
August 72-73 72-80 66-75 63-70 59-67 43-51 Oct. 25 46.05 45.30 46.70 46.10 45.25 43.05
Sept. 69-70 70-78 65-74 62-67 57-65 42-49 Nov. 29 46.90 44.00 47.30 44.25 44.65 42.25
Oct. 67-68 71-79 65-73 61-67 57-64 41-48 Dec. 27 47.81 43.08 48.62 43.67 46.19 41.75
Nov. 65-66 67-75 62-70 60-65 55-60 42-50
Dec. 64-65 68-75 63-70 59-65 55-60 42-48 SOURCE: U.S.D.A.-AMS
1981
Projected Ipre oeesBe nWihDt sPi rs
Feb.-Mar. 69-72 73-80 69-76 67-72 66-71 46-55 Imote on lss d Bef nd hich Dut9i7Pidreh0
April-June 74-77 82-88 75-82 70-77 68-74 48-58FrenFlidadU.,1980
July-Sept. 77-80 86-92 78-84 76-8 1 70-76 46-56 September January-September
SOURCE: James R. Simpson, Cooperative Extension Service. Change Change
Quantity from Quantity from Calendar
Year Rec'd. prey. year Rcd prey.,year Ya
Average Prices Received, Effective Parity and Percent 1000er ea
of Parity for Livestock, U.S., December 1979 and 1980 100010000
Pounds Percent Pounds Percent Pounds
Florida
Prices Parity Avg. Prices 1978 15,975 +23 144,567 -12 221,074
Item Received Prices as %of Parity 1979 15,188 5 194,536 +35 253,377
17 190 19791 198 1979 11980 1980 3,841 -75 119,759 -38
19791 9801 U.S.
Dols. per Cwt. Dols. per Cwt. Percent 1978 137,391 + 9 995,737 +11 1,392,568
Beef Cattle 64.40 59.10 74.50 86.70 86 68 1979 96,458 -30 1,139,767 +14 1,511,175
Calves 84.30 70.80 86.20 103.00 98 69 1980 82,318 -15 989,492 -13
Hogs 37.50 43.90 73.70 81.10 51 54 SOURCE: U.S. Department of Commerce
THE FLORIDA CATT'LEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 53




All hins cosidred ~ armcorn. Other main crops were sugarcane,
Al hnscnieeFid a fa m337,100 acres; corn, 311,100 acres; hay,
HEsaes eac 293,400 acres; grapefruit, on 162,200
salesreachacres, yielded 3.9 billion pounds. FOR ASSISTANCE IN $31 blinLivestock and their products
LOCATING HEREFORD $31blinbrought a return of $667 million, comBULLS OR FEMALES Sales of farm products in Florida pared with $408.6 million in 1974. Floramounted to $3.1 billion in 1978, ida's total cattle and calves inventory of
No Cost ... No Obligation according to the Bureau of the Census, 2.3 million on 21,199 farms was down
Contact your American U. S. Department of Commerce. from 2.4 million in 1974, but the 1.3 milThe total is based on preliminary lion head sold from 19,044 farms was Hereford Association results of the 1978 Census of Agri- ahead of 966,000 sold in 1974. Twelve
Field Representative: culture, which counted 44,165 farms in percent of those sold were fattened on
the state, with average sales of $69,691; grain and concentrates. The inventory H.L. (CHIP) CARRIER an average size of 304 acres; and average included 1.2 million beef cows, about
Box F Bluff City, TN 37618 value of land and buildings of $351,836. steady with 1974.
(615) 538-5354 Comparison with totals from the last A total of 619 farms sold $250.6 milAREA: New York, Pennsylvania, previous census (1974) should be made lion in dairy products. The inventory of
New England states, Virginia, with caution because of significant 204,200 milk cows was up from 198,700
North and South Carolina, improvements in data collection pro- four years earlier.
Georgia, Florida, Maryland and cedures in 1978. Bureau officials believe A total inventory of 376,600 hogs,
West Virginia that the improvements in data collec- 65,300 for breeding purposes, was
tion had a much greater effect on the counted on 8,277 Florida farms, with REGIITEED HEREFOESS count of farms than on measures of agri- 526,500 reported sold of which 138,100
~- OAKcultural production. The improvements were feeder pigs. Approximately one
SM OAKIV are discussed further below. percent, 100 farms, reported 500 or
~ H USEWhile Florida farm product sales more hogs and pigs, accounting for 25
HO SEclimbed 62 percent from $1.9 billion in percent of the state's total inventory.
~~ RANCH ~'~ ?" 1974, farmers' expenses also grew. For Hog numbers were 180,000 more than
Ron& Mrth SmakRt.4, ox 235 example, feed purchased for livestock 1974 level.
andson poultr was4 up04from-$279.1 to The horses and ponies inventory on
Maisn Fla 324 .9417-2 $348.2 million in 1978; hired labor from farms was 51,400.
Performance Tested $264.5 to $394.2 million; gasoline and Sales of poultry and their products
other petroleum products from $46.7 to amounted to $223.6 million, compared HEREFORD & SIMMENTAL $83.8 million in 1978. The total energy with $180.1 million in 1974. A total of
Annual Bull Sale-Dec. 8 cost for Florida farms amounted to 5,994 farms reported an inventory of
$111.5 million. The market value of all 15.2 million chickens 3 months old or CORRIGAN RANCH machinery and equipment went up 80 older, compared with 14.4 million four
P. 0. Box 2410 percent from $523.8 million to $944.2 years earlier. Hens and pullets of laying
Ph: 305/567-7141, 569-2342 million four years later, age were reported at 13.1 million comVero Beach, Florida 32960 Crops brought a return of $2.2 bil- pared with 12.5 million in 1974.
lion, 71 percent of Florida's total farm Other measures of Florida farms Hereford Bulls sales, compared with $1.3 billion in also portrayed gains as the average
1974. Oranges, the leading crop in acre- value of land and buildings per acre Diamond C. Ranch, Inc. age, were grown on 695,900 acres, pro- climbed from $685 to $1,143; total cropHary Cbbducing 14.9 billion pounds. Soybeans land went from 3.7 to 4.5 million acres;
Hary Cbbplaced second with 372,500 acres pro- and irrigated land increased from 1.6 to
Route 3, Box 93-C ducing eight million bushels. Vegetables 2 million acres in 1978.
Donalsonville, GA 31745 were the third ranking crop with 340,000 Additional facets of Florida farms as
912/524-2263 acres, including 60,100 acres of sweet depicted in the 1978 Census of Agriculture include the following.
Registered Herefords Eighty-three percent or 36,780 of the
PINE ACRES RANCH 44,165 Florida farms were operated by
individuals or families, 4283 by
Poputra Floie262 partnerships, and 2770 by corporations,
Popuar Boodlnesof which 2305 were family held.
-CHF Sam McDonald H464-JF Dundy 1154- Ninety-two percent of the operators
-P.A. Mischief Aster 307-7198 Progressive-owealorptofheamshy
G. P. Leitner, Mgr.Af owealorprofteamshy
904/595-3806 904/591-2180 operated, with 33,348 fully owned, 7211
Located 12 Mi. North of Ocala on US 301 partly owned, and 3606 operated b
Nt tenants,.b
A" 0 Farming was the principal occupa%WM~lertion of only 18,082 or 41 percent of the G ri e operators, while 26,083 spent most of
H ereforl thi wr time at a nonfarm occupaFan,,. ~~~~TOM COCHRANE, Fort Meade, right, was Svnyoepreto h prtr
recetlypresnte a paqu shoing who reported place of residence lived on Griner~ appreciation for his supervising the youth thfamheopred
Hubby Grnractivities at the four previous field days, teflrid farers wpereyugen h
P.O0 Box 825, and for his assistance to the Florida Junior Flrdfamsweeyugroth
Columbia, MIS 39429 Hereford Association. Tom Childs, Lake average than in 1974, 51 years compared
Office: 601 736-6347 Placid, vice president of the Florida Here- with 52.8.
Home: 601 736-6680 ford Association, made the presentation Some 4452 farms, 10 percent, were
Bud Spencer, Herdsman during the field day activities held as part operated by women, as revealed by a
of the Southeastern Hereford Pen Bull question on sex of operator asked for Show and Sale at Bartow. the first time.
54 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN /FEBRUARY 1981




L S
* HeFEB. 13
FRIDAY
the day before Valentines
SALE
1:00 p.m., at Cattlemen's Livestock Market
LAKELAND, FLORIDA
Selling 50 Bulls
30 strong breeding age bulls. 20 young performance tested yearling bulls. Hereford and Polled Hereford. In addition to the bulls, we will be selling 25 registered Hereford females, with quality enough to start a fine
herd. Be sure to attend.
For Information:
Bob Rush 912/987-1796 aKen Rush 912/987-3574 Bill Hamilton
at the Market
C F A813/665-5088
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 55




120 HEAD
TOBIN ANTPUSET, left, Orlando, was reelected recently to serve another term as W weighing 1350-1400 lbs. president of the Florida Junior Hereford
Association. Other leaders are, second from left, ShereenLynn Childs, Lake Placid, vice president; Wayne Tanner, These are extra high quality Horned Herefords, Orlando, secretary-treasurer; and Mrs.
located in Kansas and developed on cake and grass. Tom Childs, Lake Placid, advisor.
For reference in Florida, call Reuben Carlton, Fort
Pierce, who has used our bulls in the past. Phone Farm product sales of $100,000 or
305/461-6649. He'll tell you what our bulls are like. more were recorded by 10 percent or
All bulls are priced to sell. Call now. 4232 farms; 7984 sold $40,000 or more;
11,782 had sales of $20,000 or more; and 32,383 had sales of less than $20,000.
Figures published are for farms
Contact: Emmett LeFors qualifying under the following definiPhone 806/669-3533 tions:
P. O. Box 1635 Any place from which $1,000 or
more of agricultural products were sold, Pampa, Texas 79065 or normally would have been sold,
during the census year. Published dollar values have not been adjusted for changes in price levels.
The improvements previously menT BAR For Hereford Bulls Call tioned were in two areas. The first was
Hereford Ranch h an improvement in the mailing lists used
Hd Ranch to send farmers their census report forms. The second was a door-to-door Reg. Hereford Bulls for Sale at All Times Sam Paylor 913/225-4745 canvass of sample households in rural
Robert & Debi Thompson Office: 913/225-4345 aeas Th sul oh s inuraCarney OK 405/865-2513 areas. The results of this direct enumeraRalph & Estelle Thompson tion, when combined with the count by
Colquitt GA 912/758-2230 BROOKSVILLE, KS 67425 mail, allowed the bureau to identify
additional farms in the state which Herefords are just naturally better Ask us about would have been missed under Pine Pasture Farms breeding Herefords and become an active breeder. procedures used in the 1969 and 1974
Performance Tested Bulls FLORIDA census.
For Sale IMEREFORD The bureau estimates that the direct
enumeration sample added 7959 farms Herd Accredited & Certified ASSOCIATION (averaging 36 acres and with average
We deliver each November
Ron Smoak, President sales of $3805) to the mail census.
Jesse L. Williams, Jr. & Sons Rt. 4, Box 1235, Madison, FL 32340 Although characteristics of the
Suffolk VA 23434 Ph: 804/539-8819 Phone: 904/973-2304 additional farms are tabulated tn the
report for the state, they are not J SO LI included in the totals published for each
Feed Florida Molasses J U-0U county.
Had 1978 procedures been used in
.. a good source of FARMS, INC. the last previous census (1974), Bureau
mineral elements Registered Hereford Cattle officials estimate that between 8000 and
Ralph Thompson, Gen. Mgr. 11,000 smaller farms would have been
Off. 912/758-3637 Res. 9121758-2230 added to the 1974 Florida total. The COLQUITT, GEORGIA 31737 estimated state total would have been
between 40,466 and 43,466 farms in 1974 instead of the 32,466 enumerated
- C m p pCo te A.I. under the procedure actually used.
Services A detailed description of the 1978
INC SerCensus of Agriculture program com'-'BEF -DAIRY pared with earlier censuses is available
Florida Molasses Exchange, Inc. Quality Semen Supplies from the Agriculture Division, Bureau
Phone 305/996-7711, P.O. Box 507 904/383-3772 305/968-6783 of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233.
Belle Glade, Fla. 33430 Noba-Ga. 912/987-2171
56 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




H BV
AA
4
Breeding valueeratios accurately estimate Hereford bulls' ability to improve weaning weights, increase yearling weights and improve milking ability in a cow herd. A computer analysis, unique in the industry, scans records of sires, dams and grandparents to calculate
breeding valuebased on ancestor's performance.
Hereford breeding value predictions are accurate and reliable because of the American Hereford Association's vast storehouse of
over one-million individual performance records.
Over 100,000 registered Hereford bulls with predictable performance will sell this year. Contact registered Hereford breeders in your area or the American Hereford Association for more
information.
Tfan All things considered...
HEREFORD D.
American Hereford Association 715 Hereford Drive Kansas City, Missouri 64101 Phone (816) 842-3757 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 57




carries an "S. designation version passed by the full body may not (meaning Senate); if in the House of be eatythe saeas the comte ...... Representatives, an HR._____" version.
vioo~otdesignation (meaning House of Repre- Sixth Step. Once the bill is approved
sentatives). by the full House (House floor), it is
Ol(~ 0 a a Of, 8 ago, Let's follow a bill through the referred to the Senate. Essentially the
coming a public law on the statute Senate side as outlined for the House in ..................... boos steps two through five. The House bill
________ E1I~fl~1~1 In the example, we'll use a tax cut number remains on the bill as it is being
L a l~j proposal, since this issue is in high considered by the Senate.
W a higtn ep il focus, and we'll assume it is introduced If the versions of the bill passed by
in the House of Representatives. Also, the House and by the Senate are the we'll assume the bill is acted upon favor- same, the bill then goes to the President A new Congress ably at each stage-not let lie, be killed, for his approval. On the other hand, if
tabled or other. (Bear in mind that bills there are differences, the two versions With a new, more conservative, 97th which are the same or similar may be are referred to a Senate-House ConferCongress underway, cattlemen can introduced in both the Senate and the ence Committee.
expect to be treated more favorably, House at or near the same time and may Conference Committee. A Senateaccording to C. W. (Bill) McMillan, move through the two bodies within the House Conference Committee, as NCA vice president for government same time period.) implied, is made up of Senators and
affairs.
An example of the more con- First Step. The proposed bill is intro- House representatives. Typically, these
servative bent of Congress can be found duced on the floor of the House by a are chosen from the committees which in the committee chairman assignments member of that body (may have no co- considered the proposed legislation in in the Senate, where two-thirds of the sponsors or may have several other the two bodies, and in the same proporchairmanships will be occupied by representatives as co-sponsors along tion of Republicans vs. Democrats as
Senators from west of the Mississippi with the principal sponsor). found in the make-up of the commitRiver. While there is no guarantee on Second Step. The bill is referred to tees. (The party make-up of committees how they might act toward any given the appropriate committee-the com- is generally in the same proportion as legislative proposal, it can be assumed mittee having jurisdiction in the subject the total membership of the given that their more rural, more con- area covered by the bill. In some cases, body-Senate or House.)
servative viewpoint will benefit agricul- more than one committee may be A conference committee considers
ture. The situation will be different from involved. In the instance of a tax cut bill, only those provisions of the bill on that with the more urban-oriented chair- it would be referred to the House Coin- which the Senate and House are in conmen of the past 25-30 years. mittee on Ways and Means. flict, and it has the responsibility for
Another welcome change is the Third Step. The bill may be con- resolving said differences.
appointment of many new persons to sidered by the full committee, as is most The compromises made and the staff positions on the Senate commit- often the case with major tax bills. How- resulting final language are included in a tees. It is felt by most analysts that the ever, the prevailing practice throughout conference report which is then referred new thinking and experience will benefit the Congress is for the full committee to back to both the Senate and House the legislative process. refer the bill to the appropriate sub- (floors) for consideration. If both bodies
On the House side (where the committee for initial consideration. In approve the conference version of the
Democrats are still the majority), it the case of tax bills, this is the subcom- bill, it is then "enrolled" for preappears that the conservative viewpoint mittee on select revenue measures. sentation to the President, who may has gained. McMillan cited a growing The subcommittee would typically approved or veto it.
number of southern and southwestern hold public hearings and accept written Congressmen who have expressed inter- statements from interested parties. Micheloni ownership est in working with the Republican Amendments may be made by the subAdministration against legislation too committee before it votes the bill out. undergoes change liberal to their liking. Fourth Step. The bill goes from the Sole ownership of Micheloni PropIt is felt that much of the legislation subcommittee back to the full commit- erties, Groveland, is now in the hands of coming out of this Congress will reflect tee. The full committee may make Rudy and Jane Geraci of that city. The intensified efforts to balance the federal further amendments or change what the change was effected last August, the new budget, cut out unnecessary govern- subcommittee has done before approv- owners said. ment programs and restrain inflation- ing the mniasure-"marking the bill up." The firm, consisting of cattle and which is one of cattlemen's greatest A report of the action taken in commit- citrus holdings, has been in operation a problems. It is also anticipated that tee now accompanies the bill. This is the number of years and has been breeding more attention will be given to costs and start of the legislative history, which sets registered Angus since 1952. A combenefits, and there should be a more forth Congressional intent and other mercial cow/calf operation is also mainreasonable balance between economic pertinent information. tamned where a crossbreeding program is
and environmental goals. Fifth Step. The committee version of observed.
the bill, together with the committee In the purebred Angus herd, bloodThe legislative process report, is referred back to the House lines noted are Wye breeding; A nkonian
How proposed legislation moves floor. (In the case of the House, the bill Dynamo; Emulous lines; "Colossal" and through Congress may be of interest to is actually referred from the Committee Geordus of Graham. The slogan keynotyou. The following explanation was pre- on Ways and Means to the House Coin- ing the breeding program in the Angus pared by B. H. (Bill) Jones, NCA vice mittee on Rules, which is responsible for operation is "Breeding Tomorrow's Perpresident for policy development, determining the rules under which the formance Today!"
The work of Congress is initiated by bill will be considered by the full Under the breeding program at the the introduction of a legislative House.) ranch, bulls are placed with the cows in
proposal. There are four principal forms The vote on the House floor may or early to mid-January with calving in the of such proposals: the bill (the most may not be recorded. House members fall of the year. common), the joint resolution, the con- may seek to have a vote recorded, and Hay is produced for the herds using current resolution and the simple resolu- this is typically done on controversial Coastal Bermuda, Alecia Bermuda and tion. issues. Amendments are sometimes Callie Bermuda grasses. The main ranch
If a bill is introduced in the Senate, it made on the floor and, therefore, the area is on Carter's Island Road west of Mascotte.
58 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




Bang's testing R Ag c cm
increases under
accelerated program
Testing and vaccination activities have increased substantially during the first
three months of the accelerated program
to eradicate the cattle disease brucellosis, Commissioner of Agriculture Doyle Conner has announced.
A quarterly report released showed
the number of cattle tested up 57 percent and calfhood vaccination up 94 percent
since the eradication program was officially accelerated on October 1. There is
an even more dramatic increase of 71
percent among cattle tested on the
farm/ranch where the area testing
program is concentrating.
The report shows 412,655 cattle were
tested in the three-month period of Florida born 23 Years
October, November and December of Red Angus bull calf- Herd Performance
1980. That's 149,669 more than the 9 months old, Data Corn puter
262,986 that were tested during the same 905 pounds Analyzed
period in 1979. The on-farm/ranch
testing accounted for most of the 1980
increase. A total of 355,771 cows were
tested on the farm/ranch during the last *The world's most efficient breed of cattle: YES, more live calves born unassisted. YES, they
quarter of 1980 as compared to 208,019 grow faster, finish faster, grade better. YES, the calves are always red when bred to other red
for the same period of 1979, resulting in cattle. YES, you should put performance tested Red Angus bulls to work in your cow herd.
the 71 percent increase. YES, save better heifers to improve mothering and milking ability.
There also was an increase of 55 per- F a
cent in testing at livestock markets.
Figures for 1980 showed 16,871 head I I I IAI
tested at market, compared with 10,887 F C F 3
for 1979-an increase of 5984.
Testing at slaughterhouses showed a Red Angus Superiority
decrease of 10 percent with 40,013 head B R A A K S M A Herd EML EMULATION 1-adj. 205
tested, down 4067 from the 44,080 tested Sires: day wt. 665 ADG on test 3.61
in the 1979 period. Red Angus-Home of: CHEROKEE REBEL PV-weanThe report also shows that the 1980 National Grand Champion Bull ing wt. 552, yearling wt. 1103
number of infected cattle is down con- EHF Umpire 123-205 wt. 689, 365 wt. 1083 Chipola Red Angus Ranch
siderably-by 21 percent overall. There Super Cliarpr 496-205 wt. 584, 365 wt. 1040 Ken and Nell Williams
were only 6201 infected cattle found Rt. 2, Box 330 904/726-4874 Route 1, Box 295B-Altha, Florida 33421
during the last quarter of 1980, com- FLORAL CITY, FL 32636 Ph: 904/762-8259-813/541-4330
pared with 7527 in 1979, for a dropoff of 1326. HIDDEN VALLEY RANCH
There was an even more substantial Red Angus Cattle Born and Bred Tested Red Angus Bulls.
decrease in the percentage of positive In Florida to Meet the Needs Records to Prove Performance.
reactors to the test, dropping 48 percent of Florida Cattlemen.
from 2.86 percent to 1.50 percent. Jack Sweger, owner Terry Martin, Mgr. RED ANGUS
Calfhood vaccination, a corner- 813/581-5638 904/796-5296 ENFINGER RT. 3, BOX 683
stone of the eradication and prevention 904/796-5868 JAY, FLA. 32565
program, nearly doubled during the last Rt. 3, Box 170 Brooksville, Fla. 33512 Ph. 904/994-7033
three months of 1980. Total calves vaccinated were 66,995 for the period, up
32,505 over the same period in 1979
when only 34,490 were vaccinated. AUCTIONEER Livestock Hauling
Testing and vaccination showed its
usual seasonal dropoff in December as ConsultantC
the calving season started in south H. Fred Dietrich IIl
Florida. The slowdown is expected to Rt. 10, Box 921A 904/796-9071
follow its normal pattern through Janu- Ph: 305/568-2351
ary and into February. Orlando, FL 32820 P. 0. Box 1930, Brooksville, FL 33512
Testing was up 60 percent for
December 1980, increasing to 133,864 TOP PROGENY
from 83,515 for a net gain of 50,349. BARZONA CATFITE
Calfhood vaccination increased by 44 F.B.C.A performance nos PROVEN BULLS
percent, up to 11,415 from 7952 for a net records available
gain of 3466 for the month of LAKE ORIOLE RANCH Dairy&Beef
December. W. R. and Dorothy LaRosa, Owners 30 Breeds Featured
Dennis Dunn, Manager L, Call or Write
Route 3, Box 443 r43
Support your local county Cow- Brookstlle, Florida 33512 4 George MDnter 904733-2882
Belles Association. Phone 904-796-9677 4138 Piper Dr. Jacksonville 32207
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 59




ALXH UA, FLORIOA
32616
REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORDS
Watch for an
announcement on
our 1981 Bull Sale
Mrs. S. Y. Davis, Owner Bill Snead, Mgr.
Phone (904) 462-1453
MITCHELL
HEREFORD FARM
Performance Tested
Polled Hereford Cattle
Lumber City, Ga. 31549
912/568-4236 or 586-3263 SAM SELLS & SONS, Moultrie, Georgia, represented by Sam Sells, Jr., fourth from left,
was the big winner at the first Southern Select Polled Hereford Pen Bull Show and Sale. The firm won grand champion and reserve grand champion pen honors, and also had the REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORDS reserve grand champion individual bull, shown above. Others shown are, from left, Buster
"Trojan Style" Longino, Wilson Rumberger, Dusty Rich, Sells, Max Hammond, and Don Hargrove. On the
Quality Simmental and Simbrah announcer's stand are Johnny Winston, John Gray, and Bob Lee.
ECHODELL FARM Davis is volume Polled Hereford
Joe Harvey, Owner Jakin, Ga. 31761
Farm: 912/793-2081 buyer; Sells is big win er
Davis Cattle Corporation, Sebring, reserve grand champion individual.
represented by J. Wesley Davis and his FCA President W. G. (Kayo) ( i II REGISTERED two grandsons, was volume buyer at the Welles, Arcadia, welcomed guests to the
F POLLED first annual Southern Select Polled sale, along with Dexter Douglass, TallaFarmsll HEREFORDS Hereford Pen Bull Sale, held December hassee, president-elect of the Florida
Performance Tested Bulls Available 17, at Bartow. Davis purchased 17 lots Polled Hereford Association, and Dusty at the sale for $23,975, an average of Rich, Kansas City, Missouri, president Cliff & Howard Shepard, owners $1410 each. of American Polled Hereford AssociaCliff, Gen. Mgr.-912/552-5464 P.O. Box 755 The event saw 74 Polled Hereford tion. The event was co-sponsored by Howard-912/552-3012 Sanderavllle, GA bulls gross $89,075 to average $1204 per FPHA and APHA.
head. Auctioneer for the sale was Morris
Polled Hereford Second top volume buyer was Phil Fannon, Pennington Gap, Virginia. Bob
Lafon, Bowling Green, with purchases Lee, Quincy, served as sale chairman. Range Type Purebred Bulls totaling $9250 for 10 head. PH Cattle Buyers at the sale, with number
Using 2 sons of J3-212, also 1 son of WP Company, Tampa, a Davis related purchased shown in parentheses if more Victor H 125 W497. enterprise, was third high, spending than one, and amount spent, follow.
J. L. Wetherington $5625 for seven bulls. Davis Cattle Corporation, Sebring (17) $23,975; Phil
912/242-4721 Top selling individual was a Florida Lafon, Bowling Green (10) $9250; PH Cattle Company,
Tampa (7) $5625; Flowing Hill Farm, Alachua (2) $3000;
2201 Newbern Dr., Valdosta, Ga. 31601 bred bull, RHF Victor 749 940, bred and Oak Knoll Ranch, Lake Wales (3) $4000; Deer Acres, consigned by Rock Hollow Farm, Monroe, Georgia $3700; Rolland Carlton, Lakeland $1800;
P Alachua. The two-year-old son of RHF Fish Hawk Farm, Riverview (3) $3750; Four E Cattle ComHEREFORD BULLS pany (2) $3075; Clyde Wall, Webster $1500; Circle T Ranch,
Victor 266 749, sold to Deer Acres, Clermont $1750; Micheloni Properties, Groveland (4) $5275; for $3700. Bill McFarland, Manteso, Tennessee $1700; Johnny Hayes,
SAM SELLS MnoFort Ogden (4) $3900; WJR Polled Herefords, Lake City
The bulls were evaluated on the day $1750; Vida DePue, Zephyrhills (2) $1750; S. L. Waters & prior to the sale by a three man team of Sons, Bartow $675; Doyce Teague, Alachua $1025; McLeod & Ranch, Frostproof (3) $3300; Carlton Brothers, Plant City
P.O. Box 1175 l Farm 912/782-5281 judges. Two cattlemen and a University (3) $3075; C. E. Tool, Bowling Green $1125; HK Ranch, of Florida beef specialist were utilized as Lake Wales (2) $1450; Gene Moyers, Manchester, Tennessee Moulrie Gergi 3178 o Flrid bee spciaistwereutiize as $800; R. L. Leak, Plant City $800; George Hancock, Alturas Moultrie, Georgia 31768 judges. Serving this year were Buster $1025.
MEMBER, GEORGIA B.C.I.A. Longino, a Sarasota rancher, M. E.
(Max) Hammond, president of W. H. American cheese output during October
FLORIDA POLLED Stuart Ranch, Inc., Bartow, and Don totaled 186 million pounds, up seven
Hargrove of the University of Florida, percent from a year earlier and marking HEREFORD Gainesville. the 29th consecutive month that proASSOCIATION The grand and reserve grand cham- duction has been above that of a cor'The B B Bed pion pens of bulls were both exhibited responding month.
"The Big Bold Breed" by Sam Sells and Sons, Moultrie,
P. 0. Box 1261 Georgia. E. D. Raulerson, Alma,
305/464-6833 Georgia, exhibited the grand champion Join your local county Cattlemen's
Ft. Pierce FL 33450 individual bull, and Sells showed the Association.
60 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




Client Commercial Cow-Calf Producers
Job Description Design Profitable, Modern Beef Machine
S ruct ral Soundness
Polled
Eye
PigF
Good Sheath and Testicles
Mothering Abilitlya
-Fertility and Longevity
Tod 'y's Polled Herefordcs fit your' pans for success.
Profitable, functional and efcient they're designedt ...... 4 tr ...... .......
meeTt your needs.
-Polled Hereod The "Troul-reBed
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN /FEBRUARY 1981 /61




Pollution controlsA
(Continued from Page 44) ANHINGA
[ed to p the requirements; FARMS
4) Provide for adequate technical -LE
and financial assistance if needed; and POLLED
5) Set up a reporting system to the Regional Administrator of the EPA on HEREFORDS
l progress made in implementation.
The Florida plan addresses each of Complete records. Performance tested
these conditions, but, at present, funds bulls. Southeastern bloodlines. All herd to support problem identification and to bulls RWJ pedigrees. provide cost-sharing assistance for best Route 3, Box 577
* management practice application are Tallahassee, FL 2308
quite limited. Florida did not receive Terese and Dexter Douglass
_ A ,any funds under the latest Rural Clean Phone 904/893-5422
Water Act allocation and indications 8 miles E. of Truck Rt.
from Washington suggest that Agri- on Centerville Rd.
cultural Conservation Program funds may be cut back as well. Young Acres Ranch
Despite these funding setbacks, New Trend Polled Herefords
planning and implementation efforts Performance Cattle
continue. The DER has established an Service Age Bulls
implementation schedule with annual Bred and Breeding Age Females
program evaluations through June 1982. For information on our Performance Cattle: Adv vantage At that time, an evaluation of the
1 H -. I g effectiveness of the voluntary approach H. Y. Tillman
Jil l"] ri [ ] will be made based on the degree of 1 1207 W. Park Ave. Valdosta, Ga. 31601
and Illet feding expri landowner cooperation in instituting
ments,111' t Tfo 44p best management practices, and the RWJ Victor Dominos
duced I;------ percent-- effectiveness of the management agen- Foundation Source
* f- .* [a:llI [ ces in carrying out their functions.FonainSuc
Av c esck g with thei unictens. tContinuing to linebreed RWJ Practical Costl.* A check with the EPA indicates that Performing Polled Herefords.
Florida agricultural 208 plan is similar in style and approach to other state R WJ FARMS
plans. The voluntary approach has the Mr. & Mrs. V. H. Jones Route 1, Box 157 advantage that producers are not forced 912/874-6105 LESLIE, GEORGIA 31764 to implement specific controls. Its disad- I can be oIwI far vantage is that producers may not have
north a Oklahoa, i sufficient incentives to participate on
S o u t h e r n I Ia llln o i s, a voluntary basis. However, the Top Bloodlines
etr agricultural element indicates that the
EPA may withdraw approval of non- JAMES F. HOLMAN
regulatory programs if implementation milestones are not met. A regulatory Rt. 5, Blakely GA 31723
CROP CIE.NC, V Se t. program would then be implemented.
",1P. 911. Il*l J A O The advantage of a regulatory Ph: 912/723-5428
A L SCIENC, V 7 N 4, program lies in the fact that specific
1978. practices or controls can be mandated. POLLED HORNED
The primary disadvantage of course, is HERIEFORDS
that producers lose that much more control over the management of their SINGLETARY FARMS
operations. A. J. and R. C. Singletary
, The best season b= to'p 'risout BLAKELY, GEORGIA 317M
standin fo n hay g s is Ph: 912/723-3525 (Office) 723-3196 (Res.)
lawin t. W a re nw tng USDA study critical 2 MI. NW OF BLAKELY ON HWY. 27
ordes for dormant, hig q The final report of USDA's two-year Io I
study has recommended the "modifica- Polled Herefords
tion" of existing policies on taxation, Malloy Hereford Ranch farm credit, commodity price support, Victor Dominos
trade, federally supported agricultural Wicto om n
For nfomatin, ontct- eserchandconervaion "Wth the Malloy Accent"
Wa lter h T research, and conservation. Home of: RWJ Victor J133 76
-The report was critical of subsidies Al Certificates Available
912/38-1412 for gasohol production and called for an Mr. & Mrs. Dallas Malloy, Owners
befoe7:3 am. .i end to most federal subsidies for large P 0. Drawer G, Marianna, FL 32446
after 7:30,pm farmers, those with sales in excess of office) 904/526-2672 (res.) 482-5196
or 91/360 6 $200,000 annually.
It also called for revision of tax provisions and farm credit procedures that RANCHO SA A NI O have encouraged land speculation,
Ro B 31 6." inflated land prices, and the expansion
ifton, -eorg 31794 of the size of farms. Those farmers with
sales between $5000 and $200,000 annu- P.,d JI-el, d.
P h n : 9 2 / 8 4 2Linebred Bulls P o om meca ate e
ally, a majority of farmers in the U.S., e red m B eral Catlemen
need new policies designed particularly Route 5. Moultrie, GA 31768
to help them, the study stated. 912/324-2602
62 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




Seffner bull sale RIVER DIVIDE RANCH
averages $1002 1k V
1116 N. Edgewood Avenue
on 102 head Jacksonville, Florida 32205
An overall average of $1002 was struck
on 102 head of Angus, Brangus, Brah- Herd sires: RWJ Victor 212 14, RWJ ( I J )l07 rM ]
man, Simmental, and Polled Hereford Victor 330 HH25, and RWJ Victor 266
bulls at the Cattleman's Bull Sale, held HH28. Pa ce T std Si
Saturday, December 13, at the Inter- Hrres
state Livestock Market, Seffner. a, PO D Bull h VT 715
The top volume buyer was Rolland RDR 19041 7W-3220 904/819-2476o 9Hh I NO 9314 2163
Skipper, Zolfo Springs, spending 1904) 879-1530 [F VICTOR 321 5112
$21,250 for 21 head. Second top volume Robet F Crane, Or
buyer was Earl Deal, Riverview, who REGISTERED R 1 0 a :3
purchased 14 head for $11,700. Other Tel: i 94 462-2200
volume buyers included Mathias Ranch, POLLED HEREFORDS
Tampa, Watford Ranch, Okeechobee,
and A & A Roller, Tampa.
The top selling individual was a (Tj BAXLEY FARMS
Brangus bull consigned by Alpha Three CIRCLE RANCH
Ranch, Pendergrass, Georgia. The two Raiin Polled Hereford & Quarter Horses
year old son of Biloxie 141, out of a Raising Polled Herefords Since 1953 Built on economically important traits
daughter of Sir Carson's 19, was pur- Bulls For Sale Harold Baxley 205/886-2913
chased by Watford Ranch for $1750. Mr. & Mrs. T. F. Thompson, owner Howell Baxley 205/886-3088
The sale was managed by Craig Clermont, Florida 32711 Tommy Baxley 205/886-2855
Cattle Sales, Inman, South Carolina. Phone 904/394-3053 Rt. 4, Graceville, FL 32440
Morris Fannon, Penington Gap, Virginia, was auctioneer.
Buyers, with number purchased P'4' -"ew LTO f M Herring Hereford Farm
shown in parentheses if more than one, "New Look In Polled Heretords"
and amount spent shown, follow: Herd Sire Battery Consisting of: Breeding Profitable Polled
nsRWJ and PAF Victor Dominos Herefords Since 1955.
Rolland Skipper, Zolfo Springs (21) $21,250; Earl Deal, Bred For Performance
Riverview (14) $11,700; Mithias Farm, Tampa (10) $8125; A J. E. Strickland, family H. W. Herring, Jr.
& A Roller, Tampa (5) $5800; Watford Ranch, Okeechobee 912/647-5439 912/872-3316
(5) $7925; L. W. Green, Webster (2) $2025; C & W Ranch MERSHON, GEORGIA 31551 Rt. 2, Whigham, Ga. 31797
(3) $3600; Anderson Farm $1025; Everett Boney, Okeechobee (2) $2175; Billy Buckner, Burnsville, North Carolina
$1250; M & M Ranch $750; Saunders (3) $3675; Grimes
Farms $1050; Dixie Growers. Tampa (3) $3400; Wayne Col- WILLMAR Florida acclimated
lier, Wauchula (2) $1725; Turner (4) $3250; Haney $975; DiyPase(2$15;DueF...Zprhls&() L NT TO G H1 Dairy, Paisley (2) $1750; DePue Farms, Zephyrhills $700;
George Coniglio $750; Padgett $750; Tri-S Ranch, Colgate, PA Georgia (3) $2350; Westby Corporation, Lake Placid (2) Polled Herefords $2275; Crayton Pruitt, Plant City (2) $2450; Phil Lafon, C
Bowling Green (4) $4000; Strickland (2) $2025; Larkin & Performance Oriented Company, Dade City (2) $2225; Nanco, Ocala $1200. RWJ Victor Dominos Polled Herefords
Box 219, Smithville GA 31787 Rt. 3, Box 266, Callahan, FL 32011
V. H. Jones Ro er Peak Curtiss Quorrier Gil Quorrler, Mqr.
'Ferry' Carpenter dies 9127.618 912,g4.5,25 904/793683 904/879-1118
Pioneer rancher, lawyer and politician
Farrington "Ferry" Reed Carpenter CROOKED LAKE RANCH
died December 12 at his home in Registered Polled Herefords Prebre Morris F.
Hayden, Colorado, after a brief illness. Victor Dominos Cattle
Pat Wilson, Inc. 813/635-4804 Bus. Salos Fannon
He was 94. Owners 813/635-3787 Res. l i
A noted H ereford breeder, he was a O e Livestock Aes.
longtime advocate of performance test- P. 0. Box 65, Frostproot, Florida 33843 Livestock Auctioneer
ing. He was a featured speaker at a Flor- Performance is our Business. Pennington Gap, VA 24277
ida Beef Cattle Improvement Associa- Phone 703/546-2510
tion meeting held at the University of
Florida, Gainesville, a number of years The Best in Beefalo Cattle Victor Dominos
ago. "That Pay Their Way and
A recipient of many honors, both vvnite Oak Tiantation "h.,Make A Profit"
industry and civic, during his lifetime,
one of the most recent was his induction Beetalo Semen Available Briar Creek Farms
Contact Ken Woehrle
into the American Hereford Associa- Star Route 1, Box 1296 E.D. and Pauline Raulerson 912/632-4492
tion's Hereford Heritage Hall Gallery of Yulee, Florida 32097 Dwight L. Rauierson 912/832-4785
Honor last November. Phone: 904/225-5204 Route 3, Alma, Georgia 31510
U.S. butter production totaled 89.6 mil- REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORD BULLS
lion pounds during October. That's up
15 percent from a year earlier and marks These Bulls Are Presently Available
the 14th straight month-and 18th in
the past 19-that output has been above SOUTHW OOD FARM
that of a corresponding month a year
earlier. Ph: 904/877-1158 TALLAHASSEE FLA. 32302 P.O. Box 191
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 63




FLORIDA Conner warns Florida's agriculturally-productive land
as possible and preserve it for its best
bimmcntal on urban ue
Representing cattle and marketing
ASSOCIATION encroachment industry segments on the council are
in R. D. Bennett, Greenwood; Pete 904/591-1156 Florida is continuing to make gains in Clemns, Okeechobee; Gerald Cayson,
Rit. 1, Box 213B sas of a
Reddick 32686 sales of agricultural products, both at Blountstown; Joe Hilliard, Clewiston, home and abroad, but Commissioner of and Gilbert A. Tucker, Cocoa. Agriculture Doyle Conner sees urban
Without advertising, encroachment on farmlands as a threat
to future agricultural growth. Simmental bulls
a terrible thing happens... Conner urged the Florida Agricultural Advisory Council at a recent average $1201
meeting in Marianna to offer its wisest Seventy-one head of breeding age Simguidance to the legislature which is mental bulls grossed $85,300 to average expected to take up the problem of pre- $1201 at the Banister Simmental Bull serving farmland at its next session. Sale, held recently at the Okeechobee Conner said that Florida sales of Livestock Market, Okeechobee. farm products have boosted it to The 71 bulls were all from the BanisOAK HILL FARMS number 11 among the states in farm ter Simmental Farms at Charlottesville,
Simmental Cattle cash receipts compared with number 13 Virginia.
And Commercial .., three years ago. And foreign sales of Top volume buyer was Dressel
Cross Breeds Florida food products have risen to Cattle Company, Okeechobee, spendJrJ i, r $515 million in 1979 from $147 million ing $9900 for six lots. Oscar Clemons,
Ph: 912/759-2946 in 1972, he said. Okeechobee, was second high, purchasP. 0. Box 118 But he cited a convergence of urban ing six bulls for $8150.
LEESBURG, GA. 31763 1 problems with increased constraints on The Dressel purchases came to an
farming as posing potentially a new average of $1650 each, while Clemons migration from cities to the country- paid an average of $1358. IN THE SOUTHEAST QUALITY side. This would further reduce the The sale was managed by Pete ClemSIMMENTAL CATTLE AVAILABLE amount of land in production, and slow mons, manager of Okeechobee LiveFor Percentage and Purebred Simmentals the expansion of marketing, barring new stock Market. Wendell Cooper, OkeeBond Simmental Ranch scientific breakthroughs. chobee, was auctioneer.
Perry Bond 912/498-4835 Urban pressure on farmland is Buyers, with number of head purPatty Fournier 9 912/498-7745 greater in Florida than in most other chased shown in parentheses if more Rt. 1'. Box 116 Boston, Georgia 31626 states, Conner said, and greatest in than one, and amount spent shown, Dedicated to the growth of Simmentals in the Southeast Dade County, which according to a na- follow:
tional lands study has lost 35 percent of Jim Stokes, Okeechobee (3) $3725; D. L. Pearce, Okeeits farmland to other uses in the last chobee (4) $5800; Dressel Company (6) $9900; Fellsmere Management Corporation, Fellsmere (6) $7000; Oscar
decade. Clemons, Okeechobee (6) $8150; Bavers (2) $2675; SemiFlorida's overall loss of farmland to sole Sugar Corporation, Loxahatchee (6) $6250; Sanford SIMMENTAL FHart, Avon Park (4) $4225; Nanco, Ocala (4) $4950; Frolick
development between 1967 and 1977 Ranch (6) $7825; Westby Corporation, Lake Placid (3)
Performance Tested Bulls was 10 percent, Conner said. This loss, if s3125; McQueen Ranch (3) $2700; J & R Ranch, Okeechobee $1225; Armeda Ranch, Okeechobee (4) $4300; Mico,
continued, could "seriously damage Okeechobee (5) $4525; R. Waldron (3) $3275; Old Summit
Rt. 6, Box 69, Ph: 804/295-7591 Florida's agricultural base in just a few Farm $1725; W. H. Ellis $800; Herman Thomas, OkeeCharlottesville VA 22901 y he said. chobee $850; Pete Clemons, Okeechobee $1250; Flint Ranch
years," $1025.
Some of the land loss in the past has
been offset by gains in productivity, but
the rate of productivity growth has been Collier named to Bull flattening out in recent years, Conner Hardee presidency
said. Higher prices for farm products
would provide an incentive to continue Heading the Hardee County Cattlefarming, he added, but also would invite men's Association for the coming year is foreign compete n with cheaper Wayne Collier, Wauchula. Serving as
The Davenports at 1, Box 213-B products. vice president will be Wendy Batey,
904/591-1156 Reddlck, Fl. 32686 Conner cited rising crime and other Zolfo Springs. Second vice president is
urban problems as reasons to flee the Maurice Henderson, Wauchula. cities, and rising farm costs and pres- Secretary is J. P. Platt, Zolfo Springs Miller Crest Farms. sure from lenders as inducements for and treasurer is Marcus Shackleford,
Simmental Cattle farmers to sell out to developers. "It Wauchula.
Quality Percentage & Purebred appears that something other than State director is Robert Ray Smith,
For Sale at all times. market forces is needed to keep farm- Wauchula.
Peggy, Spence & Jeff Miller land in production," he said. Representing the local association
Box 519, Bronson, FL 32621 How to preserve agricultural land on the board of directors are Charles
904/486-2797 or 486-2966 threatened by urbanization poses a Stevens, Zolfo Springs; Roy Crews,
major problem for the legislature, and Ona; John Paris, Bowling Green; the solution is going to require hard Kermit Stevens, Wauchula; Wilbur Billy H. Wells decisions, Conner said. Robertson, Zolfo Springs; Jay Clark,
The legislature may not be able to Wauchula; Norman Nickerson, and Livestock Auctioneer stop urban encroachment, but it should Harold Henderson, both of Wauchula.
* Ring Service plan and channel development into
Sale Consultant pm
Sale Management areas less appropriate for farm produc- Number of cattle on feed in the seven
tion, Conner suggested. major feeding states, at 7,960,000 head,
121Aldean Dr., Sanford, FL 32771 He called on the council to work on was down four percent from a year ago,
Home; 305/323-2820
0ffce: 305/86-5400 recommendations to legislative com- 15 percent below the December 1, 1978,
mittees to try to maintain as much of total, and lowest for the date since 1974.
64 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




DEHORNED
POLLED
Horned or polled,
Simmental perform!
American Simmental -- the result of intensive performance selection for the important economic traits. If polled Simmental is your choice, American breeders have the largest genetic pool in the world! We're the breed that gives you a choice: Horned or Polled.
For a free brochure about Simmental, write:
AMERICAN
ASSOCIATION
1 Simmental Way Bozeman, MT 59715 (406) 587-4531
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 65




REGISTERED Research favorable
toward reduced
BRANGUS Strain 19 dosage
The current standard dose of Strain 19
vaccine can be reduced without forfeiting adequate protection against brucellosis, USDA research indicates.
B U LL SA LEDosage rates between 100 million
and 10 billion Brucella abortus organSponsored by isms, as well as what has been the standard dosage of 90 billion organisms, all
BLUEBONNET BRANGUS BREEDERS provided significant protection against
brucellosis in a study at the National
Animal Disease Center, Ames, Iowa.
a,1981 1:00 P.M. Heifers vaccinated as calves at all
dosage rates showed no false positive
PrtCity St,,ockyards reactions to diagnostic tests for brucelSealy, Texas losis 15 months after vaccination,
veterinary medical officer Billy L.
Deyoe says.
"We conclude that there is no longer
SELLING: justification for vaccinating cattle with
current recommended dosages of Strain
19, regardless of age," Deyoe says. He
100 BRANGUS BULLS says different dose levels for calves and
for yearlings and older animals would
appear to be ideal, although practical
FERTILITY BANGS & T.B. TESTED-Ready to go to considerations may dictate a compromise intermediate dosage.
work including many herd sire prospects. These bulls Based on results of the study,
represent some of the finest Brangus breeders and USDA's Animal and Plant Health
feature the top bloodlines of the breed. Inspection Service (APHIS) and state
animal health regulatory agencies are
altering their brucellosis vaccination
Bluebonnet Brangus breeders are the best ranchers with the regulations to permit lower dosage
largest number of the best Brangus cattle in the world! It ain't rates. Vaccination at four to 12 months
of age rather than two to 10 months will
braggin' when you're tellin' the truth! also be permitted. Dr. C. L. Campbell,
director, division of animal industry,
For Information or catalogs contact: Florida Department of Agriculture,
SALE MANAGERS: reports word should soon be released on
Florida's use of the reduced dosage.
Deyoe, veterinary medical officer
Terrance A. Dorsey and technicians
Kathryn B. Meredith and Linda K.
Garrett compared dosage rates of 10
million, 100 million, one billion, 10
Box 807 billion and the standard rate of 90
BELLVILLE, TEXAS 77418 Auctioneer: billion organisms. They vaccinated 106
Phone: 713/865-3616 REYES & REYES crossbred beef heifers as yearlings and
106 Angus-Hereford heifers when four
713/463-6000 SAN ANTONIO, TX to six months old.
The serologic responses of both
groups were measured by the card,
standard tube agglutination, mercapRegistered Brangus 711 toethanal, rivanol and complement-fixaLenholt Farms' HA M NS7 1 tion tests throughout the experiment.
BRAD Immunity produced by vaccination was
Deep River Ranch BRAND checked at calving and at post-mortem
Star Route 2, Box 20 Registered Red and Gray Brahman examination.
DELAN, FLORIDA 32720), Brangus, Bratord and The magnitude and duration of posiRanch 8 miles west on Hwy. 44 P.O. BOX 117, KENANSNVILLE, FLA. 32739 tive reactions indicated by diagnostic
Phone DeLand 904/734-2534 Paul Hayman, Owner Ph.: 305/436-1062 tests were directly related to dosage
levels, Deyoe says.
Registered & Commercial Bruce Martin AA Larry Martin In heifers vaccinated as yearlings,
Brangus Cattle 904/755-0803 A 904/755-0816 those receiving the 10 million and 100
million dosage rates had no serologic
Reg. Quarter Horses reactors at eight weeks after vaccinaLITILE SPRINGS FARM ( 9nIo tion and thereafter. Yearling heifers
James M. (Buddy) Adams A',' aT. 2 80x 96 c 36 receiving the one, 10 or 90 billion dosage
404/786-8900 Farm; 404/787-2233 Office LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32055 rates showed consistent or intermittent
Rt. 6, Box 197 r reactions up to challenge exposure eight
COVINGTON GA 30209 Breeders of Registered Brangus Cattle months after vaccination.
66 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




Among heifers vaccinated at four to six months of age, only 10 and 90 billion dosage rates produced serologic reac- WINE B U LL
tors as long as 12 weeks after vaccina- FO ____REA SOs
tion, Deyoe says. All calfhood vaccinated heifers tested negative at the time of challenge exposure.
Levels of immunity produced by the varied dosage rates differed according to age of the heifers at vaccination, the researchers found.
In yearling heifers, all vaccine doses produced significant and indistinguishable levels of immunity. In heifers vaccinated as calves, higher doses tended to produce higher levels of immunity. The 90 billion and 10 billion doses yielded maximum immunity, one billion and 100 million doses gave significant immunity, and the 10 million dosage produced noticeable but less than adequate immunity.
Alachua cattlemen elect Copeland
Johnnie Copeland, Alachua, heads the Alachua County Cattlemen's Association for 1981. Vice president is John Rawls, Alachua.
Secretary is Susan Smith, Gainesville, and treasurer is Charles Page, Gainesville.
State director is Fred Clark, Alachua. Membership chairman is Richard Bryan, and publicity chairman is Ben Rowe, both of Gainesville.
Local directors from the Gainesville area unless otherwise noted, are Jack Bryan; Belle Jeffords, High Springs; Frank Denham; Fred McCullars, Alachua; Bill Snead, Alachua; Rod
Smith; Danny Williams; Ronnie Roland; Wes Schellenger; Jack Sim- For information concerning sales,
mons, Archer, and Jeannette Chitty, breed literature and new educational film, contact:
Micanopy. Southeastern Brangus [A
Robison couple dies Breeders Association
George H. "Sol" Robison, 77, of Route 1, Box 108, Rembert, SC 29128/(803)432-2920
Mango, died in December. He was a lifelong resident of the area and a cattleman. He was formerly owner of the Any Country is Brangus Country.
Interstate Livestock Auction Market at Seffner. His wife, Etna B. Robison, 69, An American Breed Since 1949.
preceded him in death by one day.
Immediate survivors include a son,
W. Douglas of Mango and a daughter, BRANGUS BULLS Circle R Ranch
Elizabeth Lorenze, Mango. Mrs. RE(. AN(IJS & BRANGUS
Robison also was survived by two WILLIAMSON RANCH
brothers, Eugene Bryan of Tampa and Jack Williamson, owner ARKY E. ROGERS, OWNER
Victor Bryan of Ocala; two sisters, L. Jim Cowen, manager 904/752-2103 Rt. 6, Box 175
Mae Thomas of Tampa and Evelyn Home: 305/597-2546
Watson of Zephyrhills, and four grand- Office: 813/763-3143 LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32055
Watsn o Zehyrhlls an fou grnd-P. 0. Drawer 668
children. Okeechobee, Fl. 33472 Located 7 miles south on U.S. 41
Mr. Robison also was survived by two brothers, William D. and Ralph "Peg," both of Tampa; two sisters, Bess Bar-A-Brangus
Chalifoux and Ida Mae Lester, both of Tampa, and the four grandchildren. Bia r D Ra no h Bulls and Heifers
Proven Crossbreed Since 1949 Clinton Dicks Terry Dicks Brady Pfeil Albert & Barbara Carlton
904/752-2733 904/752-1093 Foreman Owners
Join your local county Cattlemen's Route 3, Box 138E 813/494-7302 813/773-6867
Association. LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32055 Rt. 1, Box 215, Arcadia, FL 33821
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 67




PALMER BROTHERS
POWER PACKED
BEEFMA$TIR SALE
/D MARCH 7, 1981
L s 1 psm.
-- .....
4
0-W ~~~~~ in cojnto wit Wayn Mile and HeryCly San' Antnio Texa 512/344-4581
Rt. 11!i Box~i 85) 118 W. Na1o 512-393-221 or 512-596-3749 512r349-218




ANNOU NC ING:
Bg F JOLP A~
SELING ho ofy thee thet Pame BoterSle
00 34ulu Lot




THE Family tradition followed in
THE WINNIN HALFalOF
THER HALN WOlFiams Beefmaster program
COMBINATION
In the past two or three years, EDITOR'S NOTE-The following arti- The culling process at the Williams
we have done a lot of talking cle was written by Ruth Schumacher, ranch begins at weaning, and continues
about Beefmaster cattle. We have public relations director, Beefmaster until the cattle are presented to BBU talked to cattlemen in practically Breeders Universal. officials for inspection. His thorough
every State where cattle are selection for his first BBU inspection
raised for profit. We all know that "Every day for the past 20 to 25 years, netted him 100 percent enrollment.
ranching is hard work and long
hours. Nothing new about that. since before I got out of high school, Williams intends to continually
The price of land, labor and over- I've looked at a cow, or a piece of fence, improve his production. "I want to go all maintenance is constantly on or a horse, or a tractor, or something to up in quality with the second crossesthe increase. Nothing new about do with producing cattle," says Hugh just another step. The only way to do that either. But what is new to Williams, a rancher in Okeechobee. that in the cattle business is with the
many cattlemen is the winning Ranching has been in the Williams bulls. You've got to go to quality bulls
combination. bls o'egtt ot ult ul
family for several generations, and the to get quality calves-in your females BEEFMASTER bulls with W.W.S. Ranch is presently owned by and in your replacement heifers."
your commercial cattle. We hear Williams, his mother, Mrs. Anne Wil- Since only females are eligible for
almost daily the plus results of
using BEEFMASTER bulls. After hams, and his sister, Carol Anne Smith. enrollment in the upgrading program,
all, It's difficult enough just to Williams remembers upgrading the he sells crossbred steers at the market or
make a living; why make it more small red "scrub" native cattle using direct. "We get top prices for these difficult with short weights at the Hereford and crossbred bulls. He says calves. They are looking for them for scale. No one wants to buy the family kept the best prospects every feedlots because they're not humpy;
scrawny calves. Cattle buyers year to improve a little more on the next m
certainly don't. They are looking they are growth and have frame on
for growthy, well-developed year. Today, Williams is still upgrading them. And in the tests I've seen, they
calves. Cattle buyers must make cattle, but he has a purebred herd as his grade out. They are Number One calves.
a profit the same as everyone ultimate goal, and he has advanced con- The order buyers came out here and saw
else. siderably from the scrub cattle of other these calves; they didn't cut one out of
Don't go out and buy a 10 or years. the bunch." He has already sold about
$15,000 bull to put with your herd. The Florida rancher is producing 70 this year and has about that many
We have done that for you. We Beefmaster cross cattle eligible for more ready to market.
have bought the best Beef- enrollment in Beefmaster Breeders Uni- Steers are sold between 400 and 500
master herd bulls and the best
females from some of the top versal's Official Upgrading Program. pound weights, depending on current
breeders in the country. Now we He began with Brahman cross cattle market prices. "I like to get mine to
are producing bulls at reason- that were inspected and enrolled as base about 425 pounds, and take a look at
able prices for commercial cat- cattle in the program. The Beefmaster price differentials. If I think I can make tlemen. Visit our ranch and let us bulls purchased to breed these cows (by more money by carrying them to heavier
show you what we have to offer. Williams' own standards) had to be top weights, I will."
We think we have "the other of the line, "U" quality bulls. Williams saved a couple of his first
half of the winning combination." This fall Williams will be presenting cross bulls last year. He plans to use
about 150 head of first cross females for them on what he terms "bottom-end T ft4 inspection by BBU officials. Many of commercial cows." His intention is to
these are his own production, and some out this herd of 75 to 100 head as
he purchased from neighbor Loyd pe
Beefmasters you Bone manager of the Bever Ranch he is building toward a purebred herd.
can grow with. owned by Sug Bever. Boney was instru- The half-blood Beefmasters will replace
Canoe Creek Road a few Hereford and Braford bulls left on
on Lake Marion mental in Williams' purchase of his first the ranch. The producer is curious to see
Kenansville, Florida 32739 Beefmaster bull, and Williams what top-end Beefmaster cross bulls and
Classified" influenced Boney to enroll in the grade cows will produce.
"Casfe upgrading program. The BBU "Beefmasters are just about the
H. A. Rickards J. Jay Bamett Upgrading Program requires inspec- perfect cows for this part of Florida," he
305/436-1891 813/482-2750 tion on three successive crosses to reach
managing partner purebred status.
His goal is to eventually own a large
number of purebred Beefmasters.
Though he admits it's going to be a long
SUBSCRIBE NOW1! process through the upgrading program, he says, "I look forward to it; it's
a challenge. The rewards are certainly
there if you can raise the 'right kind of
cattle.' He has added his own selfSe r O imposed, rigid methods to the quality-n
( O M PSmp control measures issued by BBU.
CATTLE MARKETING, INC Says Williams, "I look at the cow
first. I don't put anything in the proSales Management & Private Treaty. gram (base cow) until she has a heifer
calf that is above average. A lot of
people put their whole herd in the proFRED THOMPSON gram, but I never put them in until they HUGH WILLIAMS is building toward a
purebred Beefmaster herd through his
have a first cross heifer that is suitable selection of halfblood Beefmaster heifers
8603 Crownhill, Suite 30 San Antonio, TX 78209 for a first cross cow. Then I put the cow as shown above. A commercial cow must
(512] 828-1680 in as a base cow, and the heifer will produce an outstanding heifer calf before
qualify if she grows on out-when she Williams will present the cow for enrollgets a year and a half or two years old." ment in the BBU upgrading program.
70 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




THE SIXTH ANNUAL
SOUTHEASTERN BEEFMASTER
BREEDERS SALE
Friday, Aprlj 10, 1981, At 12:30 P.M.
At The Coastal Plains Experiment Station Sales Pavilion At Tifton, Georgia
Selling 20 Herd Sires And Herd Sire Prospects
All Bangs, TB, and Fertility Tested
Also Selling 60 Top Females
Including Bred And Open Heifers, Pairs, And 3-In-One Packages Sale Headquarters: Holiday Inn, Tifton, Georgia
SEBBA President: Seth Smith Sale Chairman: Dan Morgan
Auctioneer: Gerald Bowie
A BBU Approved Sale
For More Information Or Sale Catalog Contact:
THOMPSON CATTLE MARKETING, INC.
8603 Crownhill, No. 22, San Antonio, TX 78209, 512/828-1680
Watch For Future SEBBA Sales At Jackson, Mississippi, September 19, 1981, and Bartow, Florida, October 20, 1981 THE FLORIDA CATFLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 71




says. He likes their disposition, their an answer for cattle problems with his resistance to pinkeye, and the fact that production of crossbred Beefmasters, they "slick off' much faster than British building toward a purebred herd, he bred cattle, encounters problems familiar to all
He commented, "You couldn't ask ranchers: the elements, economic presfor better disposition. I've got two kids, sures, and insects and diseases, a big and neither one is very experienced, and problem in the south Florida environI'm sure they could get on a horse and ment. "We have any kind of insect you get behind these heifers and pen them. want to come up with-ticks, lice, flies, They are just that gentle. They handle leaches. We just spray whenever they good. If any of them were crazy, I would need it. Sometimes in the spring and cut them out, but I haven't had to cut early summer when flies really get 'terout any because of disposition so far. rific,' we spray every two weeks." The
"I have never seen a case of pinkeye marshy pastures are conducive to foot
with Beefmasters. It's discouraging rot, though Williams terms it a minor ONLY TOP "U" quality Beefmaster bulls when you have 100 head of cattle, and problem when properly treated, are used on the W.W.S. commercial herd,
you go through and have to pull out two Williams says most of his land was owner Williams says. or three top cows every year with farmed in early years by tomato
cancer-eye. Or you go out and see 10 to farmers. "They limed the land, plowed it season. Presently his calves are coming 15 cows with eyes starting to cloud up. up and planted their crops; and they dug over an eight-month period. "It's strung It's hot weather, raining every day, and drainage ditches. We went behind them out pretty well. I wish I could bunch it you have to aggravate with these cows in and put in grass. It's the best way to get up to 90-150 days, but I just can't do it a pen, doctoring them every two or three your land improved and the cheapest." without spending $30 to $40 a head in days. If there is any way to get around it, The rancher says he has about 400 acres supplement. I hope to finally get to 100I'm going to do it. And Beefmaster bulls of rough land, but "what's left to 150 days. A person can do it, but there are the way to do it," he emphasized. improve now will take a bulldozer and will be lots of open cows and lots of
Williams was first introduced to the that is $30 to $50 an hour. It would cost additional expense."
breed by Boney. That was seven years a fortune. Williams has good cattle and a good
ago. He was impressed by the calves and "Sometimes we have two or three program. His goals are well-planned they impressed other ranchers in the frosts a year, and sometimes 15 to 20 and long-range ones; his standards of area as well. Today, all but one of the frosts-depending on how lucky we are. quality are of the highest level. And he ranches that borders Williams are using What really hurts us though is a drouth. incorporates two other factors not often Beefmaster bulls. "It just takes time. Several years ago, five or six, it was found together-he is young and he is People go out and see the results. That's brown out here. The last three or four patient. These attributes, coupled with why they've gone to the bulls," said Wil- years, we've had plenty of moisture." his desire to upgrade to a superior herd liams. Another problem Williams would of purebred Beefmasters, have the makThough Williams feels he has found like to overcome is a lengthy calving ings of a winner.
II
Conformation ad ,, :
72 / THE FLORIDA CA rLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




I eefirnaster nuLLs
#4=attLe
SATURDAY, March 21, 1981 -- 11:00 A.M. Io 3 010 o
Producers Auction, San Angelo, Texas
SPRING Sale
We are offering approximately 110 CERTIFIED BEEFMASTER bulls averaging 18 months old and 1100 pounds. These bulls have been conditioned for HEAVY SERVICE on rocky pastures and wilt be fertility tested.
As in our four past sales, the bulls will be priced and catalogued in advance with full performance data in the catalog. /
In our two 1981 sales, we will offer approximately 350 bulls.
BULLS RAISED BY THESE
FOUNDATION BEEFMASTER ASSOCIATION MEMBERS:
Billy Boyd Big Lake, Tx Earl McElroy Toyah, Tx
Skipper Duncan San Angelo, Tx Bill Newsome Canton, Tx
Bill George, Jr. Eagle Pass, Tx Shelby Phillips III Deming, NM L. G. Hargis, Jr. Waurika, Ok Charles Probandt San Angola, Tx Steve Langston Water Valley, Tx Andy Smith San Angelo, Tx
Bulls may be seen now. Please contact:
isa Cattle Co3192 Executive Drive
Sales Headquarters San Angelo, Tx 76901 Lunch will
Holiday Inn 915/949-3763 be served
915/655-8151
Laurie Lasater Charles Probandt
915/944-3464 915/949-7906
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 73




SWT m Ocala bull sale
BO TO brings $1011
[EF A E on 188 lots
The 25th Silver Anniversary Ocala Bull Sale held at the Southeastern Livestock
Fo mr. *i om tto* Pavilion in Ocala January 13 grossed
$190,097 to average out at $1011 per B a -t l Breeders Universalhead. The event is sponsored annually
Ge ;ne Kuienl~l by the Marion County Cattlemen's
:0 g .Lp 410 Association and the Southeastern LiveSuite1]1 350l~o] stock Association.
M St Breaking down the sale by breeds,
the 33 Angus consignments grossed San Antoio, Te-as 78216 $38,150 with the 19 buyers paying an
average of $1156 per head; six Brangus (512) 341-1277 KIi.bulls grossed $9425 to average $1571; seven Brahman bulls brought $7675 to average $1096; 10 Beefmaster lots sold for $9650 to average $965; eight Charolais grossed $6050 for an average of
DIXIE BEEFMASTERS $756; 112 Hereford grossed $117,875 to
16-24 month old Bulls for sale. 1200- average $966, and two Santa Gertrudis
1500 pounds. consignments brought $1275 to average RON DON
"PUREBRED CATI'LE FOR SALE" $638.RO D N
Volume buyer was Flying P Ranch, 1 CATTLE COMPANY
R & M FARMS Okeechobee, with 15 lots purchased for BEEFMASTER CATTLE
SonrnMathls BobbyRowan $14,800 to average $987. Second high Ronnie Hartzog Donnie Duce
Ranch 912/533-5535 PO. Box 4 buyer was Jones Brothers Ranch, Sebr- (904) 638-7859 1904) 638-4064
ing paying $10,975 for nine lots and an Al Cleveland (904) 638-4914
average of $1219. RT. 3, CHIPLEY, FLORIDA 32428
7 LAZY 11 High buyers by breeds were Angus,
7 Beefmasters 7 Williamson Cattle Company, Okee= Rogers Farms, Inc. chobee, eight bulls for $9725; William
Ronnie Perkins, Mgr. 813/983-9701 Roberts, Trenton, four bulls for $5075;
Pete Marks, Herdsman 813/983-7039 Brangus, H. E. Mills, Chiefland, two LEE
Star Route Box 76 lots for $3700; Ned Folks, Dunnellon, FARMS
Clewiston, Fla. 33440 two lots for $2525; Brahman, Jones Purebred Beefmasters.
C__ ew__ ston,__Fa.__3 __440 Brothers, four lots $5150; Charles Banner Lee, Jr.
Cowart, Bunnell, one lot for $1300; Route 3/Pavo, GA/31778
TALLEY Beefmaster, Ned Folks, Dunnellon, four (912)859-2131 / (912)859-2120-Home
lots for $3800; Jones Brothers, three lots Bft Slta3 n. for $3225; Charolais, Buddy Howard,
Bul I Hefthree lots for $2125; Herefords, Flying CUSTOM CATTLE FEEDING
Breeding Age Bulls & Heifers P, 15 lots for $14,800; Hugh Tootin, Feed Florida Cattle in Florida
For Sale At All Times Anthony, 10 lots for $7125; E. W.
W. G. Talley Sr., Owner 904/787-3579 Davis Farms
James C. Richardson, Mgr. 904/787-3401 Cates, Sparr, six lots for $7125; Santa P.O. Box 97
P.O. Box 817, Leesburg, Fla. 32748 Gertrudis, Cannon & Folks, Dunnel- Balm, Fla. 33503
lon, one lot for 700. We Buy Feeder Cattle
Top price paid at the sale was $2100 Wayne Davis Phones
with H. E. Mills paying that amount for 610 Dal Drive Day 813/634-3344 a Brangus bull consigned by Bob Brandon, Fla. 33511 Night 813/689-5021
McLendon, Leary, Georgia. Other high BEEFMASTERS sellers were two Angus bulls going for [R
$1550 each, purchased by Becker Ranch SMITH RANCH
Mr. and Mrs. Mack Glass and Live Oak Stud, Ocala. The bulls SHORTHORNS
Mr. and Mrs. Horace Shumpert Rt. 4, Box 240 wrPolled and Horned
904/579-4641 Marianna, FL 32446 were consigned by Len Warren, Ocala Our herd is Federally Certified for Brucellosis (No.
and Graham Angus, Albany, Georgia; 400) & Accredited for T.B.
two Brahman bulls went for $1400 each Pauline N. Smith-Owner
and both purchased by Jones Brothers 813/293-2930 Winter Haven, Fla. 33880 Ranch and consigned by Wesley Ranch off SR 542 on Buckeye Rd. 3 miles N.E.
GENE Cowart, Seville, and Lester Stone,
THOMPSON Seville. Jones also purchased two Beef- Support your local county CowM masters, one for $1200 and $1100 with Belles Association.
BEEFMASTERS the consignments coming from Kanapaha Ranch, Gainesville. The high sell- RGSEE OLDSOTON
ing Hereford was purchased by C. H. Growthy-Rugged
P.O. Box 337 Cowart, Bunnell for $1575 and was con- TB & Bang's Certified Herd
McNeill, Mississippi .39457 signed by L. A. Teel, Asheboro, North Fully Acclimated for Southern Conditions
(601) 798-651)2 residence Carolina. PINEVIEW FARMS
Sale manager was Jimmy Glisson, Paul Raging, owner
e Ocala. Auctioneering chores were Route2 Ph:904/971-5417
handled by Morris Fannon, Penning- Madison, Florida 32340
(601) 798-1313 (Continued on Page 80) 1s east on u.s. 90
74 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




ZQ
e I. 4X!,
dim '94,




Activity is our new locals. Hardee president Nancy
Robertson reports that their county fair Florida CowBelles
on increase on November 10-15 went very well. Association
CowBelles and cattlemen manned the
for CowBelles food booth daily selling chili, hamburgers, and other snack foods. Also Affiliated with
PRESIDENT'S BY-LINES present for fair-goers was the mam- American National CowBelles
The quarterly board of director's meet- moth mechanical cow from Ralston Rt. 3, Box 710
ing was well attended. Many thanks to Purina.
Jackson County and Washington- On December 18, Collier CowBelles President
Holmes Cattlemen's Associations and had their Christmas social at the home Mrs. Tom Childs, Lake Placid their ladies for making this meeting a of Denise Cloeman. Husbands and 813/465-2020
success. The "Basket of Welcome" from friends were invited for dessert and cofMr. and Mrs. R. D. Bennett was lovely, fee. Special recognition was given Mrs. President Elect
Farm City Week reports are trickl- and Mrs. Don Lander for 30 years serv- Miss Jeannie Carpenter, Ft. Pierce ing in slowly. Cindy Zimmerman, ice as county agriculture agent. A handbroadcast production assistant, Florida made pine cone memory tree was pre- Vice President
Farm Bureau, reports that they used sented to Lander. A two pen bull desk Mrs. Ed Yarborough, Geneva part of an interview done at the Beef set and plaque was awarded Mrs. Festival on all of their radio shows that Lander who also became an honorary Recording Secretary
week. They did a news story on the CowBelle member. Deann Marks will Mrs. Hayward Simmons, Wimauma
event which was distributed to stations be leaving Collier County and has to and they also taped several of the resign her position as president. In Corresponding Secretary
demonstrations that are to be used on appreciation for her hard work she was Mrs. Mildred Price, Immokalee consumer shows, presented a plaque and a "boot and
November 16, St. Lucie CowBelles spur" necklace. Treasurer
hosted a barbecue luncheon with food Osceola CowBelles brought food Mrs. Mildred Sherrod, Immokalee
prepared by the CowBelles. Guest items and took donations for a needy
speaker was Lieutenant Colonel Robert family at their Christmas social held at J. Waterston, Deputy District Engineer the Lake Buena Vista Country Club. of the Jacksonville Corps of Engineers. Outstanding CowBelle Mrs. Mabel Sim- this survey found there was not enough Two hundred seventy-five were in mons McQuarrie was presented a rolled U.S. Good grade meat available
attendance. Betty Ann Scott took action plaque for her never-ending work and in large markets to make an accurate to have a farm city day proclamation devotion to CowBelles. comparison.
signed by the mayor and publicity was Pasco ladies had their Cattlemen's With the new year comes new memhandled by Judy Hamner. Sweetheart ride on a float in the local bers, Mrs. Mozelle Johnson of the Pasco
Collier CowBelles also had a Christmas parade. A bake sale was also CowBelles, and Dinah Adams from
barbecue in Naples on November 26, at held during the holidays. Baker, Florida.
the Lazy 11 Ranch. Those ladies serving December 6, Highlands County held Time is passing quickly and plans for were Edith Brown, Denise Coleman, their Christmas gathering in honor of the upcoming Region II meeting are Betty Jo Brown, Kaye Wise, Martha Mr. Edgar Stokes and Mr. Henry going well. Two full days of activities
Scofield, Deanna Marks, and Betty O'Neal. These men have helped with plus an evening of fun are in store for
Curry. nearly every CowBelle project and are all. Come join us if you can March 26,
The Brevard CowBelles were center "always willing to walk that extra mile." 27. Headquarters for this event is the stage giving half hour meat identifica- Wonderful food and company high- Holiday Inn, 1250 W. University tion demonstrations at the Merritt lighted the St. Lucie gathering. It was Avenue, P. 0. Box 1406, Gainesville, Square Mall November 14-15. Their dis- like coming home for me as St. Lucie Florida 32602. Telephone 904/376play booth had demonstrations on beef was the first local organization I had an 1661. Be sure and tell them you are with cookery, by-products board with tape opportunity to meet with after becom- CowBelles. on by-products, and a film and tape on ing a state officer three years ago. The Florida Home Economics Assonutrition. A dutch treat Christmas luncheon ciation Convention will be April 3-4 at
Thanksgiving for a needy family in with 15 Brevard CowBelles present was Tampa. Florida CowBelles will have a Riverview was made more memorable the beginning of a wonderful story. booth there and we would be delighted thanks to Hillsborough CowBelles, Cash donations from members totaling to have any CowBelle participate in this
donating canned goods, money and a $150.00, a $25.00 beef certificate, toys, event. $15.00 Beef Gift Certificate. and clothing were received. From there, Free loan audio visuals are availPasco CowBelles presented the Mary Lucas and Ruth Tucker shopped able from the FCA office. For a coinmayors of Dade City and Zephyrhills a for a family of eight. All the gifts were plete list contact Polly Golden, FCA beef roast in observance of farm city wrapped and presented to a needy fami- home economist. week signs telling of farm city were ly. "Agriculture. It's your heartbeat
made for the downtown area, news- The first Brevard County baby of the America!" This basic idea is the theme
papers ran articles, 30 second radio new year was presented a $10.00 beef for this year's Ag Day Celebration on spots were taped and announcements certificate, license plate, cookbook, Beef Thursday, March 19, 1981. By now each were sent to local churches, cutting board, Basics About Beef book, county should have received a packet of
Highlands County hosted the Flor- and a copy of all cook off recipes. materials and suggestions on how to ida Beef Festival in Sebring. Local news- Because of the many holiday invita- celebrate this nationally proclaimed papers carried articles telling of the tions to join with local CowBelles I have observance. Should you need further event for three straight weeks. On Mon- added greatly to my book of memories, information please contact Mary Lucas, day, November 17, a 15 minute radio Thank you all! 1370 Phyllis Drive, Merritt Island,
interview was made with state farm city Many thanks to CowBelles who 32952.
chairman Mrs. Elna Harris, festival par- responded to a last minute call to help in ticipant Norma Stokes and myself. The the meat survey done with Dr. A. Z. -Sarah K. Childs, President
week before local CowBelles served Palmer of the University of Florida. Florida CowBelles Association
barbecue beef sandwiches at the annual Comparisons were made to find the difSebring art league festival. ference in price between only rolled U.S.
How nice it is to hear from one of Good and U.S. Choice meat. Results of
76 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




Your dimes help to promote
BEEF--\
........ ..
at special
Beef Promotions ...
all over Flodlda
Please keep those dimes and quarters coming in.
Ask your local livestock market about deducting for the ...
FoiaBeef Council
"Promoting the product of one of Florida's leading industries." ..............P. 0. BuFlorida 32741
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 77




a feeders, from producers, for finishing in feedlots). Cow-calf operators, who produce beef calves, have been in a breakG reene's
even or loss position since last February.
Bar G Bar Ranch, Inc. at level And a lack of profits obviously reduces
retail the incentive and ability to expand basic
" Specializing in Retail beef prices this year are expected breeding herds.
to average about 10 percent higher than If the industry's cost-price squeeze
* BIMOUSIN in 1980, according to the National Cat- continues, NCA said, the current
" BRAHMOUSIN tlemen's Association. cyclical build-up in cattle numbers may
" ROMANOUSIN NCA said present indications are be slowed or halted. This would mean
at two Florida locations that most of the expected price increase less beef in future years than generally will occur in the spring, when meat pro- has been expected. North Fla. So. Florida auction will be decreasing seasonally.
Bill & Leah Kinner B. E. & Harlot Greene
Modison Flo. 4855 16th- s. Beef supplies and prices are expected to
904/973-4694 Vero Beach, Fla. be fairly stable during the remainder of Southeasterners head
305/562-2817 the year. marketing group
For 1981 in total, beef production
will increase slightly (about one per- A Tennessee marketman and his Florida
- cent), NCA said, and poultry output counterpart, along with others named,
Bar L H III also will rise. However, pork produc- head up Livestock Marketing AssociaLimousin tion will decrease, and total meat pro- tion, the Kansas City, Missouri, based
P duction in 1981 will be down slightly trade organization, for 1981. President
Purebred and Percentage calves
Commercial cattle and calves from 1980. The drop in pork supplies is Lemmy Wilson, Newport, Tennessee,
available now will contribute to the expected rise in and second vice president is John E.
Lance H. Ham & Family average beef as well as pork prices. Hawkins of Monticello.
Ph. 813/754-1731 It was pointed out that the nation's Wilson is owner-manager of Wilson
Rt. 9, Box 284, Plant City, FL 33566 basic inflation problem, affecting the Livestock Market in Newport and is prices of all goods and services, is also president of Lemmy Wilson LivePremier Limousin responsible for much of the recent and stock, Inc., an order buying firm.
Female 1978-79 expected increase in average meat Hawkins operates the Monticello
was exhibited by prices. Supply changes are not the only Livestock Market at Monticello and
OSBORNE cause, also has an auction market facility in
The average cattle price received by Camilla, Georgia.
CATTLE COMPANY cattle feeders this year has been slightly The pair were elected at LMA's
Maynard Osborne less than the 1979 average, but inflation annual meeting held at Hilton Head,
4760 5W 82nd Ave., Doye and rising costs of processing and dis- South Carolina, last month. Also
FL 33328 Ph: 305/434-5065elce wreFakD. irks
tribution have put upward pressure on elected were Franck D. Diercks, retail beef prices. Even so, the average Gordon, Nebraska, first vice president;
EMERY LIMOUSIN retail price increase for the year is only Ralph Swords, Hopkinsville, KenWhere performance counts five percent, or considerably less than tucky, treasurer, and Earl Britton,
the over-all inflation rate. Butte, Montana, secretary. The 20-man
Paul Emery A major reason for beef's not show- board of directors of the organization
Rt. 4, Box 255 Ir ing much price increase this year has were also installed at the meeting.
Quincy, Fla. 32351 been the total supply of meat. With anfirst
904/875-2529 A increase in pork production in par- vice president of the Florida Cattleticular, total per capita meat supplies men's Association, serves on the trade have been record large. While prices of group's health council. Limousin Cattle most food and other items continued to
Purebred & Percentage rise rapidly, Carlson said, meat prices
remained relatively favorable. Harris heads
He M Shirley Looking at the economic situation Highlands cattlemen
for the cattle industry, it was noted that
400 S. 18th St. Palatka, Fla. 32077 total cattle numbers have been at a Bert J. Harris, Lake Placid, heads the
Ph: 904/325-2525 cyclical low point for the past two years. Highlands County Cattlemen's Asso12. mi. north of Palatka near Bostwick Theoretically, at this point in the cattle ciation for the new year. Vice President cycle, cattlemen should be making good is Edgar Stokes of Lorida, and secreprofits. tary-treasurer is Aubrey Bone, Sebring.
A However, energy, interest, feed and Serving again as state director is Dan
W BAIR other costs have been rising even more Childs of Lake Placid.
SCUSTOM FITTERS than the general inflation rate. At the Directors at the county level are
Rick Williams, Owner same time, large total meat supplies, Bruce Blount, Lake Placid; Everett
16020 S.W. 20th Ave. Rd. inflation and a weak economy have Boney, Lorida; John Causey, Lake
- Ocala, Florida 32670 tended to hurt demand. The result has Placid; Jim Hendrie, Venus; Leonard
Fiingbeen a financial squeeze on cattlemen Godwin, Lake Placid; Sanford Hartt,
C Iate6 fo 425be iacilsueeo atee Avon Park, and Henry O'Neal, Sebring.
al t for the past year or more. This situation,
Show_ & al Brn10m .ofOclaon1-5it was pointed out, may delay or limit The inventory of hogs and pigs on Flor"Quality made for the Tropical Trade" future herd expansion. ida farms on December 1, 1980, was
A major problem at this time results estimated at 370,000 head, down 13 perSIMMONS from the 1980 drought, a smaller corn cent from last year, USDA says.
crop and a big increase in feed grain
LIMOUSINS prices. The higher feed costs, it was The U.S. inventory of hogs and pigs on
explained, have contributed to financial December 1, 1980, was 64.5 million Jim & Orie Simmons, owners losses for cattle feeders. That, in turn, head. That's down four percent below a
8697 W. ANTHONY RD. N.E. means weaker demand and lower prices year ago, but seven percent more than
OCALA, FLORIDA 32671 for feeder cattle (the cattle purchased by December 1, 1978.
78 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




Suse Rac W. S. Howrd Jr Laz Lake Lioui
R. L.6 aoM .& r.R le 6ar Jo no 6ioui
CM e Coprto Georg Fihr .EWre
Flin MC Rac J. W. Brw Bon Farms
Rocin E Lioui Rac Deni HetnJ A. vn Dou Sanford
CHALEMGN We 6 oudn' of6 ths gra so of 6o. inth 6h an 7t cetre Charle mane als knw as Chre
th e : Of Lioui is1 calves in ou sae 6taea thi her mae b $53 per6 head Th feae bre to Chre an sol fo 6 an
$1100 in th 2 or ad2
miue it too to complete




Adams Limousin Ocala sale
of North Florida (Continuedfrom Page 74)
Home of: ton Gap, Virginia, and Carroll Cannon,
Purebred Prince E. G. Jaudon 007-H Macon, Georgia. Clerking duties were
Lim ousin Bulls George E. Adams and Family handled by Mills Auction Market,
P.O. Drawer J, 15th St. N.W. Ocala.
* Big, Rugged, Raised in the Southeast Lawtey, FL 32058 Buyers at the sale, by breed, with
Registration and Health Papers furnished Phone: 904-782-3758 number of bulls purchased shown in
* GUARANTEED BREEDERS
Herd is U.S. Certified TB and Bangs Free parentheses if more than one, and
To see what you can expect from Limousin & Commercial Cattle amount spent shown, follow:
these bulls, you are welcome to see ANGUS: Becker Ranch (3) $4000; Live Oak Plantation
their fathers, mothers, brothers and Harloff Farms $1300; w. B. Copeland $1300; BraMa Ranch $1100; Castro
Farms $775; L. L. Hiers Jr., (2) $1775; Batten & Batten sisters at our farm. 6809 11th Ave., West $775; Curtis Hutchinson $800; Flying Bar C (2) $1650;
Williams Brothers St 100; Williamson Cattle Company (8) Bradenton, FL 33505 $9725; Bill Baker $1350; Box Ranch $1275; Live Oak Stud
Top O'The Hill Farm Phone 813/792-7299 $1550; Kennedy Farms $1400; Wi. Roberts (4) $5057;
912/263-7026 RHODES FROST Mobile 813/748-8668 Chancellor Farms $1025; W. B:Copeland $1350; Langford
U.S. 84, Quitman, Ga. 31643 Units 745-764 Farms $825;
_ BRANGUS: Cannon & Folks $1600; Ned Folks (2)
$2525; Patty Heinold $1600; H. E. Mills (2) $3700; BRAHMAN: Lester Lufman $600; C. H. Cowart $625; Charles Cowart $1300; Jones Brothers (4) $5150; BEEF. .... CA = Co hareMASTER: Ned Folks (4) $3800; Jones Brothers (3) $3225; J.
Coleman Haddox $1000; Patty Heinold (2) $1625; CHAROLAIS:
Armeda Farm $725; Preston Wise $825; Patty Heinold $750; ForQualiySale C. H. Cowart $700; Buddy Howard (3) $2125; Ned Folks
Herd-Sre 1979-80 Premier uil Management Service, inc. $925;
500 E Westfield Road HEREFORDS: H Ranch (3) $3275; Pete Cirraco $950;
0 CharlottesvIle. Virgi,. 22901 Drew Scott $1700; C. H. Cowart (7) $6675; Larry Studstill
Ph. 813.763-310-PQ. Box 636 Ph 804,973 4346 $1350; S. W. Cates, Jr., (6) $7125; Bill Baker $750;
Oeecoeegh 2862423 Chapman & Lewis (2) $1325; Adobe Cattle Company (2)
Sale Management $2250; Flying P Ranch (15) $14,800; A. A. Roller (3) $3035; Private Treaty Listings Ale Ranch (3) $3325; Rainbow River Ranch (2) $2500; Sale Facility Rental Hubert Waldron $1400; Patty Heinold $925; Billy Adams (4) $6725; Ned Folks (2) $1550; Peters Farm $1000; Jones Brothers (2) $2600; ABC Farms $1525; Simmons & Davis, $1375; Cecil Whaley (2) $2450; Williams Brothers $1025; GINGERBRED FARM Charles Co..t (8) $6925; Dale Aikens (2) $2050; Batten &
"-Charles CaBatten (5) $3825; Carl Perry, Sr., $1100; B & G Ranch (2) 1979-80 Premier Limousin Female $1750; Larry Lindsey $700; Hugh Tootin (10) $7125;
Langford Farm $575; Darrell Nichols $1150; Becker Ranch Breeding Limousin Since 1970 (2) $1900; L. L. Hiers, Jr., $1175; Singletary Farms $650;
Herdducks Ranch $775; Emery Mills $550; Ramsey Stock Limousin Cattle For Sale W. E. & Joenell Webb Farm (2) $1375; Robert Williams $1400; BraMar $1125;
Art Schrader & Sons Box 387, Rt. 15 James Young (2) $1700; D&G Cattle Company $725;
San Antonio, FL 33576 Maxville, Fl. 32234 Armeda Farm (3) $2750; Robert Barnett (2) $1425; Roy
904/588-3321 904/289-7159 Story $925; Bill Marion $675; SANTA GERTRUDIS:
Cannon & Folks $700; J. Haddox $575.
FLORIDA Decrease noted in
LIMOUSINE ASSOCIATION retail beef prices
invites you to check with the Limousin breeders in this section for more Retail beef prices in early January were information on the "Carcass Breed.' Or, write us for free literature and down from a month earlier, the information on becoming a member. National Cattlemen's Association has
P. 0). Box 636, Okeechobee, Fla. 33472 reported.
-L__.O._Box___6,_Okee_ hobee,_Fa.____72 The association's 19-city survey of
supermarkets showed that the national average price of five beef cuts on January 8 was $2.39 per pound, comi Pared with $2.42 on December 11.
Production of beef and other meat
Contact any of our fieldmen IN ttle i ais has continued large in recent weeks and
for full details. -( ,TAND LIVESTOCK JOURNAL that is a principal reason for lower
average wholesale and retail beef prices, Kissimmee, Fla. 32741 it was noted.
A spokesman said that retail beef
prices have been declining or only holdL ing steady for the past several months. Limousine lub Calf Sale The NCA retail average for January was
the lowest since last May, and it was even lower than the year-ago average.
"Beef prices continue to lag behind
Saturday, July 11 the general inflation rate," the spokesman said. "Unlike the prices of most
Lake City, FL things we buy, beef prices go down as
well as up with changes in meat supplies. And most of the time in recent For Information months, beef prices have tended to go
Contact: down."
NCA's five-cut average price
Carl Story Maynard Osborne decreased during the past month in 11
ities, increased in six and was
904/755-3910 or 305/4345065 unchanged in two.
80 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




The
LIMOUSIN
BU LL PROVIDER OF MANY
vuLL BEEF EXTRAS!
He has captured the interest
of cattlemen throughout
the Southandl!
. and members of this organization
are geared to help you find one!
SOUTIIASTM 1111101181111
SOUTHEASTERN MEMBERSHIP S = O
OFFICERS ALABAMA Quercus Farms, Inc. Be Bris Rol Lines James T. Crandal
President Dr. G. S. Killian Rt. 1 Twin0disan RL 2,BO xSS RL, ox225
P. 0. Bo) 5"1 ZLXBX 2MiloFa257 JOHN SPIVEY P. 0. Box576 Gay, Ga. 30218 P. 0. 503 inlel NC. 28092 Milton, a. 32570
Fort Payne, Ala. 35967 404/538-6303 Monroe, G 30655 704J5-8249 094-6949
McDonough, Ga. 205/84-0624 Bob Williams 404 9 Al Smith MISSISSIPPI
Vice President w. c Tinsle, Jr Twin Hills Farm Clay Tnsley 610 Ci Lane H. M. Jordan
ARLEN EUBANKS P.'0.Box 150 1060 N. Jamestown RFO#1 Cay1 511 1411 Jode St.
ARLN EBANS P 0.Box160141 11 MlSt
Edison, Ga. LaFayette Ala. 36862 Rd. Resaca. 3 Clevel Miss. 38732
205/864-9466 Decatur, Ga. 30033 404629-1148
Secret Huey P. Long 404/634-1234 o 60143-5549
CA Rt8 4 Box 2 Rockin E. LimousinR McQueen Limousin Hale Farms, Inc.
MICHA E.~paa o Aimusn Moiuoe PO.3Bx0 sae O Huh H. Haraison, Ill
KEATHLYelka, Ala. 368 Aen Tim Eubanks 4 3 15 P. 0. B 129 P.. Box 117
Albertson, N.C. Four T Acres Edison, Ga. 31746 Emory C. Durham Farm 32034ia Beac, Ba. 6 9 02
Treasurer Rt. 4, Box 474 912/835-25o RL Box 142 904/261-9746 Thomas J. McAdory
GEORGE Pell City, Ala. 35125 Top O'The Hill Farm Bluffton, Ga. 31724
OR 205/338-2791 Rt. 4, Box 343 912/723-4419 0. Doewrxl 642 F o xMiss. 322-74
COCOROS Thomasville Rd. 6Ke-La Acres Ft. Walton Beach, Fla. 601/625-7717
Gaffney, S.C. Dr. David Hall Quitman, Ga. 31643 J. W. Durham 3549
1327 Loftin Dr. 912/263-7026 Rt. 2, Box 139 9o4 651-0939 VIRGINIA
DIRECTORS Auburn, Ala. 36830 Robert J. Dwyer Bluffton, Ga. 31724 Ja S Worrell Land & Cattle
Auburn BATE. 2568 30784 James C. ShiverGo
BOBBY BATES 205/887-7384 Rt. 2, Box 308B 912/723-4419 Rt. 1, Box 234Co. B 5386
Centerville, Tenn. Charlie F. Horne Monroe Ga. 30655 A. G. Lee Jr R 1, Box2 P. 0. Box 5386
Rt. 1, Box 135A 404/267-6070 P. 0. Box 413 M .0 Charlottesville, Va.
VERLYN DENNEY Salem, Ala. 36874 1580
Barwick, Ga. 205/749-0414 Otis Milner Alma, Ga. 31510 22905
Bluff Farms 912/632-7739; 632- Freeman Cattle Co. 804977-6803
H. H. HARASON, III KENTUCKY 804 Charlton Rd. 5412 P. 0. Box 636
Forest, Miss. J W Cole Rome, Ga. 30161 Okeechobee, Fla. SOUTH CAROLINA
CARL JOHNSON Bourbon Cattle Co. 404/232-3019 TENNESSEE 33472 R. F. Hipp
Haines City, Fla. P.O0 Box 408 John Spivey HOLS Limousin 813/763-3610 Rt. 2, Box 258
LAN 0NS 408o361 i yon Rt. 2, Box 299 Adams Limousin Saluda, S.C. 29138
ROLLAN JONES Paris, Ky. 40361 CMC Corporation Centerville, Tenn. Ranch 8031445-7095
Denver, N.C. 606/299-7070 P. 0. Box 716 37033 6114 Ricker Rd. Geore Cocoros
H. M. JORDAN Coffey Lane
West, Miss. GEORGIA McDonough, Ga.30253 615/729-4303 Jacksonville, Fla. 107 Greenbriar Dr.
MAYNARD OSBORNE W. K. Stringer 404/957-2681; 471- Billy1 J. Henshaw 32210 Gaffney, S.C. 29340
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. Tuxedo Farms 2219 Rt. 1 904/771-8769 803/489-8696
P. 0. Box 49502 Milandi Farms L nchburg, Tenn. H. M. Shirley M. C. Walker
LEON SMITH Atlanta, Ga. 30359 And Miller 37352 400 S. 18th St. Rt. 1 Walker Rd.
Centerville, Tenn. 404/939-9363; 325- Rt. 615/759-7103 Palatka Fla. 32077 Anderson S.C. 29621
R. C. (Hap) TINSLEY 9009 Donalsonville, Ga. The Double B 904/325-2525 803/224-0208
Pell City, Ala. W. L. Murray 31745 151 West Swan Osborne Cattle Co. Robert H. Blanton
W. C. TINSLEY 320 Mayfield Dr. 912/524-5780 Centerville, Tenn. 4760 SW 82nd Ave. Rt. 7, Box 473
LaFayette, Ala. Monroe, Ga. 30655 R. E. Youngblood 37033 Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Gaffney S.C. 29340
M C WALKER 404/267-2125 615/729-5117 33314 803/489-6213
M. C. WALKER 4/2-1 305434-506
Anderson, S.C. Verlyn Denney Ashburn, Ga. 31714 Jim Stark 305/434-5065 Ralph Davis
Lazy Lakes 912/567-4044 Rt. 3 Frank Chaplin Rt. 3, Box 391B
P. 0. Box 189 Retus Iddins Newbern, Tenn. 38059 Running CH Farm Pelzer, S.C. 29669
Barwick, Ga. 31720 Rt.1, Box 244 901/643-6287 3333 SW 130th Ave. 803/243-3178
912/735-4495; 735- Reldsville Ga 30453 NORTH CAROLINA Fort Lauderdale, Fla. James R. Hurt
3350 912/557-4247 33330 Rt. 4
as ,Jr 91255-447Michael A. Keathley 305472-3334 Saluda, S.C. 29138
Thomas Ripley, Jr. Seal Durrence Rt. 1, Box 97 Saluda S.C. 29138
340 Chaffin Rd. e ie a 30453 bsn 28508 Arnold Lumber Co. 803/445-2739
O^.W ~ Reisvll Ga 30453I I I. U Alberson N.U C tOJ 280 P. 0. 15
Roswell, Ga. 30 912/G 0516 919/658-397 P 0. 1
404/992-9024 Caryville, Fla. 32427
Contact These Neighbors Of Yours ... For BULLS, And
More Information On This Exciting Breed Of Cattle!
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 81




Bee se in r can be used to predict the performance
Beefsemiarsof bulls, and gave some examples of how ~'rn~uto take advantage of heritability for oRE c ver otalimproving production.
Smanagement3 A plan to sell cull cows at the
%Isherd ma a e e optimum market times was discussed by
"Total herd management" was the Jim Simpson, extension livestock marI.,Il theme for the Beef Cattle Management keting economist at the University. He and Herd Health Seminars that were also predicted that inflation will curb
held in Florida during December and the demand for beef over the next six The best January. months, with interest rates staying at 18
crossbreeding The seminars were sponsored by the to 23 percent.
University of Florida's IFAS and Flor- John Holt, extension farm manageprog rams start with ida Cooperative Extension Service. The ment economist, gave some budget
seminar held at the Marion County figures for a 25 head beef operation
A ~ Agricultural Center, Ocala, on January research report, and concluded that
B R AM H M A N S 6, was covered by The Cattleman. highly improved pasture production for
Seminars held at Orlando, LaBelle, beef operations is unlikely to make a
and keep building Sebring, Palmetto, Chipley, and Live profit at current on-farm beef prices.
on he ree 'sOak, covered the same material, and Bob Mason, DVM, rural animal
on he ree exceptt for minor differences, included medicine specialist at the University's
superior traits. the same personnel. College of Veterinary Medicine, covered
Dr. Gene Cope, extension vet- herd vaccination pointing out the
When it comes to eiaanfor beef cattle,. was in importance of continued surveillance
charge ofthe programs, and Edsel and diagnosis before initiating vaccrossbreeding, Rowan, agricultural extension director cination programs. He stressed the
for Marion County, served as emcee at importance of keeping vaccines properly Brahman blood goes the Ocala meeting. mixed when using, following label direcon and on and on ... Bob Sand, extension livestock tions, and keeping all material clean.
specialist with the University, opened Cope was last speaker, discussing write for more information the Ocala program with a talk on select- herd health reproduction. He said
ing herd sires. He said a rancher must reproduction is the most important part BRAHMAN have a "planned breeding program and of any beef program. Producing early
7Aern ASSOCIATION a goal in order to select animals to help calves is of major importance also. Cope
reach that goal." Bull selection should pointed out that calves born early in the Don err, Screarybe based on improving current progeny, season are not only older but have a betKISMEFLRD. 24 according to Sand. He stressed the ter average daily gain than late calves.
importance of selecting bulls that have Speaking of poor calf crops, Cope 1 been raised in a similar environment to said inadequate nutrition is the single the one in which they will be expected to most important management reason for perform. it. He also covered breeding and managSand outlined the ways that per- ing heifers, and artificial insemination in
iW H 6 uar Ra chInc1 formance and production information beef herds.
4R 4R
JFARMSPERFORMANCE
Jimmy Register
Rit. 2, Graceville, FL 32440
Off ice 904/263-6514 Home 904/263-6895
4R 4R
Gentle Red Brahmans
Peace Valley ... ..
Ranch
We Invite you to Inspect the largest Red Brahman Herd In the
Southeast.
E. D. Rogers, Owner .
Route 1, Box 97
Zolfo Springs, Fla. 33890 BULL SALES ACROSS THE STATE have been steady the past several months. The
Ph: 813/735-5561 scene here was taken at the annual Bull Sale at the Chipley Livestock Market, Chipley,
where 129 bulls representing a number of breeds sold to average $1325. Owner E. D. Located 9 mi. east of Zolfo Springs "Buddy" Neel handled the auctioneering chores. Neel is first vice president of the Florida
on State Road 66 Cattlemen's Association.
82 /THE FLORIDA CATiTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




Field labs
at one-third
mark in program
One third of the planned 29 field laboratories to be used in Florida's acceldisease brucellosis are now open and
helping to test blood samples in record Doyle Conner has announced.
The nine on-line facilities are in operation from Jackson County in the Panhandle to Broward County on the 2 year old
Lower East Coast, Dr. C. L. Campbell, director of the division of animal industry, announced.B u l
"A few others should be on-line by
the first of the year," Campbell said, "and nearly all of the field labs will be in operation by the time seasonal testingPu e r d B h n nL n us ,
intensifies in the spring."Pu e r d B a m n Li o s ,
"Testing has already accelerated
dramatically" since the acceleratedan r h o s .
program officially got underway on October 1, Conner said, and "the field labs are going to enable us to continue R n i g C a c
accelerating at a high rate as the testing R n i g C a c
program sweeps from ranch to ranch." Flrd
The program is designed to elimi- Davie,Flrd
nate the highly contagious and incurable cattle disease that causes abortion, Call:
weak calves, impaired breeding and reduced milk yields, and has cost the Frank Chaplin Quinn Tindall
Florida producers untold millions of 305/472-3334 305/473-0368
dollars in lost revenue over the years. -______________________________________Data from test records processed in
the state/federal laboratory in Jacksonville indicates testing increased 40 per- Quality Brahmans Gentle, Gray Brahmans
cent over the previous year during the fl ~ ~D. T. Davis Ranch
October-November 1980 period. The fl jl j l1 .DoanDreeDviO es
lab how tha a ecor 18,830hea ofRt. 1, Box 130, Zolfo Springs, FL cattle were brucellosis tested in October P. 0. Box 345, Dade City, Fla. 33525 33890
and 128,312 tested in November. That 904/588-3713 (Home) Telephone 813/735-0537
compares with 108,889 in October of 904/567-6767 (Office) Home: 813/735-1038
1979 and 112,480 in November of 1979. _______________"We anticipate those numbers of
cattle tested will increase even more dra- "Top Testing Bra hmans" ry ~ Gentle,
matically as we bring more people on G.A. TUCKER & SONS RO Gray Brahmans R
board in the on-going hiring process," You'll Be Satisfied R n l .O k e
Campbell said. "We have been autho- R n l .O ke
rized to hire 30 livestock inspectors in With Tucker Bra hmans 1330 W. Clinton Ave., Dade City, Fla.
the last month as we further gear up for Rt. 1, Box 1340 33525
more testing." Cocoa, Fla. 32922 Iy 904/567-2219 (Home) R
The field labs are under the super- 305/636-2390 305/636-684090/6-51(fie
vision of George Contos, director of the state/federal lab in Jacksonville. Genl Grey Brahmans
The system of satellite laboratories is For Registered Red Brahmans in the
designed to provide quick but still so- Double CB rR nhWiregrass
phisticated testing service for pro- Rgsed ComrilGrace Brothers Farm
ducers, who would otherwise be RtCaot30tewolel. 65
reqird o aitdas efre eanig heJames C. CamnWallace & Larry Grace, Owners results of lab tests conducted on their Ph 019-47Phones (205) 692-3223, 692-3536,
cattle's blood samples in the main lab in P. 0.Bx15S.CodFl326 692-5679
Jacksonville.
Currently field labs are in operation
at Davie in Broward County, at Lake PUREBRED BRAHMANS Rgsee rhtnCtl
City in Columbia County, at Moore eitrdBamnCtl
Haven in Glades County, at Palatka in I.
Putnam County, at Fort Pierce in St. IJS U R
Lucie County, at Bushnell in Sumter J. K.STUia3A2RTK
County, at Monticello in Jefferson Rue1Boc1 305/636-396
County, at Marianna in Jackson County featuring more flesh. stronger bone, BARTOW FLORIDA 33830
and at Deland in Volusia County. larger size, with gentle disposition
Most of the satellite labs eventually
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 83




will be located in the south-central part
of the state, where they will be closer to
the larger concentrations of cattle and C W1
where the higher rate of infection is F Modern Grey Brahman
CAJUNSl' found.,ZW and Brahmousin
CnJUNSn foun. 'Boyce H. Blackmon, owner
Spending cutbacks Rt. 2 Box 332X, Sarasota, FL 33582
CATTLE SERVICE will increase burdens 813/371-6462 or 371-6591
FLORIDA DIVISION Federal and state spending cutbacks will
increase the burdens on the livestock Gray & Red Brahmans
industry, already hit by inflation, and
Carl & Jo Lynn Story hinder effectiveness of disease control or l A Y' h
elimination programs, the new presi- Cresonv 0 Ranch
Rt. 3, Box 192B dent of the U.S. Animal Health AssoLake City, FL 32055 ciation said. Dr. A- E. WholeRd Rt, Wholex2
Phone: 904/755-3910 Dr. Lowell Hinchman, Indiana State Kissimmee, FL 32741 St. Cloud, FL 32769
Veterinarian, delivered his remarks to 305/847-3871 (Off.) 3051892-4092 the 1000 member organization at their
TUCKER'S 84th annual meeting November 2-7 in Gentile Brahmans that Perform
T C Louisville, Kentucky. The USAHA met
____ jointly with the American Association SALT BRANCH
ITJ of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosti- RANCH
cans.
Registered Brahmans The USAHA represents state and Harold and Sue Griffin
Mrs. L. M. Tucker federal animal health officials, Rt. 1, Box 103, Bunnell, FL 32010
Route 5 Box 221
Tifton, GA 32794 Van Tucker Scott Tucker veterinarians, livestock producers and Phone 904/437-2334
912/533-4681 912/532-6585 912/533-7811 several foreign countries. Located halfway between Bunnell & Palatka on Hwy. 100
Hinchman said inflation had hit not
G. T. STACK & SONS only federal, state and local govern- Brahman Cattle
ments, but also the livestock industry
REGISTERED BRAHMANS and agribusiness. International
Suite 406-A 9225 Bay Plaza Blvd. "The livestock industry will
Tampa, Florida 33619 inadvertently bear the brunt of reduced Ranch
services in many areas of disease control
Telephones: Off. 813/621-2117 at a time when such services are vital to P. 0. Box 821
Home 813/689-3920 teClewiston, FL 33440
the maintenance of disease programs," Ph: 813/983-7773 (Off.)
he said.
Hinchman continued:
Registered Brahmans "It concerns me that the livestock
"Red & Gray" research grants, laboratory DIAMOND
Daughtry Brothers support and personnel support are being
reduced when government excess and Red & Speckled Brahmans
Jay& Mike Daughtey, Oswns
Rt. 2, Box 388, Wauchula, FL 33873 controls on meat products are being
Phone 813/773-9285 promoted in the name of consumer P. 0. Box 836
"Young ovwners breeding for the future" protection. WAUC HULA, FLORIDA 33873
"The U.S. Department of Agri- Ph: 813/773-9450
culture continues to serve in the best
Registered Grey Brahmans interests of the livestock industry and
McGuire, Inc. the consumer, but adequate disease con- CHI
"Where Gentleness Is A Basic" trol programs depend on good state- owek
federal relations. We must work to con- anih
Hugh & Jon McGuire, owners tinue necessary control programs
3612 16th Ave. E. despite these cutbacks in fiscal support. Registered Brahmans
813/722-7586 or 748-0151 "I believe we have the inherent
Palmetto, Fla. 33561 ability to solve our problems with justice 1245 Orange Ave., Winter Park, Fa. 32789
and fairness to all in the prevention, Tel 305/644-8136, Home 896-25
control, and eradication of all conS. L. WATERS & SONS tagious and infectious diseases, and to Quality
Registered Brahmans develop a greater union, composed of a Registered Brahmans
galaxy of health states, each working for
RA I~1 C Hall, and all for each." Visitors Welcome By Appointment
8345 Alturas Rd., Bartow, FL 32830 Hinchman emphasized that the
Ranch 813/537-2167 USAHA would continue using its "key LENN SUMNER RANCH
Home 813/537-2147 man" network of 50 state veterinarians, 813/689-7421
Home 813/533-6415 28 committee chairmen, and repre- 1507 So. Valrico Rd., Valrico FL 33594
sentatives from affiliated groups and
foreign countries to keep the lines open "SOMETHING TO SHOW" Red and Gray Brahmnans so livestock health interests would be
informed and protected. You are invited to Inspect our
HALES FARMS, INC. production for Genetic Consistency
Richard and Freeman Hales, Owners MARSTON RANCH
P. 0. Box 1395 Ph. 813/763-7387 Support your local county Cow- 3508Ft. KngHwy.
OKEECHOBEE, FLORIDA 33472 Belles Association. Zephyrhills, Fla. 33599
Cable "MARTURK"
84 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY .1981




PERFORMANCE
Who needs it?
You need it!
All cattlemen, no matter how large or small, must get some kind of performance from the herd. Without performance there would be no results. The kind and degree of performance and production within a herd is what counts.
The April, 1981, issue of The Florida Cattleman will be devoted to taking a practical look at herd production and performance, and how a commercial cattleman can use proven performance techniques to increase profits and herd quality.
If you have performance proven seed stock available, get your message to the commercial cattle industry of Florida through the April issue of The Florida Cattleman. You'll get the added impact of this special issue which will focus on performance.
Call one of our representatives to reserve space. We'll be happy to help with copy and layout. Deadline is March 5. In Florida call toll free: 800/432-9192. Out of state call: 305/846-2800.
April is
Performance
issue
in
jWloelda
; e
" attleman.
AND LIVESTOCK JOURNAL "
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 85




POLLED HEREFORD BULLS FIATC slates
BRAHMAN BULLS Registered and Commercial Brahmans
CHAROLAIS BULLS 11th annual
owROLLINS 1 i an u lC. H. Beville
RONS trade show
.... :RANCH
The 1lth Annual Florida International Telephone 904/793-2081
Rt. 2. Box 1250, Okeechobee, Fla. 33472 Agribusiness Trade Show will be held BUSH N ELL,FLORIDA 33513
Phone: 813/763-2410 May 14-15, 1981 at the Florida State I
Fairgrounds in Tampa. The event has
BRHMN acquired the reputation as the most
DIAHMAN$ important trade show in the state, Exceptional Brahmans
spokesmen say.
W alker Farm s Visitors to past shows have been Santa Barbara Ranch
treated to a wide array of livestock and
Andy Word 904/796-9767 farm machinery exhibits that were dis- P. 0. Box 821
Route 2, Box 28 Clewiston, Florida 33440
Brooksville, FL 33512 played by Florda and national firms. 813/983-7773 (Office)
Florida Agriculture Commissioner
Doyle Conner has issued a blanket
invitation to agribusiness repreGentle, Quality sentatives from the Caribbean, Central w
BRAHMAN CATTLE and South America to join with him Lazy _9!q_ Ranch
in attending this year's show. Conner has Registered Brahmans
Rocking S Ranch made several trips to many areas in and Quarter Horses
P.O. Box 935, Wauchula, FL 33873 Latin America and anticipates renew- Joe & Jeanette Barthle
Marcus Shackeiford L M Shackeiford ing past acquaintances as well as estab- -.O. Box 6
813/773-4616 813/773.9133 lishing new friendships while at the San Antonio, Fla. 33576
show. Phone 904/588-3716
The trade show will again be sponHEART BAR RANCH scored by Conner's state agriculture
Still producing top quality department in conjunction with the REGISTERED BRAHMANS
Florida International Agricultural
BRAHMANS Trade Council (FIATC). Longtime
FIATC president, B. Edmund David, Jame W carborq h
Henry 0. Martin & Sons Winter Haven, expects a record-shat- P.0. Box 1373
tering crowd both in terms of numbers P .Bx17
KISSIMMEE, FLORIDA 32741 Wauchula, FL 33873
Phone 305/846-2168 of exhibitors and visitors. 813/735-0391
David explained that, more than /
anything else, it is "good, old-fashioned
Quality Registered Brahmans Florida hospitality that keeps old and BRAHMANS
LIVE OAK PLANTATION new friends alike coming to this annual
trade show." He added, "Our visitors
Ocala, Florida always seem pleased with what they see Circle JD Ranch
John King, herdsman 904/237-2863 when they get here. Yet it has been my Dee Wallace, Owner
office 904/237-3401 impression that this show's greatest sell- Ph: 305/683-2939
ing point has been the honesty, integrity 400 J. F. Kennedy Memorial Blvd. On SR 40, Five miles W. of 1-75 and friendliness of the exhibitors." West Palm Beach, FL 33406
Visitors can expect to get a close-up
view of the latest in farm machinery and
r Lm equipment. Actual demonstrations of Chapman & Collier
much of this machinery and equipment Re istered Brahman Cattle
are also planned. Certified & Accredited for TB & Bangs
Brahman Cattle A varied assortment of high quality
dairy and beef cattle, horses, swine, Manse & Imperator Breeding
Rt. 5, Mt. Pleasant, Texas 75455 poultry, goats and rabbits will also be A. R. Chapman and Wayne Collier, owners
Monty Banks, Manager on display. Information booths repre- Ph. 813/773-9528 or 813/773-3161
214/572-7668 senting breed associations, artificial Route 2, Box 218, Wauchula, Fla. 33873
insemination organizations and other
groups (as well as a special booth with Registered & Commercial Brahman Cattle Prom t Bbilingual technicians) will be manned by KABAR RANCH
everyday people ready to answer any and all ques- HA.. Kennedy & Sons
evr dy tions. Western wear and equipment will also be on sale. 13503 Ranch Rd.
Jacksonville, Fla. 32218
Support Your The show is preceded by the 15th PH: 904/757-3643
annual Latin American Livestock and Corner of 1-95 and entrance of Jacksonville
Florida Beef Council Poultry Conference at the University of International Airport.
Florida, Gainesville, beginning May 10.
SNHN SAES R Commercial red meat production for Bohu Da i
UNSHINE STATE STEERS, INC. the U.S. during November, 1980, BobbuiI'
totaled 3.10 billion pounds, down six custom Fitters
Breeders of Registered Brahmans percent from the year before, according 0 "Custom Fitters"
J. Mike Leonard, Mgr. [ to USDA. Show & Sale Consultant
. Box157 r 0 Herd Consultant & Management
Bo 17 Contract & Special Hauling [
Loxahatchee, Fla. 33470 a 305/793-2428 Join your local county Cattlemen's 803/3487802 Rt. 4, Abbvll, S.C 29620 \6 /T FLORIDAssociation. 8ATTLEMAN / 4, 19S1
86 / THE FLORIDA CATT'LEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




Eastrn G ma g ass Cattle will graze it and nothing else.
Gama grass yields of 150,000 to
needsmore250,000 pounds of green grass per acre
needs morewere produced in Alabama. This equals a
recog ition15 to 25 tons of dry matter. In 1975 irrigated Gama grass yielded 10 tons of dry
One species of native grass widely dis- matter per acre from four cuttings at tributed in Florida is urgently in need of Woodward, Oklahoma. This was some recognition. double the production obtained from
Eastern Gama Grass, (Tripsacum many perennial grasses grown under
Dactyloides), occurs in nearly every irrigation at that location. county in Florida and especially Preliminary dry matter digestibility
adapted to the more moist and fertile of 35-day-old Gama grass forage was 60 soils. The species occurs in at least 26 percent compared to 47 percent for states in the eastern half of the U.S., Midland Bermuda grass and 64 percent W 'ecm e u ie
south through Mexico, Central America for alfalfa.Wev co bd urf s
and West Indies, Florida researchers The high quality and yields of Gama and discovered..
say. grass could benefit many farmers and 1.FdotpearsiFlra
A warm season perennial, the grass stockmen in the spring and summer anFdotostatr The Florida
grows from five to nine feet in height. Its months.anou-fsterdThFlia major growth occurs in early spring and Researchers at the Woodward Great Cattleman regularly and will be
stays green until late fall or frost if mois- Plains Field Experiment Station at quick to see your ad mentioning ture is available. The grass produces Woodward, Oklahoma, has over 800 feeder steers for sale.
seed from July to September. accessions of Eastern Gama grass being
Many consider Eastern Gama grass grown; one of which is from Highlands 2 o ilawy elfrmr
to be the most fascinating species of wild County. 2 o ilawy elfrmr
grasses since it is closely related to Is research on Eastern Gama grass money if you have several
Indian corn or maize. Early settlers needed in Florida? It would seem very interested buyers. Give us the found this grass in almost pure stands advisable. If fertilizer is needed to facts-we'll help with layout. covering thousands of acres, produce forage and irrigation is already Write or call
Eastern Gama grass is a choice hay available, why not devote this expense
plant and if needed, may be managed to a perennial grass that will produce The Florida for hay production. It is readily grazed yields as those experienced elsewhere? ~- m ~
by all livestock during the spring and CATTUELEMVANI
summer months. If grazing pressure is
not properly managed, the Gama grass Join your local county Cattlemen's P. 0. Box 1403 305/846-2800
will be grazed out. (True of all grasses!) Association. KISSIMMEE, FLA. 32741
STILL PRODUCING cRLS & BRAHMAN CATTLE
THE FLORIDA CATlTLEMAN /FEBRUARY 1981 /87




Gray reports there will be both bulls
SGBI slates and females consigned to the sale
coming from some of the noted Santa
GERTRUDIS annual meeting Gertrudis herds in the country.
STAGE COACH RANCH in Florida
Dade City. Florida The annual meeting of Santa Gertrudis Value of U.S.
Breeders International, Kingsville, farm assets up ROBERT SANDERS, Mgr. Texas, is slated to be held at Walt
P. 0. Box 421 Ph: 904/588-3711 Disney World, March 5-7. Several of the The value of U.S. farm assets is seen at a
904/567-7040 functions will be sponsored by the record high, but the increase is smaller
Florida Santa Gertrudis Association than in recent years, according to a including the "Florida Festival Sale" recent USDA Economics and Statistics which will be held at 2:00 p.m., Friday, Service report. March 6. The report, Agricultural Finance
Most of the events will take place in Outlook, says the value of farm assets as Center which is a part of the Disney billion. That's a record high, up 8.8 percomplex. Registration and committee cent and $80.4 billion from a year 4 SA meetings will be held on Tuesday, earlier. But, it's the smallest annual
March 5 beginning at 8:00 a.m. That dollar and percentage gain since 1977. JULIA M. PITTMAN evening a cocktail cruise on Bay Lake Farm assets had increased 14.1 perwill be hosted by the Florida associa- cent and nearly $107 billion in 1978 and tion beginning at 7:00 p.m. 14.5 percent and $113.5 billion in 1979,
Committee meetings will be held the report notes. C & S Ranch starting at 8:00 a.m., Friday, March 6 As in other years, the increase in the
with luncheon at 12:30 p.m. The Flor- value of farm real estate accounted for Registered Santa Gertrudis ida sale will follow at 2:00 p.m. at the most of the boost.
Carl & Betty Stevens conference center.
Ph: 904/489-4274 On Friday evening at 7:30 p.m. there
P. 0. Box 730, Dunnellon, FL 32630 will be a barbecue dinner and entertain- McMillion heads I ment at Pioneer Hall, Fort Wilderness in the Disney area. Martin cowmen
Home of Friday 517 The SGBI board of directors will Paul McMillion, Hobe Sound, is presiCOVE BEND RANCH hold a breakfast meeting at 7:30 a.m., dent of the Martin County Cattlemen's
Saturday, March 7 with the annual Association for 1981. Vice president is
Registered Santa Gertrudis membership meeting set for 9:30 a.m. Garry Lamb of Indiantown.
Owner: Dermont & Maureen O'Connor narry -treasurer is David
Manager: Hank Baggett The new board will meet at 11:30 a.m., Secretary- treasurer is David
904/344-1670 and again at 2:00 p.m., following the Chambers, Hobe Sound, and state
Rt. 1, Box 248, Floral City, Florida 32636 annual membership luncheon at 12:00 director is E. James Cowen, Jr., IndianWhere State Road 48 crosses the Withlacoochee noon. town.
River. Group transportation will be avail- Local directors are Harmon
able for those portions of the program McBride, Indiantown, William Taylor, Santa Gertrudis which will be held away from the con- Stuart, and Marvin L. Thomas, Indianference center. town.
Chairman of the "Florida Festival
D. L. Thomas Ranch Sale" is J. Charles Gray of DeBary.
Dwight & Jackie Thomas, owners President of the host breed group is The U.S. pig crop for 1980 totaled 101.6
Rt. 9, Box 203, Lake City, Fla. 32055 Troy Burrell, Morriston, and secretary- million head, one percent below 1979,
Telephone 904/752-6438 treasurer is K. D. Eatmon of Pompano but 15 percent above the 1978 crop,
Located 'A mile W. of 1-75 on Hwy. 47 Beach. USDA says.
ADVERTISING
-PAYSAmerica s
First
Beef Breed
*SANTA
GERTRUDIS
BREEDERS
INTERNATIONAL GEMINI SPRINGS FARM, DeBary, owned by Charles and Saundra Gray, hosted representatives of the InterAmerican Confederation of Cattlemen (CIAGA) on a tour of the Santa BOX 1257: KINGSVILLE. TEXAS 78363 Gertrudis facility last November. On the podium are owner Gray, left, and Dr. Roberto Parajon, Miami, secretary of the Florida International Agricultural Council, explaining the operation to the visitors.
88 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




JUST CHECK THE RECORD
Eatmon Santa Gertrudis Lead The Way
We usually have bulls and heifers available to fit your needs. Call, write-or better yet-come by for a visit and make your selections. K. D. Eatmon Charles Wolf, Gen. Mgr.
305/97 1-8880 305/278-0913
2922 N. State Rd. 7, Margate, Fla. 33063
.1UHELTON I Registered Santa Gertrudis
ORDADON Pure Bred Top Bloodlines
SIS Visitors Welcome
RANCHES SUWANNEE POINT RANCH
FRANK GABOR, left, hosted a purebred Call GENE JONES or Branford, Florida 32008
Santa Gertrudis sale at his Bent Tree ALBERTO DE MOLA8
Farm, Ocala, recently. Others shown are, BELLEGLADE, FLORIDA Carroll Hall Lloyd Thema,
from left, Troy Burrell, consignor of the top (305) 9969800 Ph: 904/935-1303 Ph: 904/935-1981
selling female, Chuck Brannan, volume
buyer, and auctioneer Fred Dietrich, III. rad SAN A GERTRUDI
I SATA RT-RU[ DI The kind that WEIGH and PAY on
Georgia S'Gertrudis good Florida pastures!
Georgia S'GertrudisBLUT&HD
averages $155r BLOUNT & HYDE
sale averages $1559 .. .,
Phone Lake Placid 813/465-4771
An overall average of $1599 was hit on Rt 4, Box 324, Lake Placid, Fa. 33852
81 3/4 lots of purebred Santa Gertrudis 6 R 4 Box 324 Lake Placid 33852
cattle at the third annual Georgia Santa
Gertrudis Breeders Association "Home of Cherokee Royal Governor"
"Prestige Sale," held December 13, at Registered Santa Gertrudis Bulls & Females For Sale
Tifton, Georgia.
bulls grossed $44,800 to average $2389, Diamond B Ranch
while 63 female lots grossed $82,675 to Troy & Molly Burrell
average $1312. The total gross receipts Rt. 2A, Box 221, Morriston, FL 32668
for the sale was $127,475. Telephone 904/489-4202
Three breeders from Florida consigned cattle to the event. Troy Burrell,
Diamond B Ranch, Morriston, K. D. BREEDERS & CONSULTANTS MILLS
Eatmon of Margate, and Charles Gray SANTA GERTRUDIS IL A
of DeBary, consigned cattle to the sale. TRIPLEMFAMS
Two Floridians were listed among CHAMPIONSHIP 01HORNED POLLED R P Ad
buyers at the sale. Sunny L Ranch, DIETRICH BROTHERS Santa Gertrudis
O'Brien, and Larry Coven, Cassel- Route 1, Whigham, Ga. 31797
berry, each made purchases. Ph: 305/568-2351 Rt. 10, Box 921A 904/385-2906 404/325-0555
The sale was managed by W. Scott ORLANDO FLORIDA 32820 Ranch 35 miles North of Tallahossee
Wilson, Macon, Georgia. Auctioneer
was Gerald Bowie, West Point, Georgia.
Santa Gertrudis Bulls and Females
Alabama SG sale For Sale
averages $1562 GEMINI SPRINGS FARMS
An average of $1562 was struck on
56 lots of Santa Gertrudis bulls and Star Rt. 1 J. Charles Gray, owner
females at the Alabama Santa Gertru- DeBary, Fl. 32713 Ph. (305) 668-6486
dis Sale, held December 5, at Montgomery Alabama. The sale grossed $87,475. Purebred Santa Gertrudis
The 15 bulls grossed $33,050 to
average $2203, while 41 females grossed
$54,425, to average $1327. ia First Establishe Santo Ge rrudis
The event was managed by Thomp- W innatead Herd in Florida
son Cattle Marketing, San Antonio, Texas, and Gerald Bowie, West Point, Plantai ll Polled and Horned
Georgia, was auctioneer. SANTA GERTUDIS
Herd No. 61
Homed and Polled H
Santa Gertrudis Cattle
ForSanta G ertrdis CattlePhihlp G. Rust little Everglades Ranch
Home aPled[ Phihl EverRlade
River Oaks Ranch Route 3 A Pioneer Ranch
Thomasville, Ga. 31792 ChorterMember S.G.B.I.-CharrerMember F.5.GA
Rt. 3, Box 102 Mr. W. Larkin, Owner, P.O. Box 1666
Donalsonville, Georgia 31745 Herd No. 255 w. 301 N. L Robun () ottle. Mr.
DadeCt, FZ 3325
JOE & LINDA GARCIA Home 912-524-2680 Albert Blankenship, Mgr. 226-6304 Telephon 94567-2292
Office 912-372-5634 1
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 89




Cattle, hay raising and
general farming keep
Davis Family
busy at Fellowship
by ETHEL HALES STANCIL Wilbur Campbell.
The Malcolm "Buddy" Doster Davis, The family is a closely knit one
Jr. family own and operate a family which gets together as frequently as posfarm in the Fellowship section of sible, usually at Margie's mother's, Mrs.
Marion County in north central Delba (Thelma) Campbell, who lives
4 !Florida. Mrs. Davis is Margie. Their north of Ocala. Margie's father died a
cattle are grade but the herd bull is black few years ago. Angus. They also have riding horses, A yellow tabby cat, Tom, moved
hogs, a few goats and chickens. with the family from New Orleans three
Hay is raised and a large garden pro- years ago. Other family pets are a vides fresh vegetables and ample vari- mother cat and her latest batch of kiteties for canning and freezing. Meat for tens and two Irish setters, Red, the I1, the table comes from the livestock and watchdog and Poochie.
, r ',poultry raised. The chickens, of course, Margie sews for herself, Lydia and
,I( i ,, .' also provide eggs. her home and finds time (somehow!) to
- --'. Buddy's father (deceased) operated a quilt tops which she lines and uses for
3," ,'\Bdd' ahe dcesd peae bedspreads.
saw mill and Buddy learned the business. He has a saw mill and cuts and Margie likes to cook and shares
saws logs for his community. Adept three of her favorite recipes with us.
AH FORD CT RAISN with machinery, Buddy built a pea Ozark Pudding Cake
bw Jot Am Ac, hi, seller last fall. 2 eggs, well beaten; 1 c. sugar; 1/ c.
"We try to be as self-sufficient as flour; 2 2 tsp. baking powder; '/2 tsp. Give it as a possible," Margie says, "and we are salt; 2 peeled apples, chopped; I c. chopgift buying a dairy cow to milk." ped nuts; 1 tsp. vanilla; and 1/2 tsp. cinf Margie and Buddy both grew up namon.
This beautifully bound around Fellowship and returned there Combine eggs and sugar. Beat well.
Thisb a kerl nd after several years in New Orleans, Add flower, baking powder, salt and book by Joe A. Akerman,where Buddy was stationed with the cinnamon. Beat. Add apples and nuts
is the first comprehensive weeBdywssaindwt h
history of Florida's colorful U.S. Coast Guard. and stir in vanilla. Put into greased pan
cattley indusr hl After Buddy's service career ended, and bake at 325 degrees for 30 minutes.
cattle industry. he and Margie taught in the public Oatmeal Cookies
The narrative is accom- schools in the Bayou country. She 3/4 c. shortening; 1 c. brown sugar;
panied with graphic pen and worked in the primary grades while c. granulated sugar; 1 egg; 4 c. water; 1
ink illustrations, with prints Buddy taught the lower-teens, tsp. vanilla; 1 c. sifted flour; 1 tsp. salt;
by Frederic Remington and The Davises also worked as mis- /2 tsp. soda; and 3 c. uncooked oats.
with early photographs sionary teachers under the late L. R. Mix shortening and brown sugar
showing Florida range life. Shelton who conducted a tremendous and white sugar. Add egg, beaten slightORDER YOUR COPIES NOW. ministry. His voice was known to large ly. Sift flour with salt and soda. Add to
O RE -E -W - --- audiences over the air and his printed other mixture with water. Stir in vanilla
S books, pamphlets and brochures read and oats. Bake at 350 degrees for 12-15
by thousands. Buddy handled the print- minutes. Makes about 60 cookies, if ing of the large volume of materials. His dropped by teaspoonfuls on greased
Program was carried locally, cookie sheet.
0 Margie and Buddy's son, Mac, an Sweetened Condensed Milk
engineer, stayed behind in New Orleans, 1 c. dry milk; 213 c. sugar; 3 c. boilwoo
-OO [where he is employed by a tug boat com- ing water; and 3 T melted butter.
O pany which operates on the Mississippi Combine in blender and process
River. Son Jonathan, recently married, until smooth. Refrigerate.
- 0 lives in New Orleans, too.
Daughter Lydia is graduating from Note: This is my final copy for these
. 0 V N E high school this year. An adept piano columns which I have been writing for
00 M M 30 years. I appreciate all of the help I
=-= H student, she has plans which include have had from you readers over the
N !, z N college and a teaching career.
E E 3: r 6 Margie comes from a large family. years and will miss you.
One of nine children, she has four living I do have plans for writing a book,
N 0 *- E brothers and four living sisters. One using portions of materials used here
sister, Shirley, and her husband, Larry with other original writings. Ingram are missionaries in Hong Kong, I will let you know when the book is
'- a where they have served about 12 years. published.-EHS
a 0 IM They have three sons and spend six
S. months here every three years. A Editor's Note-Mrs. Stancil's columns
Z' brother, Bud, lives in Pocatello, Idaho. through the years have been read by literZ 2 Other members of her family live in the ally thousands of readers. We appreciate
C same general area as she: Mrs. Mike her work in providing the material used in
(Esther) Home; Mrs. L. E. (Ellen) each issue of The Cattleman the past 30
Griggs; Coley Campbell; Stanley Camp- years. We are happy to say she never bell; Mrs. Tommy (Brenda) Bib; and missed a deadline in these three decades.
90 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




The 1st Annual
Bond Austrian Influence
12Saturday, April4th Sale
12 Noon Boston, Georgia
15 Fullblood Lots Including: Offering 50 Lots
* Planned matings to top fullblood donors including Austrian influenced 3-in-1 packages (fullbloods with
Heidi (daughter of the great Austrian cow Ardrahan calves at side bred back to Austrian bulls).
Fenella F6 by Sigfried). 4 yearling heifers bred to Austrian bulls (top indi* Selling 1/2 interest in your choice of Gretchen viduals carrying Austrian calves).
(a Parisien daughter out of a Hamlet cow) or Ingrid Pairs and bred fullbloods by Double Extra, Beat, (an Extra daughter out of a Ural dam). Petro, Galant and Buffalo
A super Copper King fullblood bred heifer.
Tempete II an extremely modern Achilles daughter out of the great Tempete cow 35 Purebred Lots
These lots, specially selected to appeal to the most discriminating reeders, include pairs and 3-in-1 packages with calves sired by the leading A.I. sires and many of the females rebred to Austrian Bourbon fullblood Double Extra son.
sires.
Several of the fullblood and purebred cows will be bred to the ,Bond bull battery, Bourbon, Dallas and Caruso.
Bond Simmental Ranch
Route 1, Box 116
Boston, Georgia 31626
Auctioneer: Merrill Anderson Patty Fournier
912/498-7745
Perry Bond
Office: 912/498-4835 0
Home: 912/228-1381 Ingrid Parisien x Hamlet (Fullblood).
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 91




Bag Balm
all-purpose
i !! Ointment
~help s FA ST
B AG BALM healing!
41/2 1ooFlorida PDCA holds all-breeds
For Cattle, Horses, dairy show at Bartow
All Domestic Animals
The Florida Purebred Dairy Cattle five breed shows follow:
MEdAtedG Bag Balrhelu pes Show was held at the Agricultural Ayrshire: Grand champion-Doug Blackadar, Lithia,
HEALING of injuries, cuts, scrapes, Chestnut Ridge Wyatt's Sadie; Reserve grand championwire snags, chapping, windburn, Pavilion, Bartow, November 15, 1980, Jeana Brantley, Lithia, Milk-A-Way Bo-Francine Punkin;
sunburn, massage of caked bag. with a total of 113 head showing. This Junior champion-Jeana Brantley, Lithia, Milk-A-Way BoFrancine Punkin.
Also use for horses, all domestic was an increase of 24 per cent over last Brown Swiss: Grand champion-Brian Solger, Chipley, animals. Smooth spreading. STAYS year's show, according to C. W. Greenwood Delegate Cinnamon; Reserve grand chamON. National best seller at farm, Reaves, secretary-treasurer of the pion-Jeff Carter, Brandon, I.E. Carey's Sugar Jill; Junior
feed, drug stores or write. Large champion-Kathy Bryan, Lakeland, Bryan's Rosie
41/2 lb. PAILand l0oz. CAN. Florida Purebred Dairy Cattle Associa- O'Brady.
tion, the sponsoring organization. Guernsey: Grand champion-Elaine E. Ward, Astatula,
Royal's Anita of Layi-aine; Reserve grand champion, FredLOADED WITH LANOLIN The day's events started with the erich L. Ward, Astatula, Penn Del Charming Agnes; Junior
DAIRY ASSOCIATION COMPANY youth showmanship contest, initiated by champion-Elaine E. Ward, Astatula, Chief's Feather of
LayLaine.
Lyndonville, Vt. 05851 BB2-78 the PDCA youth committee. Top win- Holstein: Grand champion-Bassett's Dairy Farm;
ners were: (1) Melissa Ratterree of Monticello, Bassettview Zee Anjo; Reserve grand champion-Rolling Hills Dairy, Archer, Claw-Land Sena Jose;
Jacksonville; (2) Trina English of Junior champion-Jay Swiers (Jaysun Holsteins), Trenton,
Lecanto; (3) Ken Johnson of Jackson- Mandy East Lake Jaysun.
SILAGE CUTTING ville. Cash premiums were presented to
the top 10 winners as they left the ring
by Ray Bassett, president of the Florida
200 to 4000 acres Purebred Dairy Cattle Association.
The "Rail-Bird Judging Contest"
We have the equipment to relieve was participated in by 88 spectators.
you of the headache of silage cut- Senior division winners were: (1) Denise ting. We serve Florida, Georgia, Harman, Lakeland; (2) Judy Solger,
Alabama, and all through the mid- Hipmey; (3kean; and ()Ler
west. Chipley; (3) Betty Branch; and (4) Leroy
Bryan, both of Lakeland.
Custom Feed Cutting Junior winners were: (1) Carolyn
Silo Filling Roddenberry, Lecanto; (2) Chris Solger,
Feed Hauling Chipley; (3) Chris Rutherford, SaraDAVID YANCEY sota, and (4) Scott Walker of Crystal
River.
Ph: 813/322-1959 (day or night) Entry fees were charged and a
Myakka City FL 33551 premium list provided for the first time HOLSTEIN CHAMPIONS, from left, Dale
Eade with Bassett's Dairy Farm's Bassettin the PDCA show. Donors providing view Zee Anjo, grand champion; Mike
cash for the premiums, trophies, ribbons Bond with Rolling Hills Dairy's Clow-Land and other expenses of the show were: Sena Josie, reserve grand champion, and ADVERTISING Florida Department of Agriculture, Jay Swiers with the junior champion,
-PAYS- Doyle Connor, American Breeders Mandy East Lake Jaysun.
Service, Select Sires, Noba, Joe Buckler,
C. W. Reaves, and Sunbelt Breeders
and J. & S. Dairy Supply with Curtiss
Breeding Service providing the
judge. Robert Heilman of RichFOR THE BETTER KIND OF mond, Virginia, judged the show. His
DAIRY CATTLE SEE US placings and explanations of reasons
BEFORE YOU BUY. WE HAVE were well accepted by exhibitors and
AN INVENTORY TO CHOOSE spectators, Reaves said. John Brenneman, Polk County Extension Dairy
FROM OF OVER 1000 HEAD Agent was superintendent of the show.
OF OPEN AND BRED HOL- Mrs. Joe Buckler clerked it and Jack
S T E I N A N D B ROW N Van Horn handled the Rail-Bird judgSWISS-SIRED BY SOME OF ing classes. Kathy Manookian, 4-H
THE MOST POPULAR BULLS dairy specialist, and Thomas Benecke, GUERNSEY CHAMPIONS, all from LayIN THE COUNTRY. National Holstein Association Con- LamNe, from left, C. L. Ward, Jr., with
sultant judged the youth showmanship. Royal's Anita of LayLaine, grand chainMiss Manookian and Bruce Buckler, pion supreme champion; Frederic Ward,
CAREY CATTLE COMPANY former outstanding 4-H'er graded the with Penn Dell Charming Agnes, reserve
Phone 813/689-1249 judging contest, grand champion, and Bob McLaughlin
Tampa. Florida The grand champion, reserve grand with Chief's Feather of LayLaine, the junior
champion and junior champion of the champion.
92 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




Jersey: Grand champion-Bassett's Dairy Farm, Monticello, G. R. Bassett's Sophia Samson Helga; Reserve grand champion-Chris Solger, Chipley, G.W.F. Jeweler C. J. Tiffany; Junior champion-Chris Solger, Chipley, G. W.F. Jeweler C. J. Tiffany. l n e R a ty O f r
The Guernsey grand champion,
Royal's Anita of LayLaine was named The Renowned Tn S Ranch
the all-breeds champion. This outstanding cow belonged to LayLaine Calhoun Falls, South Carolina
Guernsey Farm. Another cow, Nance'sCahuFllStharln Guensey oFarm Anohathehighestnpro1,762 acres in lush western Piedmont. Operated as quality Charolais Donut of LayLane had the highest pro- and Chianina breeding ranch. 85% productive land in pasture, Fescue
duction record of any cow in the show & Bermuda hay, soybeans & corn. Attractively priced at $790/acre,
based on the mature equivalent fat-cor- financing available. Color brochure upon request. rected milk record.
Bassetteview Zee Anjo, Bassett's Operating Dairies Also Available...
Dairy Farm's Holstein grand champion had the highest Holstein production record, while Summerfield's Generators Jacksonville, Florida
Rita shown by Clint Pate of Chipley 800 cows, 385 acres with double-10 parlor. Turnkey sale includes
received the trophy for the highest base in co-op paying $16.85 per cwt. Owner also willing to sell cows
Jersey record, and base. Then lease land and facilities to purchaser. Color brochure
available.
Ag exports pass Quincy, Florida
Turnkey operation. 375 cows, double-8 parlor with equipment. $40 billion mark 509 acres crop and pasture land. 765 gallon/day base in co-op.
USDA reports that fiscal year 1980 agri- Owner's residence. Three tenant houses & mobile home. cultural exports passed the $40 billion PLANTEC Realty Corporation
mark during the period which ended 3986 Boulevard Center Drive, Suite 104
October 31. The figure $40.5 billion Jacksonville, Florida32207
which exceeded the fiscal year 1979 level 904/396-3668
by $8.5 billion or 27 percent.
Increased foreign demand for grains, oilseeds, cotton, and a wide range of other commodities contributed to the strong export performance, officials said. In terms of volume, shipments of principal agricultural commodities reached a record of nearly 164 million LE tons.
The value of U.S. farm exports overshadowed the cost of U.S. farm product imports in fiscal year 1980, producing a $23 billion trade surplus for farm O r 4D t a t r
products which helped to offset a substantial part of the growing nonagricultural deficit.
Nicely retires the oth rs
Marlin Nicely, Ellisville, retired as live- & STEIGER.
stock market reporter effective January 15, 1981.
Nicely has been assigned for the past several years to the North Florida area and covered markets in Lake City, Live Oak and Gainesville for the Florida Department of Agriculture, division of marketing. He was employed by the department since 1957.
Over the years, Nicely has been active in many livestock activities including the judging, grading and showing of cattle. He is the owner/operator of Bellemeade Farms, a O purebred Angus operation. .......
The big tractor tests are over. And Steiger showed the others just how good four-wheel
drive tractors can really be in three important categories -Most work per gallon of
Wilkerson heads market fuel, Best percentage drawbar horsepower and Quietest cab.
So when you decide on a new four-wheel drive tractor, make sure you get the best J. D. Wilkerson has been elected presi- -Steiger. Stop by anytime and we will fill you in on the details. dent of Trenton Livestock Market, Trenton, it was recently announced.
Manager of the facility is Michael O TRA A
Wilkerson and office manager is Sara Wilkerson. 4 Ovied F 3 3 o 3
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 93




CLET CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING SELL FOR YOU
Rate 30 per word, minimum charge $6.00. Classified display $17.00 column Inch. Deadline 5th of month. In circulation about 25th of month. Send copy and remittance to:
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN, BOX 1403, KISSIMMEE, FLORIDA 32741
AUCTIONEERING LIVESTOCK REAL ESTATE
FORT SMITH AUCTION SCHOOL, Ft. Smith, Ark. 72903. Resident:
and home study. Veteran approved. -om m ercial-bred We Sell Ranches & Ranch Land
BE AN AUCTIONEER-Outstanding successful auctioneers are
your instructors. Write for brochure today. Term soon. heifers for sale STEPHEN L. MILLER REALTY CORP.
Mendenhall School of Auctioneering. U.S. Hwy. 29-70 (E-85) High
Point, N.C. 27263. tf73c 11913 U.S. 27 South Stephen L. Miller
Sebring, Florida 33870 Reg. Real Estate Broker
DOGS Calfhood vaccinated. (813) 655-2001
AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERDS: Female, Black-tri. 7 months. Ready to Coming 2 years old.
train. Registered. Marianne Curty, P. 0. Box 1025, Dun- FOR SALE-DRY FEED and LIQUID BUSINESS. Family type operanellon, Fla. 32630. 904/489-3937. tion or will supply large ranch. Includes all real estate and
equipment. Dry Feed 40 Ton/day capacity. Central FloridaTRAINED REGISTERED-Catahoula Leopard Cowhogdogs, Border $325,000. Mary L. Adsit, Lisc. Real Estate Broker, P.O. Box 812,
Collies, Australians. Money back guarantee, 30 day trial. Carlton 2x4 Ranch Lake Wales, Florida 33853.
Pups. Charles Whitener, Route 1, Paris, TX 75460. Phone HIIIhwa 31 Soulh
214/785-4724 or 214/785-4475. 876p Aj ,lorda 33821
813/494-7302 Brady Pfe., Manager WANTED: VARIOUS PARCELS
BORDER COLLIES ... Registered. Ouinn Tindall, Running CH 10,000 or more acres each-anyRanch, 2000 Hiatus Road, Davie, Florida. 305/473-0368. where in Florida-for cow/calf
Claude Tindall, 1600 N.W. Avenue N, Belle Glade, Fla. 305/996- BREEDING AGE RED ANGUS BULLS for sale.' Braaksma Red Clad TAngus, Rt. 2, Box 330, Floral City, Florida 32636. 904/726- operation. Have cash buyers. Will
7435._4874. co-broke. Will also consider partial
NUBBIN VALLEY REGISTERED BORDER COLLIES. From imported groveland. Contact Toni Hulme,
stock. James A. Thomas, Route 4, Box 229, Graceville, REAL ESTATE associate, New Era Realty, Inc.
Florida 32440. Phone 205/886-2154 after 6 p.m. 178P 1401 South Military Trail
WANT TO SELL-Your Cattle Ranch, Acreage or Citrus Grove? West Palm Beach, Florida 33406
LIVESTOCK Contact BRENNAN & BRENNAN, REALTORS, Accredited
Farm & Land Brokers, Box 1809, Lakeland, Fla. 33802 178c Phone: 305/964-4303 or
FOR LIST OF AREA BREEDERS-Contact Florida Red Angus Asso- 305/582-7052
ciation-Harold Braaksma, Route 2, Box 330, Floral City, Fl
32636. Phone 904/726-4874. 1,000 Acres, good elevation.
Highway frontage. Already in 5 acre MISCELLANEOUS
lots. $2,000 per acre. MISCELLANEOUS_________CUSTOM FREEZING BULL SEMEN FARROWING STALLS-All steel $124.20. Includes feederSemen Testing W. H. Morse Corporation, Realtors waterer, top rail, rump rail. Weighs 204#. Free literature.
Modern Mobile Lb t Units P.O. DrawerA 0 305/847-3133 Starr National, 238 Main, Colchester, I1. 62326. 309/776-3446.
Modern Mobile Laoratory Units Kissimmee, Fl 32741
SOUHEATER FR ZEN Don S hicsior
SOUTHEASTERN FROZEN 904/7hi1r533 Also Have Available
SE EN SEVIERANCH FOR SALE, Clewiston, Florida. 310 plus acres, horn, 2C
JACKSONVILLE, 32218 Box 26088 mobile homes, equipment. 235 head Purebred Brahman IA LLIE H A Y
Breeding herd. Asking $1,200,000. Principals only reply to Box 1403 L, Kissimmee, Florida 32741.
FOR SALE-HEREFORD BULLS. Big, rugged,Canadian breeding, A LFA LFA H A Y
1, 2, and 3 yr. olds. $500.00 up. Call Lewis B. Flynn, Robert S. "Bob" Cody,
912/336-7860, Camilla, Georgia 31730. FLI, Associate
All Hours: 305/847-4781 Contact
Sell your free boarders and in- Ranch
stins I J Joe Messana, Jr.
crease your calving percentages, RE JoY Wantd n----nr
through annual pregnancy test- 4RATY I P 1 5
REALTR(F)PH: 813/735-4402
ing. Let us show you facts to Box 1889, Kissimmee, FL32741 Rt. 1, Box 403
prove we can help.
P.O. Box 21 CATTLE RANCHES & FARMS-Nation Wide. BRENNAN & BREN- ZOLFO SPRINGS FL 33890
LARRY LEW IS Felsmere, Fla. 32948 NAN, REALTORS, Accredited Farm & Land Brokers, Box
Ph: 305/571-1627 1809, Lakeland, Fla. 33802. 178c
WINDMILLS FOR SALE. Dealers needed for America's best new
BIG RED ANGUS BULLS for sale. 14-27 months. Registered, per- windmill, "EAGLE #1." "FREE BROCHURE." (Toll Free 1formance tested. Delivery available. Enflnger Red Angus. 800-431-2353, Op. 132.) American Wholesale Windmills, Box
904/994-7033. Rt. 3, Box 683, Jay, Florida 32565. Diversified Farm, Holmes County, 261, Stone Mountain, Georgia 30066.
Fla. 407 acres, level and gently rollRED BRANGUS ing. Excellent 3 Bed rm. Brick Disc 100rancher. 21/ Baths, Big family rm.
For a free color brochure on the "BIG RED with fireplace. 300 acres cultivation & Harrow
MULEYS" and a membership list, write to: pasture. Big hay shed. Feed mill, B d /
AMERICAN RED BRANGUS ASSOCIATION Equipment shed. Grain Storage bin, Blades
P.O. Box 1326, Dept. P, Austin, Texas 78767 3/4 mi. frontage on Large Creek. Total Fd
512/345-2625 Price $450,000. Terms. Fully cross rolled and heat treated blades
to fit any disc harrow. Heavier gauges.
Largest stock in the southeast. 12' to 38"
LLAMAS, Miniature Horses, Pygmy Goats. Registered stock, for Strout Realty, Inc., Licensed Broker disc.
Show or Pets. DINEYJIM FARMS, Box 1591, Palm City, Leonard D. Landress, Associate ER BLADS
Florida 33490. Phone 305/2874951. 904/547-3466
P. 0. Box 595, Bonifay, Fla. 32425
BEEFMASTER BULLS Chopper blades to fit any chopper.
16 E AT4 BULLs odWe863-ACRE HARDEE COUNTY RANCH, all Improved and Irrigated. CALL COLLECT FREE DELIVERY
16-24 months old. Weigh 1200-1500 (2) 12" wells, equipment, barn, small lake. Planted in Argenlbs. Grown out on grass and silage. tineBahia, PangolaandClover.CarrylngcapacityG6Ohead.Price ERB & ROBERTS, INC.
Tough, hardy, ready to work. We 1,375.00 per acre. Owner financing at 10% down, balance in two Toll Free 1-800/342-3402
welcome your visit. Dixie Beef- mortgages at 6% and 9% interest. Offered exclusively by Joe L.
masters, Enigma, Georgia. Phone Davis, Inc., Realtors, P.O. Box 1149, Wauchula 33873. Call Gainesville, Fla. 904/376-4888
912/533-5535 day, 9121533-5561 night. 813/773-2128 (Day) or Jim Scarborough, Associate, 813/735- Our 25th year selling direct to the farmer
0391 (Night).
94 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




P.O. Box 427
Bartow. Florida 33830
COMMODITY BUYER FEDERALLY INSPECTED
CATTLE BUYERS Tom Hutto-Bartow 533-0685 FD AL INE
PLANT PHONE
Al Kaplan-Lakeland 683-4836 Charles Smith-Moultrie, Ga. 985-1338 FEEDLOT MANAGER Bartow 813-533-0685 Tom McPhillips-Plant City 752-9237 James Price-Bartow 533-7233 Don Bryan-Bartow 533-0685 Lloyd Williamson-Ocala 622-4962 Bernie Gordon-Lakeland 644-4360 L. C. Hendrick-Ft. Meade 285-9875
= e LYKES
WANTED READY-DAILY
CATTLE RANCH CASH MARKETtmarkets more meat
Major investor has appointed Atkins, Florda acker
Green, Stauffer, Clark & Company, Florida packer.
Realtors, to acquire Working cattle We buy direct from
ranches including cattle inventory. producers in truckload
Also, will consider ranches not Central Packing Co. Inc. oroducer lo ad
stocked or raw land that can be or larger lots.
fenced and developed. Size: 7,000 P. 0. Box 429
acres up, no limit. Location pre- Contact LYKES BROS., INC.
ferred, 75 mile radius of Orlando. CENTER HILL, FLORIDA 33514 PHONE 813/229-6506, Tampa, FL
Confidentiality assured. Call Chet 813/752-1102, Plant City, FL
Kessler, Broker/Salesman, collect rwin Bryan, Jr. 904/793-4701 Ask for:
305/841-6060 or write AGSC, Inc., Tommy Bryan, 904/793-2781 Larry Ross, Kenneth
211 East Colonial Drive, Orlando FL Dick Helton, 305/585-1589 Killingsworth, Kenny Salter Jerry
32801. Office Phone Sapp, or E. G. Morgan
I 904/793-3671
We Can Sell Your Land
Need Going Ranches
Rawland-Groves
SEE US FOR
YOUR ACREAGE NEEDS
WHITE
James W. (Jimmy) Ringo
Realtor-Rancher Meat Packers of Florida
National Farm and Land Broker U.S.D.A. Inspected
P.O. Box 1047 Daily Cash Market For All Classes Of Cattle
Immokalee, Fla. 33934
813/657-2332, 813/657-2322 L M. White, Owner & Pres. Don Barrett, Executive Vice Pres.
Bob Perry, Manager/Cattle Buyer
"Established 1946" 1-800/342-0298 904/622-3272 904/622-7714
Sas Inc
THE e I A BA
572 *dm Dr Tapg 31 ap 836683 ln Ct 63506 ee 0 78BFRT
SPERR BUSH HOLAN OWAATR
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 95




GBu r's Guide
A Bar B .................... 26 Florida Polled Hereford ........ 60 Ralston Puina ............... 19
Acree, David ................ 52 Fa. Red Angus Ass'n .......... 59 The Rancher .................. 39
Adams Limousin ............. 80 Florida Santa Gertrudis ....... 7 Rancho San Antonio ........... 62
Adams Ranch .............. 97 Florida Simmental ............. 64 R and M Farms ............... 74l
Adsit ....................... 31 Flying M Ranch ............... 21 Register Farms ............... 82
Ag Bag ..................... I Freeman Cattle Co ............. 80 Ringo, Jimmy ............... 95
Agri-Business Trade Show ...... 24 River Divide Ranch ........... 63
Agri-Guard ................... 30 Gainesville L.S. Market ...... 35 River Oaks Ranch ............ 89
Aid Labs ..................... 10 Gainesville Stockman Supply ... .16 Roberts Angus Farm ......... 49
American Angus Assn .......... 49 Gemini Springs .............. 89 Rock Hollow Farm ........... 63
American Breeder Service ...... 59 Georgia-Florida Charolais .... 45 Rocking S Ranch ........... 86
American Hereford ........ 54, 57 Georgia Livestock Equipment .. 32 Rocking T Ranch ............ 74
American Polled Hereford ...... 61 Gingerbred Farms ........... 80 Rogers Bar HR .............. 45
American Simmental .......... 65 Glory Land ................. 45 Rollins Ranch ............... 86
Anderson Sales & Service ....... 32 Glover Farms ............... 52 Ron Don Cattle Co ........... 74 by H. L. RUBIN, D.V.M.
Andrew Tent ................ 45 Gould's .................... 39 Ross Bros .................. 89
Anhinga Farms ................ 62 Grace Brothers ................ 83 Running C H Ranch ........... 83 Florida Dept. ofAgriculture
Arcadia L. S. Market .......... 35 Grady's Hat Shop ............. 40 Rush Bros ................... 55
Arcadia Rodeo ................ 41 Graham Angus Farm ...... 50, 51 R.W. Bar ..................... 78 Last month, in our discussion of
Austin Fertilizer ............. 23 Graham & Associates .......... 45 RWJ Farms ................. 62
Baldwin, Leroy .............. 52 Greene's Bar-G-Bar ........... 78 Neonatal Diarrhea or scours of the newBanner Lee Farms ......... .74 Greenway Angus .............. 46 Sagamoreborn animal, it was pointed out that
Bannister Simmental .......... 64 Griffin, Harold ................ 8 San .................... 25 death from neonatal diarrhea was
Griner Herefords .............. Sans Souci..........5 dah fo entl dare a
Bar A Brangus .............. 67 Gie eeod .......5 Santa Barbara Ranch .......... 86
Bar D Ranch ................ 67 Santa Fe River Ranch ..... 60 primarily due to dehydration or loss of
Bar G Bar ................. 78 Haile-Dean Seed Co .......... Sna..... R
Bar LH Ranch ............... 78 G. C. Hanford Mfg ........... 27 S.G.B.l.....................88 body fluid. The major viral agents that
Barnett Angus Farm ....... .... 84 Scarborough, James ............ 86
... Hae ar............ Schearbrook Farms ............ 52 can cause neonatal diarrhea were also
Barthle Bros ................ 86 Hardee M market ......... ...... Select Sires .................... 44
Barton Charolais Ranches Roger Harloff Farms .......... 80 Sells, Sam & Sons ............. 60 covered.
Banley Farms ................ 63 Harvey, Joe ................. 60 Semiema Farms ............... 46e
Bay Ford Tractor .............. 9 Heldenbrand & Sons ........... 44 Seminole Stores ................ 97
Bellemeaderatr............5 Herring Polled Herefords ...... 63 Seven-Eleven ............... 66 causes of neonatal diarrhea. Many
Beefaster Breeders Universal Hidden Valley Ranch .......... 59 Seven Lazy Eleven Befmasters .74 bacteria,
Bel mea s Holman, James F .............. 62 Shelton Land & Cattle ....... 89 including E. coli, Salmonella
Bennethor Americas.D .............. 452 Hughes Angus ................. 46 Shirley, H. M ................ 78 and Closlridium perfingens, can cause
Bevilet, Hrman................86 n lsrdu errnes a as
Beville, Herman ............... 86 IMC Rainbow ................. 17 Silver Spurs Rodeo ........... 38
Blount & Hyde ........lS....66 International Ranch...........84 Simmons Ranch .............. 78 neonatal diarrhea. E. coli has been
Bobebynne D ra uso Fittle. 8.66 Interstate Livestock Market 35 Singletary Farms ............. 62 proven to be the primary cause of
Bondy Diment m Ranh 9 U n m .....5 2 A. 0. Smith Harvestore .......8
Bobby DvisCstom Smih .....C. 8 Urvington Farms ............ 52 bacterial neonatal diarrhea.
Braaksma Red Angus Isa Cattle Co..................73 Smith C.O., Farm ............. 52
......Red.Angus.......Smith Ranch ................. 74 Young animals constantly ingest
Briar Creek Farms...........63 Jacksonville L.S. Market Smoak House Ranch .......... 54
Criand Srk Rah.............8 Jayivlek Mket........ 35 S.E. Beefmaster Ass'n ...... 71, 75 bacteria that they pick up from sucking
C and S Ranch ................ 88 Jay Livestock Mkt ............. 35 SE. Brangus Ass'n ............. 67
C.G.Q. Polled Herefords ........ 63 Jenkins Ranch ................. 52 SE. Limousin Ass'n .......... 81 and licking their dam's teats and hair,
Cajun Cattle Service .......... 84 Jennings and Son Mfg .......... 20 SE. Molasses ................ 30 eating pasture grasses and drinking conCapri ...................... 15 JMC Ranch .................. 72 S.E Senepol, Ltd .............. 97
Carey Cattle Company ......... 92 Jo-Su-Li Farms ................ 56 Southern Star. ..... ...52 taminated water. Fortunately, the gasCattlemen's L.S. Market ........ 35
Cattlemen's Construction Co. ...31 K Bar ...................... 45 Southside Farms ............... 46 tric juices, which are highly acid, act as a
CJB Farms ................. 49 Kabar Ranch ................ 86 Southwood Farm .......... 49, 63
S ................ Ranch..............6 Stack, G.T ..................8 4 barrier and destroy most of the bacteria
CK Ranch ................ .... 56 anp h a c . .
C&H Farm ................... 60 Kaplan Industries .............. 5 Stage Coach Ranch ............ 88
Central Packing .............. 95 Kissimmee L.S. Market ......... 35 Stalnaker Brothers ............. 37 swallowed. A few bacteria sometimes
........... 6Stardust Ranch ................ 49 will get past this barrier. However, in
Century Steel.................6 Lakeland Cash Feed ........... 44 Steel-N-Timber Buildings ....... 12 most instances, they are rapidly passed
Chandelle Ranch ............. 64 Lake Oriole Ranch ............. 59 Stockmen Supply Co ......... 16
Chapman and Collier. 86 Lee & Sons Fitting Service ...... 52 Story Limo. Steer Sale ....... 80 out with the feces without causing any
Chapman, James C ............. 83 Emmett LeFors ................ 56 Strong Post Structures ........26 rapid
Chipley L.S. Market .......... 35 Lemmon Cattle Enterprises ..... 52 Stuart, J ................. 83 damage or diarrhea. Tie moveChipola Red Angus Ranch ...... 59 Lenholt Farms ............... 66 W. H. Stuart Ranch .......... 82 ment of the intestine and the presence of
Chutes-Heldeobrand ............ 44 John Lillie Quarterhorses ....... 39 Sugarand Ranch ............ 13
Circle R Ranch .............. 67 Little Everglades ............. 89 Sumner, Glenn .............. 84 antibodies are the major factors in preCircle T Ranch .............. 63 Little Springs Farm ........... 66 Sumter County Market ....... 35
Clark Angus Ranch ............ 46 Live Oak Plantation ..........86 venting these bacteria from gaining a
Coleman Sale Mgmt. Service .... 80 Suse .anh .............7
Long, Aaron ............... 46 Sunset Ranch Limousin ....... 80 foothold in the intestine. Unfortunately,
Columbia Market .............. 35 Lykes Brothers, Inc ............. 95 Sunshine State Steers ........... 86
Conibear Equipment............ 29 Lykes Pasco Fertilizer Division ...8 Superior Fertilizer ..... 100 during the first 24-48 hours of life, the
Corrigan Ranch .............. 54
Cove Bend ................ 88 M & M Supply ................ 14 Super-Mol .................. 10 acid content of the stomach of the newCow Palace Market ......... 35 Madison Stockyards..........35 Suwannee Point ............... 89
Cow Pen Ranch.............84 Malloy, Dallas...............62 Suwannee Valley Market ....... 35 born is very low and during this period
Crescent J Ranch .............. 45 C. J. Martin .... ............18 ...........52 numerous bacteria can gain entrance
Cypress Creek Ranch .... 49 Marston, Lauren .............84 ............. into the intestine. Again, the intestinal
Martin's Casa Grande .......... 66 T-Bar Ranch ..................56
Dairy Assn. Co..............92 McGuire, Inc .................. 84 Thomas, Dwight ......... 88 movement and presence of maternal
Daken-Australia ............... 16 McKellar Ranch ............... 86 Thompson Brothers...........52 antibodies
Daughter Brothers............84 McKethan Cattle .............. 59 Fred Thompson ............... 70
Davis, D. T., Ranch ........... 83 Micheloni Properties ........... 49 Tifton Bull Sale ............... 98 bacteria from causing any problems.
Davis Farms ................ 74 Mills Market ................ 35 Tilton, W. W al..............98 ba ce fo caing any problem.
Dean Steel .................... 22 Mills/Triple M Farm ........... 89 Tinde! Livestock Market ........ 35 E. the cause
Deep River .................. 66 Miller Auction ............... 12 Top O'The Hill ............ 79, 80 bacterial neonatal diarrhea, let us
Diamond B Ranch ........... 89 Miller Clay Beefmaster Sale .:...69 Trail-Rite ................... 41
Diamond C, Inc ............. 54 Millercrest Farm ................ 64 Trask Ranch ................97 examine it in more detail. E. coil, of
Diamond H Ranch ............ 84 Mitchell Hereford Farm ........ 60 L/S Equimet.........40
Dietrich Brothers .............. 89 Monticello Stockyard, Inc ....... 35 Tucker Gilbert & Sons. ..... 83 which there are several types, is found in
Dietrich, H. Fred .............59 ............ Tucker, L.M................84 the intestinal tracts of all animals. ForDixie Beefmasters .............. 74
Dry Creek .................... 74 NOBA ....................... 56 tunately, not all of these types of E. coi
Duda, A. & Sons .............. 83 Nutrena ....................... 2 U.S. Sugar Corp ................. 5
Duncan Charolais Farm ........ 45 Oak Hill ...................... 64 Walker Farms ................. 86 can produce disease (colibacillosis).
EB.A......................82 Oakley, Ronald ................ 83 Wallace, Dee .................. 86 In order for an E. coli to be an
Eatmon, K. D...............89 Odom Polled Herefords ........ 62 Wasdin Charolais .............. 45 e r at
Echodell Ranch .............. 60 Okeechobee L.S. Market ........ 35 Waters, S. L ................... 84
Edwards Livestock ............ 35 Old South Mills .............. 34 Wells, Bully H., & Associates .. 64 producing organism), it must have two
El Dorado Ranch ............. 9 Osborne Cattle Co ............ 45 Western Gentleman ........... 40
Emry, Paul........... ..8 Osborne Cattle Services ......... 78 West Florida L.S. Mkt ........ 35 characteristics. First, it must have the
Enfinger Red Angus ..........7 Oviedo Tractor .............. 93 Wetherington, J.L ........... 60 ability to be able to attach itself to the
EhadRbrs......9and nFCate......66 Waley's Crescent 0 ... .......84bity obeal to tac islfoth
Erb Roberts .................39 P6amer eatele.6 White Oak Plantation ........ 63 lining of the intestine and, secondly, it
E-Z Pull ..................0.. 39 Palmer Befnaster Sale ......... 68 White Packers ............... 95
Fair Store ..................... 40 Parks Land Clearing ........... 14 Wik-A-Weed ................ 34 must be able to produce toxins. Those
Far C rri B ...........28 Partin, Henry ................ 86 Williams, Frank ..............37 that do not have the ability to attach
Farm Credit Banks .... ........ 28.....................82 W illiams, Rick .............. 78
Feton Feeders ..............'20 Peae Valley Ranch ............ 82 Williamson Ranch ........... 67 themselves to the intestinal wall seldom,
Flint River Mills.............3 Pemberton, Inc ................. 24 Willmar Plantation ...........63
Fln ie il ... .....3 Pigg, W. C. ......... .37 ifevrwil......ny dieae
Flo-Chem ................... 22 ................. Wilson, Pat ................. 63
Florida Angus Futuristic Pine Acre Farm ............... 63 Winn-Dixie Stores, Inc ........ 26 However, those that attach to the
Fln. Association L.S. Mkts Pi. Acres Ranch .............. 54 Wunnstead Plantation 89 intestinal wall will reproduce, produce
F.B.C.I.A ..................... 45 Pine Pasture Farms...........56 Wise Seed Company .......... 97
Florida Beef Council... ..... Pineview Farms ................ 74 their toxins and, in time, overwhelm the
Florida Fence Post ........... 732 Placid Farms ............... 83 Yancey, David ............... 92
Florida Hereford Ass'n ..... .56 Plantec Realty ............... 93 Young Acres Ranch ............ 62 animal.
Florida Limousin Association ..80 Powell, H.T................. 84 Ironically, enteropathogenic E. coi
Florida Molasses Exchange 44, 56 Quarrier Polled Herefords ...... 63 Zipperer Beefmeasters ........... 74 infections do relatively little damage to
96 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




the lining of the intestine. However, S D these enteropathogenic strains produce
S E E D S toxins which increase fluid secretion in
the intestine which results in dehydra- _I tion and, in many instances, death. H c r
CALL Two clinical types of E. coli infection
occur in young calves. (a) Septicemic V-MESH FENCE
endotoxemic colibacillosis and, (b) enteric colibacillosis. Septicemic endotoxemic colibacillosis occurs in
COMPANY, INC. young calves that have been deprived of
colostrum. This type of infection is (813) 635-4473 characterized by sudden death or a
rapidly developing shock-like collapse. Route 1, Box 7 This is a relatively rare form of
Frostproof, Fla. 33843 colibacillosis (less than 10% of all cases).
However, where management is poor, Available for Spring Planting the incidence may be higher. In enteric colibacillosis, infection is limited to the SorghUmSudangrassi Hybrid intestine and death is due to dehydraJapanese Millet tion. This is the most important form of
Browntop Millet E. coli infection.
Aeschynomene The control of colibacillosis, as with Catl
Alyce Clover other neonatal diarrheas, can be an
Hairy Indigo extremely difficult problem. As with Squeeze
Paraguayan Bahia most neonatal diseases, the best protecPensacola Bahia tion is the maternal antibodies that the Sae-1
Bermuda newborn calf obtains through the Safe
colostrum. Calves that receive adequate Holds 'em colostrum from well-immunized brood Secure
SHARE HARVEST PROGRAM cows during the first few hours of life
Supervised by owner and sons have an excellent chance of avoiding the Call for catalog sheet and prices: 904/732-4143
l MODERN PROCESSING and many common calthood diseases. In the I
Warehouse facilities case of E. coli infections, it is essential
that the brood cow have antibodies against specific adhering types ofE. coli. F See a Fti (Registered, Licensed and Bonded) Without this protection, calves could P._0._Box940_A___cala,_Floida_3267 become victims of colibacillosis.
The use of vaccines that contain E.
coli with the adhering factor may help SENEPOL
Advertising Aids increase the E. coli antibody level of the
brood cow. Un some instances, vaccines "The New Performance Breed" Your Personal have been made from the bacteria Fla. Dtributor: Alvin Futch
Salesmanship isolated from cases of colibacillosis Plant City Ph: 813/752-8572 (home)
occurring on a particular farm. These 813/752-3181 (offLe)
Contact any of our fieldmen so-called autogenous vaccines have been SOUTHEASTERN SENEPOL, LTD.
Freeman Wingard, Rt. 2 Montezuma, Ga. Ph:
forful dtalsofsom hlpin controlling 912/433-6702 lofficel 9121472-7885 Ihomel
colibacillosis. However, the use of / e autogenous vaccines must be
approached with care. First, one must SEED HARVESTING
be sure that the organism used to make C.M. Payne & Son, Inc.
qjL t tiem a1L the vaccine has the adherence factor and Licensed, Bonded Seed Dealer
the ability to produce toxin. Without 9410 Payne Road, Sebring, FL 33870
AND LIVESTOCK JOURNAL these two fbe Seed Available: Argentine & Paraguayan
factors, the vaccine would 22 Bahia grass. Aeschynomene; Common
P.O. Box 1403 worthless. Secondly, be sure that a Hairy Indigo; Jap Millet; Winter and Summer
Kissimmee, Fla. 32741 qualified laboratory is used to produce Legumes.
the vaccine. Ph: 813/385-4642 or 385-8330
As I have said before, veterinary
research is constantly trying to improve, through vaccination, ways to protect the Promote BEEF
newborn calf. If you have a serious new- ay
30 born calf scours problem, have your every ...
30 Coming veterinarian submit calves for examinaTwo-Year Old, tion so that we can try and determine 1W Support Your
Pasture-Raised Bulls the cause of the problem. Florida Beef Council
"From the Trask Hall of Fame A breakdown of cattle on feed totals
Polled Hereford Herd shows Arizona with 382,000 head, down
Established 1931" one percent; California with 672,000, Adams Ranch
TRASK ANCHdown 14 percent; Colorado with
875,000, down nine percent; Kansas Braford Cattle
with 1,175,000, down seven percent; and Neil W. Trask, Owner- Ph: 803/348-7691 Texas with 1,970,000, down one per- P.O. Box 1030
Call Thru Iva, S. C. cent from November, 1979. Iowa's total Fort Pierce, FL 33450
CALHOUN FALLS, S. C. was 1,310,000 head, up one percent, 305/461-6321
Located 6 miles North on Hwy. 81 with Nebraska unchanged at 1,580,000.
THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 97




WEditotialst
23rd PERFORMANCE Into the second half of FCA's year
TESTED BULL SALE
Checking the calendar we noted that the second half of FCA's year under the M arch guidance of President W. G. "Kayo" Welles is well underway. We were M arch minded that the twenty-fourth leader of this industry organization pledged at the outset that a "grass roots" philosophy would be followed and that cornat the Coastal Plains mittees would be given latitude to function, yet retain the "team effort" conExperiment Station cept.
Sale Pavilion That and more has been accomplished these past months. It has been a
T IFTON, GA. working team. Much has been done and actions are being taken to do even
more in the coming months. Committees have been at work in the animal Sale Starts 1 p.m. health area; the marketing area, looking at the feasibility of marketing
Florida's beef under a revised grading program; a watchful eye is being kept on the meat import situation; new programs and methods for promoting beef are being observed; these, and other challenges are being met by FCA's current team.
Two specific points in the animal health area acted upon by FCA concern A BI DAYthe concessions granted in conducting Florida's brucellosis program which were requested by the industry and approved at the federal level; and alertSelling 80 Head ing officials to the imminent danger of foreign. livestock diseases being
introduced into Florida. This danger was emphasized through a resolution Polled Herefords adopted by FCA's board of directors which urged tighter surveillance and
Charolais cooperation by state and federal agencies.
Santa Gertrudis That Florida's revised brucellosis program is progressing at a steady pace
Simmental is an established fact. Also, action taken by the Florida Department of AgriLimousin culture and the U.S. Department of Agriculture has been positive regarding
Angus foreign animal diseases as noted in the next segment of this editorial column.
Red Angus To be sure, the association's position has been acknowledged.
Ankina It's been a busy first half for President Welles and his team. The second
half will be similar, no doubt. Bear in mind, too, that the time the leadership, committee chairmen and members devote, is given voluntarily. And they're doing it for you and for the good of the industry. They're all deserving of an expression of appreciation.
BULLS WITH A seminar will be conducted
RECORDS OF: As noted above, FCA has urged that cognizance be taken by all concerned of
Florida's vulnerability and susceptibility to an intrusion of foreign animal Growth Ability diseases into this country. It was urged that consideration be given to educat" Ready for light ing involved agencies of the necessity to effectively combat the threat through
service certain disease preventive measures. It was suggested that an educational
*Not highly fitted seminar be held.
From nown erdsIt is significant that Commissioner of Agriculture Doyle Conner has anFrom nown erdsnounced that a seminar aimed at safeguarding Florida Livestock and plant industries against exotic diseases and pests being carried into the state by smugglers will be held this month (see story on page 36.) Such a seminar should provide input for establishing the guidelines for the cooperative efforts needed at the various levels.
The danger of an exotic disease outbreak in Florida is not restricted to the livestock industry and that has been considered by the authorities in includAuctioneer ing the plant industry and rightly so. Just look at the current problem being
Gerald Bowie faced in California. Because of a Mediterranean fruit fly-said to have probably been smuggled in by a tourist from Hawaii hiding a mango or papayafor additional that state is facing decimation of its $6 billion a year fruit and vegetable
information contact: industry.
Clyde M. Triplett That Florida's overall agriculture industry could be similarly affected is
Coopratve Etenionnot improbable. This jointly sponsored federal/state Exotic Agriculture
Coo erieExeso Threats Seminar (EATS) will greatly aid in reducing the threat to our indusBox 1209, Tifton, GA 31794 tries. It should be given full support by all.
912/86-407 le.Remember, FMD calls for mandatory slaughter-no marketing-of cat98 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981




TIMES
7D
What about WINTER GRASSES?
Yes, especially now when Well, there's a good amount of food in
your cattle need a boost to them-if your cattle can get it out! That's help digest winter grasses and maintain health and where P.D.Q. protein-mineral-vitamin
vigor until spring, supplements come in. They help the cattle
break down the cellulose structure of the winter forages, releasing the nutritional values for digestion and assimilation.
Don't Put A Limit On Your Profit
By Holding Back On Nutrition
(Member, Florida Cattlemen's Association)
Ask Your Local Dealer to Stock It for You or
Phone 813/682-6144, P.O. Box 116, Zip 33802mo
LEAD FLORIDA




When smut grass invades your play an important part in getting the you to fertilize your improved bahia,
improved pastures, fight back. The most for your fertilizer dollar. bermuda and St. Augustine pastures
man from Superior has all the latest If you have a 10% infestation of now, but hold off on your pangola.
information on the use of Dowpon M smut grass in your pastures you are This is also a good time to topGrass Killer for the control of smut already losing money. Your Superior dress clover and rye grass pastures
grass and other weed killers for the salesman will be glad to explain with Superior's special fertilizer
control of broad leaf weeds. Proper this statement. formulas.
use of these herbicides The man from Superior advises Dowpon MO is a trademark of Dow Chemical Co.
ANNA MARIA Roger Hale 778-9433 MADEIRA BEACH C. S. Little 397-2778 BALM Dan Sumner 634-6381 OKEECHOBEE Ben Dixon 763-3257 BARTOW Donald Smith 533-8660 SARASOTA Leroy Fortner 371-4148
CLERMONT Carlisle Byrd 394-2959 ST. PETERSBURG Darryl Rejko 576-9214
FORT MYERS David McCormick 936-3372 TAMARAC Ed Haithcock 739-2772
FORT PIERCE Wally Long 461-0636 TAMPA, Paul Bearss 961-0474
Robert L. Williams 461-1392 VERO BEACH G. Sidney Stinson 562-5439 GROVELAND Steve H. Smith 429-2758
JUPITER Sunny Smith 746-5557
LAKE ALFRED Wade Wiggins 956-1433




Full Text

PAGE 1

FEBRUARY 1981 AND LIVESTOCK e e epl

PAGE 2

We can help you prevent Nutrena research this problem. developed Pasture 20 Poor cow condition now, (Winter) to meet the needs can mean bashful breeding of Florida cattlemen. after next calving season. This product has been Poor condition also conveniently designed to be reduces the cow's ability self fed or hand fed. Call to develop and drop a -) your nearest Nutrena strong, healthy calf. dealer to get all the details So the feeding decisions on this problem you make now are critical. -\ 7 solving product. We can help you improve herd performance. We wani to earn your feed business. NutrenaFeed Division 4014 40th Street, Tampa, Florida 33601 (813) 626-5171

PAGE 3

FLORIDA CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION A report from FCA headquarters WELLES NEEL FCA'S RECENT REQUEST FOR ACTION IN SETTING UP AN educational seminar designed to inform law enforcement agencies and others about the imminent danger faced by Florida regarding exotic diseases being carried into the state by drug smugglers and refugees has resulted in the program being set for February 11-12 at the Holiday Inn on International Drive in Orlando. The announcement of the seminar has been made by Commissioner of Agriculture Doyle Conner who said, "We have become genuinely concerned with the real threat and potential devastating effects that a foreign disease outbreak would have on our consumers and our agricultural industries." FCA President W. G. "Kayo" Welles said the seminar is coming none too soon as the agencies involved need to know more about the danger faced by both the livestock and plant industries of Florida. The seminar is designed to alert law enforcement personnel to the dangers of foreign diseases, establish guidelines for handling agricultural refuse at crime scenes and open communications between lawmen and producers for a more cooperative effort in reporting illegal entries and clandestine operations. President Welles urges all local association officials to contact their law enforcement representatives and inform them of the vital importance of their attending this seminar. PRESIDENT WELLES RECENTLY ANNOUNCED THE ASSOCIATION had retained the services of L. M. "Buddy" Blain as legislative representative. We are all aware of the importance of having an able and capable contact in Tallahassee and the association is fortunate to have the services of Buddy Blain. An attorney, he maintains offices both in Tampa and Tallahassee. A warm welcome is extended to this native Floridian. THE RECENT BEEF GRADING CONFERENCE IN AMES, IOWA, INDICATED that changes in beef grading standards are likely. It appeared there was general agreement that the beef business faces financial problems. There are other problems such as the production of excess fat and it appeared the trend is to change the system to reduce this production and encourage leaner beef. Changes might be coming about in the next two months or so. Attending the meeting from FCA were executive committee members Andy Tucker, chairman, Florida Beef Council; D. S. McAteer, feedlot committee chairman, and Polly Golden, home economist. Also in attendance were Mrs. JoAnn Smith, NCA's beef promotion and consumer relations chairman, and A. Z. Palmer, meats specialist from the University of Florida at Gainesville. BE SURE AND MAKE YOUR PLANS TO ATTEND THE QUARTERLY meeting on March 12-13, Thursday and Friday, in Arcadia. Full information will be coming soon on this homecoming meeting for President Kayo Welles. FLORIDA CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION (30s) 846-6221, Box 1929, Kissimmee 32741 Market News-30 628-0412 President W. G. Welles, Arcadia Phone 813 494-2471 First Vice President E. 1). Neel, Chipley Second Vice Presidents Ralph W. Cellon, Jr., Alachua Al Bellotto, Lakeland Secret ary Joe Marlin Hi liard, Clewiston Treasurer Bayard Toussaint, Punta Gorda Execute Vice President Executive Director, Fla. Beef Council Ron Stephens. Kissimmee Hone Economist Poliy Golden Past Presidents G. H. Prather (D~eceased) P. F Williams Davenport Dave Turner, (Deceased) Irlo Bronson, (Deceased) C. S. Radehangh. (Deceased) Ben Hill Griffin, Jr., Frostproof Jay B. Starkey, St Petersburg B. J. Alderman (Deceased) J. 0. Pearce, Jr., Okeechobee Alto Adams, Jr., Fort Pierce Louis Gtlbreath, Ocala George Kempfer (Deceased) Ralph (ellon, Sr., Alachua W. D. Roberts, Immokalee Latimer H. Turner, Sarasota Charles Lykes, Tampa R. D. Bennett, Greenwood Thomas IJ Sloan. Fort Pierce Pat Wilson, Frostproof Gilbert A. Tucker. Cocoa Cedrick M. Smith. Jr., Wacahoota Henry Do'lus, Zephyrhills Harvey A, hI Melbourne State Directors Fred Clark, Alachua E. L. Crews Jr., Baker 3 W. Lowrey, Bay Fred Mueller. Bradford Andy Tucker Brevard Martin Woodward, Brosard Gerald Cayson, Calhoun Bayard Touss int. Charlotte Mike Van Ness, Citrus S. D. aunders Clay R. A. Roherts, Collier Bud Fraser, Columbia John DuPuis, Jr., Dade Lloyd Ryals, DeSoto John 0. Osteen, Dinie F. D Gregory, Duval Alfred R. Tucker, Flagler How ell E. Lancaster, Jr., Gilchrist Billy Peeples, Glades Robert Ray Smith, Hardee Joe Marlin Hilliard, Hendry D. S .McAteer, Hernando Dan Childs Highlands Angelo Massaro, Hillshorough J. Pat Corrigan, Indian River Jack Calloway, Jackson John E. Hawkins, Jefferson Stanley E. Banter, Lake Nat Hunter, Lee Charles Field, Leon John Pendray, Levy 0. B. Shuler, Liberty Ronnie Smoak, Madison Tom Christian, Manatee Juck Cullison, Matrion Jim Cowen, Martin Curtis G. Quarrier, Nassau Bryan Jernigan, Northwest Marion Tidwell, Northwest Jeff Adams. Okaloosu Elwyn Bass, Okeechobee Joe Walter, Grange irlo (Bud) Bronson, Osceola Dave Young, Palm Beach Joe Barthle, Pusco Al Bellolto, Polk W. W. Tilton, Jr. Putnam Herschel Parrish St. Johns Wayne Carlton, St. Lucie B. T. Longino, Saurasota Wayne Jacobs, Seminole C. Aubrey Caruthers, Sumter Frank Garrard, Suwannee Rohert Ezell, Taylor Ray Cruwford, Union Elmer McDonald, Voluia Jer ry Spears. Wakcullas Earl Brngdon, Walton U. S. Harrison. Washington-Holmes THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 3

PAGE 4

'aleqoIa FEBRUARY I-6-NCA Convention .Phoenix AZ 4-15-Florida State Fair .Tampa 7-Beefalo Sale.Tampa 9-12-Range Mgmt. Meeting .Tulsa OK il2-Exotic Animal Dixease Seminar .Orlando 1-14 -SE Angus Futuristic Event .Bartow 13-Rush Bros. Hereford Sale .Lakeland 14-Lovana Farms Sale .Clarkesville GA 19-Florida Feedlot Clinic .Wauchula 20-22-Silver Spurs Rodeo ..Kissimmee 23-27ABS School ..Ocala 23-27-ABBA Annual Meeting .Houston TX 25-AgriBusiness Institute Meeting ..Tampa 26-National Brahman Sale .Houston TX 26-2810th American Furriers Conv. .Albuquerque NM 28-Sans Soxci Charo lais Sale ...Ocala 28-Goswick Beefmaster Sale .El Campy TX MARCH 5-7-SGBI Annual Meeting .Lake Buena Vista 6-FSGA Florida Festival Sale .Lake Buena Vista 7-Alabama Brangus Breeders Sale .Cullman AL 7-Ky. Limousin Ass'n Sale .Winchester KY 2-13-FCA Directors Meeting .Arcadia 13-15-All-Florida Champ. Rodeo .Arcadia 17-Graham Angus Open House .Albany GA 20-Bull Hill Ranch P'Hereford Sale .Laurens SC 21-ia. Limousin Asson Sale .Tifton GA 21-ISA Beefmaster Sale.San Angelo TX 27-High Field Farm Angus Disp ..l .Statesville NC 28-Carolina Angus Futurity .Clemson SC 29-Adonis Braford Bull Sale .San Angelo TX 3O-Santini Angus Sale .Lawrenceburg TIN APRIL 10-SE Beefmnaster Ass'n Sale .,.Tifton GA Il-So. Carolina Simmental Sale .Clemson SC 20-Briarhill Angus Sale .Union Springs AL 25-Santa Gertrudis Sale ..Laurens SC MAY -Harloff Limousin Sale .Bradenton l-2-Brahman Futurity & Sale .Wharton TX 2-Sunup Farms Angus Sale .Smithville MO 4-Angus Breeders Sale .Bowling Green KY 6-Single Tree Angus Dispersion .Staunton VA 6-8-Beef Cattle Short Course.Gainesville 9-No. Carolina Chianina Sale .Asheville NC 14-15-FIATC Trade Show .Tampa 16--Pace Setter" Sale .Cullman AL 16-Florida Limousin Breeders Sale .Ocala 23-Hutchinson Limousin Sale .Thomson GA 26-28-LCI Annual Meeting .,.St. Louis MO 30-Rogers P'Charolais Sale .Collins MS JUNE -Ozark Atigus Classic .Diamond MOD h-Starr Valley Angus Dispersion .Fayetteville AR 10-12-LMA Marketing Congress .Minneapolis MN 24-26-FCA Annual Convention .Marco Island JULY I1-Cajun Limousin Steer Sale .Lake City AUGUST 3-4-American Angus Futurity .Louisville KY 26-28-Brahman Clinic VII .Houston TX 29-Clover Hills Angus Sale .Spencer IN 29-Brahman Sale of Sales .Houston TX 30-Beefmaster Prod. Sale .San Antonio TX SEPTEMBER 5-LJ Bar Beefmaster Prod. Sale ..Pleasanton TX 19-SE Beefmaster Ass'n Sale .Jackson MS 30-BBU Annual Convention ..San Antonio TX OCTOBER 10-Hidden Valley Red Angus Sale .Brooksville 12-Bear Creek Beefmaster Sale .Franklin TN 17-Barfield Farms Beefmaster Sale .Immokalee 19-The Confederacy Beefmnaster Sale .Tampa 19-Gore Farms Angus Sale .Carthage TN Service Issues of The Florida Cattleman for 1981 January .American Breeds February-. Horses and Rodeos March. Brahmans April ..Performance May .Animal Health June .Florida Pastures July. Better Bulls August .-. Marketing September .Continental Breeds October .H&P Herefords November .Angus December .Santa Gertrudis FEBRUARY, 1981 attle tfl~a VOL. 45, NO. 5 AND LIVESTOCK JOURNAL Editor-James J. Flanagan, Deput" Editor-Donald E. Berry, Advertising Coordinator-Mrs. Lou Allen. Circulation-Mrs. Kate Smith. Write Box 1403, Kissimmee, Florida 32741. Phone (Area 305) 846-2800. Florida Toll Free (800) 432-9192. Owned and Published by the Florida Cattlemen's Association 4hls IU1onth's Contents Regular Departments FCA Reports .3 Editor's Desk .6 Latest Statistics .6 Now It's History .34 FCA Special Page .48 Livestock Roundup .53 Washington Report .58 President's By-Lines .76 Stories By-Stancil .90 Diagnostic Lab Notes-Rubin .96 Editorials ..98 Horse, Rodeo News Florida Cutters Compete .38 Spurs, Arcadia Rodeos Slated .40 Shows and Sales Bulls Sell Strong at Chipley .37 FSGA Sale Averages $1227 .37 Ocala Has Anniversary Sale .74 P'Hereford Pen Sale Told .60 Bulls Sell Well at Seffner .63 S'Gertrudis Sell at Georgia Event 89 Dairy News All-Breeds Show Held at Bartow ..92 Special Features Control Pollution! -Boggess .42 General News Animal Disease Seminar Set .36 FCA Names Blain to Post .36 Futures Contracts Revised .38 Feedlot Seminar Scheduled .41 State Fair Slates Ag Expo .45 FBCIA Elects Sexton .52 Florida Farm Sales in Billions ..54 Urban Encroachment Told .64 Strain 19 Status Given .66 Beef Price Increase Predicted ....78 Beef Seminars Held in State .82 Field Labs Open Around State .83 FIATC Trade Show Announced .86 Gama Grass Could Help .87 Breed Information Angus Sire Program Grows .46 Beefmaster Program Underway ..70 Florida to Host SGBI Meeting ..88 The Cover for February 1981 Our cover picture for this annual Florida horse and rodeo edition shows the late J. 0. Pearce, Sr., Okeechobee, on the range in south Florida in years gone by. The original painting was done by cowboy artist Buster Kenton of Kissimmee, who named the scene, "Taking a May Colt to Water." OFFICIAL P UBLICATION Florida Cattlemen's Association, W. G. Welles, President, Arcadia Eastern Brahman Association, Andy Tucker, President, Rockledge, Georgia Ga.-Fla. Charolais Association, Bill Casey, President, Cedartown, Georgia Southeastern Brangus Association, R. A. (Pete) Griffin, President, Talledega, Alabama Florida Angus Association, J. R. Thompson, President, Marianna Florida Santa Gertrudis Association, Try M. Burrell, President, Morriston 0 Florida Shorthorn Breeders Association, Jack Hooker, President, Plant City 0 Florida Hereford Association, Ron Smoak, President, Madison 0 Florida Meat Packers Association, Joe Teijerio, President 6 Florida Beef Council, Andy Tucker, Cocoa, Chairman Florida Cutting Horse Association, R. D. Welles, President, Arcadia Florida Association of Livestock Markets, L. H. Thompson, Jr., President, Gainesville Florida Simmental Association, J. Pat Corrigan, President, Vero Beach Association of Florida Rodeos, J. C. Bass, President, Okeechobee 0 Florida Polled Hereford Association, Dexter Douglass, President, Tallahassee & Florida Limousin Association, Maynard Osborne, President, Davie. The Florida Cattleman and Livestock Journal (ISSN 0015-3958); is published monthly for $5.00 for 1 year at Cody Publications, Inc., 410 West Verona Street, Kissimmee, Florida 32741. Second Class Postage paid at Kissimmee, Florida 32741. Postmaster: Send address changes to The Florida Cattleman and Livestock Journal, P. O. Box 1403, Kissimmee, Florida 32741. Rate Card mailed on request. Closing date 5th of preceding month. In circulation 25th of preceding month. Member Agricultural Publishers Association, American Agricultural Editor's Association, Florida Magazine Association, Livestock Publications Council, Audit Bureau of Circulation. 'PC CIVESOCK PUBLICATIONS COU NCIL 4 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 f nomAoo

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Moisture Protein NPN Molasses Ash Total Sugars Lick Wheel Liquid Feeds 32% 32% 28% 7% 12% 32% USSC'S Suga-Lik No. 5 16% 90/ 11% 40% If Not, ThenFEED high in total solids and sugars United States Sugar Telephones: 813/983-8121, 983-7946 Corporation CLEWISTON, FLORIDA 33440 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 5

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PR E-INVENTORY SALE CLOSEOUT PRICES ~Centufry Steel Buildings CALL TOLL-FREE 1-800-342-6301 26 Gauge Steel 30 x 20 x 12 $ 2,624 Open Span I Beam 50 x 40 x 14 $ 4,996 Construction 60 x 50 x 16 $ 7,597 Accessories Extra ALL STEEL -Other 30 x 48 x 12 $ 4,433 Sizes Available 50 x 72 x 14 $ 8,926 Limited Quantities 60 x 75 x 16 $11,916 21 -F.O.B. FACTORY LOCAL ZONiNG MAY AFFECT PRICES Name Address City State Telephone Zip KANAPAHA BEEFMASTERS Coming in the 1980's We are upgrading with 18 Lasater Beefmaster Bulls. We have 10 more Lasater Ranch Beefmaster Bulls contracted for delivery in 1981. We have Lasater Ranch Beefmaster Bull power in Florida for the 1980's. The 6 Essentials DISPOSITION FERTILITYY J WEIGHTT CONFRMATIONj HARDINESSI MILK PRODUCiON KANAPAHA BEEFMASTERS RanchW Idcon 1-5 Gfa inesvile, -L P0ic H ox 479 lacksnville, Ft, Mr. s Lews Lee Member. Foundation Beefmaster Ass'n. I I I (Editor's (,Des,4k New subscriber added to circulation list Marianna Please start sending me your fine magazine, The Florida Cattleman and Livestock Journal. I happened to find a July 1978 issue and was extremely impressed with the depth and scope of your articles Frederick B. Peters Author commented on his recent article La Verne, California .Saw "Beef Cow-Forever" in your last (November 1980) issue. It read real good. I hope it will help. Retirement is tremendous-no more seven day weeks .I enjoy Florida Cattleman; you do an excellent job Tony Cunha FIATC prexy comments on promotional event Winter Haven Thanks for the promotional folder about the Trade Fair of the Americas in Miami ...I hadn't seen it. Nice to have that much money to spend, and a professional management company to do the work, but I guess we'll just keep plugging along in our own way. Maybe our return per dollar spent is better than their's Ed David ILatest Statistics Commercial Slaughter and Average Weight (USDA) Cattle Calves Swine M Head Wt. M Head Wt. M Head Nov. 1980 (Fla.) 24.0 967 8.3 265 16.3 Nov. 1979 (Fla.) 32.7 1042 9.8 307 17.8 Nov. 1980 (U.S.) 2711.0 1070 214.2 248 7706.4 Nov. 1979 (U.S.) 2798.4 1071 240.0 235 8499.2 Slaughter Under State Inspection, Head (AITC) Cattle December 1980 3688 December 1979 3774 Brucellosis Testing (AITC) Beef Cattle, December 1980 Dairy Cattle, December 1980 Swine, December 1980 Livestock Prices Per Hundred (USDA) Cattle Cows Fla., Dec. 15, 1980 $53.90 $45.80 Fla., Nov. 15, 1980 54.90 44.00 U.S., Dec. 15, 1979 64.40 47.20 U.S., Dec. 15, 1980 59.10 41.70 Wt. 224 215 246 245 Sheep M Head .1 432.7 403.2 Calves 71 14 Tested Reactors 85,605 1246 33,415 222 Strs. Hfrs. $61.90 61.10 69.00 64.70 Calves $ 64.80 65.60 84.30 70.80 Wt. 80 114 114 Swine 16,630 14,347 Vaccinated cahes Adults 8772 2986 2646 1374 Swine $43.50 45.00 37.50 43.90 Chickens $28.50 28.50 25.20 29.70 Field Crop Prices Per Bushel and Ton (USDA) U.S., Dec. 15, 1980 U.S., Dec. 15, 1979 Corn (Bushel) $3.20 2.38 6 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 DEMOCRAT Kika De La Garza (Texas), has been selected to be chairman of the U.S. House Agriculture Committee. He is shown here when he was the featured speaker at the opening of USDA's export office in Coral Gables in the fall of 1978. 7Mr. David, who heads up the Florida International Agricultural Trade Council, is probably right in his closing sentence. His group, with its annual trade show, does a top job of helping export some of Florida's agricultural commodities. The 11th annual event is slated for May 14-15 at the State Fairgrounds in Tampa. See article on page 86 of this issue. Hay, Baled (Ton) $74.20 61.00 I

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N** e -go

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Owna Harvestore system I a Admit it, you'd like to own one but wonder if you'd be able to pay for it. But have you ever wondered if you're paying for a Harvestore system and still don't have one? Paying for it with the high cost of protein .and storage losses. and sweat and strain. and poor results when you are forced to feed rain-damaged crops. Maybe you're paying for a Harvestore system without owning one. Find out. Start by filling out the coupon below and mailina it to us. rm ready. Please send me additional information about Harvestore' storage systems and feeding equipment. To: GIogii-loridki trvcswre. hic. lol%,,o Roai ^" 6A 3171 Name Address Town County State Zip -Phone (Area Code Number Acres farmed Dairy Hogs Beef (Number) (Number) (Number) (Number) Georgia-Florida Harvestore, Inc. Tobacco Road Attapulgus, Georgia 31715 AC (912) 465-3987 LY KES AC Pasture Grove Fertilizer Division For your pasture or grove materials, write or call: P. 0. Box 97, 904-567-5622, Dade City, Fl. 33525 WE STRIVE FOR REPEAT CUSTOMERS Spencer and Welch join in cattle business enterprise George S. Spencer and John W. Welch have announced the formation of a new company, Summit Cattle Enterprises, Inc. the Denver, Colorado-based firm, a joint venture with Bob Refenacht of Phoenix, Arizona, will be involved in several aspects of the beef cattle business. Spencer, who will be president of the company, was executive vice president of the National Cattlemen's Association (and the Spencer former American National Cattlemen's Association) for 10 years prior to resigning last August. Welch, also a former NCA staff member, has been in cattle management, risk management and commodity brokerage work for the past three (3) years. He will be vice president of the new firm. Rufenacht owns and operates a commodity brokerage business, Rufenacht Commodities, and he is also involved in his own cattle operations. Spencer said that a principal part of Summit operations will be a commodities office, as the Colorado branch of Rufenacht Commodities. The new company also will offer marketing management services for cattle producers and feeders. Services will include buying and selling cattle, forward contracting and hedging. In addition, Summit will provide order-buying services through r.------.Want More I Information? The Florida Cattleman I Drawer 1403 Kissimmee, Florida 32741 I Please get me information on the material below. (Check more than one box if you wish.) Offer good until May 1, 1981. 0 101. Cunha Book l 102. Swiss Clipper 0 103. Wadler Baler l 104. Franklin Ramrod l 105. Biodry Treatment L 106. Agri-Fan Name Address ........ Phone ........... City State ZIP 8 / TFHE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981

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We're reducing our herd numbers due to owners age and to selling some of our pasture land. The following items for sale at private treaty 25 heifers available by March 1. Bred heifers, yearling heifers, and 10 month old heifers. Top quality foundation breeding stock. 40 cows, some with calves at side available April 1. A good selection of yearling bulls and weaned bull calves now on feed efficiency test. Herd bull prospects and commercial bulls. A few top quality 3 & 4 year old bulls. (All are from foundation breeding stock) SEMEN AND FERTILITY: Mr. Don Schlesier, Box 26088, Jacksonville, Florida 33218. Phone 904/757-1533. Don has been collecting semen and semen testing for over 20 years. He has a reputation for absolute honesty. Last year, when he started collecting and freezing semen for us, after collecting from our first bull, he started shouting for me. When I walked over to his portable lab, he told me that it was some of the best semen by far he had ever seen and he was very much excited as to how the cattle were bred. Special: Kelly Duplex 11 Ton Feed Mixer with Molasses Blender. Conveyors, gauges, etc. all intact. In very good condition. Save approximately 40% on feed bills by operating your own mixer-blender. EL DORADO HEREFORD FARM Shown by appointment only. We do not have hired help so to make sure someone can meet you call after 7:00 p.m. Lorin and Gladys Anderson, Owners 904/567-3413 4301 S. Hwy. 301, Dade City, Florida THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 9

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Super-Mol Products Dried Molasses* Dried Distillers Molasses Solubles (Super-Ferm) Protein Blocks* Livestock Minerals* Hi-Mag Blocks (aids in preventing grass tetany) Other Blocks *Available under private label, A Double Feature Mixing SaltTampa Salt Distributors Salt for all agricultural needs, bulk/bag Ingredients for feed mixing Bicarbonate of Soda Urea Trace Minerals Vitamins Other Agricultural'items Processed Minerals, Inc. Super-Mol Products Toll Free: 800/282-9149 813/677-9181 P.O. Box 1478 Gibsonton, FL 33534 Tampa Salt Distributors 813/677-8477 L I AN EARTAG AD THAT'LL MAKE YOU MAD. You'll be mad. Absolutely mad. Mad about, that is, the custom imprinted eartags from AiD Laboratories. You'll also be mad about the SuperSpeed service for every eartag order. Start to finish in 72 hours. Want something special? AiD will custom imprint your logo or practically anything for a nominal charge. Initial orders will take two weeks, reorders just 72 hours. 10 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 So, call us names if you want. Or call us numbers. -Just call us an order. We promise not to get mad. (813) 763-0225 AiD LABORATORIES, INC. 1800 East North Park Street Okeechobee, Florida 33472

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Day and night, horn flies pierce hides and extract blood. Often 500 to 1,000 live on an unprotected animal. In 24 hours, entomologists estimate 600 horn flies bite an animal 4,200 to 13,800 times. Daily blood loss and harassment may cut milk production as much as 20%, according to the USDA, and reduce weight gains on growing cattle as much as 1/2 lb per head daily. Don't let bloodsucking horn flies torment your grazing cattle Start feeding MoorMan's IGR before the fly season starts It's easy to stop horn flies before they develop wings, thanks to the insect growth regulator in MoorMan's IGR products for grazing cattle. IGR passes through their digestive tracts to manure. There it stops horn fly development in the harmless pupal state. They never mature into adult flies that torment cattle, suck blood, cause cattle to waste energy or grazing time. This amazing insect growth regulator is available exclusively in MoorMan's IGR mineral products. It's the selective pesticide methoprene (Altosid*). *Trademark of Zoecon Corp. U.S. Patents 3,904,622 and 3,912,815. Potential IGR benefits from stopping horn flies These are for an average horn-fly season and population in the U.S., with IGR fed continuously for 150 days-starting before horn flies appear: Cows and calves: $7 to $10 of IGR can save as much as 40 to 50 lbs weaning weight per calf. Stocker cattle: $4 to $6 of IGR can save up to 75 lbs weight gain per head. Dairy cows: $8 to $10 of IGR can save as much as 750 lbs milk per cow. For about 51 per head daily, you can stop horn flies and supply your grazing cattle a scientific combination of base and trace minerals, plus vitamins A and D. IGR's full-time action keeps horn-fly numbers from ever building up. They have not developed resistance, as with organic-phosphorus feed-through products, in customer's 5-season IGR use. It stops development of horn flies resistant to sprays and dusts. IGR does not harm fish, wildlife, etc. You have a choice of four IGR products to feed freechoice to your grazing beef cattle: MoorMan's IGR Mineralsin comes in loose, processed form. MoorMan's IGR Mineral Block. MoorMan's Special Phos IGR Minerals-high in phosphorus and in loose, processed form. MoorMan's Hi-MagR IGR Minerals-high in magnesium and in loose, processed form. Get details from our representative on IGR products and on our Wind-Vane Feeder, ideal for feeding IGR. m Co Qi n L 20 Reasons to order IGR now: (1) Have it on hand to begin feeding before the fly season. (2) Preseason discount. THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 11

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FARM EQUIPMENT AUCTION EQUIPMENT BELONGING TO McKINSTRY FARMS McKinstry Farms has discontinued their Cattle & Swine Feeding Operation. They have also discontinued their Hay & Row Crop Farming Operations. McKinstry Farms has commissioned Miller Equipment & Auction Co. to dispose of their equipment at public auction. AUCTION DATE: February 7, 1981, 10:00 A.M., near Blackshear, Georgia. LOCATION: From Blackshear, take Hwy. 203 N, 4 miles to Country Store, turn left on County Rd., go 3 miles, sale on right. From Alma, take Hwy. #1 S, to Radio Station Rd., turn left, go app. 18 miles to Lees Grocery, turn left, go 2 miles, sale on left. WATCH FOR AUCTION SIGNS! TRACTORS 4386 Int. w/Duals, 1978, 1000 Hrs. 1130 MF w/Duals, less Tires, 1972 1100 MF, 1972 504 Int., Diesel 35 MF, Diesel 35 MF, Diesel 840 AC 4 W D Loader w/Root Rake D8H Caterpillar w/Hyster Winch & Hyd., Angle Blade, SN# 35A4615, Rome KG Blade, Root Rake, Stump Head w/Splitter 815 Int Combine, Diesel, Hydro, w/15 Ft. Grain, 843 Corn, 844 Corn Head Airco Portable Welder 1000 Gal. Nurse Tank Ford Pumping Unit 35 MF Parts Roller Packer Bermuda King 20" Grass Digger Bermuda King 2 Row Grass Sprigger Sprayer Several Rolls New 12 Strand Fence Wire Several Hundred New Fence Post 550 Irrigation Gun 20 Ft. Cattle Body 1973 Ford Service Truck FARM EQUIPMENT 8 Ton New Holland Spreader HAY & FEEDING E 61 Ft. Jet Flow Auger Feed Wagon 29 Ft. Bush Hog Hyd. Fold Harrow (2) Crop-Carrier 8 Ron Silage Wa 6 Row 300 Gal. BoMac Nitrogen App. Farr Hay Tedder 9 Ft. Southern Offset Harrow New Idea Hay Rake Toward Rotovator, 130" 850 New Holland Hay Baler 8 Row 30" W & A Ripper Planter w/ New Holland Hay Bine (8) 71 J Planters 352 New Holland Feed Mill 200 Gal. Johnson Sprayer (2) 27 New Holland Silage Blowe S But. MF Plow 3 Heads 8 Row 30" illiston cult. Hay Lift 12 Ft. MF Harrow Service Rake 125 Sank Athens Chisel Plow 15 Ton Feed Body, 22 Ft. Utility ITrailer 320 Gehl Tub Grinder Mixer w/S 5 Ft. Rotary Mower Kuhn Disk Hay Mower PT) 4" Irrigation Pump 1972 Dodge Truck w/Silage Bod Post Driver Several Cow Feeders 12) 200 Gal. Saddle Tanks Several Hay Racks Miscellaneous Items, Too Numerous to List, INSPECTION: Thursday, Feb. 5 until Sale Time TERMS: Cash or Company Approved Check GAL #392 SALE CONDUCTED BY: MILLER EQUIPMENT & AUCTION COMPANY Hazlehurst, Georgia FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL: Miller Equipment & Auction Co. 912-375-2322 QUIPMENT gon rs cales y GAL #374 Manager Jackie Jordan, Farm 912-449-6198 Sale Rain or Shine-Lunch Available-Not Responsible For Accidents one of Rufenacht's companies, Cactus Cattle Company. Another activity will be the company's own pasturing and feeding of cattle. Summit Cattle services and operations will be national in scope. The commodity brokerage services, Welch said, will involve all types of futures contracts, including grain, livestock and financial instruments. Summit Cattle Enterprises opened for business on January 5, 1981. Its offices will be located in the Inverness office complex southeast of Denver. The address is 8 Inverness Court East, Englewood, Colorado. The phone is 303/779-0952. Before joining the former ANCA in 1970, Spencer was in public relations and packing plant management positions with Swift & Company. Earlier he was a vocational agriculture teacher in his native Utah. When he resigned f r om N C A Spencer indicated that he wanted to devote more time to his family and remain in Denver, while being involved in the livestock business. Welch, an Welch agricultural economics graduate of Texas A&M University, was with Cattle-Fax, the marketing analysis service associated with NCA, and with NCA for several years. Later he was with Triple G Feedlot, Brighton, Colorado, in charge of risk management. Most recently he has been in cattle management and commodity brokerage, as a vice president of Taurus Corporation, Boulder, Colorado. Rufenacht was a founder and principal in Rufenacht, Bromagen & Hertz, a commodity brokerage firm, before the firm was sold in 1977. In 1978 he established Rufenacht Commodities, and he acquired cattle ranching and feedlot properties which are part of Rufenacht Land & Cattle Company, which also operates Cactus Cattle Company, an order-buying business. 101-Horse feeding and nutrition book authored by Cunha A 300 page text devoted entirely to horse feeding and nutrition has been written by Dr. Tony J. Cunha, dean emeritus and horse nutrition authority from California State Polytechnic University at Pomona. Cunha previously was chairman of the animal science department at the University of Florida, Gainesville, for 25 years and retired there in 1975 as Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus. The book has 50 photographs and 20 chapters. The book discusses the future of the horse industry, myths in feeding, relative value of feeds, vitamins, minerals, protein, amino acids, carbohydrates, fiber, fatty acids, fat, volatile 12 / THE FLORIDA CATTrLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 LOWCOST fT EELL IMBE R BUILDINGS 4.9 P.O. Box 3335 FOREST CITY TERMS A VA/LA ELE FLORIDA 32751 q e~ AN'T 0 .RG scis a N\t 'C'~5 AN5

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SUGAR'S PREPOTENT FEMALE Ont At Sugarland Ranch we place emphasis on the superior meat type qualities of our females as well as our bulls. The prepotency of the cow and her consistent production is by far the most important trait in our herd. Capitalize on the potential of Sugar's females and inject the ultimate in performance into your herd. SUGARLAND RANCH Owned and Operated by United States Sugar Corporation 813/983-8121 Clewiston, Florida 33440

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(And its the only wormer that does.) (1 fl I "'n iiiddiI"I 11 j Ii t ijii I 'l I h I I 'lC l dI 11 "C0CI 1 C i ll 110 111 ) I LI ..i a CI~Ci ( ~ iC-jIC. i C,~~ ~C. I Cii .Cll Cn~lniiil"",-1 0 11 C1Ll Only Tramisol' gets all the worms worth getting. and6 UPPLY COMPANY of FLORIDA INC. Fla. Hwy. 579 & Main St. Thonotosassa, Ph: 813/986-2491 LOOK WHAT WE HAVE TO OFFER Complete Palmetto Removal Dozer, Loader, Grader, Heavy and Light Discing Two Rotovators Modified for Sod fieldss PARKS BROTHERS T Land Clearing Call us Collect Due to the tremendous response another Palmetto Removal Machine has been added to our Fleet of Machinery. 1300 N.W. 9th St. Okeechobee, FL Ph: 813/763-0261 A. -7 DAVID 813/322-1269 Route 1 or GLEN 813/322-1582 Box 80D Myakka City, Florida "TramisollmSO cattle Worme OBLETS Tramnisof RJECTABLE SOLU"1N 6 soube drench Powder 14 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 fatty acids, energy, water, antibiotics, pastures, hay, hints on feeding, feeding behavior, and other related topics. The nutritional requirements of the horse and deficiency symptoms of nutrients are discussed. The practical application of the basic information presented in the book is discussed in chapters on feeding the foal, the growing horse, the performance and race horse as well as the stallion and the mare during gestation and lactation. Sample rations are given and discussed. They can be used as guides for developing other rations for horses. The book is written in a fashion which is very easy to follow and understand. It is designed to be valuable for beginners in horse production, to established horse owners and trainers; and to those who are concerned, either directly or indirectly, with horse feeding, nutrition or ration formulation. The book is also designed to be especially helpful for county agents, farm advisors, vo-ag teachers, veterinarians, pharmaceutical companies, university and college teachers and students, lending agencies and firms which produce nutrients, products and services for the feed and horse industries. For more information check number 101 and return the form on page 8. Modern production practices increase need for vitamin D As more and more cattlemen move to confinement housing and feeding of high concentrate rations, silages and artifically dried forages, cattle will need supplemental vitamin D. Under these conditions, cattle are robbed of adequate amounts of vitamin D from natural sources such as sunlight and sun-cured forages. Cattle which are fed high energy rations to increase growth rates have a greater metabolic demand for vitamin D, according to spokesmen with the department of agriculture and animal health, H offman-La Roche, Inc., Nutley, New Jersey. Vitamin D, one of the essential vitamins for proper growth, regulates the metabolism of calcium and phosphorus. It promotes calcium absorption from the intestine and aids in calcification of bone by increasing the uptake of minerals by bone tissues. Without adequate vitamin D, bone development is impaired and poor growth results. Cattle will eat less and digestive problems may occur. Often cattle will walk with a stiff gait, show labored breathing, irritability, weakness and occasionally tetany and convulsions. Vitamin D deficiencies are also characterized by enlarged joints, arching of the back, bowing of legs and erosion of joint surfaces, all of which cause difficulty in moving. In severe cases, fracture of the vertebrae and paralysis may occur. Even though severe vitamin D deficiencies are seldom fatal, lack of the vitamin does predispose cattle to other diseases.

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TRA 'Soc The Payoff: *Tramisol levamisole is efPayoff.that's why any smart cattleman deworms. fective against all 9 major cattle worms, inAnd more cattlemen deworm with Tramisol than any other prodgldi stoMach, intestinal and lungwvorms.ut Asin e treatment level controls all degrees uct. Simply because it pays off better. of infection. Compatible with other standOnly Tramisol gets every major cattle worm with a single treatard management practices. ment. And when you get all the worms, you also get faster-growing animals with more added value at market time. A 3-year published study proves it.** So treat your calves with Tramisol just after weaning. And treat yourself to the Tranisol Payoff. Tra~mis.qn* It naysu n htter beca-use it iwrks better. **A wnpetemmaryM[I be nuffleid mn r~uesL FCVAWJAMJD

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ELECW A -*POWERHOUSE THE AUSTRALIAN SYSTEM Of CATTLE CONTROL Did you know that one ELECTRA POWERHOUSE Electric fence charger can control all the fences on a 2000 ACRE RANCH. Florida and Australia have similar weather conditions: eery dry and sometimes very wet. The Electra Powerhouse has been especially developed to cope with Australia's very big ranches to cat fencing cost and provide complete control not available trom any other tensing system. The Electra Volt meter reads up to 6000 volts and gives you complete technical control of your Electric fencing system. ELECTRA Stand off will beef up your fencing. Clips on to uny two wires in an existing tence and puts the electrified wire where it should be, 12' out tram the tence line. Made of galvanised heavy gauge spring steel with Pinlock insulator. ELECTRA Nail-On Insulator for all wood posts. The Stockyard 1010 Cattlemar Road A complete range of Electra accessories is available to transform your fencing system with lower costs for maintenance and Bull Proof Subdivisional fencing. FIBREMAX. FIBREGLASS POSTS & DROPPERS. ELECTRA FENCE STRAINERS to keep your wires permanently tight, HIGH tensile wire. Costs less and means less posts. COMPLETELY NEW Fencing technology. Developed over 30 years to suit Australia's tough conditions. *Wehave units ready for Immediate Delivery right here n Florida. Full technical Information and Service Facilities. Dick Kearley Route 3, Box 55 Phil Griner Rt. 1, Box 703 Sarasota, Florida 33582 Hawthorne, Florida 32640 HayneS, Florida 338 813/371-6462 904/481-3998 813/439-4698 OAKEN AUSTRALIA (U.S.A.) INC. 6955 SOUTH A1A MELBOURNE BCH. FLA. 32951 TEL. 305-727-3469. Major Animal Health Products A complete qi% line of western wear Gainesville Stockman Supply 5001 N.W. 13th St. (Stockyards) Gainesville, Fla. 32601 904/372-8916 Stockman Supply Co. Hwy. 27 South, 3 miles (Agri-Civic Center) Sebring, Fla. 33870 813/382-2526 Alb.y The stores that Service built / ELECT RA voftmeter "Your most dependable source of supply' 16 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 44 Supplemental vitamin D can help maintain optimum performance and help reduce the effects of stress in cattle. Adequate amounts of vitamin D usually cannot be supplied by feedstuffs alone. It is important to review the vitamin supplementation needs of range and feedlot cattle periodically to assure that supplemental vitamin levels are sufficient to offset conditions that can cause even marginal deficiencies and hinder optimum performance. 102-Clipper offered for cattle and horses Available from The Coburn Company, Whitewater, Wisconsin, and manufactured in Switzerland comes a heavyduty electric animal clipper called the Universal/Swiss clipper. It's made to exacting specifications and has a patented rotor which eliminates the major cause of breakdowns. Despite its high initial cost, over 80,000 Universal/Swiss clippers have been sold throughout the world in the past 12 years. For more information check number 102 and return the form on page 8. Swift goes to boxed beef Swift Independent Packing Company will open a boxed beef plant at Des Moines, Iowa, in its first major expansion move, it was announced today by John A. Copeland, president and chief executive officer. The facility will process some 300,000 head of cattle a year acquired in the Iowa area for approximately $230,000,000. Copeland said beef production in Des Moines will be initiated by early January at a former Swift & Company beef plant that was closed in July, 1979, due to economic conditions. He estimated operations in the city by Swift Independent Packing will create jobs for 500 employees at full production and generate an annual payroll in excess of $10,000,000. Swift Independent Packing consists of key assets of the former Fresh Meats Division of Swift & Company. It commenced operations as a separate corporate entity on October 27. Copeland said the opening of beef operations in Des Moines was prompted by increased fed cattle marketings in Iowa, and anticipated cost efficiencies to the new Swift Independent Packing Company. As a free standing corporate entity, Swift Independent Packing has 13 modern processing plants for beef, pork, lamb and broilers, and holds a unique position in the meat industry with a nationwide complex of 77 retail and food service sales and distribution centers. Swift Independent Packing has annual revenues of approximately $2 billion. Of this, approximately 80 percent represents sales to retail outlets and further processors, and 20 percent sales L

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More yield per field. m .~ ...&r -. 2 .fi.ie, lR.AIN BOW

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MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM M PHENOTHIAZINE M 711ttavREGULAR DRENCH ESALSE 188 M For Removal of Stomach M Worms, Nodular Worms, M Large-Mouth Bowel Worms M and Hookworms in Cattle, M M Sheep & Goats. M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M Economical and Effective M M Worm Control in Cattle, M U Sheep and Goats. U Dependable Since 981 YEARS WADLER MANUFACTURING Company's big bale handler mounts on pickup trucks in seconds and fits any vehicle. to institutions, making the new company one of the largest suppliers of red meat to the food service market. 103-Bale handler fits on pickup truck A big bale handler that fits any pickup truck is now being produced by Wadler Manufacturing Company of Galena, Kansas. The rig mounts in all truck beds and is outfitted with a portable, 12-volt winch that has a 3000-pound capacity. A bale can be speared, lifted, moved and removed by remote control from the truck's cab. The pickup bale handler is designed for fast assembly and removal. Either THE AFFORDABLE SYSTEM U SAVES YOUR VALUABLE FORAGE, RAIN OR SHINE highest hourly capacity and most omical sealed storage system available Forage is perishableunlimited total capacity. Stores all forage cut it green, s as well as high moisture grains. store it green, ore information, contact: Ag-Bag Corp. of Fla. feed it green (Book) Cunningham 904/795-2025, 904/795-4436 with the Ag-Bagger. Route 1, Box 7008, Crystal River, Florida 32629 The econ with crop Form L. E. 18 / THE FI.ORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 -Mm +x Il

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More nutrition, pound for poundfank top to bottom. Unlike conventional liquid feeds, Purina Sup-R-LixO brand supplement is homogenized So it can carry more and a better balance of nutrients-like water insoluble minerals and high energy fat, And the nutrition stays uniform, won't separate out. Your cows get a complete, body-conditioning, appetizing supplement every time they lick the wheel. In cow/ o \ calf operations across the country, Sup-R-Lix outperformed conventional liquid supplements on all important counts. Helped cows produce more early calves, heavier calves at weaning, breed back faster. This winter, balance the nutrition deficiencies in forages with SupR-Lix-get the performance eo of highest quality dry supplement with self-fed, liquid convenience. Have your Purina Dealer fill your tanks with the superstar of liquid supplements: Sup-R-Lix. Purina Q Ralston Purina Co., 1980 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 19 ,.1 4UPOR

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Fenton's Fiberglass Liquid Feeders Backed by 38 years of Pictured is Fenton Quality gal. model. Reinforced with a steel brace for maneuverability. Wheel brackets remove from top for easy maintenance. Lick-wheels can be placed vertically or horizontally. the 350 gal. model. Also available in 250 Both come with four lick-wheels. Field tested by selected Florida cattlemen for one year. Fully assembled. Free delivery on volume orders. 20 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 F ENTON'F EEDERS Ph. 813/494-2727. Route 1, Box 124 ARCADIA, FLORIDA 33821 "Q Jennings Multi-Purpose Equipment Hinge type hookup holds rear of fork to bucket. Take front and Long ribbon line of hay is shown for easy access by cattle for rear mounts off and on in 5 minutes. feeding in pasture or for baling old hay in square bales. Handles 4' and 5' wide bales. JENNINGS & SON MFG. Member, Florida Cattlemen's Association Route 2A, Box 163 Phones 904/629-4127 & 732-3574 MORRISTON, FLORIDA 32668 job can be done in seconds. The side rails, bale spear and rear frame are secured with quick hitch pins and an instant-coupling hitch. The bale spear also can be used on a three-point hitch. The entire unit weighs 219 pounds and is load rated at 2000 pounds. The portable winch comes equipped with a 50-foot cable and a snatch block for double cable hook-ups. For more information check number 103 and return the form on page 8. Cattleman faces problems with growth of his ranch As if the effects of drought, parasites and sparse vegetation don't pose enough challenges for the managers of the Putnam ranch near Bartow, they also have undertaken the added pressures of expansion. Owner Dudley Putnam began his expansion in 1978 with the purchase of 109 Brahman heifers in the 500-pound range. He has continued in recent years by purchasing additional land in Hardee County, bringing his present total acreage to 3000. "We've got a lot of decision-making to do around here because of our expansion," he says. "So we've got to have a sound management program to keep on top of things. "First of all, we had to decide whether we wanted to start raising our own heifers or continue buying them," 0+

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Ancestry animals are not eligible for registration as Beefalo, but under certain circumstances, their offspring may be. Presenting BEEFALO ANCESTRY CATTLE from Florida Dear Cattleman, There is a revolution among the consumers of America! No longer can we afford to pay the price for that good "Red Meat" being produced by "Conventional Cattlemen", breeding "Conventional Cattle", finishing them for market at 2-3 years old on high "Conventional Feeds." The successful infusion 22 years ago of the American Buffalo blood into our domestic cattle was the beginning of a new era for the industry. Feed tests confirm that Beefalo will produce a superior carcass in less than 2 years that will yield more high quality red meat at a remarkably lower cost than the conventional Bovine. The "Flying M" is dedicated to the development of these great Beefalo. We have selected some of the best foundation cattle in the country for our breeding program and have mated them with the Super Sires of the future. Many of our cattle are safe in calf to our own 3/4 Buffalo Bulls (Revolution I and II) to produce 3/8 Bison calves. Our program is one of continuing research and development as we will never let prejudice and ignorance prevent improvement and progress. The Buffalo influence into our industry is destined to be the most important advent of the century and "Flying M" is proud and excited to be a part of it. We have designed our breeding programs to allow selected sales at private treaty this fall and winter of 1980. (1) From the top end of our foundation herd bred to our "Revolution I or II" to drop 3/8 Bison calves. (2) 3/8 Bison calves by the "Revolution" Bulls. (3) 1/2 and 3/4 Beefalo cattle bred and open. Our purpose for making these superb cattle available is to encourage a few more solid, dedicated people into the Beefalo Fold so that our growth in other geographical areas may benefit all of us. Come to see us. You are always welcome! Sincerely S. E. MONTGOMERY VISIT US AT THE TAMPA FAIR The Florida Chapter of American Beefalo Association Sale will be at the Florida State FairgroundsTampa, Florida. SHOW: Friday, February 6, 1981 at 4:00 P.M. SALE: Saturday, February 7, 1981 at 4:00 p.m. WE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU THERE! S. E. MONTGOMERY 1001 Montgomery Lane, Leesburg, FL 32748 (904) 787-0773 Ranch (904) 748-3482 Office-S. E. or Wanda THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 21

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Hign floataion custom appiicaion ...-oii, ieai an water testing along with a complete consulting service ...Florida's most experienced personnel over 100 years total experience ...all new fluid lime and fertilizer combinations ...feed and weed ... complete line of injector pumps, tanks and fittings call and find out why so many growers depend on us to solve their production problems, we are experts in plant nutrition ...three convenient locations. FIELDMEN: North: Steve Dubose 904-497-2635 Central: Tom Dorman 305-889-3212 (Citrus) Tom Lockhart 904-383-0294 (Crops and pasture) South: Donnie Yeomans 813-983-6791 P. 0. Box 790 Zellwood, Florida 32798 Chem In Florida Call: 1-800-432-6928 or 305-886-7900 LIQUID SUPPLEMENT has helped Dudley Putnam, right, maintain profits despite economic and weather setbacks. Going over records with him are his wife, Sally, and Ed Weink, farm manager. he recalls. "When we bought our Brahman heifers, our goal was to get them into shape for breeding and to get as many good-gaining, healthy calves as we could." To get a consistent daily gain, the firm utilized a feed supplement during the colder months. A liquid user for years, Putnam is unhappy with most varieties because of the high moisture content he found in them. "I've fed liquids as long as anybody around here, and I've bought a lot of water because the products didn't do "The Florida Connection" Florida Owned, Florida Operated and Manufactured. 80,000 sq. ft. of Manufacturing Area. Over 30 years of Experience with Sales Throughout Southeast U.S. and Puerto Rico. A Complete Line of Quality Assured Buildings. PEAI Steel Buildings, Inc. 2942 PALM AVE. FT. MYERS, FL 33901 (813) 334-1051 "YOUR BETTER ____ MlIiU METAL BUILDING BUILDER" 22 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 11r ~I-ommmimbib LIQUID 0 0 ~

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what they were supposed to do," he says. "I wouldn't mind paying for water if it was in the form of rain, but not in my feed supplement." Putnam learned of a new hoR A K E Smogenized liquid supplement, Sup-RFOR Lix, from his local feed store manager F ~~~~ ~ ~ L ROTMDLO DR/ULD ZR Smith, which contains only 30 FRO NTEND LOADERS/BULLDOZE RS percent moisture. Research results have shown that Sup-R-Lix can provide daily gains that are 10 to 15 percent greater than conventional liquids with a seven to 10 percent improvement in feed efficiency and gives performances similar to high quality dry supplements. "Our heifers really went after it," says Putnam. "They had no problems making those lick tank wheels sing. We came in with better than 85 percent calf crop that year. It was a highly successful feeding program and our cows consumed just about what we expected." In September of 1978 Putnam sold the calves as the weather turned dry. He estimates the average weight at sale was 450 pounds. Pleased with the results, Putnam now provides the supplement to his cattle year-round instead of just during winter months. Putnam faced another decision created by the land expansion when ALLIS-CHALMERS, CASE, CATERPILLAR, JOHN local veterinarians began advising preDEERE, FIAT-ALLIS, FORD, IHC, CLARK, PEMI E Oi IN .ventive worming. With the size of his rEREX, YALE, TROJAN, MF P. 0. Box 899 -Longwood Industrial Park land and no significant freezes to kill the Longwood,(Orlando), Florida 32750, USA worms, he faced the possibility of SEE YOUR DEALER TWX/TE LEX 810-853-5034 305/831-668 serious health problems if infestation occurred unnoticed. MR. FARM AND RANCH EQUIPMENT DEALER, Would You Like to Increase Your Export Sales? Join The Florida International Agricultural Trade Council Exhibit in the ELEVENTH FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL AGRIBUSINESS TRADE SHOW May 14 & 15, 1981 Florida State Fairgrounds, Tampa, Florida Co-sponsored by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Doyle Conner, Commissioner Write: FIATC, Room 430, Mayo Building, Tallahassee, Florida 32301 24 / TIE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981

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"'J1 I I I I 1 9 10 J4 I I q"Y", I I .1 a 11 ---I

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BUILDINGS DESIGNED TO MEET YOUR REQUIREMENTS Strongpanel Roofing and siding in stock to 24 ft. Cannonball hardware Penta treated structural posts STRONGPOST STRUCTURES 1629 N. Ohio Ave. Live Oak, FL 32060 Call collect 904/362-2548 for building quotes BUILDING -SPECIAL 30x50x12 erected in Florida $7,995. Includes one slide door AGRICULTURAL 1. Cattle 2. Swine 3. Horse 4. Poultry INDUSTRIAL COMMERCIAL TURNKEY or BUILDING PKGS. PUREBRED & COMMERCIAL CATTLE RA NCH W-W Equipment Off: 904/629-5050 J. cuilison: 694-4322 F. Quance: 622-3561 4900 NW. Blichton Rd. OCALA, FLORIDA 32671 (Hwy. 27, west of 1-75) Promote BEEF Support Your every day .Florida Beef Council r-------------.----------. Florida Beef Council P. 0. Box 1929 Kissimmee FL 32741 Would you like to be reminded that it's time to send in your direct contribution to the Florida Beef Council? (Circle one.) YES NO Name Address City L----------------------------4 RAMROD from Franklin Laboratories features heavy insulated wires in a flexible shaft. "I started a comprehensive program to help rid my cattle of worms 12 years ago," he says. "We've used different wormers, on our vet's advice, to cut down worm resistance." Additionally Putnam takes stool samples regularly which his vet examines under a microscope for worms. This is a major project and becomes even more difficult each year as the Putnam herd continues to grow. But he is not deterred. The drought this past year and the market squeeze have taught this experienced cattleman that there is no shortcut to proper management and planning. Just good, oldfashioned, hard work, he notes. Strickler joins Coleman sales management staff Charles Strickler of Banco, Virginia has joined the staff of Coleman Sale Management Service, Inc., Charlottesville, Virginia, as an agent of the company in their service to livestock producers in sale management, herd sire selection, consultation, and tent rental facilities. Strickler has been actively working livestock events since his graduation from VPL His experience in Angus breed publication work and ring service gives great dimension to CSMS, Inc., reports Paul Coleman. Strickler, a recent graduate of the Superior Auction School, will work out of Banco. 104-Franklin has low-cost ramrod on market Livestock handling is easier and faster with the new high voltage "Ramrod," the "take charge" cattle prod from Franklin Laboratories, Denver, Colorado. The wide-spaced electrodes prevent shorting out and allows the 26 / THE Fl.ORIDA ('ATTIEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 "THE BEST FOR LESS" Supporters of Fla, Cattlemen, Poultrymen, Pork and Dairy Prodocers ~~ XEW N N -D I STORES, INC. General Offices: Jacksonville 32203

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The imitators keep trying. Allflex perfected the very first successful two-piece eartag system. And patented it. The patented tag has a flexible shaft and a hard tip. This hard tip provides a solid fit with the applicator pin so wobble is eliminated. Once in the ear the flexible shaft bends if the tag gets caught. Another Allflex patent covers the easy-to-use applicator. It locks the two parts of the Allflex tag together fast, just like a pop rivet. The applicator fits your hand comfortably. makes a day of tagging go by fast and easy. Other big Allflex features are: making the hard tip of brass and having the applicator pin extend through the brass crown. The Allflex pin pierces the ear so the tag can slip through cleanly, virtually eliminating bleeding and damage to ear tissue. Allflex tags stand up to weather, They go in fast. and go in for good because the special polyurethane is stabilized against the effects of ultraviolet rays and temperature extremes to stay flexible and colorfast. The imitators can try. But their performance can't match the Allflex system for cattle, sheep and hogs. And that's one reason livestock producers bought over 53% more Allflex tags last year. Eastern Marketing Agent: G.C. Hanford Mfg. Co., Box 1017, Syracuse, NY 13201 (315) 476-7418 Registered trademark of Aliflex Tag Co., Culver City, CA 92030) But unless your eartag system is Aliflex, you can't get Aliflex performance. THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 27

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If your lender thinks Brangus and Braford are great linebackers You're borrowing at the wrong place. te speak Beef Cattle. Our loan officers know beef cattle production and marketing. They know what you're up against. We're America's farmer-owned, farmercontrolled cooperative lending institutions. We make short and long term loans to farmers and their farm supply and marketing cooperatives for many purposes to help make their operations more profitable, including replacements, Al service, farm buildings, additional land -and other financing needs of cattlemen and their cooperatives. Call or come by today and talk to the people who speak your language. r ke herej i We speak ur language. L o l l 1 1 1 J o i ntt o,, ,! B x h@II'it k,111 "df"I 1,111 s 0',111 [VneA S ci ic "shock" to get through heavy dirt and matted hair. The activator buzzer "sounds off" so you can hear it working. Designed for tough use, the Ramrod features heavy insulated wires in a flexible shaft with a high-impact polycarbonate handle and tip. Unique switch guard protects against accidental turn-on when laid aside or stored. Easy to use too, as the 36" Ramrod is almost perfectly balanced. Low initial cost is combined with low operating cost in that only four "C" size batteries are needed. For more information check number 104 and return the form on page 8. Thomas named to inspection post Dr. F. L. (Frank) Thomas has been named chief of the bureau of meat inspection in the division of animal industry by Florida Agriculture Commissioner Doyle Conner. Thomas, a native of Alabama and a graduate of Auburn University where he received his degree of Doctor of Veterinary Medicine in 1944, will fill the vacancy created when Dr. R. H. Bennett retired after 23 years of service with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Thomas, who himself recently retired from the U.S. Department of Agriculture after 22 years, joins the staff of Division Director Dr. C. L. Campbell after serving the past 12 years in Tallahassee with the Federal Meat and Poultry Inspection Program. He has spent the past nine years in Florida as area supervisor. During that time he managed all aspects of the inspection program in Florida, including all imports and exports. "We are delighted to have a person of Dr. Thomas' talents with the division," Dr. Campbell said. "We know that with the confidence and esteem which he commands in the meat industry, Florida will continue to have one of the nation's outstanding inspection programs." 105-Biodry mastitis treatment introduced by Upjohn Biodry, a dry cow mastitis treatment, is available in a new 18 cow pack carton from TUCO, division of The Upjohn Company. The new size carton is designed especially for the convenience of the 20to 40-cow herd operator. The new carton contains 72 plastet syringes of Biodry nestled in a foam tray. Individual alcohol pads are also provided with each 10 ml. plastet in this new Biodry package. Biodry is also available in a 4-cow carton (12-10 ml. plastets) for the convenience of the small producer, and for the large dairyman, a case of 144-10 ml. plastets that will treat 36 cows. The three package sizes of Biodry dry cow mastitis treatment are available from farm supply stores. Biodry consists of 400 mg. of the 28 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 yeI rn JO U111

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antibiotic novobiocin in all oil suspension. Novobiocin is indicated for dry cow treatment of the two most common mastitis-causing organisms -Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus. Recommended dosage of Biodry is treatment in all four quarters by infusing the contents of one tube in each quarter after the last milking, prior to the initiation of the dry period. Prior to administration, milk the udder dry. Wash and dry the teats thoroughly. Using the alcohol pads provided, wipe each teat with a separate pad. Warm the Biodry antibiotic to body temperature and shake thoroughly. Remove the cap from the tip of the tube and insert tip into the canal. Infuse the entire contents of the tube into the quarter, and massage the udder after treatment to distribute the Biodry throughout the quarters. Dip all of the teats following Biodry treatment with a suitable teat dip. Biodry should be used at least 30 days prior to calving, and withdrawn 30 days before slaughter. Further information concerning the new Biodry 18 cow pack, check number 105 and return the form on page 8 of this issue. Buffington named 1980 young educator by ASAE Dennis E. Buffington, associate professor, agricultural engineering department, University of Florida, Gainesville, has received the A. W. Farrell Young Educator Award from the American Society of Agricultural Engineers (ASAE). The award is presented annually by the society to honor ASAE members under 40 years of age "for outstanding contributions to the advancement of the profession and to stimulate professional achievement" in education. Buffington was named the 1980 Young Educator during the society's winter meeting, held at the Palmer House, Chicago, Illinois, December 2-5, 1980. Buffington began his career in education in 1966, as an instructor and graduate assistant at Pennsylvania State University. He was a National Science Foundation trainee and graduate assistant at the University of Minnesota from 1968 to 1971, and became assistant professor at the University of Florida in 1971. He was elevated to associate professor in 1976. A registered professional engineer in Florida, Buffington has been active in numerous continuing education activities and scientific societies. He has received several educational service honors and awards. Buffington obtained his bachelor's degree and master's degree in agricultural engineering from Pennsylvania State University, University Park, and a doctoral degree in agricultural engineering from the University of Minnesota, St. Paul. Nreckver From LIVESTOCK TRAILERS This model comes in 16, 20, 24, 28 and 32 foot lengths. Widths of either 5' or 6' with the following standard equipment: solid bow construction, sandblasted, primed and painted with two coats of enamel, spare wheel and tire, brakes on all wheels, pressure penta treated two inch flooring, clearance, stop, directional and tail lights, 10,000 lb. heavy duty dropleg jack, hub caps, 2-5/16" ball hitch column, split tailgate, one center gate on 16 and 20 foot trailers, two center gates on 24, 28 and 32 foot trailers, 750 by 16" 8-ply rated tires, the 28 and 32 foot trailers have three axles, the 16, 20 and 24 foot trailers have two axles. All trailers have 8 hole wheels and all truck hookup parts. This rig is just the thing for economy. It is 32' long by 6' wide which gives this trailer the ability to save you time, effort and money. Please note the walkways running the length of the trailer and the three axles. CONIBEAR EQUIPMENT CO., INC. P. 0. Box 376. Lakeland, Florida 33802 7 Miles North on U.S. 98. Ph: 813/858-4414 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 29

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as good as the best and better than most All ingredients used are of the finest quality and our prices are very competitive. Give us a call and we will prove what we claim. SOUTHEASTERN MOLASSES & SUPPLY CORP. For EXCELLENCE in liquid feeds and ENERGY without waste, we tailor our products to meet your needs P. 0. BOX 1226, OKEECHOBEE, FLORIDA 33472 PH: 813/763-3115 AGRI-G High Protein Liqu We fill the The cows feed LIQUID FEED 0 Telephone 813 688-3325 "Vsit our Feed Store now open at A COMPLETE LINE UARD "Ole Aggie id Supplement feeders themselves THE P. 0. Box 923 _/W E Loakelnd, FL W 33802 'I L A 3340 U. S. Hwy. 92, East." )F ANIMAL FEEDS AGRI-FAN was designed and built to meet the tough demands of agri-industry, the manufacturer says. ASAE is a non-profit, technical, scientific and educational society committed to improving agriculture through the application of engineering principles. Headquartered in St. Joseph, Michigan, the society's membership includes 9000 full members and 2300 student members in 50 states and 90 foreign countries. 106-Air circulating fan offered for ag buildings Agri-Fan is a newly developed type of air circulating system which is changing conventional thinking on internal air movement in the ventilating industry for various types of agricultural structures, according to an announcement by Northwest Environmental Systems, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Normal fan ventilation systems do a good job moving air horizontally through the structure, either by "intake" or "exhaust," but in many instances, horizontal air movement is not adequate. Conversely, Agri-Fans move air vertically inside the structure, at up to 650 FPM or 24,000 CFM per unit, providing air circulation where it's needed most, from floor to ceiling. Agri-Fans improve existing ventilating systems by dispersing stagnant air, gases, odors and humidity, thus speeding up the ventilation rate in a building. Agri-Fans circulate and dispense air at 24,000 CFM creating a continuous air movement that speeds drying of floors, bedding, walls and ceilings, thereby reducing seasonal condensation problems. Agri-Fan is manufactured exclusively for Northwest Environmental Systems by Envirofan Systems, Inc., of Buffalo, NY. Completely moisture resistant units have been installed in many dairy, beef, poultry, hog, equine and other types of agricultural buildings. Testimonials from Agri-Fan users verify payback of investment on AgriFan installations in less than one year officials say, and claim much improved conditions in their buildings, for their livestock and themselves. According to Northwest Environmental Systems, Agri-Fan Systems are efficient to operate as well, consuming 30 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981

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less than .60 watts at normal speed. For more information check number 106 and return the form on page 8. USDA issues yearbook on how to cut energy costs "Cutting Energy Costs," the 1980 Yearbook of Agriculture, was issued December 16 by USDA. The 408-page book is designed to help bring down energy costs of farmers, foresters, homemakers, communities and the food industry. "Every American should find something worthwhile in this volume," Secretary of Agriculture Bob Bergland said in the book's foreword. ...All of us are well aware of how the increases in energy costs have cut into our incomes. "Farmers especially have been struggling to hold down their production energy requirements so that Americans can continue to get their food at reasonable cost," he said. "In fact, a new agricultural revolution may be in progress-one in which agriculture's own renewable energy supplies may be used increasingly to fuel farm machinery, heat farm buildings, dry grain and serve many other purposes. "Some of agriculture's renewable energy supplies already are being used in gasohol to fuel the family car." A copy of "Cutting Energy Costs" may be purchased by sending a check or money order for $9.50 to Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D.C. 20402. Sales copies also are available at U.S. government bookstores which are located in a number of cities. Members of Congress have limited allotments of the book for free distribution to constitutents. USDA has no copies for distribution. The four sections of the new yearbook are: agriculture and forestry, family living, communities and alternative energy sources. Authors are specialists mainly from USDA and the state land grant universities. The book has 48 chapters and many illustrations. Amber glass protects cattle virus vaccines When you buy cattle virus vaccines-for IBR, BVD and P1--consider where you work cattle, and how long it takes. Then consider the color of the vaccine bottle. It makes a difference, says Dr. Mark Keister, technical service veterinarian for Anchor Laboratories, a division of Philips Roxane, Inc., St. Joseph, Missouri. "Certain portions of sunlight spectrum can kill live and modified-live virus vaccine in clear vials," Keister says. "But amber glass filters out the damaging rays and substantially reduces loss of potency." If you work cattle outside, Keister says, choose virus vaccines in amber bottles. "Our tests show that a clear vial of virus vaccine left in the sun begins to lose potency pretty fast," Keister explains. "An animal vaccinated toward NEWEST TROUG Toughest yet! REINFORCED molded F Used in series or indivi Designed to skid in past 10 ft. long, 40" wide. CATTLE FEEDING EQUIPMENT MINERAL FEEDER L1 NO MAINTENANCE. Large capacity. Advanced design rain guard cover. Durable as our liquid feeders! Molded cross-link Polyethelene will stack or "nest" for shipping. Molded of black material for extra durability. H olyethelene. dual trough. re. 24" deep, LIQUID FEEDERS 3 & 4 wheel models Special design lick wheel assembly. 0 Stainless steel wheel hangers & axles. Designed with special rain guard to eliminate dilution of molasses. Entire unit easily removable from outside. Units easy to move and clean. Larger capacity, long life. Special provisions for gravity fill models. Our "Big Black Liquid Feeders" in stock. 3 or 4 wheel models. Call or write for brochure. ADSIT DURA-CAST PRODUCTS Special quantity discounts available Manufactured in Lake Wales, Florida Fully assembled, delivery available Dealer Inquiries invited P.O. Box 812 Lake Wales, Fla. 33853 813/676-4116 (day) 813/285-8874 (night) ATTL EMENOS INSTRUCTION TURNN-KEY COMPANY, INC. -_ PR OJE CTS CATTLE SWINE DAIRIES 0 FEED FACILITIES HOUSING MILLS atANIMAL WASTE METHANE GAS SOLAR RECYCLING PRODUCTION SYSTEMS CATTLE FEEDLOT SPECIALIST CONFINEMENT OR CONVENTIONAL EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES MANAGEMENT & CONSULTING SERVICES ENGINEERING.DESIGN & DRAFTING SERVICES CALL TODAY 2 813/665-2424 PDRW BOX 1536 BARTOW, FL. U.S.A. 33830 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 31

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Established 1946 Our Posts, Wire & Gates Cost You Less Please call before driving to Ona. Our inventory is low on some sizes. FLORIDA P. FENCE POST CO., INC. Open 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday thru Friday PLANT and SALES OFFICE 0. Box 645-Ph: 813/735-1361 4 ONA, FLORIDA 33865 j Designed for Almost Every Farming Use BUTLER BUILDINGS See Us for Planning A Products and Cons BUTLER AGRI-BUILDER ssistance, Proven truction Service Frank Anderson Sales & Service Inc. 1315-5th Ave., Tampa, FL 33605 Phone 813/247-5649 Frank Anderson 813/961-5048 Harold Still 813/949-7154 J f 32 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 Portable Cattle Feeders Built of heavy guage steel, all welded seams, ready to use. 3% and 8 ton capacity. Hay Feeders-Silage -Troughs and Molasses T Tanks. Choice Dealerships Available Georgia Livestock Equipment Route 1, Box 297 Lyons, Georgia 30436 Office 912/526-8593 Res: 912/526-3376 the end of a multi-dose clear vial may not be protected. But vaccine in an amber vial can be left in the sun for several hours and still provide adequate protection." IBR vaccines in clear bottles can drop to minimum government standards for potency after only 30 minutes of sunlight exposure, according to a recent study by Anchor Laboratories. Anchor's IBR vaccine in amber vials exceeded government standards for more than four hours of sunlight exposure. In the test, eight vials of reconstituted modified-live IBR vaccine were exposed to sunlight to determine its effects on virus vaccines in amber glass and clear glass vials. Anchor tested its vaccine in amber and clear glass vials plus six competitors' vaccines in clear glass vials. The vaccines were tested for potency at 0, 5, 30, 120 and 240 minutes. After 30 minutes of sunlight exposure, more than half of the IBR vaccines in clear vials dropped below minimum government standards for release. By the end of two hours, all seven vaccines in clear glass vials failed to meet the minimum government standards for IBR vaccine. In contrast, the amber vial of Anchor IBR vaccine remained above the minimum government standard, and maintained a constant level of potency through four hours of sunlight exposure. The amber vial effectively filtered out harmful rays of sunlight and substantially reduced long-term potency loss. "If you're doing very much with your cattle when you work them, it's almost impossible to go through a 50dose bottle in thirty minutes," Keister says. "You could cover a clear bottle of virus vaccine to protect it from sunlight. That is fine, but it's not human nature. It's simpler and safer to buy virus vaccines in amber vials." All of Anchor's live and modifiedlive virus vaccines for cattle are packaged in amber vials. Bacterin vaccines are killed-virus products, not as susceptible to sunlight, and don't require the same protection, Keister says. NALF names communications director The North American Limousin Foundation (NALF), Denver, Colorado, has selected Burt Rutherford of Fort Collins, Colo. to seve as communications director. "We are pleased to have a young man of Burt's background and experience coming to work for us," stated Greg Martin, NALF's executive vice president. "Burt worked for us part-time last summer on a job-internship program with Colorado State University. We were impressed with his enthusiasm for his work and the knowledge he has in journalism and animal science. He will definitely be a strong addition to our staff," Martin concluded. \1

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FRM HELPS YOUR LIVESTOCK GROWAND THAT HELPS YOUR PROFITS GROW. A fully grown animal is a profitable animal. FRM can help with a wide range of complete feeds, minerals, and supplements for your beef cattle, dairy cows, horses, swine and poultry. FRM also offers small animal and specialty feeds. All FRM products are especially designed for the Georgia, Florida and Alabama area, so you can rest easy knowing that your livestock's nutritional needs are being satisfied. FRM knows what makes them grow because our research and development is focused in this area. That means all FRM products are designed with your livestock's growth in mind. Choose from a full line of quality FRM products; from Vitaminde Minerals to FRM Horse Nuggets, from Pig Popper Pellets to FRM Poultry Mix. FRM products are an investment with a payoff that grows, and grows, and grows. See your FRM dealer ...he'll show you how your profits can fLiN WIMI MILLION thrive along with your animals. Flint River Mills, Inc. Bainbridge, Georgia I II ORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 33

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"We Can Do More For You" Aeschynomene Tifleaf-1 Millet Hairy Indigo Alyce Clover Bermudas Millets Bahias Peas -OTHERSFlorida Distributor CATTLEMAN'S CHOICE Sorghum Sudangrass Hybrid SHARE/HARVESTING From our "seed processing plant at Arcadia .call us to schedule the harvesting of your Bahias, Millets, Aeschynomene. Indigo, Alyce Clover, etc. "Since 1933" Haile-Dean Seed Co., Inc. 1333 W. Church St. P.O. Box 5517 Ph. 305/425-3426 Orlando, Fla. 32805 OLD SOUTH MILLS, Inc. Serving you from two locations, with Great Southern Minerals Range Pellets Cattle Feed Horse Feed Medicated Custom Premixes Sebring, FL Kissimmee, FL 813/655-1335 305/846-4285 "WIK-A-WEED" for Dog Fennel-Bull Grass Smut Grass and Other Weeds ECONOMICAL WEED CONTROL WIK-A-WEED, Inc. J. B. Starkey, Jr., 813/920-5288 Rt. 3, Box 1400, Odessa FL 33556 .I 34 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY I NOW ITS HISTORY 1938: Florida cattle showed improvement The 144 head of Florida-raised cattle entered at the Florida State Fair, Tampa, showed the greatest improvement of any feature of the entire fair, according to onlookers ..It was noted in a marketing report that during the month of December and January, cattle prices in Chicago dropped on top grades from six to seven cents per pound live weight. 1943: Cover showed P. E. Williams The cover picture of the February issue showed P. E. Williams, Davenport, president of the state cattlemen's association astride his fine Palomino Judge for the Southeastern Fat Stock Show and Sale at Ocala was L. V. Starkey of Clemson College ...T. J. Durrance of Brighton was named president of the Highlands County Cattlemen's Association ...A Brown Swiss cow weighing 1205 pounds sold at $11.35 for a gross of $136.77 at the Arcadia Livestock Market. 1948: Brahman heifer brought top price A Brahman heifer sold for a record price at the fourth Southeastern Brahman Sale at Ocala with $3100 being paid by M. C. Stallworth, Jr., of Vinegar Bend, Alabama for the Norris Cattle Company consignment ... The first livestock show was sponsored by the Nassau County Cattlemen's Association at Hilliard ...D. E. Cannon was elected president of the Pasco County Cattlemen's Association. 1953: 'Vacation Sale' was promoted Sun Lake Ranch at Lutz promoted its Angus "Vacation Sale" with three pages of advertising in The Florida Cattleman ..S. N. Smith of Nocatee was elected president of the DeSoto County Cattlemen's Association ...Florida independent slaughterers were on record saying the state should pay all costs of meat inspection ...It was noted Florida agriculture's value amounted to more than $500 million annually in income to the state. R0 DIPPING WAS THE RECOGNIZED TREATMENT for ticks and cow crews worked at it back in the 30s. The crew shown here in the Big Pine area in 1930 were from left, Buf Thomas; Will Long; Sam Story; Charlie Thomas; Oscar Tyson; Wash Hart; El Tyson; Vance Tyson; Warren Mann, and Gay Story. The picture was sent in by Early Story of Deer Park. The Cattleman needs old pictures for this space and will return the photo undamaged after use. 981

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Mr. Beef Producer: It makes a difference when you let your local livestock auction market manager sell your cattle. He not only sells livestock, but PROMOTES their sale. And that brings you a better return usually than selling direct. Why? Because there is competitive bidding under the livestock auction market system and the difference is between what livestock might just "sell" for, and for what they are actually worth under the conditions of competitive bidding. Your marketman works at "selling" livestock. Check with him and you just might find that you will get the little extra return that will mean the difference between profit and loss in your operation. Check with YOUR local marketman! The Auction Market Way is the Best Way! CONTACT ANY OF THESE MARKETS, ALL MEMBERS OF THE STATE ASSOCIATION Arcadia State Livestock Market* Auctions Every Wednesday Pat Kelly, Mgr., Ph. 813/494-3737, 1808, 3250 ARCADIA, 33821 Chipley Livestock Company* Auctions Every Tuesday E. D. (Buddy) Neel, Mgr. Ph. 904/638-0267, 638-4498 CHIPLEY, 32428 Gainesville Livestock Market, Inc.* Cattle Auctions Every Mon.-Wed. Hog Auctions Every Wednesday Mgrs., L. H. (Tommy) Thompson, Jr. and J. W. "Buddy" Clark Ph. 904/372-3442 GAINESVILLE, 32601 Tindel Livestock Market* Auctions Every Monday Clyde Crutchfield, Mgr. Ph. 904/263-3224 GRACEVILLE, 32440 Jay Livestock Auction Auctions Every Tuesday Horace McCurdy, Mgr. Ph. 904/675-4795 JAY, 32565 Kissimmee Livestock Market Auctions Every Wednesday Dorothy Norris & Johnny Bronson, Mgrs. 305/847-3521 KISSIMMEE, 32741 Columbia Livestock Market* Hog Auctions Every Monday Cattle Auctions Every Thursday H. Tom Willis, Mgr. Ph. 904/755-2300 LAKE CITY, 32055 Cattlemen's Livestock Markets* Monday -Sales -Tuesday Bill Hamilton, Mgr. Tampa 813/626-5164 Lakeland 813/665-5088 TAMPA, 33609 and LAKELAND, 33802 Suwannee Valley Livestock Market* Auctions Every Wednesday Kiah Eubanks; Cecil Moore -Ph. 904/362-1702 LIVE OAK, 32060 Madison Stockyard Inc.* Hogs-Monday; Cattle-Tuesday George Townsend, Mgr. 904/973-4094,929-4605 MADISON, 32340 West Florida Livestock Market* Sale Every Thursday Buddy Williams, Mgr. Ph. 904/482-2229, 482-8684 MARIANNA, 32446 Mills Auction Market* Hog Auction Every Wednesday Cattle Auction Every Thursday Emery Mills, Mgr. Ph. 904/732-4454 OCALA, 32670 Cow Palace* Sale Every Sat. W. T. (Bill) Wells, Mgr. Ph. 813/858-6253 LAKELAND, 33802 Monticello Stockyard, Inc.* Auctions Every Monday J. E. Hawkins, Mgr. -Ph. 904/997-5711 MONTICELLO, 32344 Okeechobee Livestock Market Auctions Every Monday & Tuesday Pete Clemons, Mgr. Ph. 813/763-3127 OKEECHOBEE, 33472 Edwards Livestock Company* Hog Auction Every Monday Cattle Auction Every Wednesday 0. W. Edwards, Jr., Mgr. -904/627-9584 QUINCY, 32351 Hardee Livestock Market, Inc. Auctions Every Monday Mgrs: Doyle Carlton, IIl, Robert Ray Smith Phones 813/773-9747, 773-9560 WAUCHULA, 33873 Interstate Livestock Market Auctions Every Tuesday Jay Mueller, Mgr. 813/689-2424, 689-5995 SEFFNER, 33584 Sumter County Farmers Market Auctions Every Tuesday Gene Babbitt -Ph. 904/793-2021 WEBSTER, 33597 Jacksonville Livestock Auction Market* Auctions Every Monday Thos. W. Waldrop, Owner 904/781-4677 WHITEHOUSE, 32095 *-Indicates Subscriber to Livestock Marketing Association For Further Information about Florida Livestock Auction Markets, Contact 911/1fid #ASSOCIATION OF LIVESTOCK MARKETS P.O. Box 1403, Kissimmee, FL 32741 THE FL.ORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 35

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Danger is great for foreign disease outbreak Seminar slated to stress disease safeguards for Florida's agriculture industry Florida Agriculture Commissioner Doyle Conner has announced dates and site for a seminar aimed at safeguarding Florida livestock and plant industries against exotic diseases and pests being carried into the state by drug smugglers and refugees. The Exotic Agriculture Threats Seminar (EATS) will be held February 11-12 at the Holiday Inn on International Drive in Orlando. "We have become genuinely concerned with the real threat and potential devastating effects that a foreign disease outbreak would have on our consumers and our agricultural industries," Conner said. Conner said the main concern was with the animal diseases Foot-andMouth Disease, African Swine Fever and Exotic Newcastle Disease. "All three are running rampant at our doorstep in the Caribbean and South America," Conner said. The diseases are highly contagious. The virus, in addition to being spread from animal to animal, can be carried on clothing and footwear, on tires of vehicles and in undercooked meats from infected animals. "Our concern has heightened greatly in the last few months because of increased numbers of clandestine landings in Florida pastures of aircraft loaded with drugs from South America, with the influx of refugees from Haiti," Conner said. The seminar is designed to alert law enforcement personnel to the dangers of foreign diseases, establish guidelines for handling agricultural refuse at crime scenes and open communications between lawmen and producers for a more cooperative effort in reporting illegal entries and clandestine operations. Conner said all law enforcement agencies in our state would be invited to the seminar, which was requested by the Florida Cattlemen's Association and is being conducted jointly by the Florida Department of Agriculture and USDA. The program also will include representatives of Senator Lawton Chiles' office, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, Florida Sheriffs Association, Florida Association of Chiefs of Police, Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission, Florida Department of Natural Resources, U.S. Customs, U.S. Border Patrol and the U.S. Coast Guard. "We are making an all-out effort by involving a wide spectrum of concerned agencies because of the wide implications and seriousness of the matter," Conner said. There are no cures for animals infected with Foot-and-Mouth Disease, African Swine Fever or Exotic Newcastle Disease. Infected and exposed animals must be slaughtered and the carcasses destroyed. "An extensive outbreak would result in widespread depopulation of our herds of cattle and swine and flocks of poultry," Conner said. "That would leave us with a short supply of meat and, in turn, drive up the prices at the supermarket." There also exists a threat of pests and plant diseases invading the state's vast citrus and winter vegetable areas. "For example," Conner said, "just one mango could conceal the eggs of the West Indian Fruit Fly, and an infestation in Florida could devastate our citrus industry." The West Indian Fruit Fly is just one of the many pests which are widespread throughout the Caribbean area. "We feel the seminar will greatly help us reduce the threat of foreign diseases and pests entering Florida," Conner said. During FCA's board of directors meeting at Crystal River last September, Dan Childs, Lake Placid, chairman of the animal health and technical committee, emphasized the imminent danger existing on the entry of foreign diseases into Florida. He specifically referred to African Swine Fever and Foot-andMouth Disease, and explained the several ways the diseases could be introduced into Florida, expecially FMD. Pointing out the last outbreak of FMD was in 1929 in California, when 120,000 head of cattle had to be killed, Childs warned that with the disease there is no marketing of cattle; they are subject to immediate slaughter and disposal. At the Crystal River meeting, Childs introduced a resolution which was adopted and later distributed to state and federal government levels. It stressed the vulnerability of Florida to these diseases and urged that more stringent precautionary measures be taken. Additionally it was recommended that FCA, along with the Florida Department of Agriculture and USDA, join in working toward a goal of educating involved agencies to combat the diseases through proper preventive measures. This action by FCA resulted in the move to conduct the seminar, noted W. G. "Kayo" Welles, Arcadia, president, who said it was vital that local association leaders take action to ensure that law enforcement agencies from their areas be represented at the two-day session. Welles pointed out the danger of these foreign diseases pose an economically devastating threat to the country's livestock industry. "The programming of this seminar is a positive step in the right direction," Welles remarked. 36 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 Legislative representative named In a recent press release, W. G. "Kayo" Welles, Arcadia, president of the Florida Cattlemen's Association, announced that L. M. "Buddy" Blain, Tampa, has been retained as FCA's legislative representative. Blain is an attorney with the firm of Blain & Cone, Tampa. He will monitor the interests of the cattle industry in Florida during the coming session of the legislature. Welles said that Blain also maintains an office in Tallahassee, which will give the industry on-the-spot representation. Blain is a graduate of the University of Florida, Gainesville, where he received his bachelor's degree in education. He later returned to the University's law school where he received his law degree. He served in the Attorney General's office in Tallahassee for a number of years prior to joining the Gibbons law firm in Tampa. Later he opened his own practice. A native Floridian, he was born and raised in Plant City. At one time he was engaged in farming and ranching and was a member of the Hillsborough County Cattlemen's Association. He currently holds the post of general counsel for the Southwest Florida Water Management District at Brooksville. Welles said that FCA was very fortunate to be in a position to retain Blain to monitor those legislative activities "which have direct or indirect impact on Florida's multi-million dollar cattle industry."

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Solid sale! The sixth annual bull sale at the Chipley Livestock Market, Chipley, December 13 had 129 bulls sell for an average of $1325, according to E. D. "Buddy" Neel, market operator. Buying power was steady with six breeds represented at the annual sale event which drew a standing room only crowd. The Simbrah consignments averaged $1275; Simmental bulls $1319 Limousin $1425; Angus/Limousin crosses (Angusin) $1377; Brahman $882, and Brahmousin bulls $1313. Top selling bull went to J. D. Swearingen, Marianna, who paid $1950 for the Brahmousin sale topper, Neel, who also auctioneered the sale, is first vice president of the Florida Cattlemen's Association and president of the WashingtonHolmes Cattlemen's Association. 18th annual S'Gertrudis sale averages $1227 The 18th Annual Florida Santa Gertrudis Association sale held at the Southeastern Livestock Pavilion in Ocala on January 17 brought a gross of $90,800 to average out at $1227 per head. High buyer at the sale was Diamond B Ranch, Morriston, with purchases of five lots for $8550 to average $1710. Second high buyer was Joe Wattlesworth, Williston, with an outlay of $7900 and an average of $1129 on seven lots. High selling individual was a polled bull consigned by K. D. Eatmon of Pompano Beach bought by Diamond B Ranch for $4200. Second high individual was a female consignment from Eatmon and purchased by C&S Ranch, Dunnellon for $3500. Sale manager was Carl Stevens of Dunnellon. Gerald Bowie, West Point, Georgia, was auctioneer. Buyers at the sale with number of head purchased, if more than one shown in parentheses, and amount spent follow: Joe Wattlesssorth, Williston (7) $7900; B, 0. Padgett, Perry (4) $3425; Diamond B Ranch, Morriston (5) $S8550; Stage Coach Ranch, Dade City (3) $6850; Winnstead Plantation, Thomasville, Georgia $1250; C&S Ranch, Dunnel]on (2) 56600; Sunny L Ranch, O'Brien (3) $2825; Charles Rowe, MacClenny (4) F4125; Mrs. K. D. Eatmon. Pompano Beach $1100; Doable RJ Fams, Georgia $875; Wyecott Plantation, Midway, Alabama $1050; Markham Brothers, Dannellon S900; Layette Farms. Caspeth, Georgia (6) $6925; Willard Hall, Cairo, Georgia (4) $2825; K. D. Eatmon, Pompano Beach (7) $6775; Nine Bar Ranch. Hempstad, Texas (4) $6050; J. W. Eley, Lake City (3) $3575; K Bar 3 Ranch, Okelenta, Georgia (2) $1775; William Townley, Ocala (2) $2200; Don Brown, Plant City (2) $1875; T. M, Reeves, Okaloosa $500; Elwell Oliver, Ocala $800; Robinson Farms. Atlanta, Georgia $1500; Harwell & Harwell, Lakeland (2) $2125; Joe Cracker, Plant City $975; John Curls, Lakeland $500; Cox Eland, Citra $675; D. L. Thomas, Lake City $650; Rogers Brothers, Arcadia $3000; Earl Cox, Bradenton $2625. Power Chutes Best for cattle and cowboys. Three sizes. Triple duty chutes. Can be portable. I FARM MACHMERY AND LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT SPECIALIST W. C,R I STALNAKER FARM & RANCH SUPPLY, INC. TAMPA, FLORIDA Phone collect (813) 248-6238 P.O. Box 172 Tampa, Fla. 33601 Come see us at 33rd st. and East 7th Ave., Tampa Largest Inventory of Fencing for Farm & Ranch in Florida FARM FENCING BARBED WIRE GAUCHO BARBED WIRE POULTRY NETTING FARM GATES Galvanized steel, wire GALVANIZED ROOFING 5-V-Crimp FENCE POSTS -Steel. STAPLES GATE HARDWARE ELECTRIC FENCE SYSTEMS AMERICAN POWER PULLS HI LIFT JACKS WELDED WIRE HARDWARE CLOTH NAILS -Bright or galvanized. THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 37 DON'T FIGHT RUST USE HEAVY DUTY WOOD TROUGHS All material two-inch pressure treated pine. Available in 8'-12'-16' lenghts. CALL FRANK WILLIAMS Day or Night 904/528-5278 or write Rt. 1, Box 61, Morriston FL 32668 Ph: (405) 772-2801, 1-800-654-5024 I Rt. 1, Box 2, Weatherford, OK 73096 Wi E DELIVE Ra

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arV ~,iver Florida's Oldest Professional Rodeo Now Our 67th February 20,21,22 Fri., Sat., Sun. 2:30 p.m. daily Silver Spurs Parades: 10:30 Friday-St. Cloud 10:30 Saturday-Kissimmee Silver Spurs Arena U. S. 192-441 East of KISSIMMEE featuring Saddle Bronc Riding Bareback Bronc Riding Calf Roping Steer Wrestling Bull Riding Team Roping Coweirl's Barrel Race Silver Spurs Horseback Quadrille Announcer Clem McSpadden 12,000 Reserved Seats Under Roof 50 Acres of Free Parking Admission $4.00, $5.00, $6.00 Phone Reservations: Silver Spurs Arena, Kissimmee 305/847-5118, also; St reep's, Orlando 305/849-5240. Fashion Square, Orlando 305/896-1129. Western Gentleman, Dundee 813/4391033. Western Corral, Melbourne 305 7 23-2611. Altamonte Mall, Altamonte Springs 305/834-3444. Mail Reservations: Silver Spurs, Inc., (Tickets), P. 0. Box 1909, Kissimmee, Florida 32741 Florida riders active in NCHA cutting events during 1980 Results of the National Cutting Horse Association standings for 1980 show a number of Florida riders participating in several categories. In the non-pro rider of the year scoring, Bubba Welles, Arcadia, competed in 31 shows and won a total of $10,229.06 riding Brigand's Breeze and Brigand's Sugar. In the same division, Robert Bradley of Pensacola, participated in eight shows and won $2758.14 riding Cow Trouble and Argentine Moore. A number of prizes were contributed by firms and individuals around the country. A saddle was awarded to the reserve champion, non-pro rider, by McLelland's Boot and Saddle, Inc., of Lake Worth. Area 16 (Florida) leaders as listed by NCHA have points counted for being the owner of the contesting horse at shows having added purses of $500 or less. Horse, owner, city, number of Area 16 shows participated in shown in parentheses, and amounts won, are as follows: Open 1. DULCINEA QUIXOTE, Spencer Harden, Sorrento (7)$ 1432.94 2. LONSUM TIGER, R. D. Welles, Arcadia (4)-$1227.76 3. DOC'S WIMPY, George Culverhouse, Fort Pierce (4)-$447.00 4. BLUE HONCHO, Claude Gibbs, Pensacola (2)-$363.70 5. GAY PIPER, Don Beverly, West Palm Beach (3)-$336.70 6. VOW BACK SMOKE, Tommy Walls, Fort Pierce (2)-$239.70 7. LADY TARI, George Culverhouse (2)-$202.55 8. ILLINI VAN, Don Day, Arcadia (2)-$190.22 9. COW TROUBLE, Robert Bradley, Pensacola (1)-$149.77 10. BILL'S WILL POWER, Rufus Hayes, Milton (1)-$131.25 Non-Professional 1. BUBBA WELLES, Arcadia (3)$1160.70 (Brigand's Breeze and Brigand's Sugar) 2. SPENCER HARDEN (6)$948.86 (Dulcinea Quixote) 3. DON BEVERLY (5)-$903.10 (Gay Piper) 4. GEORGE CULVERHOUSE (5)-$465.58 (Doc's Wimpy) 5. JIM OUSLEY, Loxahatchee (2)--$268.20 (Sister Cole) 6. TOMMY WALLS (1)-$205.50 (Vow Back Smoke) 7. CHARLEEN McMANUS, Lake Worth (3)-$121.74 (Peako Peake) 8. ROBERT BRADLEY ()$50.40 (Argentine Moore) 9. MARTIN SHARRON, Pensacola (1)-$25.20 (Dee's Party Doll) $1500 Non-Professional 1. DONNA LEE CULVERHOUSE, Fort Pierce (9)-$395.80 38 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 Feeder futures contract revised A significantly revised feeder cattle futures contract will be listed for trading on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange as of January 2, 1981, following approval by the Commodity and Futures Trading Commission. Designed to keep pace with changes and needs within the feeder cattle industry, the revisions will take effect with a new January, 1982 contract and subsequent delivery months. Changes in the feeder cattle contract are being made in the grade description, par contract weight allowable, discounts for grade and weight, maximum horn length and approved par and discount delivery points. The new feeder cattle trading unit will be 44,000 pounds of feeder steers instead of 42,000 pounds. The steers will be of Medium Frame and the lower 2/3 of the Large Frame size. In addition, the steers will be of Number One and the top 1/3 of the Number Two Muscle Thickness as defined in the official U.S. Standards for Grades of Feeder Cattle. The existing contract calls for 80 percent Choice and 20 percent Good grades and has now been revised to not more than 13 head of Number Two Muscle Thickness. A delivery unit can contain up to 23 head or 10 additional steers, of the top 1/3 of USDA Number Two Muscle Thickness at a discount of $4.00 per hundredweight. The average per head weight has been increased from 550-650 pounds to 575700 pounds. The discount for heavy cattle has been increased from 1.5 cents per hundredweight over 600 pounds to 3 cents per hundredweight over 700 pounds. In addition, a delivery unit averaging over 750 pounds up to 800 pounds is deliverable at a 5 cent per hundredweight discount. The acceptable horn length has been increased from three inches to five inches. Par delivery pounds in the revised contract are Omaha, Nebraska; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma and Sioux City, Iowa. Delivery may also be made at Kansas City, Missouri and St. Joseph, Missouri at a 25 cent per hundredweight discount. The 75 cent per hundredweight discount for delivery at Billings, Montana and the $6.00 per hundredweight discount for delivery at Montgomery, Alabama remain unchanged.

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(Doc's Wimpy) 2. SANDY HAYES, Milton (1)$114.10 (Bill's Will Power) 3. MARK HARDEN, Sorrento (3)-$73.15 (Dulcinea Quixote) 4. CHARLEEN McMANUS (3)$49.65 (Peako Peake) 5. JIM OUSLEY (3)-$37.05 (Sister Cole) 6. LEE HERB DAVIS, Wauchula (1)-$34.20 (Tynes War Bond) 7-8. LINDA "SQUEAK" HUBER, Williston (1)-$14.50 (No Return) 7-8. ROY HARDEN, Sorrento (1)-$14.50 (Dulcinea Quixote) 9. JACKIE TALLEY, Leesburg (1)-$13.55 (Lee's Holley) $1000 Novice 1. BLUE HONCHO, Claude Gibbs, Pensacola (2)-$185.45 2. BILL'S WILL POWER, Rufus Hayes, Milton (1)-$142.70 $500 Novice I. BLUE HONCHO (5)-$627.73 2. BILL'S SAN, Bill Hoecherl, Fort Lauderdale (1)-$190.00 3. DULCINEA QUIXOTE (2)$72.20 4. HASTAJOKE, Roy Wellman, Citra (2)-$58.90 5. DOC FESS, John Mitchell, Jay (1)-$23.75 6. MR. GUNSMOKE 2, R. D. Welles (1)-$19.00 7. DOC SHY DANCER, Rex Holley, Fort Pierce (1)-$14.25 Youth 1. PHILLIP HAYES, Milton (2)-2 Points (Bill's Will Power) 2. SHANA CULVERHOUSE, Fort Pierce ()-I Point (Bald Jess) Farrier's to hold annual convention The 10th annual convention of the American Farrier's Association is slated to be held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, February 26-28. Hosting the event will be the New Mexico Professional Horseshoers Association with the theme of "shoeing the performance horse". Included will be lectures and demonstrations, a farrier's trade fair, equipment displays, and cashprize forging and shoeing competitions. For further information contact American Farrier's Association, Box 695, Albuquerque NM 87103. Pioneer cattleman dies James Franklin "Frank" Story of Chuluota, died at the age of 90 on January 10. Born in Chuluota, he was a lifetime resident of that community. Known as "Uncle Frank" to many, he was a citrus grower in Orange and Seminole counties as well as a cattleman in Osceola County. Survivors include: son, Herman, Orlando; daughter, Mrs. Geraldine Story Sharp, Orlando; two grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. The South's Largest Western Store addles & Tack Billy Cook ] Longhrn (all sizes Longhorn available Tony Lama Simco Justin Textan ____ _A l_ Texas Frye Bailey and Resistol H ats 0 k Your Complete Ranch Supply Store Telt VSA -poe 904/376-4595 WORLD'S FINEST LIVESTOCK TRAILERS FEATURES All Steel Construction ng -Treated 2" x 8" Floor 6'4" or 7'8" Wide -Divider, Escape and Slide/Swing Rear Doors -Full Roof 8-Ply Tires Electric Brakes Many Dptions Available Buy Direct From The Factory and Save: (1) Delivery Charges 121 Dealer Markup Call now for a factory tour te Bee why E-Z Pull Trailers are the world's finest trailers Number 1 dealer for Neckover trailers. Also feature a complete line of Vaccines and Health Supplies, Guns, and Ammunition. ILP ANCHER INC. 21 NW 6TH STREET AT HWY. 441 GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA Books open for the 1981 Breeding Season Now Standing in Florida "HARD TACK TAHI" Son of the Great Catting Horse Sire Doc Tan by the Immert Dec Bar Dam: King Kay 1981 Fee: $500.00 Young Doc Bar bred horses for sale at all times Foundation bread mares beaght and sold John Lillie Quarter Horaes Rit. 2, Bee 600, Bushnell, Floeida 33513 904-793-4215 30-F act Bed Deluxe 78" inside width Goseneck. Hjals 24 cows E-Z PULL TRAILERS Rt. 1, Box 1213 Q Tavares, Fl. 32778 1-904-343-1000 1-904-343-2438 1-305-859-5009 Call or WriteShown by Appointment Only 42-Foot Flatbed hauls up to 4 tractors or 500 bales of hay. THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 39 STETSON & BAILEY HATS RANCH & WESTERN WEAR Levis Wranglers Lee G 0 0 tj D' S A Wrangler e Tea i n 26 Broadway, Kiimee, Fla. 32741 305/847-4791

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STORE HOURS Monday-Saturday 8:30 A.M. to 7:30 P.M. Sunday 1:30 P.M. to 5:00 P.M. P. O. DRAWER M DUNDEE, FLORIDA 33838 U.S. HWY. 27 U PHONE (813) 439-1033 Sa --fa Satisfaction South Florida's Oldest !Garnted On &Most Complete Good Fur Felts Western Wear Store Levi*e Stetson i D-J Lee 9 Panhandle Slim 9 Acme FORMERLY OF TonyLama R Justin e Texas TEXAS Nocona e Durango Renovations-$15 Includes cleaned and blocked. liner and ribbons leather sweat ad lo THE FAIR STORE twotthreewe'ek"s.^Ad h 415 S. Park St. postage and handling. Mail to Grady's, Formerly Okeechobee, Fla. 33472 of Texas, 6027 N. Dale Establshed 1925 Mabry, Tampa, Florida 33614 (813) 879-6620. WHY SETTLE FOR LESS THAN THE BEST SAVE TIME AND MONEY Pre-fab processing areas, hydraulic squeeze chutes and dipping vats. Trojan has a one year warranty on all parts. Trojan chutes have grease zerts in all linkage, chutes are available for single phase or three phase electricity, All sales, service and parts will be handled through our office and plant at Weatherford, Ok. TROJAN LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT, INC. P0H. Box 453 WEATHERFORD, OK. 73096 Plant: 405/772-7724 Office: 405/772-2146 I 40 / THE FLORIDA (WITLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 U WESTERN WEAR AND TACK } -0 Florida's top rodeos slated in February, March Florida's two oldest rodeos will be held again in the coming months with the Silver Spurs Rodeo and Arcadia AllFlorida Championship Rodeo slated for February and March respectively. The Silver Spurs will present its 67th rodeo with performances set for February 2 21, and 22, Friday, Saturday and Sunday, all at 2:30 p.m. at the arena on U.S. 192-441 east of Kissimmee. The Silver Spurs parades will be held at 10:30 a.m., Friday, February 19 in St. Cloud and again on Saturday at 10:30 a.m., in Kissimmee. Arcadia's mid-winter edition, the 72nd performance and the 53rd year, is on the schedule for Friday, Saturday and Sunday, March 13, 14 and 15, all beginning at 2:00 p.m., at the Fenton Area on South Highway 17. Both rodeos will feature the regular events with saddle bronc riding, bareback bronc riding, calf roping, steer wrestling, bull riding, team roping, and cowgirl's barrel race. The Kissimmee event will also feature the Silver Spurs Horseback Quadrille. Both rodeos are PRCA approved and will draw nationally ranked rodeo performers to the competition. FCA's board of directors will be meeting in Arcadia on March 13 and it is expected that a number will attend the performance that afternoon. The Silver Spurs event will feature announcer Clem McSpadden from Oklahoma. Ralph Thompson leaves Jo-Su-Li Ralph Thompson, Colquitt, Georgia, the veteran general manager of Jo-Su-Li Farms, has left that firm to go into private business. Thompson has purchased a farm south of Colquitt and is relocating to start a livestock management service. The new company will specialize in purebred and commercial sales management, consulting, order buying, semen testing, pregnancy testing, and foot trimming. Thompson said he will continue to be affiliated with C & T Farm, Colquitt, Georgia, owned by Clarence Cross, and T Bar Herefords of Oklahoma, an ownership that is shared with Thompson's son Robert. The T Bar Hereford Bull Sale will continue to be held at the Jennings Overstreet Ranch, Kissimmee. A 1981 sale is tentatively planned for October. Thompson said he will now be locating and order buying bulls of all breeds for his long time Florida customers. Join your local county Cattlemen's Association.

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Feedlot clinic slated at Wauchula Jim Hentges, chairman of the 1981 Florida Feedlot Clinic, University of Florida, Gainesville, has announced the event will be held February 19 in Wauchula. Registration will get underway at 8:00 a.m., in the conference room of the Hardee Agricultural Center. The opening session will be presided over by Dr. H. D. Wallace, chairman, animal science department, University of Florida, Gainesville. The program will get underway at 8:45 a.m., with a discussion on structural and operational characteristics of the Florida cattle feeding industry presented by Jim Simpson of the University staff. At 9:00 a.m., a panel will discuss live and carcass beef marketing alternatives and trends. Moderator will be Kary Mathis, director, Florida Agricultural Marketing Research Center, University of Florida. Others heard will be Pat Wilson, Frostproof, and Jim Pearson, USDA, Washington, D.C. Others appearing on the morning program will be Roger West, University of Florida, covering beef packer processing developments, and Dan Fox, Cornell University, New York discussing meeting the protein needs of feedlot cattle. The afternoon session will be presided over by Bill Kunkle of the University staff. A number of topics will be covered by University staffers including Findlay Pate, Sloan Baker, and Glyn Horton. Hentges said registration fee is $25 per person and pre-registration is requested. Checks should be made out to the University of Florida. Bradford-Union elects Joyner Royce Joyner, Starke, was elected president of the Bradford-Union Cattlemen's Association for the coming year. Serving as vice president will be James W. Brown, Lake Butler. Secretary-treasurer is Ray Norman, Starke. State director from Bradford County is Fred Mueller, Starke, and state director from Union County is Ray Crawford, Lake Butler. Local Bradford County directors are L. C. Sapp, Starke, J. E. Tomlinson, Starke, and W. F. Andrews, Brooker. Union County directors, all from Lake Butler, are Neal V. Varnes, Wilford Croft, and A. C. Saunders. U.S. veal production was 31 million pounds in November, down six percent from November, 1979. Calf slaughter at 214 thousand head was down II percent, while the average live weight of 248 pounds was up 13 pounds. S 0 TRAIL-RITE Trailer Mfg. Co. presents HA YKRADLE Completely Manual No Hydraulics No Electricity Saves Labor virtually Maintenance Free 9 One Man Can Load, Haul, and Unload Horse Horse Trailers-i, 2 Stock Trailers-16-42 Goose neck and bum Open and closed side Rt. 2, Box 2442 5 Roll with Gooseneck RITEtented R IT E 4FG. Co. k Stock Trailers Manufactured in Florida 4, and 8 Horse All metal except wood flooring ft., even numbers -New tires standard per hitches -Matched paint optional s Also custom built to your specifications TRAIL-RITE TRAILER MFG. CO. T E HallC owner ST. CLOUD, FLORIDA 32769 Ph, 305/892-2498 TH1E FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 41 ARCADIA ALL-FLORIDA CHAMPIONSHIP RODEO MID-WINTER EDITION "GRANDDADDY OF 'EM ALL" 72nd Performance-53rd Year FRIDAY, MARCH 13th, 2 p.m. SATURDAY, MARCH 14th, 2 p.m. SUNDAY, MARCH 15th, 2 p.m. PRCA Approved Nationally Ranked Cowboys FENTON ARENA SOUTH 17 ARCADIA $5.00-$6.00 All Covered Reserved Seats $4.00 General Admission R00oo For Information and Reservations P. 0. Box 1266 1 Arcadia, Florida 33821 Phone 813/494-2014 Advance Tickets on sale February 9-March 13 at Rodeo Office on Rodeo Grounds, Highway 17, South, 124 Heard Street, Arcadia, Florida.

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An assessment of agricultural nonpoint pollution controls by WILLIAM G. BOGGESS University oJ Florida F LORIDA is blessed with an abundance of natural resources that not only provide an attractive tourist environment, but also help make Florida's agricultural industry one of the largest and most diverse in the nation. Yet, the warm, humid climate and sandy soils make agriculture in Florida particularly dependent upon the use of chemical pesticides and fertilizers. The impact of these agricultural practices on the environment has been recognized at the national level and federal legislation has been established to provide guidelines for controlling pollution from agricultural sources. The purpose of this article is to provide a brief overview of Florida's agricultural nonpoint pollution control plan and the guidelines that have been established for implementing the socalled "208 plan." Planning framework On October 18, 1972, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments became Public law 92-500 with the primary objective of restoring and maintaining, the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the nation's water. The Act also contains two more specific goals: that by June 1983, wherever possible, water quality is to be suitable for the protection and propagation of fish and wildlife, and for recreational purposes; and that by 1985 discharges of pollutants will be eliminated. To achieve these goals, the Act provides for extensive inventorying, planning, and regulation to control point sources of pollution. In addition, although the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is primarily responsible for carrying out the provisions of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, Section 208 of the Act requires states to develop and implement water quality management plans. These water quality plans are to include: -a process to )i) identify, if appropriate, agriculturally and sikiculturally related nonpoint sources of pollution, including return flows from irrigated agriculture, and their cumulative effects, runoff from manure disposal areas, and from land used for livestock and crop production, and (ii) set forth procedures and methods (including land use requirements) to control to the extent feasible such sources ." In Florida the Department of Environmental Regulations (DER) is responsible for developing and implementing the 208 plans. The DER has responded by developing a State Water Quality Management Plan for EPA approval. Included in the overall plan is an Agricultural Nonpoint Source Element, the provisions of which are the major subject of this article. The stated thrust of the agricultural element is "to identify those agricultural activities contributing to water quality degradation, and to develop beneficial management schemes to control and prevent this degradation." In addition, the element includes sections on implementation procedures and provisions for possible federal and state cost-sharing. Problem Identification Numerous studies have been performed throughout the nation to identify characteristic pollutants from agricultural nonpoint sources. These studies have been useful in providing a qualitative assessment of the total agricultural nonpoint pollution problem nationwide. For example, the EPA has reported that agricultural lands are a major contributor to the estimated four billion tons of sediment annually washed into the nation's waterways, with croplands responsible for over 50 percent of the total sediment yield to inland waterways. For several reasons, however, the DER has maintained that the above estimates are not satisfactory for identifying local problems. First, since the Agricultural Nonpoint Source Element relies on voluntary cooperation (discussed in a later section), local acceptance of a water quality problem is an essential ingredient. Secondly, Florida's agricultural nonpoint pollution problems differ in many respects from those typical in most other states. Soil erosion, for example, is considered the major nonpoint pollution source nationwide. In many parts of Florida, though, the highly permeable soils and flat typography result in little erosion. But by the same token, because of the rapid infiltration rates and heavy rainfall in Florida, dissolved nutrients from animal wastes, fertilizers, oxidized organic matter and natural sources can pose a significant water quality problem. As a result, the DER determined that a consistent statewide assessment of agricultural nonpoint source pollution was needed to identify specific problems and problem areas. A review of the data available in Florida has shown that although there has been considerable monitoring of water quality in the Okeechobee-Kissimmee Basin, monitoring in other areas has not been sufficient to fulfill the problem identification goals of a state-wide plan. Faced with time and resource limitations that precluded rigorous monitoring of water quality state-wide, the DER has developed a method to rank the state's 115 hydrologic segments with respect to their potential nonpoint source pollution problem (see Figure 1). In developing the method, the DER attempted to identify factors that link agricultural activities to nonpoint source pollutants. Existing state-wide data was used to provide consistent rankings of the 115 segments, taking into account climate, agricultural activity and terrain variations across the state. Based on these requirements, the DER chose four factors for evaluation: average fertilizer application rate as represented by nitrogen and phosphorus application; average pesticide application; animal unit density; and amount of sediment delivered to streams. Each of the 115 hydrologic segments illustrated in Figure 1 was evaluated in terms of these four factors and assigned a numerical ranking of 0.0 to 1.0. The segment's ranking is based on the calculated potential nonpoint source pollution from each factor. A value of 1.0 was assigned to areas with the greatest potential for problems. Other areas were ranked proportionally. A final state-wide ranking of hydrologic segments was calculated by summing the rankings of all pollution factors within each segment. The purpose of the overall ranking as stated by the DER, was to "present a relative picture of all segments within the state, highlighting those which have the greatest potential to have water quality problems stemming from some type of agricultural land use." The shaded segments in Figure 1 represent the 20 segments with the greatest potential for water quality problems stemming from agricultural land use. Five of the "top 20" segments were identified for additional study (see Figure 1). Within each of these five segments, a smaller watershed was identified for more detailed analysis. The analyses will be the first step in a statewide effort to determine: 1) The ability of various best management practices and/or management schemes to reduce pollution levels. 2) The associated costs and benefits of implementing these practices. 3) The magnitude and potential effects of nonpoint source runoff associated with various agricultural activities common to the major land resource areas of Florida. Selection of the five segments was based on the following criteria: 1) Segments exhibited a high potential for agricultural nonpoint source pollution based on one or more of the four factors considered in the state-wide assessment. 2) The segments chosen were representative of the broad range of nonpoint source problems and agricultural land uses existing in the state. The information developed in these areas should then have maximum utility, state-wide. 3) Areas characterized by private 42 / THE F LORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981

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land ownership rather than public corporate land ownership were given preference since it was felt that these areas would have a greater need for cost-sharing programs to implement pollution controls. 4) An even geographical distribution over the state was desired to maximize the demonstration benefits and citizen involvement. 5) Areas with existing programs addressing 208 objectives were not chosen, to avoid duplication. One of the key sources of funding considered for the 208 plan was the costsharing monies authorized in the Rural Clean Water Act of 1977. This act contains a section addressing watershed eligibility for cost-sharing monies which was used in identifying the specific watershed study areas within the five selected segments. The section specified that eligible watersheds should be smaller than 200,000 acres, have a majority of privately-owned farms, have evidence of widespread landowner cooperation and interest, and be dominated by agricultural activities. In addition, preference was given to watersheds with existing data and a documented nonpoint source water quality problem. Implementation The DER is responsible for the overall management and implementation of the nonpoint program with assistance from the State Soil and Water Conservation Districts (SWCD's), the U.S. Soil Conservation Service (SCS), the Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service (ASCS), and the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS). The plan calls for the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences to provide research assistance in carrying out and evaluating the program, and to assist in public education efforts through the Cooperative Extension Service. Interagency memoranda of agreement are being drafted to clarify the specific roles of each of the agencies involved in implementing the 208 plan. Voluntary approach In the case of point sources of pollution, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act requires a regulatory (permits) approach. However, the EPA guidelines exempt nonpoint sources from the permit requirements. Because there is uncertainty regarding the effectiveness of best management strategies for controlling nonpoint source discharges, the DER has not developed specific permitting requirements for nonpoint sources at this time. Instead a cooperative or voluntary program will be conducted and monitored for a period of three years (phase I). The success of the voluntary program will be judged by the cooperation received from farmers, rather than by strict attainment of water quality standards. If the voluntary program proves ineffective, there is a possibility of a regulatory approach. The plan itself calls for the DER to develop a technical manual of agricultural best management practices for use by the SWCD's, SCS, and landowners, and to coordinate and monitor the activities of the various implementing agencies. The particular roles of those agencies, as proposed in the agricultural element, are outlined below. These roles may be clarified and revised in the interagency memoranda of agreement. The first step in implementing best management practices will be for the SWCD's to identify problem areas in their annual plans. The districts will then seek landowner cooperation in these areas and direct SCS district conservationists to begin site specific planning for implementing the practices. Each SCS district conservationist will develop a site specific best management practice workplan for the area and assist extension personnel in transferring information to farmers and educating them in the application of the practices. The SCS district conservationist will also provide landowners with technical assistance. The DER will be responsible for reviewing the site plans and monitoring their effectiveness. In addition to educating farmers in the designated watersheds in the use of best management practices, the Cooperative Extension Service will use the results from these demonstrations in state-wide educational programs. In this manner the relative cost and effectiveness of the various practices in meeting the goals of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act can be transmitted to other producers and to the public. Funding For the voluntary approach to be effective it is recognized that in some cases installation of best management practices will require financial assistance. Federal cost-sharing funds for installation of best management practices are authorized under the Rural Clean Water Program and the Agricultural Conservation Program. The Agricultural Nonpoint Source Element indicates that the SCS, assisted by the FCACS, will administer the Rural Clean Water Program. However, since the element was written, responsibility for administering the Rural Clean Water Program has been shifted by Congress to the ASCS. The DER has recently completed a revision of the implementation section of the Agricultural Nonpoint Source Element reflecting this change in agency responsibility. The SWCD's are directed to assist landowners in preparing appliTHE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 43 Figure 1: Twenty hydrologic segments as identified by FDER with greatest agricultural pollution potential. Cross-hatched areas are designaeted for detailed study.

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cations for cost-sharing funds under both the Rural Clean Water and AgriFeed Protein and cultural Conservation programs. The plan also indicates that state Mineral-Rich funding would be sought by the FDACS Florida Molasses in two ways. First the FDACS was to introduce a supplemental budget request to the State Legislature in 1979 for a $90,000 appropriation to assist the SWCD's. This request was not successful and no further efforts are planned. Secondly, the FDACS will introduce legislation providing for state costsharing for best management practice applications. Legislation is to be introFlorida Molasses Exchange Inc. 5 esMna o Hydra ly duced in the next legislative biennium calling for approximately $300,000 per Phone 305/996-7711, P.O Box 507 year to provide state cost-sharing. Belle Glade, Fia. 33430 -AConclusion NI34 M5 V-1111118"31 N3 KA.4 I The Agricultural Nonpoint Source Element of the Florida 208 program has received preliminary approval from the SELECT SIRES EPA as a non-regulatory program. SUBSCRIBE NOW1! However, the DER is still waiting for the EPA's written comments and final approval. In order to obtain final FLORD.ARN approval, a non-regulatory program Green Cove Springs, Florida 32043 ___ must complete the following: 904-284-3982 SISAL BALERTWIN ) Identify best management pracScott Yant 001AL ALRTWNEtices; Orange Park, Florida 32073 9000 or 10000 feet 2) Agree on a schedule of mile904-269-3708 $20.25 per bale delivered in Florida Hirman Eugene DeWitt Minimum order 1100 bales stones, such as implementation, Okeechobee, Florida 33472 Belthor Americas Corp. monitoring, and program evaluation; 813-763-0341 3) Establish an effective educational 1800 Shames Drive program to inform the affected public of Offering semen on all dairy and beef Westbury, N.Y. 11590 Cntnenpge6)breeds plus supplies and service. (516) 333-3030 (Continued on page 62) :.* EATON PARK, FLORIDA FEED PLANT 813/682-6144 Main Office 813/665-5722 Delivery P.O. Box 116, Lakeland, Florida 33802 LAKELAND CASH FEE Where nutrition comes first.A 44 / [iE iFORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981

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Initial Ag Expo slated at Tampa fair The first state-wide agricultural products exposition Ag Expo will be held February 10, 11 and 12 during the Florida State Fair at Tampa. Florida Ag Expo will be a giant agricultural trade show aimed strictly at growers and their families, officials say. In addition to a special area for exhibits of agricultural machinery, chemicals and irrigation equipment, there will be a demonstration area where equipment can be seen in operation. Computers and windpower displays will also be included. Special events and entertainment for families will be held during the threeday Ag Expo show including Commissioner of Agriculture Doyle Conner's Agriculture Hall of Fame banquet, scheduled for Tuesday evening, February 10. FCA executive vice president Ron Stephens, Kissimmee, is chairman of the Hall of Fame program. T. Wilson Sparks, executive director of the state fair, and Lisa T. Hinton, assistant manager-Agribusiness, will coordinate all the details of the Florida Ag Expo Show. Dr. John Woeste, dean for extension at the University of Florida, Gainesville, has announced that the Agricultural Extension Department will be participating in the Expo. The department will provide exhibits and displays. According to Milton Morris, chairman of the editorial department, plans initially call for the department's wood burning tractor and wood powered electric generator to be on display. Demonstrations of these two energy saving machines will take place during the three-day event. Rush E. Choate, acting chairman of the department of agricultural engineering at the university, said the wood burning tractor was the project of Dr. Larry Shaw, and was a standard model tractor augmented by the addition of a wood burner. After fabrication of a wood burner, the conversion could be done in a week, said Choate. Ag secretary chosen by Reagan John Block, director of the Illinois Department of Agriculture, has been picked by President Ronald Reagan to be secretary of USDA. Block, who is 45 years old, is a graduate of West Point and owner of a 3000 acre farm near Galesburg, Illinois. Block was quoted as saying he favors less government involvement in agriculture, and is against direct governmentto-government grain sales and additional bilateral grain agreements. The Rogers Blend of Charolais where domestic, French, and Polled are being blended into a better beef animal-performance testing since 1961. Remember Our 7th Invitational Polled Charolais Sale SSaturday, May 30, 1981 at 2:30 p.m. Harlan & Dorotheann Rogers Rogers Bar H R 9 Collins, Mississippi 601/765-8848 CHAROLAIS and CHARBRAY CATTLE K RANCH Henry Douglas Ph. 813 782-1571 Ph: 813 782-1938 ZEPHYRHILLS, FLORIDA 33599 8 MI. SW of Zephyrhills On Morris Bridge Rd. DUNCAN CHAROLAIS FARM For Sale Quality Charolais Open and Bred Heifers Performance Tested Bulls Tom Jackson, Farm Mgr. Rt. 1, Box 1t1 Tignall, Ga. 30668 Ph: 404/285-2383 Bob & Arlene Duncan, owners 2307 S.F. 14th St. Ocala, Fla. 32670 Ph: 904/629-2629 Polled French CHAROLAIS WASDIN CHAROLAIS RANCH Ed & Dot Wasdin 1906 Shady Oaks Tallahassee, Fla. 32303 904/385-9393 Aren't you ready for NEW SUCCESS? You could be earnimp THOUSANDS more under our "Fast Start program. Brochure: JIM GRAHAM SCHOOL OF AUCTIONEERING, 204 US 1, North Palm Beach, FL 33408. B3fDAIRY Osbome Cattle Services 4760 SW 82 Avenue Davie, FL 33328 305/434-5065 Limousin-The Carcass Breed Representative for Carnation Geecs-Midwest Breeders Andrew Tent Co. Inc., KENNETH S. ANDREW Ownert and Operator Catering to the breeder who requires the very best in Sale equipment. P. 0. Box 4400-Ph: 912/883-4400 ALBANY, GEORGIA 31706 BARTON Charolais Ranches Wayne Templeton-Ranch Manager Rt. 2, Box 267, Abbeville, SC 29620 Phone-803/446-2929 Crescent J Ranch FOR SALE AT ALL TIMES Purebred Charolais bulls & heifers 3/4 Chianita bulls & heifers Win. J. Broussard, M.D. Tom Sewell, Jr. Owner Foreman 1355S. Hickory St. Ranch 8 mi. south Melbourne, Fla. 32901 of Holopaw, Hwy. 441 305/727-7632 (office) 305/892-5010 (Ranch) GLORYLAND Charolais Ranch Charolais Cattle For Sale Jim & Frankie Shannon Phone: 912/945-3997 P. Box 311 Jeffersonville, GA 31044 "TEST and WEIGH TO MAKE BEEF CATTLE PAY" Ask about Joini ng-Contact BOB SAND C FBCIA Sec'y Rolfe Hall, U. of Fla. A. Gainesville, Florida 32601 SUBSCRIBE NOW! FEEDERS KNOW what CHAROLAIS can dot Professional feeders know what Charolais sired steers and heifers will do In the feedlot, and the kind of carcass they produce under today's new grading standards. The emphasis is on fast gains, low feed costs and high quality, high cutting carcasses. There's a Charolais breeder near you .let him show you how to produce the most from your cow herd. Ga./Fla. Charolais Ass'n Frankie Shannon, Secretary P.O. Box 311 Jeffersonville, GA 31044 Affiliated with American Intl CharolalsAss'n 11HE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 45

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SOUTHSIDE FARMS Performance tested Angus since 1959 GA BCIA AHIR Herd certified & accredited Box 174 Hawkinsvillo, Ga. 31036 located 2 mi s. of Hawkinsville on US 129 Bill Pope, owner 912/892-9165 912/892-2651 GREENWAY Breeders of vsuperior angus. P.O. Box 1240 Ocala, Florida 32670 Day Phone (904) 732-4800 M I Night (904) 732-3363 Semiema aem Registered Angus and Ankina Cattle Route 4 Swainsboro, Georgia 30401 Donald & Gerald Hooks, Bill Aibriton, Mgr. ownors-912/562-3538 912/562-3200 LONG'S ANGUS RANCH Large type, registered Angus for sale. P. 0. Box 1057, Ruskin, FL 33570 813/645-3751 Over 60 Years Breeding Quality Angus Cattle HUGHES Angus Ranch Curtis Hughes, Owner Ph: 813/722-316 R, R. 1, Box 455 Palmetto, Fla. 33561 CLARK ANGUS RANCH Registered Aberdeen Angus raised in South Florida FOR SALE Fifteen 2 year old Angus bulls. Fifteen 1 year old Angus bulls. Performance evaluated. Tested for T.B. and Brucellosis 15 young bulls now available. Call for information and inspection 1600 E. Harbor View Road, Punta Gorda, FL 33950 (813) 625-5390 (813) 639-2146 46 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 Angus report highlights registered bulls potential A comprehensive report on the breedmore of a bull's progeny that were used ing value of 564 registered Angus bulls to compute the ratio, the higher the was released November 17 by the accuracy figure. American Angus Association and is Richard Willham, Iowa State Uniavailable to the general public, reports versity, who along with an associate P. C. K. Allen, executive vice-president of J. Berger analyzed the AHIR data for the American Angus Association, St. the 1980 Field Data Report, points out Joseph, Missouri. The "Field Data Sire that Angus breeders have made outEvaluation Report" is the first of its standing progress since 1965 when they kind ever produced by a long first began keeping AHIR records in established beef breed organization, significant numbers. Allen said. "The average Angus sire born in The 60-page bound report shows a 1978 was genetically 34 pounds heavier dramatic variation in the ability of indiin yearling weight than the average vidual Angus bulls to sire calves with Angus sire born in 1965," he said. "The superior weaning and yearling weights. genetic trend of 2.6 pounds per year in The expected progeny differences for the Angus breed represents the response yearling weight range from a minus 35 of Angus breeders to the beef industry's pounds to a plus 60 pounds, according desire, first expressed in the middle to Dick Spader, director of breed 1960's, to have Angus breeding stock improvement for the association. "This with more growth potential. This means," he said, "that a breeder who evaluation of a genetic trend is the first uses the minus bull could expect the reported for a breed of beef cattle. yearling weights of his calves to be "The genetic trend for the Angus reduced by as much as 35 pounds per breed for pre-weaning growth (weaning animal. On the other hand, a breeder weight) is plus 11 pounds from 1965 to who uses the top ranking bull would 1978." Willham said. "This is an imporfind that the calves from this sire would tant change, although not as spectacular average up to 60 pounds heavier than as the yearling weight change. calves from other sires in the report. The Some 214,000 yearling weights on potential yearling weight difference in file in the AHIR program were analyzed the calves from these two bulls would be to produce the yearling figures, Willham 95 pounds. Based upon $70 per hunsaid. The statistical procedure used was dredweight cattle prices, that would developed for dairy sire evaluation at mean a $66.50 per head difference in the Cornell University. value of yearling offspring from the two The report represents a "milestone" bulls. in the use of performance records for ."Obviously this report can have a accurate selection of sires, said Willham. major economic impact on the Angus "Until now only the newly introduced breed and upon the commercial cattlebreeds have had sire evaluation promen who use Angus bulls in their programs that used existing performance grams," Spader pointed out. "Cattledata. This was possible because the men who use this report to help them breeds were introduced by using sires by select breeding stock to improve specific artificial insemination." economic traits in their herds should be The association report was made able to increase the productivity of their possible by two factors-one, the open cattle." artificial insemination rule adopted by The new report, available for $5 the Association board of directors in from the association, is based upon the 1972 combined with the subsequent more than 1.5 million birth, weaning, widespread use of A.I. throughout the and yearling weight records on permabreed, and two, the dramatic increase in nent file in the association's Angus Herd recent years of the use of the AHIR proImprovement Records (AHIR) program by Angus breeders. gram. Breeders have no choice of Another factor that contributed to whether their bull is listed in the report. the success of the field data report is the All Angus bulls with sufficient qualified fact that some 250 Angus bulls have progeny are evaluated and listed. been evaluated in the designed (strucThe report on each individual bull tured) Sire Evaluation program that was shows the expected progeny difference started in 1974. Some of the sires used in for birth weight, when available, and for the designed program, and later used weaning weight and yearling weight. widely in the breed through artificial These are expressed in plus or minus insemination, tied the AHIR perpounds to make it easy to evaluate indiformance data together and made it posvidual bulls, and compare different sible to compare sires in all parts of the bulls. In addition, a maternal breeding country and under various managevalue is also calculated for each bull. It ment conditions. Only Angus bulls that is expressed as an estimated breeding had sufficient numbers of AHIR value of how daughters of a bull will progeny that could also be tied to milk. This ratio is also accompanied by reference sires were included in the field an accuracy figure to show cattlemen data report. how accurate the ratio is. In general the One surprise that came from the

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Activities in the industry! Upper left, Commissioner of Agriculture Doyle Conner, emphasizes the importance of brands which help to discourage rustlers and he encourages livestock owners to brand their animals. Shown here he puts the "Open A" brand of the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services on a range cow penned at Withlacoochee State Forest. Second row, Ron Smoak, Madison, center, president of the Florida Hereford Association visits with two of the Southeastern Pen Bull Show judges at Bartow. At left is Lowell Holley, Bowling Green, and Morris Meador, Jachin, Alabama. At left, FCA President W. G. "Kayo" Welles, Arcadia, gave welcome comments to those attending the recent Southeastern Hereford Pen Bull Show and Sale held at the Polk County Agriculture Pavilion, Bartow. Third row, center, A cattle judging demonstration was conducted by Don Hargrove of the animal science department, University of Florida, Gainesville, during the annual winter meeting of the Florida Santa Gertrudis Association held at Ross Brothers Farm and Ranch, Branford. Third row, right, Visiting during the Santa Gertrudis Association's meeting at Branford were Charles Wolf, Delray Beach, left, longtime manager of K. D. Eatmon Santa Gertrudis, Pompano Beach, and Carl Story of the Florida Division of Cajun's Cattle Service, Lake City. Bottom, Some of the officers and directors of the Sarasota County Livestock Association from left, are, Buddy Alday; John Albritton; Maurice Combee, treasurer; Arlin Hawkins; Jeff Durrance, and Boyce Blackmon, president. 48 TEill FLORIDA CATTLE\MAN / FEBRUARY 1981

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report is that despite an increase in yearling weights, there has been a slight decrease in overall average birth weights in the Angus breed since 1965. The decrease has averaged a minus .2 pound per year. Several factors could influence this trend, according to Willham, but he said that it ...does suggest that ..Angus breeders are considering calving ease in their sires." The Field Data Sire Evaluation Report represents a shift from purely subjective evaluation to more objective means of evaluating the value of a breeding animal, according to Willham. "The American Angus Association has provided its breeders with the most current set of performance programs in the breeding stock industry," Willham concluded. "Angus breeders have responded by developing records that are the base on which a specification product can be offered to the commercial producer." Angus Group forms foundation A non-profit foundation to receive and administer tax deductible contributions for scientific research and education has been formed by the American Angus Association, St. Joseph, Missouri, reports C. K. Allen, executive vicepresident. The first contribution to the fund will be some $5000 received by the association from the sale of a registered Angus heifer at the 1980 National Western Stock Show. That heifer was donated by A. F. Flint and Sons, Bard, New Mexico, and purchased by Jim Baldridge, North Platte, Nebraska, to provide initial funds for the National Junior Angus Association. The second contribution will come from the sale of another heifer at the 1981 National Western Stock Show. The heifer is Band 053 of Ideal 3163 174, donated by the Martin Jorgensen Family of Ideal, South Dakota. Tax deductible donations to the fund may be made by any individual or organization by sending a check made out to the Angus Foundation, to the American Angus Association. The Angus Foundation's charter has been approved by the Internal Revenue Service. The foundation will be administered by a board made up of association officers and members of the board of directors, and the executive vicepresident of the association. The world agricultural output is unchanged in 1980, according to USDA. But, that translates into a two percent decline in per capita outputthe lowest level since 1972. U.S. farm production expenditures for 1979 were $135.1 billion, according to USDA, up from $114.2 billion in 1978. Average farm expenditures came to $58,037 for the year. Herd Sires: Ankonian Dynamo; Bar Northern 546. Off'iig top .qliolii,. occhimited Angus Catle. from I Ck .21ififw' TB3 & Baongs free' hera G Dynamic; Gore CJB Angus Farm Bill Graham, Owner 813/322-1601 Rt. 1, Box 435, Myakka, Fla. 33551 at Bethany off Hwy. 64 on Verona Road REGISTERED ANGUS Gilbert J. Roberts Featuring CYPRESS GAY JINGO I CC PRESIDENT 345 .ome of FERD081 of WYE CYPRESS CREEK RANCH *" r e 3ya Box 2000, Johnston Rd., Dade City, Fla. Rt. 1, Box 315 Bill & Melba Straigis, Owners 904/588-2571 Marianna, FL 32446 Billy Sanders, Herdsman 904/588-2951 ** * * Performance Tested Reg. ANGUS BULLS wiii be 2-years old next January-February (Please call us) STARDUST RANCH Henry and Jeannette Chitty Phone Gainesville) 904/372-1650 MICANOPY, FLORIDA 32667 *************** ** REGISTERED ANGUS BULLS Service Age and Ready to Work Suitable for Commercial or Purebred Herds SOUTHWOOD FARM Ph: 904/877-1158 TALLAHASSEE, FLA. 32302 P. 0. Box 191 ADVERTISE BUYING ANGUS? Bulls? Cows? Heifers? Call John Crouch Regional Mgr., American Angus Association He'll give you professional counsel and help -no cost, no obligation. He understands your needs, and he's ready and willing to help. Contact him today! Cali 803/288-5910 120 Shadecrest Dr., Mauldin. SC 29662 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRI ARY 1981 / 49 MICHELONI ANGUS Reg. Angus Since 1952 BULLS FOR SALE Groveland Wy-Ankonian Dynano-Emulous Cossal-Geordus of Graham Rudy & Jane Geraci Ph: 904/429-2992 or 429-2554

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Grow----Watc,/ 11th nnuaI Graham Jgus Farm Spring Qen House Tusdy,9Wch 17,1981 This year we will be offering approximately 33 progeny-proven cows for sale. Each cow will have The following are some of the cattle to be offered for sale: a calf at its side born during January or February, 1981. These cows are all of the winter calving cows in our herd born prior to Oct. 25, 1975. None will be held back._cows Available for sale at this time will be 75 performance tested bulls just off test and several herd Cow's Sire Cow's No. Birthday 205-Day 365-Day sires we have been asns in oar herd. CwsSr o' o itdy 25Dy 6-a For the first time, we will be offering 12 F1 Brangus bulls raised and performance tested by Big Elban of Graham 43 1257 1/21/73 4/111 4/110 Graham Bardolier 84 1290 1/03/73 6/108 5/109 The objective of Graham Angus Farm into produce registered Angus bulls that will improve the Big Elban of Graham 131 1330 1/18/74 4/119 3/112 economic efficiency of commercial beef herds. We attempt to do this by stressing traits of economic Graham Emulous Para 22 1611 12/25/74 4/108 2/105 importance and only traits of economic importance in our selection of breeding animals. The followBig Elban of Graham 250 1714 1/02/75 4/115 3/112 ing are traits we emphasize in our program: .Big Elban of Graham 66 1715 12/30/74 4/115 3/109 1. Fertility and Reproductive Ability. We expose cows to bulls for 60 days and insist on a live Beat WPD and Gain after 84 days ever at Graham Angus Farm calf.2.Mothering Ability. We do not creep feed so we can measure a cow's ability to wean a heavy BULLS ON TEST calf on her milk alone. 3. Ability to Grow Rapidly. We have weighed calves since 1955, yearlings since 1961. Sire Dam's No. 205 Day Adj. Wgt. 84 Day Gain 84 Day WDA 4. Structural Soundness. We don't care about the shape of their heads, but we insist on good Big Elban of Graham 208 1193 583 4.23 3.36 legs and feet. Emulous of Georday 1 1390 626 3.81 3.33 5. Adequate Size. We like large Angus cattle. Dunnedin of Graham 12056 1523 641 3.81 3.22 Dunnedin of Graham12056 1643 555 4.29 3.15 PRICE LISTS AVAILABLE E UPON REQUEST Emulous of Georday 1 1725 637 3.86 3.24 FREE DE LIVERY WITHIN THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES. Menteith of Graham 15087 1778 627 3.99 3.17 HERD SIRES 205 Day 140 365 Day Wgt. Name Age Adj. Wgt. Day Gain Adj. Wgt. 10/30/80 Emulous of Georday1 7 672 3.68/125 1230/128 2310 BigfElban of Graham11155 5 599/118 3.18/119 1115/115 1950 L7NEGRAHAM ANGUS FARM lP GRAHAM ANGUS FARM BILL GRAHAM BILL GRAHAM Route 3, Box 587 Route 3, Box 587 Albany, Georgia 31701 Albany, Georgia 31701 Mrs. Flovd Wagner, Office Manager Mrs. Floud Wagner, Office Manager 10121 432-9240 19121 432-5245 (912.4W2-snMgr. PEF 1ANET3TN92 NE Jimmyo 2wles Cattle Mgr. 0 T. Watson Mgr. PFR CT NS E1223C4M W91)ls2-029 PERFORMANCE TESTING SINCE 19a5 10121 439--6h5u(1t2) 432-0229 PERFORMANCE TESTING SINCE t955 Jimmy Bowles, Cattle Mgr, 10121432-220(9121 435-7695 /THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 THE FLORIDA CATT-lEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 51

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A Registered Angus Cattle LAND & CATTLE CO., INC. BERT MICKEL, Mgr. P.O Box 308. Citra, FL 32627 (between Ocala and Gainesville) at junction U. 301 and Fla. SR 316 904/595-4761 4771, 4491 BARNETT ANGUS FARM (Since 1947) The Leader In Performance Tested Angus In Georgia M. H. Barnett, Jr., Mgr. Phone: 404/678-2832 Phone: 404/878-2264 WASHINGTON, GEORGIA at Airport LEMMON CATTLE ENTERPRISES Registered Angus Cattle Nina, Harvey, & Donnie Lemmon BULL SALE EVERY FALL Ph: 404/553-5124 or 404/553-3911 P. 0. Box 524 WOODBURY, GEORGIA 30293 Baldwin Angus Ranch FEATURES Emulous Pride 1 35 100% Golden Certified Meat Sire Ranch 5 Miles North of Ocala off 1-75. 904/629-4574. Leroy Baldwin, owner. GLOVER FARMS Quality Angus Super State Bradley 30. WW 680 pounds. YW 1190 pounds. 140 days Rate of Gain 3.87 pounds. Wade Glover, Owner, Ph: 813/737-2441; 754-1071. Rt. 5, Box 319-C, Plant City, FL 33566. Lee & Sons A Cattle Service Olt, R. C. Lee, owner Fit I 904/357-5068 Cate Star Route Box 820 For Show Eustis, Fla. 32726 And Sale Barn-15 Mi. East of Eustis on S.R. 44 Florida Headquarters For MARSHALL PRIDES BELLEMEADE Farms Rt. 2, Box 53B Lake City, Fl. 32055 904/752-2541 C. 0. Smith, Jr. Farm Performance Tested Angus Bulls For Sale. Vayden L. Murphy Gen Mgr. P. 0. Box 490, Moultrie, Ga. 31768 Off. 912/985-2889 Res. 912/985-1278 SYKES ANGUS RANCH 6342 Sykes Road Ph: 305/683-5134 WEST PALM BEACH, FLA. 33406 Featuring the breeding of Black Watch President 239 son of 1964 Grand Champion Ankonian President. And Hidden Hills OB53, a grandson of famous Bardoliermere 2. THE BEST IN BREEDING STOCK Brangus Bulls as well as 100% Wye Bred Angus Bulls 3a(ameru Farms Box 545 Bainbridge, Georgia31717 Telephone (912) 246-5964 SIZE-TYPE-QUALITY ABERDEEN-ANGUS THOMPSON BROS. FARM J. R. and Brace Thompson, Owners Rt. 6, Box 349 Marianna PH: 904/482-8522 Florida 32446 DN A GENETIC Registered Angus Since 1955 Using Performance Sires Since 1968 for sale: 15 3-4 yr. old cows 5 2 yr. old bulls $1500 per head, discounts available David N. Acres 813/324-4589 6055 Dunee Road Winter Haven, FL 33880 5c~e44a04 Headquarters for Performance Angus, Chianina, Ankina Gordon Johnson, Mgr. Bobby Canley, Mgr. 6130 State Route 7 26589 Highway 60E Lake Worth FL 33463 Lake Wales, FL 33853 L305/965-1473 813/692-1732 52 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 100 Performance Tested ANGUS AHIR BCIA Range Bulls For Sale Annually _____e_____ IRVINGTON FA RMS, INC. BILLY KING301/926-0200 RT. 2, Box 280 BILL & MARYT. HODGE404/884-393 WEST POINT, GA. 31833 FRED CONE404/882-0918 Intersection of GA. routes 219 & 18 Carton winds up term as FBCIA prexy Greg Carlton, Clewiston, completed his term as president of the Florida Beef Cattle Improvement Association at the group's annual meeting held in Ocala January 14. He was succeeded by Ralph Sexton of Vero Beach. Elected vice president was M. E. (Max) Hammond, Bartow, Secretary is Bob Sand, Gainesville, and treasurer is Charles Hardee of Chiefland. In his president's report, Carlton pointed out the growing awareness of bull buyers toward performance. He noted that buyers want data that will give guidance toward selecting a prepotent high performing herd sire. Carlton pointed out that buyers selecting breeding stock are looking to such data as production records, herd sire summaries, weaning weight/day gain and yearling weights. Carlton concluded his remarks by saying, "The destiny of our organization depends on the sound judgment of its members and if the past is any indication of the future, our organization will continue to grow and promote the ultimate in livestock management." Elected to the board of directors for three year terms were Leroy Baldwin, Ocala, Sexton, and Jimmy Chapman, St. Cloud. Luncheon speaker was Colville Jackson of Gloster, Mississippi, past president of the American Simmental Association. Jackson, in comments before giving a slide presentation on crossbreeding, stated the industry was in an "era of crossbreeding" and that keeping good records was an important management tool. The nation's largest farms-those with gross sales of farm products of $100,000 or more a year-account for only 17 percent of U.S. farms, but account for two-thirds of all farm expenditures, USDA reports. Registered, Top Quality Angus Bennett's Angus Ranch P.O. Box 8, Phone 904/594-5202 GREENWOOD, FL 32443 Jenkins Angus Ranch Phone 813/858-5037 Columbus Adventure T266-by "310" JAR Evolution 107-by "1342" 1978 Fla. State Fair Champion Macedon Super Contact 3-by Contact of Wye Blackdot Blue Chip 1029-W. W. 711 lbs. 7221 Old Polk City Rd., Lakeland, FL 33805 VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME

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LORD ROUNDUP *4 -, FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND CONSUMER SERVICES FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE ECONOMICS, STATISTICS, & COOPERATIVES SERVICE, USDA LIVESTOCK OUTLOOK Fed cattle at Omaha averaged $64-65 in December while Medium No. l's, 400-500 lbs. in Florida averaged $68-75. Overall, fed cattle declined about $1 from the previous month, while feeder cattle were up about $1. Cows remained unchanged. Florida hog prices for 200-230 lb. No. I and 2 barrows and gilts remained virtually unchanged from November, averaging about $45-46. The December 15 cattle on feed report indicated a 4 percent reduction of cattle on feed from December 1979, and 15 percent off from December 1978. Net placements of 1.53 million head in November were off 10 and 12 percent from last year and two years ago. In effect the supply side is tightening up considerably. Despite the bullish cattle on feed situation, considerable weight must be given to factors external to the cattle industry such as demand, hog supplies, interest rates and government policy. If inflation averaged in the 14-18 percent area over the next six months, the prime rate fluctuates between 18 and 24 percent, hog slaughter is off 2 percent from the late 1980 levels, and government appears to seriously be considering wage and price controls, then fed cattle at Omaha should average $6972 by March, $74-77 in the second quarter, and $77-80 by late summer. This would mean Florida Medium No. l's, 400-500 lbs. reaching up to the $82-88 area in the second quarter, and the high 80's by late summer. If, however, the prime rate were to decline 5 points, then both fed and feeder cattle prices would likely increase as much as 10 percent at the time this occurred. Fed cattle prices should continue to improve throughout the spring and summer with $80 cattle by August. Feeder cattle prices for Medium No. 1, 400-500 lbs. in Florida should reach $90 by September. Medium No. 1, 600-700 lbs. steers will likely average $70-77 in April-June. A drop of 5 points in the prime at that time could cause them to reach $78-80. PRICE RANGES-ACTUAL AND PROJECTED Omaha Florida 900-1100 400-500 lb. 600-700 lb. pound Feeder Steers Feeder Steers Year Utility and Choice Sltr. Month Steers Med. I Med. 2 Med. 1 Med. 2 Cows Dollars per cwt. 1980 June 66-67 70-81 66-76 68-77 62-72 42-50 July 70-71 72-79 66-74 61-67 57-64 42-50 August 72-73 72-80 66-75 63-70 59-67 43-51 Sept. 69-70 70-78 65-74 62-67 57-65 42-49 Oct. 67-68 71-79 65-73 61-67 57-64 41-48 Nov. 65-66 67-75 62-70 60-65 55-60 42-50 Dec. 64-65 68-75 63-70 59-65 55-60 42-48 1981 Projected Feb.-Mar. 69-72 73-80 69-76 67-72 66-71 46-55 April-June 74-77 82-88 75-82 70-77 68-74 48-58 July-Sept. 77-80 86-92 78-84 76-81 70-76 46-56 SOURCE: James R. Simpson, Cooperative Extension Service. Average Prices Received, Effective Parity and Percent of Parity for Livestock, U.S., December 1979 and 1980 Prices Parity Avg. Prices Item Received Prices as % of Parity 1979 1980 1979 1980 1979 1980 Dols. per Cwt. Dols. per Cwt. Percent Beef Cattle 64.40 59.10 74.50 86.70 86 68 Calves 84.30 70.80 86.20 103.00 98 69 Hogs 37.50 43.90 73.70 81.10 51 54_ Average Prices Received through 14 Florida Auctions December 1979 and 1980 Grade 1979 1980 Grade 1/ 1979 1980 Dollars Per Cwt. Dollars Per Cwt. Slaughter Calves over 250 lbs. Stocker Calves over 300 lbs. Choice 77.75 57.63 Medium #1 85.91 70.15 Good 69.77 55.50 Large #1 81.15 66.89 Standard 61.21 49.79 Medium #2 79.96 64.44 Large #2 74.49 60.97 Small #1 71.65 58.49 Small #2 67.90 55.76 All Grades 72.14 56.73 All Grades 81.34 65.53 Slaughter Cows Stocker Cows Commercial 55.28 44.79 1 54.74 49.11 Utility 52.56 45.21 2 52.71 42.84 Cutter 46.68 40.54 3 47.80 35.33 Canner 39.04 32.84 All Grades 49.91 42.75 All Grades 52.27 41.87 SOURCE: FDA & CS, Division of Marketing, Bureau of Market News. Average Prices, Dollars per Cwt. Slaughter Steers, Omaha Week Choice Choice Good Ended (900-1100 Lbs.) (1100-1300 Lbs.) (900-1100 Lbs.) 1979 11980 1979 1980 1979 1980 Oct. 25 64.88 66.92 64.72 67.10 60.55 62.80 Nov. 29 67.85 64.97 67.80 64.72 63.20 61.81 Dec. 27 68.72 63.83 68.91 63.62 64.50 60.75 Slaughter Cows, Omaha Week Com'l Utility Cutter Ended 1979 1980 1 1979 1980 1979 1980 Oct.25 46.05 45.30 46.70 46.10 45.25 43.05 Nov. 29 46.90 44.00 47.30 44.25 44.65 42.25 Dec. 27 47.81 43.08 48.62 43.67 46.19 41.75 SOURCE: U.S.D.A.-AMS Imported Boneless Beef on Which Duty is Paid Fresh & Frozen, Florida and U.S., 1978-80 September January-September Change Change Quantity from Quantity from Calendar Year Rec'd. prey. year Rec'd. prey. year Year 1000 1000 1000 Pounds Percent Pounds Percent Pounds Florida 1978 15,975 +23 144,567 -12 221,074 1979 15,188 -5 194,536 +35 253,377 1980 3,841 -75 119,759 -38 U.S. 1978 137,391 + 9 995,737 +11 1,392,568 1979 96,458 -30 1,139,767 +14 1,511,175 1980 82,318 -15 989,492 -13 SOURCE: U.S. Department of Commerce THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 53

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All things considered HEREFORD FOR ASSISTANCE IN LOCATING HEREFORD BULLS OR FEMALES No Cost .No Obligation Contact your American Hereford Association Field Representative: H.L. (CHIP) CARRIER Box F Bluff City, TN 37618 (615) 538-5354 AREA: New York, Pennsylvania, New England states, Virginia, North and South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Maryland and West Virg inia REGISTERED HEREFORDS ~ S MDAK HOUSE RANCH Ron & Martha Smoak, Rt. 4, Box 1235 Madison, Fla. 32340 *904/973-2304 Performance Tested HEREFORD & SIMMENTAL Annual Bull Sale-Dec. 8 CORRIGAN RANCH P. 0. Box 2410 Ph: 305/567-7141, 569-2342 Vero Beach, Florida 32960 Hereford Bulls Diamond C. Ranch, Inc. Harry Cobb Route 3, Box 93-C Donalsonville, GA 31745 912/524-2263 Registered Herefords PINE ACRES RANCH Citra, Florida 32627 Popular Bloodlines -CHF Sarm Mc~onald H464-JF Oundy 1154-P.A. Mischief Aster 307-7198 ProgressiveG. P. Leitner, Mgr. 904/595-3806 904/591-2180 Located 12 Mi. North of Ocala on US 301 Florida farm sales reach $3.1 billion Sales of farm products in Florida amounted to $3.1 billion in 1978, according to the Bureau of the Census, U. S. Department of Commerce. The total is based on preliminary results of the 1978 Census of Agriculture, which counted 44,165 farms in the state, with average sales of $69,691; an average size of 304 acres; and average value of land and buildings of $351,836. Comparison with totals from the last previous census (1974) should be made with caution because of significant improvements in data collection procedures in 1978. Bureau officials believe that the improvements in data collection had a much greater effect on the count of farms than on measures of agricultural production. The improvements are discussed further below. While Florida farm product sales climbed 62 percent from $1.9 billion in 1974, farmers' expenses also grew. For example, feed purchased for livestock and poultry was up from $279.1 to $348.2 million in 1978; hired labor from $264.5 to $394.2 million; gasoline and other petroleum products from $46.7 to $83.8 million in 1978. The total energy cost for Florida farms amounted to $111.5 million. The market value of all machinery and equipment went up 80 percent from $523.8 million to $944.2 million four years later. Crops brought a return of $2.2 billion, 71 percent of Florida's total farm sales, compared with $1.3 billion in 1974. Oranges, the leading crop in acreage, were grown on 695,900 acres, producing 14.9 billion pounds. Soybeans placed second with 372,500 acres producing eight million bushels. Vegetables were the third ranking crop with 340,000 acres, including 60,100 acres of sweet TOM COCHRANE, Fort Meade, right, was recently presented a plaque showing appreciation for his supervising the youth activities at the four previous field days, and for his assistance to the Florida Junior Hereford Association. Tom Childs, Lake Placid, vice president of the Florida Hereford Association, made the presentation during the field day activities held as part of the Southeastern Hereford Pen Bull Show and Sale at Bartow. corn. Other main crops were sugarcane, 337,100 acres; corn, 311,100 acres; hay, 293,400 acres; grapefruit, on 162,200 acres, yielded 3.9 billion pounds. Livestock and their products brought a return of $667 million, compared with $408.6 million in 1974. Florida's total cattle and calves inventory of 2.3 million on 21,199 farms was down from 2.4 million in 1974, but the 1.3 million head sold from 19,044 farms was ahead of 966,000 sold in 1974. Twelve percent of those sold were fattened on grain and concentrates. The inventory included 1.2 million beef cows, about steady with 1974. A total of 619 farms sold $250.6 million in dairy products. The inventory of 204,200 milk cows was up from 198,700 four years earlier. A total inventory of 376,600 hogs, 65,300 for breeding purposes, was counted on 8,277 Florida farms, with 526,500 reported sold of which 138,100 were feeder pigs. Approximately one percent, 100 farms, reported 500 or more hogs and pigs, accounting for 25 percent of the state's total inventory. Hog numbers were 180,000 more than 1974 level. The horses and ponies inventory on farms was 51,400. Sales of poultry and their products amounted to $223.6 million, compared with $180.1 million in 1974. A total of 5,994 farms reported an inventory of 15.2 million chickens 3 months old or older, compared with 14.4 million four years earlier. Hens and pullets of laying age were reported at 13.1 million compared with 12.5 million in 1974. Other measures of Florida farms also portrayed gains as the average value of land and buildings per acre climbed from $685 to $1,143; total cropland went from 3.7 to 4.5 million acres; and irrigated land increased from 1.6 to 2 million acres in 1978. Additional facets of Florida farms as depicted in the 1978 Census of Agriculture include the following: Eighty-three percent or 36,780 of the 44,165 Florida farms were operated by individuals or families, 4283 by partnerships, and 2770 by corporations, of which 2305 were family held. Ninety-two percent of the operators owned all or part of the farms they operated, with 33,348 fully owned, 7211 partly owned, and 3606 operated by tenants. Farming was the principal occupation of only 18,082 or 41 percent of the operators, while 26,083 spent most of their work time at a nonfarm occupation. Seventy-one percent of the operators who reported place of residence lived on the farm they operated. Florida farmers were younger on the average than in 1974, 51 years compared with 52.8. Some 4452 farms, 10 percent, were operated by women, as revealed by a question on sex of operator asked for the first time. 54 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 Griner Hereford Farm Hubby Griner P.O. Box 825' Columbia, M1S 19429 Office: 601 736-6347 Home: 601 736-6680 Bud Spencer, Herdsman

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FEB. 13 FRIDAY the day before Valentines SALE 1:00 p.m., at Cattlemen's Livestock Market LAKELAND, FLORIDA Selling 50 Bulls 30 strong breeding age bulls. 20 young performance tested yearlin bulls. Hereford and Polled Hereford. In addition to the bulls, we will selling 25 registered Hereford females, with quality enough to start a fine herd. Be sure to attend. For Information: Bob Rush 912/987-1796 Ken Rush 912/987-3574 m Bill Hamilton at the Market 813/665-5088 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 55

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T BAR Hereford Ranch Reg. Hereford Bulls for Sale at All Times Robert & Debi Thompson Carney OK 405/865-2513 Ralph & Estelle Thompson Colquitt GA 912/758-2230 Pine Pasture Farms Performance Tested Bulls For Sale herd Accredited & Certified We deliver each November esse L. Williams, Jr. & Sons Sul olk VA 23434 Ph: 804/539-8819 Feed Florida Molasses .a good source of mineral elements Florida Molasses Exchange, Inc. Phone 305/996-7711, P.O. Box 507 Belle Glade, Fla. 33430 For Hereford Bulls Call CK Ranch Sam Paylor 913/225-4745 Office: 913/225-4345 BROOKSVILLE, KS 67425 Herefords are just naturally better! Ask us about breeding Heer ods and become an active breeder FLORIDA HEREFORD ASSOCIATION Ron Smoak, President Rt. 4, Box 1235, Madison, FL 32340 Phone: 904/973-2304 Jo-su-LI FARMS, INC. Registered Hereford Cattle Ralph Thompson, Gen. M r. Off. 912/758-3637 Res. 912/758-2230 COLQUITT, GEORGIA 31737 Complete A.I. Services BEEF-DAIRY Quality Semen -Supplies 904/383-3772 305/968-6783 Noba-Ga. 912/987-2171 TOBIN ANTPUSET, left, Orlando, was reelected recently to serve another term as president of the Florida Junior Hereford Association. Other leaders are, second from left, ShereenLynn Childs, Lake Placid, vice president; Wayne Tanner, Orlando, secretary-treasurer; and Mrs. Tom Childs, Lake Placid, advisor. Farm product sales of $100,000 or more were recorded by 10 percent or 4232 farms; 7984 sold $40,000 or more; 11,782 had sales of $20,000 or more; and 32,383 had sales of less than $20,000. Figures published are for farms qualifying under the following definitions: Any place from which $1,000 or more of agricultural products were sold, or normally would have been sold, during the census year. Published dollar values have not been adjusted for changes in price levels. The improvements previously mentioned were in two areas. The first was an improvement in the mailing lists used to send farmers their census report forms. The second was a door-to-door canvass of sample households in rural areas. The results of this direct enumeration, when combined with the count by mail, allowed the bureau to identify additional farms in the state which would have been missed under procedures used in the 1969 and 1974 census. The bureau estimates that the direct enumeration sample added 7959 farms (averaging 36 acres and with average sales of $3805) to the mail census. Although characteristics of the additional farms are tabulated in the report for the state, they are not included in the totals published for each county. Had 1978 procedures been used in the last previous census (1974), Bureau officials estimate that between 8000 and 11,000 smaller farms would have been added to the 1974 Florida total. The estimated state total would have been between 40,466 and 43,466 farms in 1974 instead of the 32,466 enumerated under the procedure actually used. A detailed description of the 1978 Census of Agriculture program compared with earlier censuses is available from the Agriculture Division, Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233. 56 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981

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Breeding valuerratios accurately estimate Hereford bulls' ability to improve weaning weights, increase yearling weights and improve milking ability in a cow herd. A computer analysis, unique in the industry, scans records of sires, dams and grandparents to calculate breeding value~based on ancestor's performance. Hereford breeding value predictions are accurate and reliable because of the American Hereford Association's vast storehouse of over one-million individual performance records. Over 100,000 registered Hereford bulls with predictable performance will sell this year. Contact registered Hereford breeders in your area or the American Hereford Association for more information. T*,,' All things considered. .1 ecords 1981 c ,WEREFORD American Hereford Association -715 Hereford Drive -Kansas City, Missouri 64101 -Phone (816) 842-3757 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 57

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Washington Report A new Congress With a new, more conservative, 97th Congress underway, cattlemen can expect to be treated more favorably, according to C. W. (Bill) McMillan, NCA vice president for government affairs. An example of the more conservative bent of Congress can be found in the committee chairman assignments in the Senate, where two-thirds of the chairmanships will be occupied by Senators from west of the Mississippi River. While there is no guarantee on how they might act toward any given legislative proposal, it can be assumed that their more rural, more conservative viewpoint will benefit agriculture. The situation will be different from that with the more urban-oriented chairmen of the past 25-30 years. Another welcome change is the appointment of many new persons to staff positions on the Senate committees. It is felt by most analysts that the new thinking and experience will benefit the legislative process. On the House side (where the Democrats are still the majority), it appears that the conservative viewpoint has gained. McMillan cited a growing number of southern and southwestern Congressmen who have expressed interest in working with the Republican Administration against legislation too liberal to their liking. It is felt that much of the legislation coming out of this Congress will reflect intensified efforts to balance the federal budget, cut out unnecessary government programs and restrain inflationwhich is one of cattlemen's greatest problems. It is also anticipated that more attention will be given to costs and benefits, and there should be a more reasonable balance between economic and environmental goals. The legislative process How proposed legislation moves through Congress may be of interest to you. The following explanation was prepared by B. H. (Bill) Jones, NCA vice president for policy development. The work of Congress is initiated by the introduction of a legislative proposal. There are four principal forms of such proposals: the bill (the most common), the joint resolution, the concurrent resolution and the simple resolution. If a bill is introduced in the Senate, it carries an "S. designation (meaning Senate); if in the House of Representatives, an "H.R. designation (meaning House of Representatives). Let's follow a bill through the normal process from introduction to becoming a public law on the statute books. In the example, we'll use a tax cut proposal, since this issue is in high focus, and we'll assume it is introduced in the House of Representatives. Also, we'll assume the bill is acted upon favorably at each stage-not let lie, be killed, tabled or other. (Bear in mind that bills which are the same or similar may be introduced in both the Senate and the House at or near the same time and may move through the two bodies within the same time period.) First Step. The proposed bill is introduced on the floor of the House by a member of that body (may have no cosponsors or may have several other representatives as co-sponsors along with the principal sponsor). Second Step. The bill is referred to the appropriate committee-the committee having jurisdiction in the subject area covered by the bill. In some cases, more than one committee may be involved. In the instance of a tax cut bill, it would be referred to the House Committee on Ways and Means. Third Step. The bill may be considered by the full committee, as is most often the case with major tax bills. However, the prevailing practice throughout the Congress is for the full committee to refer the bill to the appropriate subcommittee for initial consideration. In the case of tax bills, this is the subcommittee on select revenue measures. The subcommittee would typically hold public hearings and accept written statements from interested parties. Amendments may be made by the subcommittee before it votes the bill out. Fourth Step. The bill goes from the subcommittee back to the full committee. The full committee may make further amendments or change what the subcommittee has done before approving the measure-"marking the bill up." A report of the action taken in committee now accompanies the bill. This is the start of the legislative history, which sets forth Congressional intent and other pertinent information. Fifth Step. The committee version of the bill, together with the committee report, is referred back to the House floor. (In the case of the House, the bill is actually referred from the Committee on Ways and Means to the House Committee on Rules, which is responsible for determining the rules under which the bill will be considered by the full House.) The vote on the House floor may or may not be recorded. House members may seek to have a vote recorded, and this is typically done on controversial issues. Amendments are sometimes made on the floor and, therefore, the 58 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 version passed by the full body may not be exactly the same as the committee version. Sixth Step. Once the bill is approved by the full House (House floor), it is referred to the Senate. Essentially the same procedure is followed on the Senate side as outlined for the House in steps two through five. The House bill number remains on the bill as it is being considered by the Senate. If the versions of the bill passed by the House and by the Senate are the same, the bill then goes to the President for his approval. On the other hand, if there are differences, the two versions are referred to a Senate-House Conference Committee. Conference Committee. A SenateHouse Conference Committee, as implied, is made up of Senators and House representatives. Typically, these are chosen from the committees which considered the proposed legislation in the two bodies, and in the same proportion of Republicans vs. Democrats as found in the make-up of the committees. (The party make-up of committees is generally in the same proportion as the total membership of the given body-Senate or House.) A conference committee considers only those provisions of the bill on which the Senate and House are in conflict, and it has the responsibility for resolving said differences. The compromises made and the resulting final language are included in a conference report which is then referred back to both the Senate and House (floors) for consideration. If both bodies approve the conference version of the bill, it is then "enrolled" for presentation to the President, who may approved or veto it. Micheloni ownership undergoes change Sole ownership of Micheloni Properties, Groveland, is now in the hands of Rudy and Jane Geraci of that city. The change was effected last August, the new owners said. The firm, consisting of cattle and citrus holdings, has been in operation a number of years and has been breeding registered Angus since 1952. A commercial cow/calf operation is also maintained where a crossbreeding program is observed. In the purebred Angus herd, bloodlines noted are Wye breeding; A nkonian Dynamo; Emulous lines; "Colossal" and Geordus of Graham. The slogan keynoting the breeding program in the Angus operation is "Breeding Tomorrow's Performance Today!" Under the breeding program at the ranch, bulls are placed with the cows in early to mid-January with calving in the fall of the year, Hay is produced for the herds using Coastal Bermuda, Alecia Bermuda and Callie Bermuda grasses. The main ranch area is on Carter's Island Road west of Mascotte.

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Bang's testing increases under accelerated program Testing and vaccination activities have increased substantially during the first three months of the accelerated program to eradicate the cattle disease brucellosis, Commissioner of Agriculture Doyle Conner has announced. A quarterly report released showed the number of cattle tested up 57 percent and calfhood vaccination up 94 percent since the eradication program was officially accelerated on October 1. There is an even more dramatic increase of 71 percent among cattle tested on the farm/ranch where the area testing program is concentrating. The report shows 412,655 cattle were tested in the three-month period of October, November and December of 1980. That's 149,669 more than the 262,986 that were tested during the same period in 1979. The on-farm/ranch testing accounted for most of the 1980 increase. A total of 355,771 cows were tested on the farm/ranch during the last quarter of 1980 as compared to 208,019 for the same period of 1979, resulting in the 71 percent increase. There also was an increase of 55 percent in testing at livestock markets. Figures for 1980 showed 16,871 head tested at market, compared with 10,887 for 1979-an increase of 5984. Testing at slaughterhouses showed a decrease of 10 percent with 40,013 head tested, down 4067 from the 44,080 tested in the 1979 period. The report also shows that the number of infected cattle is down considerably-by 21 percent overall. There were only 6201 infected cattle found during the last quarter of 1980, compared with 7527 in 1979, for a dropoff of 1326. There was an even more substantial decrease in the percentage of positive reactors to the test, dropping 48 percent from 2.86 percent to 1.50 percent. Calfhood vaccination, a cornerstone of the eradication and prevention program, nearly doubled during the last three months of 1980. Total calves vaccinated were 66,995 for the period, up 32,505 over the same period in 1979 when only 34,490 were vaccinated. Testing and vaccination showed its usual seasonal dropoff in December as the calving season started in south Florida. The slowdown is expected to follow its normal pattern through January and into February. Testing was up 60 percent for December 1980, increasing to 133,864 from 83,515 for a net gain of 50,349. Calfhood vaccination increased by 44 percent, up to 11,415 from 7952 for a net gain of 3466 for the month of December. Support your local county CowBelles Association. *The world's most efficient breed of cattle: YES, more live calves born unassisted. YES, they grow faster, finish faster, grade better. YES, the calves are always red when bred to other red cattle. YES, you should put performance tested Red Angus bulls to work in your cow herd. YES, save better heifers to improve mothering and milking ability. BRAAKSMA Red Angus-Home of: 1980 National Grand Champion Bull EHF Umpire 123-205 wt. 689, 365 wt. 1083 Super Charger 496-205 wt. 584, 365 wt. 1040 Rt. 2, Box 330 904/726-4874 FLORAL CITY, FL 32636 HIDDEN VALLEY RANCH Red Angus Cattle Born and Bred In Florida to Meet the Needs of Florida Cattlemen. Jack Sweger, owner Terry Martin, Mgr. 813/581-5638 904/796-5296 904/796-5868 Rt. 3, Box 170 Brooksville, Fla. 33512 AUCTIONEER Consultant H. Fred Dietrich Ill Rt. 10, Box 921A Ph: 305/568-2351 Orlando, FL 32820 BARZONA CATTLE F.B.C.IA. performance records available LAKE ORIOLE RANCH W. R. and Dorothy LaRosa, Owners Dennis Dunn, Manager Route 3, Box 443 oon or 6d 33s12 Red Angus Superiority Herd EML EMULATION 1-adj. 205 Sires: day wt. 665, ADG on test 3.61 CHEROKEE REBEL PV-weaning wt. 552, yearling wt. 1103 Chipola Red Angus Ranch Ken and Nell Williams Route 1, Box 295B-Altha, Florida 33421 Ph: 904/762-8259-813/541-4330 Florida BCIA Performance Tested Red Angus Bulls. Records to Prove Performance. RED ANGUS EN FINGER RT. 3, BOX 683 JAY, FLA. 32565 Ph. 904/994-7033 Livestock Hauling McKethan Cattle Corp. 904/796-9071 P. 0. Box 1930, Brooksville, FL 33512 TOP PROGENY ADS PROVEN BULLS Dairy& Beef 30 Breeds Featured Call or Write George Manter 904/733-2882 4138 Piper Dr. Jacksonville 32207 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 59

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S6A~oe R&wRo4k ALACHA, FLORIDA 32616 REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORDS Watch for an announcement on our 1981 Bull Sale Mrs. S. Y. Davis, Owner Bill Snead, Mgr. Phone (904) 462-1453 MITCHELL HEREFORD FARM Performance Tested Polled Hereford Cattle Lumber City, Ga. 31549 912/568-4236 or 586-3263 REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORDS "Trojan Style" Quality Simmental and Simbrah ECHODELL FARM Joe Harvey, Owner Jakin. Ga. 31761 Office: 912/524-2131 (Donalsonville) Farm: 912/793-2081 REGISTERED POLLED Farms IS HEREFORDS Performance Tested Bulls Available Cliff & Howard Shepard, owners Cliff, Gen. Mgr.-912/552-5464 P.O. Box 755 Howard-912/552-3012 Sandersvile, GA Polled Hereford Range Type Purebred Bulls Using 2 sons of J3-212, also 1 son of WP Victor H 125 W497. J. L. Wetherington 912/242-4721 2201 Newbern Dr., Valdosta, Ga. 31601 POLLED HEREFORD BULLS SAM SELLS & Sons P. 0. Box 1175 0 Farm 912/782-5281 Moultrie, Georgia 31768 MEMBER, GEORGIA B.C.I.A. FLORIDA POLLED HEREFORD ASSOCIATION The Big Bold Breed" P. 0. Box 1261 305/464-6833 Ft. Pierce FIL 33450 SAM SELLS & SONS, Moultrie, Georgia, represented by Sam Sells, Jr., fourth from left, was the big winner at the first Southern Select Polled Hereford Pen Bull Show and Sale. The firm won grand champion and reserve grand champion pen honors, and also had the reserve grand champion individual bull, shown above. Others shown are, from left, Buster Longino, Wilson Rumberger, Dusty Rich, Sells, Max Hammond, and Don Hargrove. On the announcer's stand are Johnny Winston, John Gray, and Bob Lee. Davis is volume Polled Hereford buyer; Sells is big winner Davis Cattle Corporation, Sebring, reserve grand champion individual. represented by J. Wesley Davis and his FCA President W. G. (Kayo) two grandsons, was volume buyer at the Welles, Arcadia, welcomed guests to the first annual Southern Select Polled sale, along with Dexter Douglass, TallaHereford Pen Bull Sale, held December hassee, president-elect of the Florida 17, at Bartow. Davis purchased 17 lots Polled Hereford Association, and Dusty at the sale for $23,975, an average of Rich, Kansas City, Missouri, president $1410 each. of American Polled Hereford AssociaThe event saw 74 Polled Hereford tion. The event was co-sponsored by bulls gross $89,075 to average $1204 per FPHA and APHA. head. Auctioneer for the sale was Morris Second top volume buyer was Phil Lafon, Bowling Green, with purchases totaling $9250 for 10 head. PH Cattle Company, Tampa, a Davis related enterprise, was third high, spending $5625 for seven bulls. Top selling individual was a Florida bred bull, RHF Victor 749 940, bred and consigned by Rock Hollow Farm, Alachua. The two-year-old son of RHF Victor 266 749, sold to Deer Acres, Monroe, Georgia, for $3700. The bulls were evaluated on the day prior to the sale by a three man team of judges. Two cattlemen and a University of Florida beef specialist were utilized as judges. Serving this year were Buster Longino, a Sarasota rancher, M. E. (Max) Hammond, president of W. H. Stuart Ranch, Inc., Bartow, and Don Hargrove of the University of Florida, Gainesville. The grand and reserve grand champion pens of bulls were both exhibited by Sam Sells and Sons, Moultrie, Georgia. E. D. Raulerson, Alma, Georgia, exhibited the grand champion individual bull, and Sells showed the Fannon, Pennington Gap, Virginia. Bob Lee, Quincy, served as sale chairman. Buyers at the sale, with number purchased shown in parentheses if more than one, and amount spent, follow. Davis Cattle Corporation, Sebring (17) $23,975; Phil Lafon, Bowling Green (10) $9250; PH Cattle Company, Tampa (7) $5625; Flowing Hill Farm, Alachua (2) $3000; Oak Knoll Ranch, Lake Wales (3) $4000; Deer Acres, Monroe, Georgia $3700; Rolland Carlton, Lakeland $1800; Fish Hawk Farm, Riverview (3) $3750; Four E Cattle Company (2) S3075; Clyde Wall, Webster $1500; Circle T Ranch, Clermont $1750; Micheloni Properties, Groveland (4)$5275; Bill McFarland, Manteso, Tennessee $1700; Johnny Hayes, Fort Ogden (4) $3900; WJR Polled Herefords, Lake City $1750; Vida DePue, Zephyrhills (2) $1750; S. L. Waters & Sons, Bartow $675; Doyce Teague, Alachua $1025; McLeod Ranch, Frostproof (3) $3300; Carlton Brothers, Plant City (3) $3075; C. E. Tool, Bowling Green $1125; HK Ranch, Lake Wales (2) $1450; Gene Moyers, Manchester, Tennessee $800; R. L. Leak, Plant City $800; George Hancock, Alturas $1025. American cheese output during October totaled 186 million pounds, up seven percent from a year earlier and marking the 29th consecutive month that production has been above that of a corresponding month. Join your local county Cattlemen's Association. 60 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981

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Commercial Cow-Calf Producers Job Description Design Profitable, Modern Beef Machine Polled Y"I Eye Good Sheath and Tesi Mothering Ability Today's Polled Herefords fit your plans Profitable, functional and efficient, the meet your needs. Polled Herefords The "Trouble-Free" Amwrika POWie Herfrd As,.citmi K700 E .63rd St Kansas City, Mo. 64130 Structur al Soundness Fertility and Longevity for success. y're designed to Breed THE FLORIDA CATTLENIAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 61 Client

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Pollution controls (Continued from Page 44) Ready to plants the requirements; 4) Provide for adequate technical and financial assistance if needed; and 5) Set up a reporting system to the Regional Administrator of the EPA on TIF O N progress made in implementation. The Florida plan addresses each of these conditions, but, at present, funds to support problem identification and to provide cost-sharing assistance for best D AEUBmanagement practice application are quite limited. Florida did not receive any funds under the latest Rural Clean G RA SS Water Act allocation and indications from Washington suggest that Agricultural Conservation Program funds may be cut back as well. Despite these funding setbacks, planning and implementation efforts continue. The DER has established an implementation schedule with annual program evaluations through June 1982. Advantages At that time, an evaluation of the effectiveness of the voluntary approach 1. High Qualityll In grazing will be made based on the degree of and pellet feeding experilandowner cooperation in instituting ments, Tifton 44 probest management practices, and the ducked 19 percent better effectiveness of the management agenaverage daily gains than cies in carrying out their functions. Coastal.(*) A check with the EPA indicates that Florida agricultural 208 plan is similar in style and approach to other state plans. The voluntary approach has the advantage that producers are not forced 2. Winter Hardmnesel Tifton to implement specific controls. Its disad44 :can be grown as far vantage is that producers may not have north as Oklahoma, sufficient incentives to participate on Souther n Illinois, a voluntary basis. However, the western Kentucky.(**) agricultural element indicates that the EPA may withdraw approval of nonregulatory programs if implementation milestones are not met. A regulatory CROP SCIENCE, Vol. 18, Sept.program would then be implemented. Oct., P. 911. (**) JOURNAL OF The advantage of a regulatory ANIMAL SCIENCE, Vol. 47, No. 4, program lies in the fact that specific 1978. practices or controls can be mandated. The primary disadvantage of course, is that producers lose that much more control over the management of their operations. The best season to plant this outi prtos standing forage and hay grass is late winter. We are now taking USDA study critical orders for dormant, high quality, The final report of USDA's two-year certified planting stock. study has recommended the "modification" of existing policies on taxation, farm credit, commodity price support, For Information, Contact trade, federally supported agricultural research, and conservation. Walter Stephens The report was critical of subsidies 912/382-1412 for gasohol production and called for an before 7:30 a.m. end to most federal subsidies for large after 7:30 p.m. farmers, those with sales in excess of or 912/386-0926 $200,000 annually. It also called for revision of tax provisions and farm credit procedures that RANCHO SAN ANTONIO have encouraged land speculation, Route 4, Box 316 inflated land prices, and the expansion of the size of farms. Those farmers with TPfhone rg12/3142 sales between $5000 and $200,000 annually, a majority of farmers in the U.S., need new policies designed particularly to help them, the study stated. 62 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 ANHINGA FARMS POLLED HEREFORDS Complete records. Performance tested bulls. Southeastern bloodlines. All herd bulls RWJ pedigrees. Route 3, Box 577 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Terese and Dexter Douglass Phone 904/893-5422 8 miles E. of Truck Rt. on Centerville Rd. Young Acres Ranch New Trend Polled Herefords Performance Cattle Service Age Bulls Bred and Breeding Age Females For information on our Performance Cattle: H. Y. Tillman 1207W. Park Ave. Valdosta, Ga. 31601 RWJ Victor Dominos Foundation Source Continuing to linebreed RWJ Practical Performing Polled Herefords. RWJ FARMS Mr. & Mrs. V. H. Jones Route 1, Box 157 912/874-6105 LESLIE, GEORGIA 31764 Registered Polled Herefords Top Bloodlines JAMES F. HOLMAN Rt. 5, Blakely GA 31723 Ph: 912/723-5428 POLLED HORNED HEREFORDS SINGLETARY FARMS A. J. and R. C. Singletary BLAKELY, GEORGIA 31723 Ph: 912/723-3525 (Office) 723-3196 (Res.) 2 MI. NW OF BLAKELY ON HWY. 27 Polled Herefords Malloy Hereford Ranch Victor Dominos "With the Malloy Accent" Home of: RWJ Victor J133 76 Al Certificates Available Mr. & Mrs. Dallas Malloy, Owners P. 0. Drawer G, Marianna, FL 32446 (office) 904/526-2672 (res.) 482-5196 Linebred Bulls Commercial Cattlemen Pim IBlisle, Route 5, Moultrie, GA 31768 912/324-2602

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Seffner bull sale averages $1002 on 102 head An overall average of $1002 was struck on 102 head of Angus, Brangus, Brahman, Simmental, and Polled Hereford bulls at the Cattleman's Bull Sale, held Saturday, December 13, at the Interstate Livestock Market, Seffner. The top volume buyer was Rolland Skipper, Zolfo Springs, spending $21,250 for 21 head. Second top volume buyer was Earl Deal, Riverview, who purchased 14 head for $11,700. Other volume buyers included Mathias Ranch, Tampa, Watford Ranch, Okeechobee, and A & A Roller, Tampa. The too selling individual was a Brangus bull consigned by Alpha Three Ranch, Pendergrass, Georgia. The two year old son of Biloxie 141, out of a daughter of Sir Carson's 19, was purchased by Watford Ranch for $1750. The sale was managed by Craig Cattle Sales, Inman, South Carolina. Morris Fannon, Penington Gap, Virginia, was auctioneer. Buyers, with number purchased shown in parentheses if more than one, and amount spent shown, follow: Rolland Skipper, Zolfo Springs (21) $21,250; Earl Deal, Riverview (14) $1 700: Mithias Farm, Tampa (10) $8125; A & A Roller, Tampa (5) 55800; Watford Ranch, Okeechobee (5) 57925; L. W. Green, Wehster (2) $2025; C & W Ranch (3) "3600; Anderson Farm $1025; Everett Boney, Okeechobee (2) $2175; Billy Buckner, Burnsville, North Carolina S1250; M & M Ranch $750; Saunders (3) $3675; Grimes Farms $1050; Dixie Growers, Tampa (3) $3400; Wayne Collier, Wauchula (2) $1725; Turner (4) $3250; Haney $975; S & H Dairy, Paisley (2) $1750; DePue Farms, Zephyrhills $700; George Coniglio $750; Padgett $750; Tri-S Ranch, Colgate, Georgia (3) $2350; Westby Corporation, Lake Placid (2) $2275; Crayton Pruitt, Plant City (2) $2450; Phil Lafon, Bowling Green (4) $4000; Strickland (2) $2025; Larkin & Company, Dade City (2) $2225; Nanco, Ocala $1200. 'Ferry' Carpenter dies Pioneer rancher, lawyer and politician Farrington "Ferry" Reed Carpenter died December 12 at his home in Hayden, Colorado, after a brief illness. He was 94. A noted Hereford breeder, he was a longtime advocate of performance testing. He was a featured speaker at a Florida Beef Cattle Improvement Association meeting held at the University of Florida, Gainesville, a number of years ago. A recipient of many honors, both industry and civic, during his lifetime, one of the most recent was his induction into the American Hereford Association's Hereford Heritage Hall Gallery of Honor last November. U.S. butter production totaled 89.6 million pounds during October. That's up 15 percent from a year earlier and marks the 14th straight month-and 18th in the past 19-that output has been above that of a corresponding month a year earlier. RIVER DIVIDE RANCH 1116 N. Edgewood Avenue Jacksonville, Florida 32205 Herd sires: RWJ Victor 212 G4, RWJ Victor 330 HH25, and RWJ Victor 266 HH28. Bob Fi.l owner Been Bush RDR 1904178632220 904/879-2476 (9041 879-630 REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORDS CIRCLE TID RANCH Raising Polled Herefords Since 1953 Bulls For Sale Mr. & Mrs. T. F. Thompson, owner Clermont, Florida 32711 Phone 904/394-3053 PINE .AE VATAS "New Look in Polled Herefords" Herd Sire Battery Consisting of: 4 RWJ and PAF Victor Dominos Bred For Pertormance J. E. Strickland, family 912/647-5439 MERSHON, GEORGIA 31551 WILLMAR PLANTATION Polled Herefords Perfornance Oriented BWJ Viclor Doninos Box 219, Smithville GA 31787 V. H. Jones Roer Peak 912/874-6105 912 4-5425 CROOKED LAKE RANCH Registered Polled Herefords Victor Dominos Pat Wilson. Inc. 813/635-4804 Bus Owners 813/635-3787 Res. P. O. Box 65. Frostproof, Florida 33843 Performance is our Business. The Best in Beefalo Cattle Vfhite (5ak -mantation Beefalo Semen Available Contact Ken Woehrle Star Route 1, Box 1296 Yulee, Florida 32097 Phone: 904/225-5204 BAXLEY FARMS Polled Hereford& Quarter Horses Built on economnicalli' important traits Harold Baxley 205/886-2913 Howell Baxley 205/886-3088 Tommy Baxley 205/886-2855 Rt. 4, Graceville, FL 32440 Herring Hereford Farm Breeding Profitable Polle(d Herefordls Since 1955. H. W. Herring, Jr. 912/872-3316 Rt. 2, Whigham, Ga. 31797 Florida acclimated CGQ Polled Herefords Rt 3, Box 266, Collohon, FL 32011 Curtiss Quarrier Gil Quarrier, Mqr. 904/879-3683 904/879-1118 re Morris F. sales Fannon Livestock Auctioneer Pennington Gap, VA 24277 Phone 703/546-2510 Victor Dominos "That Pay Their Way and Make A Profit" Briar Creek Farms E. D. and Pauline Raulerson 912/632-4492 Dwight L. Raulerson 912/632-4785 Route 3, Alma, Georgia 31510 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 63 REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORD BULLS These Bulls Are Presently Available SOUTHWOOD FARM Ph: 904/877-1158 TALLAHASSEE. FLA. 32302 P.O. Box 191

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FLORIDA mmcntat ASSOCIATION 9 04/59 1156 Reddick, Ft 32686 Without advertising, a terrible thing happens. BANISTER SIMMENTAL Performance Tested Bulls Rt. 6, Box 69, Ph: 804/295-7591 Charlottesville VA 22901 Bulls For Sale olled iimmntal The Davenports Rt. 1, Box 213-B 904/591-1156 Reddick, FL 32686 Miller Crest Farms Simmental Cattle Quality Percentage & Purebred For Sale at all times. Peggy, Spence & Jeff Miller Box 519, Bronson, FL 32621 904/486-2797 or 486-2966 Billy H. Wells Livestock Auctioneer *Ring Service Sale Consultant -Sale Management 121 Al dean r., Sanford, FL 32771 Home: 305/323-2820 Office: 305/886-5400 Conner warns on urban encroachment Florida is continuing to make gains in sales of agricultural products, both at home and abroad, but Commissioner of Agriculture Doyle Conner sees urban encroachment on farmlands as a threat to future agricultural growth. Conner urged the Florida Agricultural Advisory Council at a recent meeting in Marianna to offer its wisest guidance to the legislature which is expected to take up the problem of preserving farmland at its next session. Conner said that Florida sales of farm products have boosted it to number 11 among the states in farm cash receipts compared with number 13 three years ago. And foreign sales of Florida food products have risen to $515 million in 1979 from $147 million in 1972, he said. But he cited a convergence of urban problems with increased constraints on farming as posing potentially a new migration from cities to the countryside. This would further reduce the amount of land in production, and slow the expansion of marketing, barring new scientific breakthroughs. Urban pressure on farmland is greater in Florida than in most other states, Conner said, and greatest in Dade County, which according to a national lands study has lost 35 percent of its farmland to other uses in the last decade. Florida's overall loss of farmland to development between 1967 and 1977 was 10 percent, Conner said. This loss, if continued, could "seriously damage Florida's agricultural base in just a few years," he said. Some of the land loss in the past has been offset by gains in productivity, but the rate of productivity growth has been flattening out in recent years, Conner said. Higher prices for farm products would provide an incentive to continue farming, he added, but also would invite foreign competition with cheaper products. Conner cited rising crime and other urban problems as reasons to flee the cities, and rising farm costs and pressure from lenders as inducements for farmers to sell out to developers. "It appears that something other than market forces is needed to keep farmland in production," he said. How to preserve agricultural land threatened by urbanization poses a major problem for the legislature, and the solution is going to require hard decisions, Conner said. The legislature may not be able to stop urban encroachment, but it should plan and channel development into areas less appropriate for farm production, Conner suggested. He called on the council to work on recommendations to legislative committees to try to maintain as much of Florida's agriculturally-productive land as possible and preserve it for its best use. Representing cattle and marketing industry segments on the council are R. D. Bennett, Greenwood; Pete Clemons, Okeechobee; Gerald Cayson, Blountstown; Joe Hilliard, Clewiston, and Gilbert A. Tucker, Cocoa. Simmental bulls average $1201 Seventy-one head of breeding age Simmental bulls grossed $85,300 to average $1201 at the Banister Simmental Bull Sale, held recently at the Okeechobee Livestock Market, Okeechobee. The 71 bulls were all from the Banister Simmental Farms at Charlottesville, Virginia. Top volume buyer was Dressel Cattle Company, Okeechobee, spending $9900 for six lots. Oscar Clemons, Okeechobee, was second high, purchasing six bulls for $8150. The Dressel purchases came to an average of $1650 each, while Clemons paid an average of $1358. The sale was managed by Pete Clemmons, manager of Okeechobee Livestock Market. Wendell Cooper, Okeechobee, was auctioneer. Buyers, with number of head purchased shown in parentheses if more than one, and amount spent shown, follow: Jim Stokes, Okeechobee (3) $3725; D. L. Pearce, Okeechobee (4) $5800; Dressel Company (6) $9900; Fellsmere Management Corporation, Fellsmere (6) $7000: Oscar Clemons, Okeechobee (6) S8150; Boners (2) $2675; Semisole Sugar Corporation, Loxahatchee (6) $6250; Sanford Hart, Avon Pork (4) $4225; Nanco, Ocala (4) $4950; Frolick Ranch (6) $7825; Westby Corporation, Lake Placid (3) $3125: McQueen Rach (3) $2700; J & R Ranch, Okeechobee $1225; Armeda Ranch, Okeechobee (4) $4300; Mica. Okeechobee (5) $4525; R. Waldron (3) $3275; Old Summit Farm $1725; W. H. Ellis $800; Herman Thomas, Okeechobee $850; Pete Clemons, Okeechobee $1250; Flint Ranch $1025. Collier named to Hardee presidency Heading the Hardee County Cattlemen's Association for the coming year is Wayne Collier, Wauchula. Serving as vice president will be Wendy Batey, Zolfo Springs. Second vice president is Maurice Henderson, Wauchula. Secretary is J. P. Platt, Zolfo Springs and treasurer is Marcus Shackleford, Wauchula. State director is Robert Ray Smith, Wauchula. Representing the local association on the board of directors are Charles Stevens, Zolfo Springs; Roy Crews, Ona; John Paris, Bowling Green; Kermit Stevens, Wauchula; Wilbur Robertson, Zolfo Springs; Jay Clark, Wauchula; Norman Nickerson, and Harold Henderson, both of Wauchula. Number of cattle on feed in the seven major feeding states, at 7,960,000 head, was down four percent from a year ago, 15 percent below the December 1, 1978, total, and lowest for the date since 1974. 64 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 OAK HILL FARMS Simmental Cattle And Commercial Cross Breeds Jerry Jenkins, Mgr. Ph: 912/759-2946 P. 0. Box 118 LEESBURG, GA. 31763 IN THE SOUTHEAST -QUALITY SIMMENTAL CATTLE AVAILABLE For Percentage and Purebred Simmentals < > Bond Simmental Ranch rPerry Bond o 912/498-4835 I" Patty Fournier o 9121498-7745 Dc Rt. 1. Box 116 o Boston, Georgia 31626 Dedicated to the growth of Simmentals in the Southeast r

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DEHORNED POLLED What's behind the Simmental explosion?' Horned or polled, simmiii1ent~al perform American Simmental -the result of intensive performance selection for the important economic traits. If polled Simmental is your choice, American breeders have the largest genetic pool in the world! We're the breed that gives you a choice: Horned or Polled. For a free brochure about Simmental, write: AMVERICAN ASSOCIATION I Simmental Way -Bozeman, MT 59715 (406) 587-453 1 TI-HE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 65

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REGISTERED BRANGUS BULL SALE Sponsored by BLUEBONNET BRANGUS BREEDERS Saturday: MARCH 14, 1981 1:00 P.M. Port City Stockyards Sealy, Texas SELLING: 100 BRANGUS BULLS FERTILITY BANGS & T.B. TESTED-Ready to go to work including many herd sire prospects. These bulls represent some of the finest Brangus breeders and feature the top bloodlines of the breed. Bluebonnet Brangus breeders are the best ranchers with the largest number of the best Brangus cattle in the world! It ain't braggin' when you're tellin' the truth! For Information or catalogs contact: SALE MANAGERS: Box 807 BELLVILLE, TEXAS 77418 Phone: 713/865-3616 713/463-6000 Registered Brangus Lenholt Farms' Deep River Ranch Star Route 2, Box 20 DELAND, FLORIDA 32720 Ranch 8 miles west on Hwy. 44 Phone DeLand 904/734-2534 Registered & Commercial Brangus Cattle Reg. Quarter Horses LITTLE SPRINGS FARM James M. (Buddy) Adams 404/7868900 Farm; 404/787-2233 Office Rt. 6, Box 197 COVINGTON GA 30209 Auctioneer: REYES & REYES SAN ANTONIO, TX I HAYMAN'S1711 BRAND Registered Red and Gray Brahman (tndu-Brazill, Brangus, Bralord and Commercial Cattle. P.O. BOX 117, KENANSIVILLE, FLA. 32739 Paul Hayman, Owner Ph.; 305/436-1062 Research favorable toward reduced Strain 19 dosage The current standard dose of Strain 19 vaccine can be reduced without forfeiting adequate protection against brucellosis, USDA research indicates. Dosage rates between 100 million and 10 billion Brucella abortus organisms, as well as what has been the standard dosage of 90 billion organisms, all provided significant protection against brucellosis in a study at the National Animal Disease Center, Ames, Iowa. Heifers vaccinated as calves at all dosage rates showed no false positive reactions to diagnostic tests for brucellosis 15 months after vaccination, veterinary medical officer Billy L. Deyoe says. "We conclude that there is no longer justification for vaccinating cattle with current recommended dosages of Strain 19, regardless of age," Deyoe says. He says different dose levels for calves and for yearlings and older animals would appear to be ideal, although practical considerations may dictate a compromise intermediate dosage. Based on results of the study, USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and state animal health regulatory agencies are altering their brucellosis vaccination regulations to permit lower dosage rates. Vaccination at four to 12 months of age rather than two to 10 months will also be permitted. Dr. C. L. Campbell, director, division of animal industry, Florida Department of Agriculture, reports word should soon be released on Florida's use of the reduced dosage. Deyoe, veterinary medical officer Terrance A. Dorsey and technicians Kathryn B. Meredith and Linda K. Garrett compared dosage rates of 10 million, 100 million, one billion, 10 billion and the standard rate of 90 billion organisms. They vaccinated 106 crossbred beef heifers as yearlings and 106 Angus-Hereford heifers when four to six months old. The serologic responses of both groups were measured by the card, standard tube agglutination, mercaptoethanal, rivanol and complement-fixation tests throughout the experiment. Immunity produced by vaccination was checked at calving and at post-mortem examination. The magnitude and duration of positive reactions indicated by diagnostic tests were directly related to dosage levels, Deyoe says. In heifers vaccinated as yearlings, those receiving the 10 million and 100 million dosage rates had no serologic reactors at eight weeks after vaccination and thereafter. Yearling heifers receiving the one, 10 or 90 billion dosage rates showed consistent or intermittent reactions up to challenge exposure eight months after vaccination. 66 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 Bruce Martin Larry Martin 904/755-0803 JVL 904/755-0816 -\ 6s h &6 S RT. 2 BOX 96 C 3(e 4 LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32055 Breeders of Registered Brangus Cattle SAMMY PfERCE RONNIEFARRINGTON FREDDYSCOTT JOLYNNDAVIS.SECRETARY

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Among heifers vaccinated at four to six months of age, only 10 and 90 billion dosage rates produced serologic reactors as long as 12 weeks after vaccination, Deyoe says. All calfhood vaccinated heifers tested negative at the time of challenge exposure. Levels of immunity produced by the varied dosage rates differed according to age of the heifers at vaccination, the researchers found. In yearling heifers, all vaccine doses produced significant and indistinguishable levels of immunity. In heifers vaccinated as calves, higher doses tended to produce higher levels of immunity. The 90 billion and 10 billion doses yielded maximum immunity, one billion and 100 million doses gave significant immunity, and the 10 million dosage produced noticeable but less than adequate immunity. Alachua cattlemen elect Copeland Johnnie Copeland, Alachua, heads the Alachua County Cattlemen's Association for 1981. Vice president is John Rawls, Alachua. Secretary is Susan Smith, Gainesville, and treasurer is Charles Page, Gainesville. State director is Fred Clark, Alachua. Membership chairman is Richard Bryan, and publicity chairman is Ben Rowe, both of Gainesville. Local directors from the Gainesville area unless otherwise noted, are Jack Bryan; Belle Jeffords, High Springs; Frank Denham; Fred McCullars, Alachua; Bill Snead, Alachua; Rod Smith; Danny Williams; Ronnie Roland; Wes Schellenger; Jack Simmons, Archer, and Jeannette Chitty, Micanopy. Robison couple dies George H. "Sol" Robison, 77, of Mango, died in December. He was a lifelong resident of the area and a cattleman. He was formerly owner of the Interstate Livestock Auction Market at Seffner. His wife, Etna B. Robison, 69, preceded him in death by one day. Immediate survivors include a son, W. Douglas of Mango and a daughter, Elizabeth Lorenze, Mango. Mrs. Robison also was survived by two brothers, Eugene Bryan of Tampa and Victor Bryan of Ocala; two sisters, L. Mae Thomas of Tampa and Evelyn Watson of Zephyrhills, and four grandchildren. Mr. Robison also was survived by two brothers, William D. and Ralph "Peg," both of Tampa; two sisters, Bess Chalifoux and Ida Mae Lester, both of Tampa, and the four grandchildren. Join your local county Cattlemen's Association. THRE BULL1 FOR ALL REASONS .~r Brangus For information concerning sales, breed literature and new educational film, contact: Southeastern Brangus Breeders Association Route 1, Box 108, Rembert, SC 29128/(803) 432-2920 Any Country is Brangus Country. An American Breed Since 1949. BRANGUS BULLS WILLIAMSON RANCH Jack Williamson, owner Jim Cowen, manager Home: 305/597-2546 Office: 813/763-3143 P. 0. Drawer 668 Okeechobee, Fl. 33472 Reg. Brangus Commercial Cattle Bar D Ranch Clinton Dicks Terry Dicks 904/752-2733 904/752-1093 Route 3, Box 138E LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32055 Circle R Ranch REG. ^N( S & BRAN(AS ARKY E. ROGERS, OWNER 904/752-2103 Rt. 6, Box 175 LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32055 Located 7 miles south on U.S. 41 Bar-A-Brangus Bulls and Heifers Proven Crossbreed Since 1949 Brady Pfeil Albert & Barbara Carlton Foreman Owners 813/494-7302 813/773-6867 Rt. 1, Box 215, Arcadia, FL 33821 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRCIARY 1981 / 67

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~A U ~ ~ ~ PALMEK DK I POWER PA( BEEFMASTER SATURDAY, MARCH Lunch 12:00 noon -Sal HERK CKED SALE S7,1981 e 1:00 p.m. Selling 100 Lots At the ranch 15 miles South ot San Antonio on I.H. 37. Just follow the Palmer Brothers Beefmaster sign. [B]B The day before the Miller-Clay Sale. Pre-sale Party Saturday Night at the Ramada Inn Ballroom in conjunction with Wayne Miller and Henry Clay. Sale Headquarters: Ramada Inn San Pedro & Loop 410 San Antonio, Texas 512/344-4581 FOR INFORMATION CONTACT: PALMER BROTHERS Rt. I Box 85 Pleasanton, Texas 78064 512-393-2216 or 512-596-3749 REYES & MIHALSKI 118 W. Nakoma San Antonio, Texas 78216 512-349-2185 68 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981

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ANNOUNCING: sA il WAYNE MILLER -HENRY CL SELLING: 80 Fabulous Lots From two of the most famous Beefmaster breeders in America. WAYNE MILLER 512/786-2219 P.O. Box 610 Three Rivers, Texas 78071 Sunday, March 8, 1981 The day after the Palmer Brothers Sale. SALE LOCATION RAMADA INN, SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS PRE-SALE PARTY SATURDAY NIGHT AT RAMADA INN BARROOM IN CONJUNCTION WITH PALMER BROTHERS Sale: 1:00 p.m. Lunch: 12:00 noon HENRY CLAY 512/664-0951 Rt. 1 Box 91 Orange Grove, Texas 78372 REYES & MIHALSKI -SALE MANAGERS & AUCTIONEERS -512/349-2185 LAY

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THE OTHER HALF OF THE WINNING COMBINATION In the past two or three years, we have done a lot of talking about Beefmaster cattle. We have talked to cattlemen in practically every State where cattle are raised for profit. We all know that ranching is hard work and long hours. Nothing new about that. The price of land, labor and overall maintenance is constantly on the increase. Nothing new about that either. But what is new to many cattlemen is the winning combination. BEEFMASTER bulls with your commercial cattle. We hear almost daily the plus results of using BEEFMASTER bulls. After all, it's difficult enough just to make a living; why make it more difficult with short weights at the scale. No one wants to buy scrawny calves. Cattle buyers certainly don't. They are looking for growthy, well-developed calves. Cattle buyers must make a profit the same as everyone else. Don't go out and buy a 10 or $15,000 bull to put with your herd. We have done that for you. We have bought the besf Beefmaster herd bulls and the best females from some of the top breeders in the country. Now we are producing bulls at reasonable prices for commercial cattlemen. Visit our ranch and let us show you what we have to offer. We think we have "the other half of the winning combination." 11. ,E T R1 CI Beefrmasters you can grow with. Canoe Creek Road on Lake Manon Kenansville. Florida 32739 J B Classified" H. A. Rickards J. Ja Barnett 305 436-1891 813/482 2750 managing partner -~ r SUBSCRIBE NOW! HOMPSON CATTLE MARKETING, INC. Sales Management & Private Treaty. FRED THOMPSON 3603 Crownhill, Suite 30 San Antonio, TX 78209 (512) 828-1680 Family tradition followed in Williams Beefmaster program EDITOR'S NOTE-The following article was written by Ruth Schumacher, public relations director, Beefmaster Breeders Universal. "Every day for the past 20 to 25 years, since before I got out of high school, I've looked at a cow, or a piece of fence, or a horse, or a tractor, or something to do with producing cattle," says Hugh Williams, a rancher in Okeechobee. Ranching has been in the Williams family for several generations, and the W.W.S. Ranch is presently owned by Williams, his mother, Mrs. Anne Williams, and his sister, Carol Anne Smith. Williams remembers upgrading the small red "scrub" native cattle using Hereford and crossbred bulls. He says the family kept the best prospects every year to improve a little more on the next year. Today, Williams is still upgrading cattle, but he has a purebred herd as his ultimate goal, and he has advanced considerably from the scrub cattle of other years. The Florida rancher is producing Beefmaster cross cattle eligible for enrollment in Beefmaster Breeders Universal's Official Upgrading Program. He began with Brahman cross cattle that were inspected and enrolled as base cattle in the program. The Beefmaster bulls purchased to breed these cows (by Williams' own standards) had to be top of the line, "U" quality bulls. This fall Williams will be presenting about 150 head of first cross females for inspection by BBU officials. Many of these are his own production, and some he purchased from neighbor Loyd Boney, manager of the Bever Ranch owned by Sug Bever. Boney was instrumental in Williams' purchase of his first Beefmaster bull, and Williams influenced Boney to enroll in the upgrading program. The BBU Upgrading Program requires inspection on three successive crosses to reach purebred status. His goal is to eventually own a large number of purebred Beefmasters. Though he admits it's going to be a long process through the upgrading program, he says, "I look forward to it; it's a challenge. The rewards are certainly there if you can raise the 'right kind of cattle.' He has added his own selfimposed, rigid methods to the qualitycontrol measures issued by BBU. Says Williams, "I look at the cow first. I don't put anything in the program (base cow) until she has a heifer calf that is above average. A lot of people put their whole herd in the program, but I never put them in until they have a first cross heifer that is suitable for a first cross cow. Then I put the cow in as a base cow, and the heifer will qualify if she grows on out-when she gets a year and a half or two years old." The culling process at the Williams ranch begins at weaning, and continues until the cattle are presented to BBU officials for inspection. His thorough selection for his first BBU inspection netted him 100 percent enrollment. Williams intends to continually improve his production. "I want to go up in quality with the second crossesjust another step. The only way to do that in the cattle business is with the bulls. You've got to go to quality bulls to get quality calves-in your females and in your replacement heifers." Since only females are eligible for enrollment in the upgrading program, he sells crossbred steers at the market or direct. "We get top prices for these calves. They are looking for them for feedlots because they're not humpy; they are growthy and have frame on them. And in the tests I've seen, they grade out. They are Number One calves. The order buyers came out here and saw these calves; they didn't cut one out of the bunch." He has already sold about 70 this year and has about that many more ready to market. Steers are sold between 400 and 500 pound weights, depending on current market prices. "I like to get mine to about 425 pounds, and take a look at price differentials. If I think I can make more money by carrying them to heavier weights, I will." Williams saved a couple of his first cross bulls last year. He plans to use them on what he terms "bottom-end commercial cows." His intention is to phase out this herd of 75 to 100 head as he is building toward a purebred herd. The half-blood Beefmasters will replace a few Hereford and Braford bulls left on the ranch. The producer is curious to see what top-end Beefmaster cross bulls and grade cows will produce. "Beefmasters are just about the perfect cows for this part of Florida," he HUGH WILLIAMS is building toward a purebred Beefmaster herd through his selection of halfblood Beefmaster heifers as shown above. A commercial cow must produce an outstanding heifer calf before Williams will present the cow for enrollment in the BBU upgrading program. 70 / -THE FLORIDA (ATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 -----e

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THE SIXTH ANNUAL SOUTHEASTERN BEEFMASTER BREEDERS SALE .U Friday, April 10, 1981, At 12:30 P.M. At The Coastal Plains Experiment Station Sales Pavilion At Tifton, Georgia Selling 20 Herd Sires And Herd Sire Prospects All Bangs, TB, and Fertility Tested Also Selling 60 Top Females Including Bred And Open Heifers, Pairs, And 3-In-One Packages Sale Headquarters: Holiday Inn, Tifton, Georgia SEBBA President: Seth Smith 9 Sale Chairman: Dan Morgan Auctioneer: Gerald Bowie UB A BBU Approved Sale For More Information Or Sale Catalog Contact: THOMPSON CATTLE MARKETING, INC. 8603 Crownhill, No. 22, San Antonio, TX 78209, 512/828-1680 Watch For Future SEBBA Sales At Jackson, Mississippi, September 19, 1981, and Bartow, Florida, October 20, 1981 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 71

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says. He likes their disposition, their resistance to pinkeye, and the fact that they "slick off' much faster than British bred cattle. He commented, "You couldn't ask for better disposition. I've got two kids, and neither one is very experienced, and I'm sure they could get on a horse and get behind these heifers and pen them. They are just that gentle. They handle good. If any of them were crazy, I would cut them out, but I haven't had to cut out any because of disposition so far. "I have never seen a case of pinkeye with Beefmasters. It's discouraging when you have 100 head of cattle, and you go through and have to pull out two or three top cows every year with cancer-eye. Or you go out and see 10 to 15 cows with eyes starting to cloud up. It's hot weather, raining every day, and you have to aggravate with these cows in a pen, doctoring them every two or three days. If there is any way to get around it, I'm going to do it. And Beefmaster bulls are the way to do it," he emphasized. Williams was first introduced to the breed by Boney. That was seven years ago. He was impressed by the calves and they impressed other ranchers in the area as well. Today, all but one of the ranches that borders Williams are using Beefmaster bulls. "It just takes time. People go out and see the results. That's why they've gone to the bulls," said Williams. Though Williams feels he has found an answer for cattle problems with his production of crossbred Beefmasters, building toward a purebred herd, he encounters problems familiar to all ranchers: the elements, economic pressures, and insects and diseases, a big problem in the south Florida environment. "We have any kind of insect you want to come up with-ticks, lice, flies, leaches. We just spray whenever they need it. Sometimes in the spring and early summer when flies really get 'terrific,' we spray every two weeks." The marshy pastures are conducive to foot rot, though Williams terms it a minor problem when properly treated. Williams says most of his land was farmed in early years by tomato farmers. "They limed the land, plowed it up and planted their crops; and they dug drainage ditches. We went behind them and put in grass. It's the best way to get your land improved and the cheapest." The rancher says he has about 400 acres of rough land, but "what's left to improve now will take a bulldozer and that is $30 to $50 an hour. It would cost a fortune. "Sometimes we have two or three frosts a year, and sometimes 15 to 20 frosts-depending on how lucky we are. What really hurts us though is a drouth. Several years ago, five or six, it was brown out here. The last three or four years, we've had plenty of moisture." Another problem Williams would like to overcome is a lengthy calving ONLY TOP "U" quality Beefmaster bulls are used on the W.W.S. commercial herd, owner Williams says. season. Presently his calves are coming over an eight-month period. "It's strung out pretty well. I wish I could bunch it up to 90-150 days, but I just can't do it without spending $30 to $40 a head in supplement. I hope to finally get to 100150 days. A person can do it, but there will be lots of open cows and lots of additional expense." Williams has good cattle and a good program. His goals are well-planned and long-range ones; his standards of quality are of the highest level. And he incorporates two other factors not often found together-he is young and he is patient. These attributes, coupled with his desire to upgrade to a superior herd of purebred Beefmasters, have the makings of a winner. Diios on -'Weight 'Ferfility-Milk JM l ch ProductionHardiness Conformation Call Mack Padgett, Manager 813/638-1985 P. 0. Box 512, Lake Wales, FL 33853 John & Martha Carter, Owners 813/676-2442 72 / TH4E FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981

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o 9 4( 01 Hette rz rzesaLts Beefmaster BuaLLs SATURDAY, March 21, 1981 -11:00 A.M. Producers Auction, San Angelo, Texas We are offering approximately 110 CERTIFIED BEEFMASTER bulls averaging 18 months old and 1100 pounds. These bulls have been conditioned for HEAVY SERVICE on rocky pastures and will be fertility tested. As in our four past sales, the bulls will be priced and catalogued in advance with full performance data in the catalog. In our two 1981 sales, we will offer approximately 350 bulls. .4=attLe ISO 4 004i o SPRING BULLS RAISED BY FOUNDATION BEEFMASTER MEMBERS: THESE ASSOCIATION Billy Boyd Skipper Duncan Bill George, Jr. L. G. Hargis, Jr. Steve Langston Big Lake, Tx San Angelo, Tx Eagle Pass, Tx Waurika, Ok Water Valley, Tx Earl McElroy Bill Newsome Shelby Phillips Ill Charles Probandt Andy Smith Toyah, Tx Canton, Tx Deming, NM San Angelo, Tx San Angelo, Tx Bulls may be seen now. Please contact: Sales Headquarters Holiday Inn 915/655-8151 Laurie Lasater 915/944-3464 isa Cattle CO3192 Executive Drive San Angelo, Tx 76901 915/949-3763 Charles Probandt 915/949-7906 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 73 -sale -t Lunch will be served W 71.41111

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DIXIE BEEFMASTERS 16-24 month old Bulls for sale. 12001500 pounds. "PUREBRED CATTLE FOR SALE" R&M FARMS Sonn Mathis Bobby Roman Ranch 912/533.-5535 P0 Box 68 Home 912/535561 Enigma GA 31749 7 LAZY 11 7 Beefmasters 7 Rogers Farms, Inc. Ronnie Perkins, Mgr. 813/983-9701 Pete Marks, Herdsman 813/983-7039 Star Route Box 76 Clewiston, Fla. 33440 TALLEY &MfmaskancBreeding Age Bulls & Heifers For Sale At All Times W. G. Talley Sr., Owner 904/787-3579 James C. Richardson, Mgr. 904/787-3401 P.O. Box 817, Leesburg, Fla. 32748 49CREEK BEEFMASTERS Mr. and Mrs. Mack Glass Mr and Mrs Horace Shumpe R. 4, Box 240 04/579-4641 Marianna, FL 32446 GENE THOMPSON -BEEFMASTERS I ) 1) y MkNelill, lississippi ;')45(I l 1i I 7 I8-ir5i 2 residec e Steve I ill, I lerdml anl (601 ) _98) 13 Ocala bull sale brings $1011 on 188 lots The 25th Silver Anniversary Ocala Bull Sale held at the Southeastern Livestock Pavilion in Ocala January 13 grossed $190,097 to average out at $1011 per head. The event is sponsored annually by the Marion County Cattlemen's Association and the Southeastern Livestock Association. Breaking down the sale by breeds, the 33 Angus consignments grossed $38,150 with the 19 buyers paying an average of $1156 per head; six Brangus bulls grossed $9425 to average $1571; seven Brahman bulls brought $7675 to average $1096; 10 Beefmaster lots sold for $9650 to average $965; eight Charolais grossed $6050 for an average of $756; 112 Hereford grossed $117,875 to average $966, and two Santa Gertrudis consignments brought $1275 to average $638. Volume buyer was Flying P Ranch, Okeechobee, with 15 lots purchased for $14,800 to average $987. Second high buyer was Jones Brothers Ranch, Sebring paying $10,975 for nine lots and an average of $1219. High buyers by breeds were Angus, Williamson Cattle Company, Okeechobee, eight bulls for $9725; William Roberts, Trenton, four bulls for $5075; Brangus, H. E. Mills, Chiefland, two lots for $3700; Ned Folks, Dunnellon, two lots for $2525; Brahman, Jones Brothers, four lots $5150; Charles Cowart, Bunnell, one lot for $1300; Beefmaster, Ned Folks, Dunnellon, four lots for $3800; Jones Brothers, three lots for $3225; Charolais, Buddy Howard, three lots for $2125; Herefords, Flying P, 15 lots for $14,800; Hugh Tootin, Anthony, 10 lots for $7125; E. W. Cates, Sparr, six lots for $7125; Santa Gertrudis, Cannon & Folks, DunnelIon, one lot for 700. Top price paid at the sale was $2100 with H. E. Mills paying that amount for a Brangus bull consigned by Bob McLendon, Leary, Georgia. Other high sellers were two Angus bulls going for $1550 each, purchased by Becker Ranch and Live Oak Stud, Ocala. The bulls were consigned by Len Warren, Ocala and Graham Angus, Albany, Georgia; two Brahman bulls went for $1400 each and both purchased by Jones Brothers Ranch and consigned by Wesley Cowart, Seville, and Lester Stone, Seville. Jones also purchased two Beefmasters, one for $1200 and $1100 with the consignments coming from Kanapaha Ranch, Gainesville. The high selling Hereford was purchased by C. H. Cowart, Bunnell for $1575 and was consigned by L. A. Teel, Asheboro, North Carolina. Sale manager was Jimmy Glisson, Ocala. Auctioneering chores were handled by Morris Fannon, Penning(Continued on Page 80) SU;7 For Beefmasters you can rely on, look for the IL P.O. Box 640 Ft. Myers, Florida 33902 (813) 334-3255 or (813t 983-5559 RON DON CATTLE COMPANY BEEFMASTER CATTLE Ronnie H-artzog Donnie IDoCe [904) 638-7859 (904) 638-4064 Al Cleveland (904) 638-4914 RT. 3, CHIPLEY, FLORIDA 32428 LEE FARMS FARMS Purebred Beefmasters. Banner Lee, Jr. Route 3 /Pavo, GA/31778 (912)859-2131 / (912)859-2120-Home CUSTOM CATTLE FEEDING Feed Florida Cattle in Florida Davis Farms P.O. Box 97 Balm, Fla. 33503 We Buy Feeder Cattle Wayne Davis 610 Dal Drive Brandon, Fla. 33511 Phones Day 813/634-3344 Night 813/689-5021 SMITH RANCH SHORTHORNS Polled and Horned Our herd is Federally Certified for Brucellosis (No. 400) & Accredited for TB. Pauline N. Smith-Owner 813/293-2930 Winter Haven, Fla. 33880 Ranch off SR 542 on Buckeye Rd. 3 miles N.E. Support your local county CowBelles Association. REGISTERED POLLED SHORTHORNS Growthy-Rugged TB & Bang's Certified Herd Fully Acclimated for Southern Conditions PINEVIEW FARMS Paul Ragans, owner Route 2 Ph: 904/971-5417 Madison, Florida 32340 5 iea"s"e o" US 90 74 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981

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When it comes to choosing bulls in the outheast, you can't afford to be less than N o m~ o n e n se, practical. It's the high performing, super efficient no-nonsense kind of bull that's going to make you money every time. And BefTmaster bulls fit that picture to perfection. No other breed in the Southeast today can Nom nsense outprfor -eemase -Wih-aBe--at bull you get heavier weaning weights and fewer calving problems. You get a gentle disposition and greater longevity. You get C O M ~ n all the no-nonsense traits that mean more dollars in your pocket. Next time, try Beefmasterthe nononsense breed. For more information on Beefmasters, or names and addresses of Beefmaster breeders in our area write or ca// today 3820 Cleghorn Ave., Nashville, Tennessee 37215, 615/383-5802

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Activity is on increase for CowBelles PRESIDENT'S BY-LINES The quarterly board of director's meeting was well attended. Many thanks to Jackson County and WashingtonHolmes Cattlemen's Associations and their ladies for making this meeting a success. The "Basket of Welcome" from Mr. and Mrs. R. D. Bennett was lovely. Farm City Week reports are trickling in slowly. Cindy Zimmerman, broadcast production assistant, Florida Farm Bureau, reports that they used part of an interview done at the Beef Festival on all of their radio shows that week. They did a news story on the event which was distributed to stations and they also taped several of the demonstrations that are to be used on consumer shows. November 16, St. Lucie CowBelles hosted a barbecue luncheon with food prepared by the CowBelles. Guest speaker was Lieutenant Colonel Robert J. Waterston, Deputy District Engineer of the Jacksonville Corps of Engineers. Two hundred seventy-five were in attendance. Betty Ann Scott took action to have a farm city day proclamation signed by the mayor and publicity was handled by Judy Hamner. Collier CowBelles also had a barbecue in Naples on November 26, at the Lazy I I Ranch. Those ladies serving were Edith Brown, Denise Coleman, Betty Jo Brown, Kaye Wise, Martha Scofield, Deanna Marks, and Betty Curry. The Brevard CowBelles were center stage giving half hour meat identification demonstrations at the Merritt Square Mall November 14-15. Their display booth had demonstrations on beef cookery, by-products board with tape on by-products, and a film and tape on nutrition. Thanksgiving for a needy family in Riverview was made more memorable thanks to Hillsborough CowBelles, donating canned goods, money and a $15.00 Beef Gift Certificate. Pasco CowBelles presented the mayors of Dade City and Zephyrhills a beef roast in observance of farm city week signs telling of farm city were made for the downtown area, newspapers ran articles, 30 second radio spots were taped and announcements were sent to local churches. Highlands County hosted the Florida Beef Festival in Sebring. Local newspapers carried articles telling of the event for three straight weeks. On Monday, November 17, a 15 minute radio interview was made with state farm city chairman Mrs. Elna Harris, festival participant Norma Stokes and myself. The week before local CowBelles served barbecue beef sandwiches at the annual Sebring art league festival. How nice it is to hear from one of our new locals. Hardee president Nancy Robertson reports that their county fair on November 10-15 went very well. CowBelles and cattlemen manned the food booth daily selling chili, hamburgers, and other snack foods. Also present for fair-goers was the mammoth mechanical cow from Ralston Purina. On December 18, Collier CowBelles had their Christmas social at the home of Denise Cloeman. Husbands and friends were invited for dessert and coffee. Special recognition was given Mrs. and Mrs. Don Lander for 30 years service as county agriculture agent. A handmade pine cone memory tree was presented to Lander. A two pen bull desk set and plaque was awarded Mrs. Lander who also became an honorary CowBelle member. Deann Marks will be leaving Collier County and has to resign her position as president. In appreciation for her hard work she was presented a plaque and a "boot and spur" necklace. Osceola CowBelles brought food items and took donations for a needy family at their Christmas social held at the Lake Buena Vista Country Club. Outstanding CowBelle Mrs. Mabel Simmons McQuarrie was presented a plaque for her never-ending work and devotion to CowBelles. Pasco ladies had their Cattlemen's Sweetheart ride on a float in the local Christmas parade. A bake sale was also held during the holidays. December 6, Highlands County held their Christmas gathering in honor of Mr. Edgar Stokes and Mr. Henry O'Neal. These men have helped with nearly every CowBelle project and are "always willing to walk that extra mile." Wonderful food and company highlighted the St. Lucie gathering. It was like coming home for me as St. Lucie was the first local organization I had an opportunity to meet with after becoming a state officer three years ago. A dutch treat Christmas luncheon with 15 Brevard CowBelles present was the beginning of a wonderful story. Cash donations from members totaling $150.00, a $25.00 beef certificate, toys, and clothing were received. From there, Mary Lucas and Ruth Tucker shopped for a family of eight. All the gifts were wrapped and presented to a needy family. The first Brevard County baby of the new year was presented a $10.00 beef certificate, license plate, cookbook, Beef cutting board, Basics About Beef book, and a copy of all cook off recipes. Because of the many holiday invitations to join with local CowBelles I have added greatly to my book of memories. Thank you all! Many thanks to CowBelles who responded to a last minute call to help in the meat survey done with Dr. A. Z. Palmer of the University of Florida. Comparisons were made to find the difference in price between only rolled U.S. Good and U.S. Choice meat. Results of Florida CowBelles Association Affiliated with American National CowBelles Rt. 3, Box 710 Lake Placid, FL 33852 President Mrs. Tom Childs, Lake Placid 813/465-2020 President Elect Miss Jeannie Carpenter, Ft. Pierce Vice President Mrs. Ed Yarborough, Geneva Recording Secretary Mrs. Hayward Simmons, Wimauma Corresponding Secretary Mrs. Mildred Price, Immokalee Treasurer Mrs. Mildred Sherrod, Immokalee this survey found there was not enough rolled U.S. Good grade meat available in large markets to make an accurate comparison. With the new year comes new members, Mrs. Mozelle Johnson of the Pasco CowBelles, and Dinah Adams from Baker, Florida. Time is passing quickly and plans for the upcoming Region II meeting are going well. Two full days of activities plus an evening of fun are in store for all. Come join us if you can March 26, 27. Headquarters for this event is the Holiday Inn, 1250 W. University Avenue, P. 0. Box 1406, Gainesville, Florida 32602. Telephone 904/3761661. Be sure and tell them you are with CowBelles. The Florida Home Economics Association Convention will be April 3-4 at Tampa. Florida CowBelles will have a booth there and we would be delighted to have any CowBelle participate in this event. Free loan audio visuals are available from the FCA office. For a complete list contact Polly Golden, FCA home economist. "Agriculture. It's your heartbeat America!" This basic idea is the theme for this year's Ag Day Celebration on Thursday, March 19, 1981. By now each county should have received a packet of materials and suggestions on how to celebrate this nationally proclaimed observance. Should you need further information please contact Mary Lucas, 1370 Phyllis Drive, Merritt Island, 32952. -Sarah K. Childs, President Florida CowBelles Association 76 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981

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Your dimes help to promote 6,7 at special Beef Promotions Please keep those dimes and quarters coming n. Ask your local livestock market about deducting for the "Pronoting he pduc 4oine -r F)-,rida' leading industries.~ P. 0. Box 1929, Kissimmee. Florida 32741 IHE FlORIDA CATI'LM \AN FEBRL ARN 1981 77 r 81

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Greene's Bar G Bar Ranch, Inc. Specializing in LIMOUSIN BRAHMOUSIN ROMANOUSIN ar iwo Florida locations So. Florida B. E. & Horior Greene 4855 16th St. Vero Beach, Fla. 305/562-2817 North Fla. Bill & Lech Kinner Madison Fla. 904/97 -4694 Bar LH Limousin H Purebred and Percentage calves Commercial cattle and calves available now Lance H. Ham & Family Ph. 813/754-1731 Rt. 9, Box 284, Plant City, FL 33566 Premier Limousin Female 1978-79 was exhibited by OSBORNE CATTLE COMPANY Maynard Osborne 4760 SW 82nd Ave, Davie FL 33328 Ph: 305/434-5065 EMERY LIMOUSIN Where performance counts Paul Emery Rt. 4, Box 255 -. Quincy, Fla. 32351 ".904/875-2529 A-. Limousin Cattle Purebred & Percentage H. M. Shirley 400 S. 18th St. Palatka, Fla. 32077 Ph: 904/325-2525 12. mi. north of Palatka near Bostwick ffVBA IR CUSTOM FITTERS Rick Williams, Owner 16020 S.W. 20th Ave. Rd. Ocala, Florida 32670 Fitting 904/245-5290 Cattlegfor Show & Sale Bam 10 miles S. ofOcalaon 1-75, erdt 484 "Quality made for the Tropical Trade, SIMMONS LIMOUSINS Jim & Orie Simmons, owners 8697 W. ANTHONY RD. N.E. OCALA, FLORIDA 32671 Increase in beef prices expected at retail level Retail beef prices this year are expected to average about 10 percent higher than in 1980, according to the National Cattlemen's Association. NCA said present indications are that most of the expected price increase will occur in the spring, when meat production will be decreasing seasonally. Beef supplies and prices are expected to be fairly stable during the remainder of the year. For 1981 in total, beef production will increase slightly (about one percent), NCA said, and poultry output also will rise. However, pork production will decrease, and total meat production in 1981 will be down slightly from 1980. The drop in pork supplies will contribute to the expected rise in average beef as well as pork prices. It was pointed out that the nation's basic inflation problem, affecting the prices of all goods and services, is responsible for much of the recent and expected increase in average meat prices. Supply changes are not the only cause. The average cattle price received by cattle feeders this year has been slightly less than the 1979 average, but inflation and rising costs of processing and distribution have put upward pressure on retail beef prices. Even so, the average retail price increase for the year is only five percent, or considerably less than the over-all inflation rate. A major reason for beef's not showing much price increase this year has been the total supply of meat. With an increase in pork production in particular, total per capita meat supplies have been record large. While prices of most food and other items continued to rise rapidly, Carlson said, meat prices remained relatively favorable. Looking at the economic situation for the cattle industry, it was noted that total cattle numbers have been at a cyclical low point for the past two years. Theoretically, at this point in the cattle cycle, cattlemen should be making good profits. However, energy, interest, feed and other costs have been rising even more than the general inflation rate. At the same time, large total meat supplies, inflation and a weak economy have tended to hurt demand. The result has been a financial squeeze on cattlemen for the past year or more. This situation, it was pointed out, may delay or limit future herd expansion. A major problem at this time results from the 1980 drought, a smaller corn crop and a big increase in feed grain prices. The higher feed costs, it was explained, have contributed to financial losses for cattle feeders. That, in turn, means weaker demand and lower prices for feeder cattle (the cattle purchased by 78 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 feeders, from producers, for finishing in feedlots). Cow-calf operators, who produce beef calves, have been in a breakeven or loss position since last February. And a lack of profits obviously reduces the incentive and ability to expand basic breeding herds. If the industry's cost-price squeeze continues, NCA said, the current cyclical build-up in cattle numbers may be slowed or halted. This would mean less beef in future years than generally has been expected. Southeasterners head marketing group A Tennessee marketman and his Florida counterpart, along with others named, head up Livestock Marketing Association, the Kansas City, Missouri, based trade organization, for 1981. President is Lemmy Wilson, Newport, Tennessee, and second vice president is John E. Hawkins of Monticello. Wilson is owner-manager of Wilson Livestock Market in Newport and is also president of Lemmy Wilson Livestock, Inc., an order buying firm. Hawkins operates the Monticello Livestock Market at Monticello and also has an auction market facility in Camilla, Georgia. The pair were elected at LMA's annual meeting held at Hilton Head, South Carolina, last month. Also elected were Franck D. Diercks, Gordon, Nebraska, first vice president; Ralph Swords, Hopkinsville, Kentucky, treasurer, and Earl Britton, Butte, Montana, secretary. The 20-man board of directors of the organization were also installed at the meeting. E. D. "Buddy" Neel, Chipley, first vice president of the Florida Cattlemen's Association, serves on the trade group's health council. Harris heads Highlands cattlemen Bert J. Harris, Lake Placid, heads the Highlands County Cattlemen's Association for the new year. Vice President is Edgar Stokes of Lorida, and secretary-treasurer is Aubrey Bone, Sebring. Serving again as state director is Dan Childs of Lake Placid. Directors at the county level are Bruce Blount, Lake Placid; Everett Boney, Lorida; John Causey, Lake Placid; Jim Hendrie, Venus; Leonard Godwin, Lake Placid; Sanford Hartt, Avon Park, and Henry O'Neal, Sebring. The inventory of hogs and pigs on Florida farms on December 1, 1980, was estimated at 370,000 head, down 13 percent from last year, USDA says. The U.S. inventory of hogs and pigs on December 1, 1980, was 64.5 million head. That's down four percent below a year ago, but seven percent more than December 1, 1978.

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nbPUs Purebred Limousin Bulls FLORIDA LIMOUSIN ASSOCIATION invites you to check with the Limousin breeders in this section for more information on the "Carcass Breed." Or, write us for free literature and information on becoming a member. P. 0. Box 636, Okeechobee, Fla. 33472 Planning A Sale? 7,A Contact any of our fieldmen for full details. IC AND LIN STOCK JOt RNAI Kissimmee, Fla. 32741 Limousin Club Calf Sale Saturday, July 11 Lake City, FL For Information Contact: Carl Story 904/755-3910 or Maynard Osborne 305/434-5065 _J U U U U 80 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 Big, Rugged, Raised in the Southeast Registration and Health Papers furnished GUARANTEED BREEDERS Hard i U.S. Certified TB and Bangs Free Adams Limousin of North Florida Home of: Prince E. G. Jaudon 007-H George E. Adams and Family P.O. Drawer J, 15th St. N.W. Lawtey, FL 32058 Phone: 904-782-3758 Limousin & Commercial Cattle Harloff Farms 6809 11th Ave., West Bradenton, FL 33505 Phone 813/792-7299 Mobile 813/748-8668 Units 745-764 Cal eman Sale Management Service, Inc. Sale Management Private Treaty Listings Sale Facility Rental GINGERBRED FARM 1979-80 Premier Limousin Female Breeding Limousin Since 1970 W. E. & Joenell Webb Box 387, Rt. 15 Maxville, Fl. 32234 904/289-7159 To see what you can expect from these bulls, you are welcome to see their fathers, mothers, brothers and sisters at our farm. Top O'The Hill Farm 912/263-7026 RHODES FROST U.S. 84, Quitman, Ga. 31643 FREEMAN CATTLE Co. For Quality Limousin Herd-Sire 1979-80 Premier Bull Herd is certified 0 Ph. 813-763-3610-P.O. Box 636 Okeechobee, Fl. 33472 Limousin Cattle For Sale Art Schrader&Sons San Antonio, FL 33576 904/588-3321 Ocala sale (Continuedfrom Page 74) ton Gap, Virginia, and Carroll Cannon, Macon, Georgia. Clerking duties were handled by Mills Auction Market, Ocala. Buyers at the sale, by breed, with number of bulls purchased shown in parentheses if more than one, and amount spent shown, follow: ANGUS: Becker Ranch (3) $4000; Live Oak Plantation $1300; W. B. Copeland $1300: BraMa Ranch $1100; Castro Farms $775; L. L. Hiers Jr., (2) $1775; Batten & Batten $775; Curtis Hutchinson $800; Flying Bar C (2) $1650; Williams Brothers St100; Williamson Cattle Company (8) $9725; Bill Baker $1350; Box Ranch $1275; Live Oak Stud $1550; Kennedy Farms $1400; Win. Roberts (4) $5057; Chancellor Farms $1025; W. B. Copeland $1350; Langford Farms $825; BRANGUS: Cannon & Folks $1600; Ned Folks (2) $2525; Patty Heinold $1600; H. E. Mills (2) $3700; BRAHMAN: Lester Lufman $600; C. H. Cowart $625; Charles Cowart $1300; Jones Brothers (4) $5150; BEEFMASTER: Ned Folks (4) $3800; Jones Brothers (3) $3225; J. Haddox $1000; Patty Heinold (2) $1625; CHAROLAIS: Armeda Farm $725; Preston Wise $825; Patty Heinold $750; C. H. Cowart $700; Buddy Howard (3) $2125; Ned Folks $925; HEREFORDS: H Ranch (3) $3275; Pete Cirraco $950; Drew Scott $1700; C. H. Cowart (7) $6675; Larry Studstill $1350; S. W. Cates, Jr., (6) 57125; Bill Baker $750; Chapman & Lewis (2) $1325; Adobe Cattle Company (2) $2250; Flying P Ranch (15) $14,800; A. A. Roller (3) $3035; Ale Ranch (3) $3325; Rainbow River Ranch (2) $2500; Hubert Waldron $1400; Patty Heinold $925; Billy Adams (4) $6725; Ned Folks (2) $1550; Peters Farm $1000; Jones Brothers (2) $2600; ABC Farms $1525; Simmons & Davis, $1375; Cecil Whaley (2) $2450; Williams Brothers $1025; Charles Cowart (8) $6925; Dale Aikens (2) $2050; Batten & Batten (5) $3825; Carl Perry, Sr., $1100; B & G Ranch (2) $1750; Larry Lindsey $700; Hugh Tootin (10) $7125; Langford Farm $575; Darrell Nichols $1150; Becker Ranch (2) $1900; L. L. Hiers, Jr., $1175; Singletary Farms $650; Herdducks Ranch $775; Emery Mills $550; Ramsey Stock Farm (2) $1375; Robert Williams $1400: BraMar $1125; James Young (2) $1700; D&G Cattle Company $725; Armeda Farm (3) $2750; Robert Barnett (2) $1425; Roy Story $925; Bill Marion $675; SANTA GERTRUDIS: Cannon & Folks $700; J. Haddox $575. Decrease noted in retail beef prices Retail beef prices in early January were down from a month earlier, the National Cattlemen's Association has reported. The association's 19-city survey of supermarkets showed that the national average price of five beef cuts on January 8 was $2.39 per pound, compared with $2.42 on December 11. Production of beef and other meat has continued large in recent weeks and that is a principal reason for lower average wholesale and retail beef prices, it was noted. A spokesman said that retail beef prices have been declining or only holding steady for the past several months. The NCA retail average for January was the lowest since last May, and it was even lower than the year-ago average. "Beef prices continue to lag behind the general inflation rate," the spokesman said. "Unlike the prices of most things we buy, beef prices go down as well as up with changes in meat supplies. And most of the time in recent months, beef prices have tended to go down." NCA's five-cut average price decreased during the past month in 11 cities, increased in six and was unchanged in two. r

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The LIMOUSIN BULL PROVIDER OF MANY BEEF EXTRAS! He has captured the interest of cattlemen throughout the Southtandi and members of this organization are geared to help you find one! SOUTHEASTERN MEMBERSHIP SOUTHEASTERN LIMOUSIN BREEDERS ASSOCIATION OFFICERS President JOHN SPIVEY McDonough, Ga. Vice President ARLEN EUBANKS Edison, Ga. Secretary MICHAEL KEATHLY Albertson, N.C. Treasurer GEORGE COCOROS Gaffney, S.C. DIRECTORS BOBBY BATES Centerville, Tenn. VERLYN DENNEY Barwick, Ga. H. H. HARASON, III Forest, Miss. CARL JOHNSON Haines City, Fla. ROLLAN JONES Denver, N.C. H. M. JORDAN West, Miss. MAYNARD OSBORNE Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. LEON SMITH Centerville, Tenn. R. C. (Hap) TINSLEY Pell City, Ala. W. C. TINSLEY LaFayette, Ala. M. C. WALKER Anderson, S.C. ALABAMA Dr. G. S. Killian P. 0. Box 576 Fort Payne, Ala. 35967 205/845-0624 W. C. Tinsley, Jr. P. 0. Box 150 /aette, Ala. 36862 Huey P. Long Rt 4 Box 245 O2elika, Ala. 36801 2 5/745-5978 Four T Acres Rt. 4, Box 474 Pell City, Ala. 35125 205/338-2791 Dr. David Hall 1327 Loftin Dr. Auburn, Ala. 36830 205/887-7384 Charlie F. Horne Rt. 1, Box 135A Salem, Ala. 36874 205/749-0414 KENTUCKY J.W. Cole Bourbon Cattle Co. P. 0. Box 408 Paris, Ky. 40361 606/299-7070 GEORGIA W. K. Stringer Tuxedo Farms P. 0. Box 49502 Atlanta, Ga. 30359 404/939-9363; 3259009 W. L. Murray 320 Mayfield Dr. Monroe, Ga. 30655 404/267-2125 Verlyn Denney Lazy Lakes P. 0. Box 189 Barwick, Ga. 31720 912/735-4495; 7353350 Thomas Ripley, Jr. 340 Chaffin Rd. Roswell, Ga. 30075 4041992-9024 Quercus Farms, Inc. Rt. 1 Gay, Ga. 30218 404/538-6303 Bob Williams Twin Hills Farm 1060 N. Jamestown Rd. Decatur, Ga. 30033 404/634-1234 Rocking E. Limousin Anen & Tim Eubanks P. 0. Box 32 Edison, Ga. 31746 912,835-2583 Top O The Hill Farm Rt. 4, Box 343 Thomasville Rd. Quitman, Ga. 31643 912/263-7026 Robert J. D er Rt. 2, Box 3 8B Monroe, Ga. 30655 404/267-6070 Otis Milner Bluff Farms 804 Chariton Rd. Rome, Ga. 30161 404/232-3019 John Spivey CMC Corporation P. 0. Box 716 Coffey Lane McDonough, Ga. 30253 404/957-2681; 4712219 Milandi Farms Andy Miller Rt. 1 Donalsonville, Ga. 31745 912/524-5780 R. E. Youngblood Rt. 3 Ashburn, Ga. 31714 912/567-4044 Retus Iddins Rt. 1, Box 244 Reidsville, Ga. 30453 912/557-4247 Segal Durrence Reidsville Ga 30453 912/654516 Tii-a n Bobb Carre P. .O B 5 0 Monroe,. '30655 404/267-973 Clay Tinsey RFD 1 Resc4 Ga. 30735 Bobby Carrelxl 90 Monroe. Ga.30655 Emory C. Durham Farm Rt. 2, Box 142 Blufflon, Ga. 31724 912/723-4419 Kei-La Acres J. W. Durham Rt. 2, Box 139 Bluffton, Ga. 31724 912/723-4419 A. G. Lee, Jr. P. 0. Box 413 Alma, Ga. 31510 912/632-7739; 6325412 TENNESSEE HOLS Limousin Rt. 2, Box 299 Centerville, Tenn. 37033 615/729-4303 Billy J. Henshaw Rt. 1 Lynch burg, Tenn. 37352 615/759-7103 The Double B 151 West Swan Centerville, Tenn. 37033 615/729-5117 Jim Stark Rt. 3 Newbern, Tenn. 38059 901/643-6287 NORTH CAROLINA Michael A. Keathley Rt. 1, Box 97 Albertson N C 28508 919/658397 ce n Limes i Pt 2. B:r 551 L:.:srn:-t N. 28092 775-624.9 Al Smirn 69 Country Lan e C. C. 275,1 91947-0693 Mc~en Limous mn Fennina Beach, Fla. 9041261-9746 G. L. Dewrell P. 0. Box 642 Ft. Walton Beach, Fla. 32549 904/651-0939 James C. Shiver Rt. 1, Box 234B Mayo, Fla. 32066 9 /294-1580 Freeman Cattle Co. P. 0. Box 636 Okeechobee, Fla. 33472 813/763-3610 Adams Limousin Ranch 6114 Ricker Rd. Jacksonville, Fla. 32210 904/771-8769 H. M. Shirley 400 S. 18th St. Palatka, Fla. 32077 904/325-2525 Osborne Cattle Co. 4760 SW 82nd Ave. Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 33314 305/434-5065 Frank Chaplin Running CH Farm 3333 SW 130th Ave. Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 33330 305/472-3334 Arnold Lumber Co. P. 0. Box 157 Caryville, Fla. 32427 James T Crandall Rt 5, Box 225 Mton, Fla. 32570 904/994-6949 MISSISSPPI H. M. Jordan 1411 Maple St. Cleveland, Miss. 38732 601/843-5549 Harlee Farms, Inc. Hugh H. HrloIII P.0 Box 117 Forest Miss. 39074 601/469-2680 Thomas J. McAdory Rt. 4, Box 322-74 Forest, Miss. 39074 601/625-7717 VIRGINIA Worrell Land & Cattle Co. P. 0. Box 5386 Charlottesville, Va. 22905 804/977-6803 SOUTH CAROLINA R. F. Hipp Rt. 2, Box 258 Saluda, S.C. 29138 803/445-7095 George Cocoros 107 Greenbriar Dr. Gaffne S.C. 29340 803/489-8696 M. C. Walker Rt. 1 Walker Rd. Anderson, S.C. 29621 803/224-0208 Robert H. Blanton Rt. 7, Box 473 Gaffney, S.C. 29340 803/489-6213 Ralph Davis Rt. 3, Box 391B Pelzer, S.C. 29669 803/243-3178 James R. Hurt Rt. 4 Saluda, S.C. 29138 803/445-2739 Contact These Neighbors Of Yours .For BULLS, And More Information On This Exciting Breed Of Cattle! THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 81

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40 The best crossbreeding programs start with BRAHMANS and keep building on the breed's superior traits. When it comes to crossbreeding, Brahman blood goes on and on and on write for more information BRAHMAN 17j ern ASSOCIATION 4R 4R REGISTER TESTEDMAE FARMS BRAHMANS Jimmy Register Rt. 2, Graceville, FL 32440 Office 904/263-6514 Home 904/263-6895 4R 4R 9 Gentle Red Brahmans Peace Valley Ranch We invite you to inspect the largest Red Brahman Herd in the Southeast. E. D. Rogers, Owner Route 1, Box 97 Zolfo Springs, Fla. 33890 Ph: 813/735-5561 Located 9 mi. east of Zolfo Springs on State Road 66 Beef seminars cover total herd management "Total herd management" was the theme for the Beef Cattle Management and Herd Health Seminars that were held in Florida during December and January. The seminars were sponsored by the University of Florida's IFAS and Florida Cooperative Extension Service. The seminar held at the Marion County Agricultural Center, Ocala, on January 6, was covered by The Cattleman. Seminars held at Orlando, LaBelle, Sebring, Palmetto, Chipley, and Live Oak, covered the same material, and except for minor differences, included the same personnel. Dr. Gene Cope, extension veterinarian for beef cattle, was in charge of the programs, and Edsel Rowan, agricultural extension director for Marion County, served as emcee at the Ocala meeting. Bob Sand, extension livestock specialist with the University, opened the Ocala program with a talk on selecting herd sires. He said a rancher must have a "planned breeding program and a goal in order to select animals to help reach that goal." Bull selection should be based on improving current progeny, according to Sand. He stressed the importance of selecting bulls that have been raised in a similar environment to the one in which they will be expected to perform. Sand outlined the ways that performance and production information can be used to predict the performance of bulls, and gave some examples of how to take advantage of heritability for improving production. A plan to sell cull cows at the optimum market times was discussed by Jim Simpson, extension livestock marketing economist at the University. He also predicted that inflation will curb the demand for beef over the next six months, with interest rates staying at 18 to 23 percent. John Holt, extension farm management economist, gave some budget figures for a 25 head beef operation research report, and concluded that highly improved pasture production for beef operations is unlikely to make a profit at current on-farm beef prices. Bob Mason, DVM, rural animal medicine specialist at the University's College of Veterinary Medicine, covered herd vaccination pointing out the importance of continued surveillance and diagnosis before initiating vaccination programs. He stressed the importance of keeping vaccines properly mixed when using, following label directions, and keeping all material clean. Cope was last speaker, discussing herd health reproduction. He said reproduction is the most important part of any beef program. Producing early calves is of major importance also. Cope pointed out that calves born early in the season are not only older but have a better average daily gain than late calves. Speaking of poor calf crops, Cope said inadequate nutrition is the single most important management reason for it. He also covered breeding and managing heifers, and artificial insemination in beef herds. BULL SALES ACROSS THE STATE have been steady the past several months. The scene here was taken at the annual Bull Sale at the Chipley Livestock Market, Chipley, where 129 bulls representing a number of breeds sold to average $1325. Owner E. D. "Buddy" Neel handled the auctioneering chores. Neel is first vice president of the Florida Cattlemen's Association. 82 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981

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Field labs at one-third mark in program One third of the planned 29 field laboratories to be used in Florida's accelerated program to eradicate the cattle disease brucellosis are now open and helping to test blood samples in record numbers, Commissioner of Agriculture Doyle Conner has announced. The nine on-line facilities are in operation from Jackson County in the Panhandle to Broward County on the Lower East Coast, Dr. C. L. Campbell, director of the division of animal industry, announced. "A few others should be on-line by the first of the year," Campbell said, "and nearly all of the field labs will be in operation by the time seasonal testing intensifies in the spring." "Testing has already accelerated dramatically" since the accelerated program officially got underway on October 1, Conner said, and "the field labs are going to enable us to continue accelerating at a high rate as the testing program sweeps from ranch to ranch." The program is designed to eliminate the highly contagious and incurable cattle disease that causes abortion, weak calves, impaired breeding and reduced milk yields, and has cost the Florida producers untold millions of dollars in lost revenue over the years. Data from test records processed in the state/federal laboratory in Jacksonville indicates testing increased 40 percent over the previous year during the October-November 1980 period. The lab shows that a record 181,830 head of cattle were brucellosis tested in October and 128,312 tested in November. That compares with 108,889 in October of 1979 and 112,480 in November of 1979. "We anticipate those numbers of cattle tested will increase even more dramatically as we bring more people on board in the on-going hiring process," Campbell said. "We have been authorized to hire 30 livestock inspectors in the last month as we further gear up for more testing." The field labs are under the supervision of George Contos, director of the state/federal lab in Jacksonville. The system of satellite laboratories is designed to provide quick but still sophisticated testing service for producers, who would otherwise be required to wait days before learning the results of lab tests conducted on their cattle's blood samples in the main lab in Jacksonville. Currently field labs are in operation at Davie in Broward County, at Lake City in Columbia County, at Moore Haven in Glades County, at Palatka in Putnam County, at Fort Pierce in St. Lucie County, at Bushnell in Sumter County, at Monticello in Jefferson County, at Marianna in Jackson County and at Deland in Volusia County. Most of the satellite labs eventually 70 Head Z year old Bulls 4:. ~-, -1 -N / 'I K'' V I / 9 Purebred Brahman, Limousin, and Brahmousin. Running CH Ranch Davie, Florida Call: Frank Chaplin Quinn Tindall 305/472-3334 305/473-0368 Quality Brahmans H. Clit Ysng, Jr. P. 0. Box 345, Dade City, Fla. 33525 904/588-3713 (Home) 904/567-6767 (Office) "Top Testing Brahmans" G.A. TUCKER & SONS You'll Be Satisfied With Tucker Brahmans Rt. 1, Box 1340 Cocoa, Fla. 32922 305/636-2390 .305/636-6840 Gentle Grey Brahmans Double C Bar Ranch Registered & Commercial Cattle James C. Chapman Ph. 305/892-6447 P. 0. Box 115 St. Cloud, Fl. 32769 PUREBRED BRAHMANS D ~ ~ S P7C .Ft D Route 1, Box 1370, Cocoa, Fla. 32922 UVUMWA 305/636-3966 featuring more flesh. stronger bone, larger size, with gentle disposition Gentle, Gray Brahmans D. T. Davis Ranch Don and Darlene Davis, Owners Rt. 1, Box 130, Zolfo Springs, FL 33890 Telephone 813/735-0537 Home: 813/735-1038 RO Gentle, Gray Brahmans Ronald E. Oakley 1330 W. Clinton Ave., Dade City, Fla. 33525 904/567-2219 (Home) 904/567-5651 (Office) For Registered Red Brahmans in the Wiregrass Grace Brothers Farm Rt. 1, Box 300, Newton, Ala. 36352 Wallace & Larry Grace, Owners Phones (205) 692-3223, 692-3536, 692-5679 Registered Brahman Cattle J. K. STUART BARTOW FLORIDA 33830 THE FLORIDA CATrLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 83

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CAJUNS' CATTLE SERVICE FLORIDA DIVISION Carl & Jo Lynn Story Rt. 3, Box 1928 Lake City, FL 32055 Phone: 904/755-3910 TUCKER'S Registered Brahmans Mrs. L M. Tucker Rout e5 Box 221 Tifon, 6A 32794 Van Tucker Scott Tucker 91 2/533-4681 912/532-6585 912/533-7811 G. T. STACK & SONS REGISTERED BRAHMANS Suite 406-A 9225 Bay Plaza Blvd. Tampa, Florida 33619 Telephones: Off. 813/621-2117 Home 813/689-3920 Registered Brahmans "Red & Gray" Daughtry Brothers Jay & Mike Daughty, Owners Rt. 2, Box 388, Wauchula, FL 33873 Phone 813/773-9285 "Young owners breeding for the future" Registered Grey Brahmans McGuire, Inc. "Where Gentleness Is A Basic" Hugh & Jon McGuire, owners 3612 16th Ave. E. 813/722-7586 or 748-0151 Palmetto, Fla. 33561 S. L. WATERS & SONS Registered Brahmans 1W RANCH 8345 Alturas Rd., Bartow, FL 32830 Ranch 813/537-2167 Home 813/537-2147 Home 813/533-6415 Red and Gray Brahmans HALES FARMS, INC. Richard and Freeman Hales, Owners P. o. Box 1395 Ph. 813/763-7387 OKEECHOBEE, FLORIDA 33472 will be located in the south-central part of the state, where they will be closer to the larger concentrations of cattle and where the higher rate of infection is found Spending cutbacks will increase burdens Federal and state spending cutbacks will increase the burdens on the livestock industry, already hit by inflation, and hinder effectiveness of disease control or elimination programs, the new president of the U.S. Animal Health Association said. Dr. Lowell Hinchman, Indiana State Veterinarian, delivered his remarks to the 1000 member organization at their 84th annual meeting November 2-7 in Louisville, Kentucky. The USAHA met jointly with the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians. The USAHA represents state and federal animal health officials, veterinarians, livestock producers and several foreign countries. Hinchman said inflation had hit not only federal, state and local governments, but also the livestock industry and agribusiness. "The livestock industry will inadvertently bear the brunt of reduced services in many areas of disease control at a time when such services are vital to the maintenance of disease programs," he said. Hinchman continued: "It concerns me that the livestock programs, research grants, laboratory support and personnel support are being reduced when government excess and controls on meat products are being promoted in the name of consumer protection. "The U.S. Department of Agriculture continues to serve in the best interests of the livestock industry and the consumer, but adequate disease control programs depend on good statefederal relations. We must work to continue necessary control programs despite these cutbacks in fiscal support. "I believe we have the inherent ability to solve our problems with justice and fairness to all in the prevention, control, and eradication of all contagious and infectious diseases, and to develop a greater union, composed of a galaxy of health states, each working for all, and all for each." Hinchman emphasized that the USAHA would continue using its "key man" network of 50 state veterinarians, 28 committee chairmen, and representatives from affiliated groups and foreign countries to keep the lines open so livestock health interests would be informed and protected. Support your local county CowBelles Association. Modern Grey Brahman X and Brahmousin % "Boyce H. Blackmon, owner Rt. 2 Box 332X, Sarasota, FL 33582 813/371-6462 or 371-6591 Gray & Red Brahmans Cresent 0 Ranch Dr. A. E, Wholey Larzy Whoie 1360 Neptune d Rt. ox L2334 Kissimmee, FL 32741 St. Cloud, FL 32769 1 305/847-3871 (Off.) 305/892-4092 Gentle Brahmans that Perform SALT BRANCH RANCH Harold and Sue Griffin Rt. 1, Box 103, Bunnell, FL 32010 Phone 904/437-2334 Located halfway between Bunnell & Paiatka on Hwy. 100 Brahman Cattle International Ranch P. 0. Box 821 Clewiston, FL 33440 Ph: 813/983-7773 (Off.) DIAMOND <*RANCH Red & Speckled Brahmans P. 0. Box 836 WAUCHULA, FLORIDA 33873 Ph: 813/773-9450 Registered Brahmans 1245 Orane A, Winter Park, Fla. 32789 Tel. 305/644 136, Home 896-2543 Quality Registered Brahmans Visitors Welcome By Appointment c:ai1 before 7:69 .i w GLENN SUMNER RANCH 813/689-7421 1507 So. Valrico Rd., Valrico FL 33594 84 / THE FLORIDA CATrLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 "SOMETHING TO SHOW" You are invited to inspect our production for Genetic Consistency MARSTON RANCH 3508Ft. King Hwy. Zephyrhills, Fla. 33599 Cable "MARTURK"

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PERFORMANCE Who needs it? You need it! All cattlemen, no matter how large or small, must get some kind of performance from the herd. Without performance there would be no results. The kind and degree of performance and production within a herd is what counts. The April, 1981, issue of The Florida Cattleman will be devoted to taking a practical look at herd production and performance, and how a commercial cattleman can use proven performance techniques to increase profits and herd quality. If you have performance proven seed stock available, get your message to the commercial cattle industry of Florida through the April issue of The Florida Cattleman. You'll get the added impact of this special issue which will focus on performance. Call one of our representatives to reserve space. We'll be happy to help with copy and layout. Deadline is March 5. In Florida call toll free: 800/432-9192. Out of state call: 305/846-2800. April is Performance issue in '7loida attlemar AND LIVESTOCK JOURNAL THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 85

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POLLED HEREFORD BULLS BRAHMAN BULLS CHAROLAIS BULLS ROLLINS RANCH Rt. 2, Box 1250, Okeechobee, Fla. 33472 Phone: 813/763-2410 BRAHMANS Walker Farms Andy Word 904/796-9767 Route 2, Box 28 Brooksville, FL 33512 BRAHMAN CATTLE Rocking S Ranch P.0. Box 935, Wauchula, FL 33873 MarciUs Shackelford 813/ 773-4616 L M Shackelford 813/773-9133 HEART BAR RANCH Still producing top quality BRAHMANS Henry 0. Partin & Sons KISSIMMEE, FLORIDA 32741 Phone 305/846-2168 Quality Registered Brahmans LIVE OAK PLANTATION Ocala, Florida John King, herdsman 904/237-2863 office 904/237-3401 On SR 40, Five miles W. of 1-75 04RANCH 44 Red BmnCate Rt. 5, Mt. Pleasant, Texas 75455 Month Banks, Manager 214/572-7668 Promote BEEF every day,. Support Your Florida Beef Council S SUNSHINE STATE STEERS, INC. Breeders of Registered Brahmans J. Mike Leonard, Mgr. Box 157 Loxahatchee, Fla. 33470 -305/793-2428 FIATC slates 1 1th annual trade show The I1th Annual Florida International Agribusiness Trade Show will be held May 14-15, 1981 at the Florida State Fairgrounds in Tampa. The event has acquired the reputation as the most important trade show in the state, spokesmen say. Visitors to past shows have been treated to a wide array of livestock and farm machinery exhibits that were displayed by Florida and national firms. Florida Agriculture Commissioner Doyle Conner has issued a blanket invitation to agribusiness representatives from the Caribbean, Central and South America to join with him in attending this year's show. Conner has made several trips to many areas in Latin America and anticipates renewing past acquaintances as well as establishing new friendships while at the show. The trade show will again be sponsored by Conner's state agriculture department in conjunction with the Florida International Agricultural Trade Council (FIATC). Longtime FIATC president, B. Edmund David, Winter Haven, expects a record-shattering crowd both in terms of numbers of exhibitors and visitors. David explained that, more than anything else, it is "good, old-fashioned Florida hospitality that keeps old and new friends alike coming to this annual trade show." He added, "Our visitors always seem pleased with what they see when they get here. Yet it has been my impression that this show's greatest selling point has been the honesty, integrity and friendliness of the exhibitors." Visitors can expect to get a close-up view of the latest in farm machinery and equipment. Actual demonstrations of much of this machinery and equipment are also planned. A varied assortment of high quality dairy and beef cattle, horses, swine, poultry, goats and rabbits will also be on display. Information booths representing breed associations, artificial insemination organizations and other groups (as well as a special booth with bilingual technicians) will be manned by people ready to answer any and all questions. Western wear and equipment will also be on sale. The show is preceded by the 15th annual Latin American Livestock and Poultry Conference at the University of Florida, Gainesville, beginning May 10. Commercial red meat production for the U.S. during November, 1980, totaled 3.10 billion pounds, down six percent from the year before, according to USDA. Join your local county Cattlemen's Association. Registered and Commercial Brahmans C. H. Beville Telephone 904/793-2081 BUSHNELL,FLORIDA 33513 Exceptional Brohmans Santa Barbara Ranch P 0. Box 821 Clewiston, Florida 33440 813/983-7773 (Office) Lazy w Ranch Registered Brahmans and Quarter Horses Joe & Jeanette Barthle P. O. Box6 San Antonio, Fla. 33576 Phone 904/588-3716 REGISTERED BRAHMANS James W. Scarborough P. 0. Box 1373 Wauchula, FL 33873 813/735-0391 BRAH MANS Circle JD Ranch Dee Wallace, Owner Ph: 305/683-2939 400 J. F. Kennedy Memorial Blvd. West Palm Beach, FL 33406 Chapman & Collier Registered Brahman Cattle Certified & Accredited for TB & Bangs Manso & Imperator Breeding A. R. Chapman and Wayne Collier, owners Ph. 813/773-9528 or 813/773-3161 Route 2, Box 218, Wauchula, Fla. 33873 Registered & Commercial Brahman Cattia KABAR RANCH H. Q. Kennedy & Sons 13503 Ranch Rd. Jacksonville, Fla. 32218 PH: 904/757-3643 Corner of 1-95 and entrance of Jacksonville International Airport. Bou Das Custom Fitters Custom Fitters" 0 Show & Sale Consultant 0 Herd Consultant & Management 0 Contract & Special Hauling 803/348-7802 Rt. 4, Abbeville, S.C. 29620 86 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981

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Eastern Gama grass needs more recognition One species of native grass widely distributed in Florida is urgently in need of some recognition. Eastern Gama Grass, (Tripsacum Dactyloides), occurs in nearly every county in Florida and especially adapted to the more moist and fertile soils. The species occurs in at least 26 states in the eastern half of the U.S., south through Mexico, Central America and West Indies, Florida researchers say. A warm season perennial, the grass grows from five to nine feet in height. Its major growth occurs in early spring and stays green until late fall or frost if moisture is available. The grass produces seed from July to September. Many consider Eastern Gama grass to be the most fascinating species of wild grasses since it is closely related to Indian corn or maize. Early settlers found this grass in almost pure stands covering thousands of acres. Eastern Gama grass is a choice hay plant and if needed, may be managed for hay production. It is readily grazed by all livestock during the spring and summer months. If grazing pressure is not properly managed, the Gama grass will be grazed out. (True of all grasses!) Cattle will graze it and nothing else. Gama grass yields of 150,000 to 250,000 pounds of green grass per acre were produced in Alabama. This equals 15 to 25 tons of dry matter. In 1975 irrigated Gama grass yielded 10 tons of dry matter per acre from four cuttings at Woodward, Oklahoma. This was double the production obtained from many perennial grasses grown under irrigation at that location. Preliminary dry matter digestibility of 35-day-old Gama grass forage was 60 percent compared to 47 percent for Midland Bermuda grass and 64 percent for alfalfa. The high quality and yields of Gama grass could benefit many farmers and stockmen in the spring and summer months. Researchers at the Woodward Great Plains Field Experiment Station at Woodward, Oklahoma, has over 800 accessions of Eastern Gama grass being grown; one of which is from Highlands County. Is research on Eastern Gama grass needed in Florida? It would seem very advisable. If fertilizer is needed to produce forage and irrigation is already available, why not devote this expense to a perennial grass that will produce yields as those experienced elsewhere? Join your local county Cattlemen's Association. THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 87 We've combed our files and discovered 1. Feedlot operators in Florida and out-of-state read The Florida Cattleman regularly and will be quick to see your ad mentioning feeder steers for sale. 2. You will always sell for more money if you have several interested buyers. Give us the facts-we'll help with layout. Write or call The Florida CATTLEMAN P. 0. Box 1403 305/846-2800 KISSIMMEE, FLA. 32741 STILL PRODUCING GiRLS & BRAHMAN CATTLE

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SANTA GERTRUDIS STAGE COACH RANCH Dade City, Florida ROBERT SANDERS, Mgr. P. 0. Box 421 Ph: 904/588-3711 904/567-7040 S AGE CO CH RAN m JULIA M. PITTMAN Home of Friday 517 COVE BEND RANCH Registered Santa Gertrudis Owner: Dermont & Maureen O'Connor Manager: Hank Baggett 904/344-1670 Rt. 1, Box 248, Floral City, Florida 32636 Where State Road 48 crosses the WithIacoochee River. Santa Gertrudis All Polled Herd Sires D. L. Thomas Ranch Dwight & Jackie Thomas, owners Rt. 9, Box 203, Lake City, Fla. 32055 Telephone 904/752-6438 Located 1/4 mile W. of 1-75 on Hwy. 47 ADVERTISING -PAYSAmerica's First Beef Breed SA N TA GERTRUDIS BREEDERS INTERNATIONAL BOX 1257. KINGSVILLE. TEXAS 78363 ~1 -4 SGBI slates annual meeting in Florida The annual meeting of Santa Gertrudis Breeders International, Kingsville, Texas, is slated to be held at Walt Disney World, March 5-7. Several of the functions will be sponsored by the Florida Santa Gertrudis Association including the "Florida Festival Sale" which will be held at 2:00 p.m., Friday, March 6. Most of the events will take place in the Lake Buena Vista Conference Center which is a part of the Disney complex. Registration and committee meetings will be held on Tuesday, March 5 beginning at 8:00 a.m. That evening a cocktail cruise on Bay Lake will be hosted by the Florida association beginning at 7:00 p.m. Committee meetings will be held starting at 8:00 a.m., Friday, March 6 with luncheon at 12:30 p.m. The Florida sale will follow at 2:00 p.m. at the conference center. On Friday evening at 7:30 p.m. there will be a barbecue dinner and entertainment at Pioneer Hall, Fort Wilderness in the Disney area. The SGBI board of directors will hold a breakfast meeting at 7:30 a.m., Saturday, March 7 with the annual membership meeting set for 9:30 a.m. The new board will meet at 11:30 a.m., and again at 2:00 p.m., following the annual membership luncheon at 12:00 noon. Group transportation will be available for those portions of the program which will be held away from the conference center. Chairman of the "Florida Festival Sale" is J. Charles Gray of DeBary. President of the host breed group is Troy Burrell, Morriston, and secretarytreasurer is K. D. Eatmon of Pompano Beach. GEMINI SPRINGS FARM, DeBary, owned by Charles and Saundra Gray, hosted representatives of the InterAmerican Confederation of Cattlemen (CIAGA) on a tour of the Santa Gertrudis facility last November. On the podium are owner Gray, left, and Dr. Roberto Parajon, Miami, secretary of the Florida International Agricultural Council, explaining the operation to the visitors. 88 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 Gray reports there will be both bulls and females consigned to the sale coming from some of the noted Santa Gertrudis herds in the country. Value of U.S. farm assets up The value of U.S. farm assets is seen at a record high, but the increase is smaller than in recent years, according to a recent USDA Economics and Statistics Service report. The report, Agricultural Finance Outlook, says the value of farm assets as of January 1, 1980, will reach $999.3 billion. That's a record high, up 8.8 percent and $80.4 billion from a year earlier. But, it's the smallest annual dollar and percentage gain since 1977. Farm assets had increased 14.1 percent and nearly $107 billion in 1978 and 14.5 percent and $113.5 billion in 1979, the report notes. As in other years, the increase in the value of farm real estate accounted for most of the boost. McMillion heads Martin cowmen Paul McMillion, Hobe Sound, is president of the Martin County Cattlemen's Association for 1981. Vice president is Garry Lamb of Indiantown. Secretary-treasurer is David Chambers, Hobe Sound, and state director is E. James Cowen, Jr., Indiantown. Local directors are Harmon McBride, Indiantown, William Taylor, Stuart, and Marvin L. Thomas, Indiantown. The U.S. pig crop for 1980 totaled 101.6 million head, one percent below 1979, but 15 percent above the 1978 crop, USDA says. C & S Ranch Registered Santa Gertrudis Carl & Betty Stevens Ph: 904/489-4274 P. 0. Box 730, Dunnellon, FL 32630 =1

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FRANK GABOR, left, hosted a purebred Santa Gertrudis sale at his Bent Tree Farm, Ocala, recently. Others shown are, from left, Troy Burrell, consignor of the top selling female, Chuck Brannan, volume buyer, and auctioneer Fred Dietrich, Ill. Georgia S'Gertrudis sale averages $1559 An overall average of $1599 was hit on 81 3/4 lots of purebred Santa Gertrudis cattle at the third annual Georgia Santa Gertrudis Breeders Association "Prestige Sale," held December 13, at Tifton, Georgia. A breakdown showed that 18 3/4 bulls grossed $44,800 to average $2389, while 63 female lots grossed $82,675 to average $1312. The total gross receipts for the sale was $127,475. Three breeders from Florida consigned cattle to the event. Troy Burrell, Diamond B Ranch, Morriston, K. D. Eatmon of Margate, and Charles Gray of DeBary, consigned cattle to the sale. Two Floridians were listed among buyers at the sale. Sunny L Ranch, O'Brien, and Larry Coven, Casselberry, each made purchases. The sale was managed by W. Scott Wilson, Macon, Georgia. Auctioneer was Gerald Bowie, West Point, Georgia. Alabama SG sale averages $1562 An average of $1562 was struck on 56 lots of Santa Gertrudis bulls and females at the Alabama Santa Gertrudis Sale, held December 5, at Montgomery Alabama. The sale grossed $87,475. The 15 bulls grossed $33,050 to average $2203, while 41 females grossed $54,425, to average $1327. The event was managed by Thompson Cattle Marketing, San Antonio, Texas, and Gerald Bowie, West Point, Georgia, was auctioneer. Horned and Polled Santa Gertrudis Cattle For Sale River Oaks Ranl ch Rt. 3. Box 102 Donalsonville, Georgia 31745 OE & LINDA GARCIA Iome 912-524-2680 1 Office 9'12-372-5634 SHELTON RANCHES Ca GENE ONES ALBERTOODE MOLA BELLE GLADE, FLORIDA (305 996 9800 Quality Branded SA N TA GE RT RU D IS SANTA GERTRUDIS 0The kind that WEIGH and PAY on good Florida pastures! Ross Brothers BLOUNT & HYDE Farm & Ranch B. Blount, Mgr., BRANFORD, FLORIDA Phone take Placid 813/465-4771 904/935-1750 904/935-1782 Rt. 4, Box 324, Lake Placid, Fla. 33852 BREEDERS & CONSULTANTS MILLS SANTA GERTRUDIS TRIPLEMFARMS CHAMPIONSHIP 6! HORNED 0 POLLED A M Hord -nd Polld DIETRICH BROTHERS Santa Gertrudis Route 1, Whighorn. Go. 31797 Ph: 305/568-2351 Rt. 10, Box 921A 904/385-2906 -404/325-0555 ORLANDO, FLORIDA 32820 Ranch 35 miles North of Tallahossee Santa Gertrudis Bulls and Females For Sale GEMINI SPRINGS FARMS Star Rt. 1 J. Charles Gray, owner DeBary, Fl. 32713 Ph. (305) 668-6486 Purebred Santa Gertrudis Winnstead Plantation Phihlip G. Rust ~hornRoute 3 Thomasville, Ga. 31792 Herd No. 255 Albert Blankenship, Mgr. 226-6304 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 89 JUST CHECK THE RECORD Eatmon Santa Gertrudis Lead The Way We usually have bulls and heifers available to fit your needs. Call, write-or better yet-come by for a visit and make your selections. K. D. Eatmon Charles Wolf, Gen. Mgr. 305/971-8880 305/278-0913 2922 N. State Rd. 7, Margate, Fla. 33063 Registered Santa Gertrudis Pure Bred Top Bloodlines Visitors Welcome SUWANNEE POINT RANCH Branford, Florida 32008 Carroll Hall Lloyd Thomas Ph: 904/935-1303 Ph: 904/935-1981 "Home of Cherokee Royal Governor" Registered Santa Gertrudis Bulls & Females For Sale Herd-certified and accredited for TB & Bangs #740 Diamond B Ranch Troy & Molly Burrell Rt. 2A, Box 221, Morriston, FL 32668 Telephone 904/489-4202 First Estrablished Sonro Gerrrudis Herd in Florida Polled and Horned SANTA GERTUDIS Herd No. 61 Little Everglades Ranch A Pioneer Ranch chorterMemberS.Gs -charterMemberF.S.GA Mrs. W.M. Larkin, Owner, P.O. Box 1666 Hwy. 301 N., L Robun (Ray) Batole Mgr. Dade City, FL 33525 Telephone 904/567-2292

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A A HISTORY OF FLORIDA CATTLE RAISING by 1111 A MA .I. Give it as a gift. This beautifully bound book by Joe A. Akerman, Jr., is the first comprehensive history of Florida's colorful cattle industry. The narrative is accompanied with graphic pen and ink illustrations, with prints by Frederic Remington and with early photograph hs showing Florida range life. ORDER YOUR COPIES NOW. A HD IA T H o O 0 E H >0 < E 1 5 _0 U2 E_ 0 0 ILL '0 Cattle, hay raising and general farming keep Davis Famfly by ETHEL HALES STANCH, The Malcolm "Buddy" Doster Davis, Jr. family own and operate a family farm in the Fellowship section of Marion County in north central Florida. Mrs. Davis is Margie. Their cattle are grade but the herd bull is black Angus. They also have riding horses, hogs, a few goats and chickens. Hay is raised and a large garden provides fresh vegetables and ample varieties for canning and freezing. Meat for the table comes from the livestock and poultry raised. The chickens, of course, also provide eggs. Buddy's father (deceased) operated a saw mill and Buddy learned the business. He has a saw mill and cuts and saws logs for his community. Adept with machinery, Buddy built a pea shelter last fall. "We try to be as self-sufficient as possible," Margie says, "and we are buying a dairy cow to milk." Margie and Buddy both grew up around Fellowship and returned there after several years in New Orleans, where Buddy was stationed with the U.S. Coast Guard. After Buddy's service career ended, he and Margie taught in the public schools in the Bayou country. She worked in the primary grades while Buddy taught the lower-teens. The Davises also worked as missionary teachers under the late L. R. Shelton who conducted a tremendous ministry. His voice was known to large audiences over the air and his printed books, pamphlets and brochures read by thousands. Buddy handled the printing of the large volume of materials. His program was carried locally. Margie and Buddy's son, Mac, an engineer, stayed behind in New Orleans, where he is employed by a tug boat company which operates on the Mississippi River. Son Jonathan, recently married, lives in New Orleans, too. Daughter Lydia is graduating from high school this year. An adept piano student, she has plans which include college and a teaching career. Margie comes from a large family. One of nine children, she has four living brothers and four living sisters. One sister, Shirley, and her husband, Larry Ingram are missionaries in Hong Kong, where they have served about 12 years. They have three sons and spend six months here every three years. A brother, Bud, lives in Pocatello, Idaho. Other members of her family live in the same general area as she: Mrs. Mike (Esther) Horne; Mrs. L. E. (Ellen) Griggs; Coley Campbell; Stanley Campbell; Mrs. Tommy (Brenda) Bib; and busy at Fellowship Wilbur Campbell. The family is a closely knit one which gets together as frequently as possible, usually at Margie's mother's, Mrs. Delba (Thelma) Campbell, who lives north of Ocala. Margie's father died a few years ago. A yellow tabby cat, Tom, moved wit i the family from New Orleans three years ago. Other family pets are a mother cat and her latest batch of kittens and two Irish setters, Red, the watchdog and Poochie. Margie sews for herself, Lydia and her home and finds time (somehow!) to quilt tops which she lines and uses for bedspreads. Margie likes to cook and shares three of her favorite recipes with us. Ozark Pudding Cake 2 eggs, well beaten; 1 c. sugar; 2 c. flour; 2 tsp. baking powder; / tsp. salt; 2 peeled apples, chopped; I c. chopped nuts; I tsp. vanilla; and tsp. cinnamon. Combine eggs and sugar. Beat well. Add flower, baking powder, salt and cinnamon. Beat. Add apples and nuts and stir in vanilla. Put into greased pan and bake at 325 degrees for 30 minutes. Oatmeal Cookies c. shortening; 1 c. brown sugar; c. granulated sugar; 1 egg; % c. water; I tsp. vanilla; 1 c. sifted flour; I tsp. salt; tsp. soda; and 3 c. uncooked oats. Mix shortening and brown sugar and white sugar. Add egg, beaten slightly. Sift flour with salt and soda. Add to other mixture with water. Stir in vanilla and oats. Bake at 350 degrees for 12-15 minutes. Makes about 60 cookies, if dropped by teaspoonfuls on greased cookie sheet. Sweetened Condensed Milk 1 c. dry milk; 2 c. sugar; / c. boiling water; and 3 T melted butter. Combine in blender and process until smooth. Refrigerate. Note: This is my final copy for these columns which I have been writing for 30 years. I appreciate all of the help I have had from you readers over the years and will miss you. I do have plans for writing a book, using portions of materials used here with other original writings. I will let you know when the book is published.-EHS Editor's Note-Mrs. Stancil's columns through the years have been read by literally thousands of readers. We appreciate her work in providing the material used in each issue of The Cattleman the past 30 years. We are happy to say she never missed a deadline in these three decades. 90 / THE FLORIDA (ArrLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981

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The 1st Annual Bond Austrian Influence Saturday, April 4th 12 Noon -Boston, Georgia 15 Fullblood Lots Including: Planned matings to top fullblood donors including Heidi (daughter of the great Austrian cow Ardrahan Fenella F6 by Sigfried). Selling 1/2 interest in your choice of Gretchen (a Parisien daughter out of a Hamlet cow) or Ingrid (an Extra daughter out of a Ural dam). 7t:'I Sale Offering 50 Lots Austrian influenced 3-in-1 packages (fullbloods with calves at side bred back to Austrian bulls). @ 4 yearling heifers bred to Austrian bulls (top individuals carrying Austrian calves). Pairs and bred fullbloods by Double Extra, Beat, Petro, Galant and Buffalo p Tempete II -an extremely modern Achilles daughter out of the great Tempete cow. 35 Purebred Lots These lots, specially selected to appeal to the most discriminating 'breeders, include pairs and 3-in1 packages with calves sired by the leading A.I. sires and many of the females rebred to Austrian sires. -Several of the fullblood and purebred cows will be bred to the .Bond bull battery, Bourbon, Dallas and Caruso. Auctioneer: Merrill Anderson Bond Simmental Ranch Route 1, Box 116 Boston, Georgia 31626 Patty Fournier 912/498-7745 Perry Bond Office: 912/498-4835 Home: 912/228-1381 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 91 n C 0

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Bag Balm all-purpose Ointment helps FAST EAG BALM healing! 4 41/2 l b. For Cattle, Horses, All Domestic Animals Medicated Bag Balm helps FAST HEALING of injuries, cuts, scrapes, wire snags, chapping, windburn, sunburn, massage of caked bag. Also use for horses, all domestic animals. Smooth spreading. STAYS ON. National best seller at farm, feed, drug stores or write. Large 4/ lb. PAILand 10oz. CAN. LOADED WITH LANOLIN DAIRY ASSOCIATION COMPANY Lyndonville, Vt 05851 BB2-78 SILAGE CUTTING 200 to 4000 acres We have the equipment to relieve you of the headache of silage cuttin .We serve Florida, Georgia, Alabama, and all through the midwest. Custom Feed Cutting Silo Filling Feed Hauling DAVID YANCEY Ph: 813/322-1959 (day or night) Myakka City FL 33551 ADVERTISING -PAYS10 oz. Florida PDCA holds all-breeds dairy show at Bartow The Florida Purebred Dairy Cattle Show was held at the Agricultural Pavilion, Bartow, November 15, 1980, with a total of 113 head showing. This was an increase of 24 per cent over last year's show, according to C. W. Reaves, secretary-treasurer of the Florida Purebred Dairy Cattle Association, the sponsoring organization. The day's events started with the youth showmanship contest, initiated by the PDCA youth committee. Top winners were: (1) Melissa Ratterree of Jacksonville; (2) Trina English of Lecanto; (3) Ken Johnson of Jacksonville. Cash premiums were presented to the top 10 winners as they left the ring by Ray Bassett, president of the Florida Purebred Dairy Cattle Association. The "Rail-Bird Judging Contest" was participated in by 88 spectators. Senior division winners were: (1) Denise Harman, Lakeland; (2) Judy Solger, Chipley; (3) Betty Branch; and (4) Leroy Bryan, both of Lakeland. Junior winners were: (1) Carolyn Roddenberry, Lecanto; (2) Chris Solger, Chipley; (3) Chris Rutherford, Sarasota, and (4) Scott Walker of Crystal River. Entry fees were charged and a premium list provided for the first time in the PDCA show. Donors providing cash for the premiums, trophies, ribbons and other expenses of the show were: Florida Department of Agriculture, Doyle Connor, American Breeders Service, Select Sires, Noba, Joe Buckler, C. W. Reaves, and Sunbelt Breeders and J. & S. Dairy Supply with Curtiss Breeding Service providing the judge. Robert Heilman of Richmond, Virginia, judged the show. His placings and explanations of reasons were well accepted by exhibitors and spectators, Reaves said. John Brenneman, Polk County Extension Dairy Agent was superintendent of the show. Mrs. Joe Buckler clerked it and Jack Van Horn handled the Rail-Bird judging classes. Kathy Manookian, 4-H dairy specialist, and Thomas Benecke, National Holstein Association Consultant judged the youth showmanship. Miss Manookian and Bruce Buckler, former outstanding 4-H'er graded the judging contest. The grand champion, reserve grand champion and junior champion of the five breed shows follow: Ayrshire: Grand champion-Doug Blackadar, Lithia, Chestnut Ridge Wyatt's Sadie; Reserve grand championJeana Brantley, Lithia, Milk-A-Way Bo-Francine Punkin; Junior champion-Jeana Brantley, Lithia, Milk-A-Way BoFrancione Punkin. Brown Swiss: Grand champion-Brian Solger, Chipley, Greenwood Delegate Cinnamon. Reserve grand champion-Jeff Carter, Brandon, LE. Carey's Sugar Jill; Junior champion-Kathy Bryan, Lakeland, Bryan's Rosie 0 Brady. Guernsey: Grand champion-Elaine E. Ward, Astatula, Royal's Anita of Laytaine; Reserve grand champion, Fredcrich L. Ward. Astatola, Penn Del Charming Agnes; Junior champion-Elaine E. Ward, Astatula, Chief's Feather of Lay~aine. Holstein: Grand champion-Bassett's Dairy Farm; Monticello, Bassettview Zee Anjo: Reserve grand champion-Rolling Hills Dairy. Archer, Clow-Land Sena Jose; Junior champion-Jay Sssiers (Jaysun Holsteins), Trenton, Mandy East Lake Jaysun. HOLSTEIN CHAMPIONS, from left, Dale Eade with Bassett's Dairy Farm's Bassettview Zee Anjo, grand champion; Mike Bond with Rolling Hills Dairy's Clow-Land Sena Josie, reserve grand champion, and Jay Swiers with the junior champion, Mandy East Lake Jaysun. GUERNSEY CHAMPIONS, all from LayLamne, from left, C. L. Ward, Jr., with Royal's Anita of LayLaine, grand champion supreme champion; Frederic Ward, with Penn Dell Charming Agnes, reserve grand champion, and Bob McLaughlin with Chief's Feather of LayLaine, the junior champion. 92 / -T1E FLORIDA CATLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 FOR THE BETTER KIND OF DAIRY CATTLE SEE US BEFORE YOU BUY. WE HAVE AN INVENTORY TO CHOOSE FROM OF OVER 1000 HEAD OF OPEN AND BRED HOLS T E I N AND BROWN SWISS-SIRED BY SOME OF THE MOST POPULAR BULLS IN THE COUNTRY. CAREY CATTLE COMPANY Phone 813/689-1249 Tampa, Florida

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Jersey: Grand champion-Basselt's Dairy Farm, Monticello, G. R. Bassett's Sophia Samson lielga; Reserve grand champion-Chris Solger, Chipley, G.W.F. Jeweler C, J. Tiffany: Junior champion-Chris Solger, Chipley, G. W.F. Jeweler C. J. Tiffany. The Guernsey grand champion, Royal's Anita of LayLane was named the all-breeds champion. This outstanding cow belonged to LayLaine Guernsey Farm. Another cow, Nance's Donut of LayLaine had the highest production record of any cow in the show based on the mature equivalent fat-corrected milk record. Bassetteview Zee Anjo, Bassett's Dairy Farm's Holstein grand champion had the highest Holstein production record, while Summerfield's Generators Rita shown by Clint Pate of Chipley received the trophy for the highest Jersey record. Ag exports pass $40 billion mark USDA reports that fiscal year 1980 agricultural exports passed the $40 billion mark during the period which ended October 31. The figure $40.5 billion which exceeded the fiscal year 1979 level by $8.5 billion or 27 percent. Increased foreign demand for grains, oilseeds, cotton, and a wide range of other commodities contributed to the strong export performance, officials said. In terms of volume, shipments of principal agricultural commodities reached a record of nearly 164 million tons. The value of U.S. farm exports overshadowed the cost of U.S. farm product imports in fiscal year 1980, producing a $23 billion trade surplus for farm products which helped to offset a substantial part of the growing nonagricultural deficit. Nicely retires Marlin Nicely, Ellisville, retired as livestock market reporter effective January 15, 1981. Nicely has been assigned for the past several years to the North Florida area and covered markets in Lake City, Live Oak and Gainesville for the Florida Department of Agriculture, division of marketing. He was employed by the department since 1957. Over the years, Nicely has been active in many livestock activities including the judging, grading and showing of cattle. He is the owner/operator of Bellemeade Farms, a purebred Angus operation. Wilkerson heads market J. D. Wilkerson has been elected president of Trenton Livestock Market, Trenton, it was recently announced. Manager of the facility is Michael Wilkerson and office manager is Sara Wilkerson. Plantec Realty Offers The Renowned Tri S Ranch Calhoun Falls, South Carolina 1,762+ acres in lush western Piedmont. Operated as quality Charolais and Chianina breeding ranch. 85% productive land in pasture, Fescue & Bermuda hay, soybeans & corn. Attractively priced at $790/acre, financing available. Color brochure upon request. Operating Dairies Also Available. Jacksonville, Florida 800 cows, 385+ acres with double-10 parlor. Turnkey sale includes base in co-op paying $16.85 per cwt. Owner also willing to sell cows and base. Then lease land and facilities to purchaser. Color brochure available. Quincy, Florida Turnkey operation. 375 cows, double-8 parlor with equipment. 509 acres crop and pasture land. 765 gallon/day base in co-op. Owner's residence. Three tenant houses & mobile home. PLANTEC Realty Corporation 3986 Boulevard Center Drive, Suite 104 Jacksonville, Florida 32207 904/396-3668 Our 4WD tractors were tested against the 0th T Ours won. The big tractor tests are over And Steiger showed the others just how good four-wheel drive tractors can really be in three important categories -Most work per gallon of fuel, Best percentage drawbar horsepower and Quietest cab. So when you decide on a new four-wheel drive tractor, make sure you get the best ienr Rrnn hxv nnvtime And we will fill volt in nn the. dpetails THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 93

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Advertising AUCTIONEERING FORT SMITH AUCTION SCHOOL, Ft. Smith, Ark. 72903. Resident: and home study, Veteran approved. BE AN AUCTIONEER Outstanding successful auctioneers are your instructors. Write for brochure today. Term soon. Mendenhall School of Auctioneering. U S. Hwy. 29-70 (E-85) High Foint, N.C. 27263. tf73c DOGS AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERDS: Female, Black-tri.7 months. Ready to train. Registered. Marianne Curly, P. 0. Box 1025, Dunnellon, Fla. 32630. 904/489-3937. TRAINED REGISTERED-Catahoula Leopard Cowhogdogs, Border Collies, Australians. Money back guarantee, 30 day trial. Pups. Charles Whitener, Route 1, Paris, TX 75460. Phone 214/785-4724 or 214/785-4475. 876p BORDER COLLIES .Registered. Quinn Tindall, Running CH Ranch. 2000 Hiatus Rnad, Davie, Florida. 305/473-0368. Claude Tindall, 1600 NW. Avenue N, Belle Glade, Fla. 305/9967435. NUBBIN VALLEY REGISTERED BORDER COLLIES. From imported stock. James A. Thomas, Route 4, Box 229, Graceville, Florida 32440. Phone 205/886-2154 after 6 p.m. 178P LIVESTOCK FOR LIST OF AREA BREEDERS-Contact Florida Red Angus Association-Harold Braaksma, Route 2, Box 330, Floral City, Fl 32636. Phone 904/726-4874. CUSTOM FREEZING BULL SEMEN Semen Testing Modern Mobile Laboratory Units SOUTHEASTERN FROZEN Don Schlesier SEMEN SERVICE JACKSONVILLE, 32218 Box 26088 FOR SALE-HEREFORD BULLS. Big, rugged,Canadian breeding, 1, 2, and 3 yr. olds. $500.00 up. Call Lewis B. Flynn, 912/336-7860, Camilla, Georgia 31730. Sell your free boarders and increase your calving percentages, through annual pregnancy testing. Let us show you facts to prove we can help, P.O. Box 21 LARRY LEWIS Fellsrnere, Fla. 32948 Ph: 305/571-1627 BIG RED ANGUS BULLS for sale. 14-27 months. Registered, performance tested. Delivery available. Enfinger Red Angus. 904/994-7033. RE 3, Box 683, Jay, Florida 32565. RED BRANGUS For a free color brochure on the "BIG RED MULEYS" and a membership list, write to: AMERICAN RED BRANGUS ASSOCIATION P.O. Box 1326, Dept. P, Austin, Texas 78767 512/345-2625 LLAMAS, Miniature Horses, Pygmy Goats, Registered stock, for Show or Pets. DINEYJIM FARMS, Box 1591, Palm City, Florida 33490. Phone 305/287-4951. BEEFMASTER BULLS 16-24 months old. Weigh 1200-1500 lbs. Grown out on grass and silage. Tough, hardy, ready to work. We welcome your visit. Dixie Beefmasters, Enigma, Georgia. Phone 912/533-5535 day, 912/533-5561 night. LET CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING SELL FOR YOU Rate 300 per word, minimum charge $6.00. Classified display $17.00 column inch. Deadline 5th of month. In circulation about 25th of month. Send copy and remittance to: THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN, BOX 1403, KISSIMMEE, FLORIDA 32741 LIVESTOCK BREEDING AGE RED ANGUS BULLS for sale. Braaksma Red Angus, Rt. 2, Box 330, Floral City, Florida 32636. 904/7264874. REAL ESTATE WANT TO SELL-Your Cattle Ranch, Acreage or Citrus Grove9 Contact BRENNAN & BRENNAN, REALTORS, Accredited Farm & Land Brokers, Box 1809, Lakeland, Fla. 33802 178c 1,000 Acres, good elevation. Highway frontage. Already in 5 acre lots. $2,000 per acre. W. H. Morse Corporation, Realtors P.O Draer A 305/847-3133 Kissimmee, Fl 32741 RANCH FOR SALE, Clewiston, Florida. 310 plus acres, barn, 2 mobile homes, equipment. 235 head Purebred Brahman breeding herd. Asking $1,200,000. Principals only reply to Box 1403 L, Kissimmee, Florida 32741. Robert S. "Bob" Cody, FLI, Associate All Hours: 305/8474781 Ranch []g SY Wanted rEALTOR Box 1889, Kissimmee, FL 32741 CATTLE RANCHES & FARMS-Nation Wide. BRENNAN & BRENNAN, REALTORS, Accredited Farm & Land Brokers, Box 1809, Lakeland, Fla. 33802. 178c Diversified Farm, Holmes County, Fla. 407 acres, level and gently rolling. Excellent 3 Bed rm. Brick rancher. 2/2 Baths, Big family rm. with fireplace. 300 acres cultivation & pasture. Big hay shed. Feed mill, Equipment shed. Grain Storage bin, 3/4 mi. frontage on Large Creek. Total Price $450,000. Terms. Strout Realty, Inc., Licensed Broker Leonard D. Landress, Associate 904/547-3466 P. 0. Box 595, Bonifay, Fla. 32425 863-ACRE HARDEE COUNTY RANCH, all improved and irrigated. (2) 12" wells, equipment, barn, small lake. Planted in Argentine Bahia, Pangola and Clover. Carrying capacity 600 head. Price 1,375.00 per acre. Owner financing at 10% down, balance in two mortgages at 6% and 9% interest. Offered exclusively by Joe L. Davis, Inc., Realtors, P.O. Box 1149, Wauchula 33873. Call 813/773-2128 (Day) or Jim Scarborough, Associate, 813/7350391 (Night). We Sell Ranches & Ranch Land STEPHEN L. MILLER REALTY CORP. 11913 U.S. 27 South Stephen L. Miller Sebring, Florida 33870 Reg, Real Estate Broker (813) 655-2001 FOR SALE-DRY FEED and LIQUID BUSINESS. Family type operation or will supply large ranch. Includes all real estate and equipment. Dry Feed 40 Ton/day capacity. Central Florida$325,000. Mary L. Adsit, Lisc. Real Estate Broker, P.O. Box 812, Lake Wales, Florida 33853. Commercial-bred heifers for sale Calfhood vaccinated. Coming 2 years old. 850 pounds. Carlton 2x4 Ranch Hig way 31 South Arcadia, Florida 33821 813/494-7302 o Brady Pfeil, Manager 94 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 REAL ESTATE WANTED: VARIOUS PARCELS 10,000 or more acres each-anywhere in Florida-for cow/calf operation. Have cash buyers. Will co-broke. Will also consider partial groveland. Contact Toni Hulme, associate, New Era Realty, Inc. 1401 South Military Trail West Palm Beach, Florida 33406 Phone: 305/964-4303 or 305/582-7052 MISCELLANEOUS FARROWING STALLS-All steel $124.20. Includes feederwaterer, top rail, rump rail. Weighs 204#. Free literature. Starr National, 238 Main, Colchester, 11. 62326. 309/776-3446. Also Have Available CALLIE HAY ALFALFA HAY Contact Joe Messana, Jr. PH: 813/735-4402 Rt. 1, Box 403 ZOLFO SPRINGS FL 33890 WINDMILLS FOR SALE. Dealers needed for America's best new windmill, "EAGLE #1." "FREE BROCHURE." (Toll Free 1800-431-2353, Op. 132.) American Wholesale Windmills, Box 261, Stone Mountain, Georgia 30086. Disc Harrow Blades > / Fully cross rolled and heat treated blades to fit any disc harrow. Heavier gauges. Largest stock in the southeast. 12' to 38" disc. Chopper blades to fit any chopper. CALL COLLECT FREE DELIVERY ERB & ROBERTS, INC. Toll Free 1-800/342-3402 Gainesville, Fla. 904/376-4888 Our 25th year selling direct to the farmer

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MEAT PACKERS AND CATTLE FEEDERS CATTLE BUYERS Al Kaplan-Lakeland 683-4836 Charles Smith-Moultrie, Ga. 985-1338 Tom McPhillips-Plant City 752-9237 James Price-Bartow 533-7233 COMMODITY BUYER Tom Hutto-Bartow 533-0685 FEEDLOT MANAGER Don Bryan-Bartow 533-0685 Lloyd Williamson-Ocala 622-4962 Bernie Gordon-Lakeland 644-4360 L. C. Hendrick-Ft. Meade 285-9875 WANTED CATTLE RANCH Major investor has appointed Atkins, Green, Stauffer, Clark & Company, Realtors, to acquire working cattle ranches including cattle inventory. Also, will consider ranches not stocked or raw land that can be fenced and developed. Size: 7,000 acres up, no limit. Location preferred, 75 mile radius of Orlando. Confidentiality assured. Call Chet Kessler, Broker/Salesman, collect 305/841-6060 or write AGSC, Inc., 211 East Colonial Drive, Orlando FL 32801. We Can Sell Your Land Need Going Ranches Rawland-Groves SEE US FOR YOUR ACREAGE NEEDS James W. (Jimmy) Ringo Realtor-Rancher National Farm and Land Broker P.O. Box 1047 Immokalee, Fla. 33934 813/657-2332, 813/657-2322 "Established 1946" READY-DAILY CASH MARKET Central Packing Co. Inc. P. 0. Box 429 CENTER HILL, FLORIDA 33514 Erwin Bryan, Jr. Tommy Bryan, VESTS Dick Helton, 904/793-4701 904/793-2781 305/585-1589 Office Phone 904/793-3671 LYKES markets more meat than any other Florida packer. We buy direct from producers in truckload or larger lots. Contact LYKES BROS., INC. PHONE 813/229-6506, Tampa, FL 813/752-1102, Plant City, FL Ask for: Larry Ross, Kenneth Killingsworth, Kenny Salter, Jerry Sapp, or E. G. Morgan WHITE Meat Packers of Florida U.S.DA. Inspected Daily Cash Market For All Classes Of Cattle L. M. White, Owner & Pres. Don Barrett, Executive Vice Pres. Bob Perry, Manager/Cortle Buyer 1-800/342-0298 904/622-3272 904/622-7714 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 95 P 0. Box 427 Bartow, Florida 33830 FEDERALLY INSPECTED PLANT PHONE Bartow 813-533-0685

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6IRBur's Guide A Bar B .. Acre, David Adams limousin Adams Ranch A d sit Ag Bag Agri-Business Trade Show Agri-G uard A id Labs American Angus Assn. American Breeder Service American Hereford American Polled Hereford American Simmental Anderson Sales & Service Andrew Tent Anhinga Farms Arcadia L. S. Market Arcadia Rodeo Austin Fertilizer ..26 .52 .80 .97 .31 ..18 .24 .30 .10 .49 ...59 .54, 57 .61 .65 .32 45 62 35 41 23 Baldwin, Leroy .52 Banner Lee Farms .74 Bannister Simmental 64 lar A Brangus .67 )ar 1 Ranch .67 Bar, G Bar.78 Bar LH Ranch .78 Barnett Angus Farm .52 Barthle Bros .86 Ba rton Cltarolais Ranches .4.5 Bailey Farms .63 Bay Ford Tractor .95 Beefmaster Breeders Universal ..74 Belleeade Farms .52 Belthor Americas ..44 Bennett, R.D .52 Beville, Herman .86 Blount & Hyde .89 Bluebonnet Brangus Bull Sale ...66 Bobby Davis Custom Fitter .86 Bond Simmental Ranch .91 Braaksma Red Angus .59 Briar Creek Farms .63 C and S Ranch .88 C.G.Q. Polled Herefords.63 Cajun Cattle Service .84 Capri.IS5 Carey Cattle Company .92 Cattlemen's L.S. Market .35 Cattlemen's Construction Co. .* .31 CJB Farms .49 CK Ranch .56 C&H Farm .60 Central Packing .95 Century Steel ..6 Chandelle Ranch .64 Chapman and Collier .86 Chapman. James C.83 Chipley L.S. Market .35 Chipola Red Angus Ranch .59 Chutes-Heldenbrand .44 Circle R Ranch .,.67 Circle T Ranch .63 Clark Angus Ranch .46 Coleman Sale Mgmt. Service .80 Columbia Market .35 Conibear Equipment .29 Corrigan Ranch .54 Cove Bend ...88 Cow Palace Market .35 Cow Pen Ranch .84 Crescent J Ranch .45 Cypress Creek Ranch .49 Dairy Assn. Co. 92 Daken-Australia .16 Daughtry Brothers .84 Davis, D. T., Ranch .83 Davis Farms.74 Dean Steel ..22 Deep River .66 Diamond B Ranch .89 Diamond C. Inc. ..54 Diamond H Ranch .84 Dietrich Brothers .89 Dietrich, H. Fred .59 Dixie Beefmasters .74 Dry Creek ..74 Duda, A. & Sons ..83 Duncan Charolais Farm .45 E.BA. 82 Eatmon, D ..89 Echodell Ranch .60 Edwards Livestock .35 El Dorado Ranch .9 Emery, Paul ..7 8 Enfinger Red Angus .59 Erb and Roberts .94 E.Z Pull ..39 Fair Store ..4 Fannon, Morris .63 Farm Credit Banks .28 Fenton Feeders ..20 Flint River Mills. 33 Flo'Chen. 22 Florida Angus Futuristic .47 Fla. Association L.S. Mkts. .35 F.B.C.L. 45 Florida Beef Council .77 Florida Fence Post .32 Florida Hereford Assn .56 Florida Limousin Association .80 Florida Molasses Exchange .44, 56 Florida Polled Hereford Fla. Red Angus Ass'n Florida Santa Gertrudis Florida Simmental Flying M Ranch Freeman Cattle Co. 60 .59 .7 .64 .21 .80 Gainesville L.S. Market .35 Gainesville Stockman Supply ..16 G emini Springs .89 Georgia-Florida Charolais .45 Georgia Livestock Equipment .32 Gingerbred Farms .80 G lory Land .45 G lover Farms .52 G oold's .39 Grace Brothers .83 Grady's Hat Shop ..40 Graham Angus Farm .50, 51 Graham & Associates .45 Greene's Bar-G-Bar .78 Greenway Angus .46 Griffin, Harold .84 Griner Herefords .54 Haile-Dean Seed Co .34 H. C. Hanford Mfg. .27 Hales Farm ..84 iardee Market .35 Roger Harloff Farms .80 Harvey, Joe. 60 Heldeobrand & Sons .44 Herring Polled Herefords .63 Hidden Valley Ranch .59 Holman, James F. ..62 Hughes Angus .46 IMC Rainbow .17 International Ranch .84 Interstate Livestock Market .35 Urvington Farms ..52 Isa Cattle Co. .73 Jacksonville L.S. Market .35 Jay Livestock Mkt. 35 Jenkins Ranch. 52 Jennings and Son Mfg .20 JMC Ranch .72 Jo-Su-Li Farms .56 K Bar .45 Kabar Ranch .86 Kanapaha Ranch .6 Kaplan Industries ..95 Kissimmee L.S. Market .35 Lakeland Cash Feed .44 Lake Oriole Ranch .59 Lee & Sons Fitting Service .52 Emmett LeFors .56 Lemmon Cattle Enterprises .52 Lenholt Farms .66 John Lillie Quarterhorses .39 Little Everglades .89 Little Springs Farm .66 Live Oak Plantation .86 Long, Aaron ..46 Lykes Brothers, Inc .95 Lykes Pasco Fertilizer Division ..8 M & M Supply .14 Madison Stockyards .35 Malloy, Dallas .62 C. J. Martin .18 Marston, Lauren .84 Martin's Casa Grande .86 McGuire, Inc. .84 McKellar Ranch .86 McKethan Cattle .59 Michelont Properties .49 Mills Market .35 Mills/Triple M Farm .89 Miller Auction.12 Miller Clay Beefmaster Sale .69 Millerceest Farm .64 Mitchell Hereford Farm .-60 Monticello Stockyard, Inc .35 Moorman .II NOBA .56 Nutrena .. Oak Hill .64 Oakley, Ronald .83 Odom Polled Herefords .62 Okeechobee L.S. Market.35 Old South M ills .34 Osborne Cattle Co. .45 Osborne Cattle Services.78 Oviedo Tractor .93 P and F Cattle .66 Palmer Beefmnaster Sale. 68 Parks Land Clearing .14 Partin Henry 0. 86 P.D.Q..-.99 Peace valley Ranch .82 Pemberton, Inc .24 Pi gg, W. C. 37 Pi ne Acre Farm .63 Pine Acres Ranch ._54 Pine Pasture Farms .56 Pineview Farms .74 Pacid Farms .83 Plantec Realty .93 Powell, H.T. .84 Quarrier Polled Herefords .63 Ralston P rira The Rancher Rancho San Antonio R and M Farms Register Farms Ringo, Jimmy River Divide Ranch River Oaks Ranch Roberts Angus Farm Rock Hollow Farm Rocking S Ranch Rocking T Ranch Rogers Bar HR Ro lins Ranch Ron Don Cattle Co. Ross Bros. Running C H Ranch R ush Bros. R .W .Bar RW J Farms .19 .39 .62 .74 .82 .95 .63 .89 .49 .63 .86 .74 .45 .86 .74 .89 .83 .55 .78 .62 Sagamore Farms.52 Sans Souci .25 Santa Barbara Ranch .86 Santa Fe River Ranch .60 S.G.B I.88 Scarborough, James ._86 Schearbrook Farms .52 Select Sires ..44 S ells, Sam & Sons ..60 Semiema Farms .46 Seminole Stores. 97 Seven-Eleven .66 Seven Lazy Eleven Beefmasters .74 Shelton Land & Cattle .89 Shirley, H. M. 78 Silver Spurs Rodeo .38 Simmons Ranch .78 Singletary Farms.62 A. 0. Smith Harvestore .8 Smith, C. ., Farm .52 Smith Ranch .74 Smoak House Ranch .54 S.E. Beefmaster Ass'n .71, 75 S E. Brangus Ass'n .67 S.E. Limousin Assn .81 SE. Molasses .30 S.F. Senepol, Ltd ..97 Southern Star .52 Soatbside Farms .46 Southwood Farm .49. 63 Stack, G.T. 84 Stage Coach Ranch .88 Stalniaker Brothers ..37 Stardust Ranch .49 Steel-N-Timber Buildings .12 Stockmen Supply Co Story Limo. Steer Sale .80 Strong Post Structures .26 Stuart, J.R.83 W. H. Stuart R anch.t.82 Sugarla nd Ranch ...13 Sumner, Glenn .84 Sumter County Market .35 Sunset Ranch .70 Sunset Ranch Limousin .80 Sunshine State Steers .86 Superior Fertilizer .00 Super-M ol .10 Suwannee Point .89 Suwannee valley Market .35 Sykes Angus Ranch .52 Talley Ranch .74 T-Bar Ranch.56 Thomas, Dwight .88 Thompson Brothers .52 Fred Thompson.70 Tifton Bull Sale __.98 Tilton,' W. W. 87 Tindel Livestock Market .35 Top OThe Hill .79, 80 Trail-Rite .41 Trask Ranch .97 Trojan L uiment .40 Tucker. Gilbert &Sons.83 Tucker, L.M .84 U.S. Sugar Corp .. Walker Farms .86 Wallace, Dee .86 Wasdin Charolais .45 Waters, S. L .84 Wells, Bully H., & Associates .64 Western Gentleman .40 West Florida L.S. Mkt. .35 Wetheringion, J.60 Whaley's Crescent 0 .84 White Oak Plantation .63 White Puckers .95 Wik-A-Weed .34 Williams, Frank .37 Williams, Rick .78 Williamson Ranch .67 Willmar Plantation .63 Wilson, Pat ..63 Winn.Dixie Stores, Inc .26 Wunnstead Plantation .89 Wise Seed Company.97 Yancey, David ..92 Young Acres Ranch .62 Young, H. Clint .83 Zipperer Beefmasters .74 ")i giost iC Xo(t h s by H. L. RUBIN, D.V.M. Florida Dept. of Agriculture Last month, in our discussion of Neonatal Diarrhea or scours of the newborn animal, it was pointed out that death from neonatal diarrhea was primarily due to dehydration or loss of body fluid. The major viral agents that can cause neonatal diarrhea were also covered. Let us now consider the bacterial causes of neonatal diarrhea. Many bacteria, including E. coli, Salmonella and Clostridium perfringens, can cause neonatal diarrhea. E. coli has been proven to be the primary cause of bacterial neonatal diarrhea. Young animals constantly ingest bacteria that they pick up from sucking and licking their dam's teats and hair, eating pasture grasses and drinking contaminated water. Fortunately, the gastric juices, which are highly acid, act as a barrier and destroy most of the bacteria swallowed. A few bacteria sometimes will get past this barrier. However, in most instances, they are rapidly passed out with the feces without causing any damage or diarrhea. The rapid movement of the intestine and the presence of antibodies are the major factors in preventing these bacteria from gaining a foothold in the intestine. Unfortunately, during the first 24-48 hours of life, the acid content of the stomach of the newborn is very low and during this period numerous bacteria can gain entrance into the intestine. Again, the intestinal movement and presence of maternal antibodies prevent the majority of these bacteria from causing any problems. Since E. coli is the major cause of bacterial neonatal diarrhea, let us examine it in more detail. E. coli, of which there are several types, is found in the intestinal tracts of all animals. Fortunately, not all of these types of E. coli can produce disease (colibacillosis). In order for an E. coli to be an enteropathogen (an intestinal disease producing organism), it must have two characteristics. First, it must have the ability to be able to attach itself to the lining of the intestine and, secondly, it must be able to produce toxins. Those that do not have the ability to attach themselves to the intestinal wall seldom, if ever, will produce any disease. However, those that attach to the intestinal wall will reproduce, produce their toxins and, in time, overwhelm the animal. Ironically, enteropathogenic E. coli infections do relatively little damage to 96 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRIARY 1981

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SEED CA LL WISE SE E D COMPANY, INC. (813) 635-4473 Route 1, Box 7 Frostproof, Fla. 33843 Available for Spring Planting Sorghum Sudangrass Hybrid Gahi IlI Millet Japanese Millet Browntop Millet Aeschynomene Alyce Clover Hairy Indigo Argentine Bahia Paraguayan Bahia Pensacola Bahia Bermuda SHARE HARVEST PROGRAM Supervised by owner and sons MODERN PROCESSING and Warehouse facilities SEEDS-Our Only Business (Registered, Licensed and Bonded) Advertising Aids Your Personal Salesmanship Contact any of our fieldmen for full details. Se J1losrda AND LIVESTOCK JOURNAL to P.O. Box 1403 Kissimmee, Fla. 32741 i30 Coming Two-Year Old, Pasture-Raised Bulls "From the Trask Hall of Fame Polled Hereford Herd Established 1931" TRASK RANCH Neil W. Trask, Owner-Ph: 803/348-7691 Call Thru Iva, S. C. CALHOUN FALLS, S. C. Located 6 miles North on Hwy. 81 the lining of the intestine. However, these enteropathogenic strains produce toxins which increase fluid secretion in the intestine which results in dehydration and, in many instances, death. Two clinical types of E. coli infection occur in young calves. (a) Septicemic endotoxemic colibacillosis and, (b) enteric colibacillosis. Septicemic endotoxemic colibacillosis occurs in young calves that have been deprived of colostrum. This type of infection is characterized by sudden death or a rapidly developing shock-like collapse. This is a relatively rare form of colibacillosis (less than 10% of all cases). However, where management is poor, the incidence may be higher. In enteric colibacillosis, infection is limited to the intestine and death is due to dehydration. This is the most important form of E. coli infection. The control of colibacillosis, as with other neonatal diarrheas, can be an extremely difficult problem. As with most neonatal diseases, the best protection is the maternal antibodies that the newborn calf obtains through the colostrum. Calves that receive adequate colostrum from well-immunized brood cows during the first few hours of life have an excellent chance of avoiding the many common calfhood diseases. In the case of E. coli infections, it is essential that the brood cow have antibodies against specific adhering types of E. coi. Without this protection, calves could become victims of colibacillosis. The use of vaccines that contain E. coli with the adhering factor may help increase the E. coli antibody level of the brood cow. Un some instances, vaccines have been made from the bacteria isolated from cases of colibacillosis occurring on a particular farm. These so-called autogenous vaccines have been of some help in controlling colibacillosis. However, the use of autogenous vaccines must be approached with care. First, one must be sure that the organism used to make the vaccine has the adherence factor and the ability to produce toxin. Without these two factors, the vaccine would be worthless. Secondly, be sure that a qualified laboratory is used to produce the vaccine. As I have said before, veterinary research is constantly trying to improve, through vaccination, ways to protect the newborn calf. If you have a serious newborn calf scours problem, have your veterinarian submit calves for examination so that we can try and determine the cause of the problem. A breakdown of cattle on feed totals shows Arizona with 382,000 head, down one percent; California with 672,000, down 14 percent; Colorado with 875,000, down nine percent; Kansas with 1,175,000, down seven percent; and Texas with 1,970,000, down one percent from November, 1979. Iowa's total was 1,310,000 head, up one percent, with Nebraska unchanged at 1,580,000. V-MESH FENCE Cattle Squeeze Holds 'em Safe Holds 'emn Secure Call for catalog sheet and prices: 904/732-4143 SENEPOL "The New Performance Breed" Fla. Distributor: Alvin Futch Plant City Ph: 813/752-8572 (home) 813/752-3181 (office) SOUTHEASTERN SENEPOL, LTD. Freeman Wingard, Rt. 2 Montezuma, Ga. Ph: 912/433-6702 (office) 9127472-7885 (home) SEED HARVESTING C.M. Payne & Son, Inc. Licensed, Bonded Seed Dealer 9410 Payne Road, Sebring, FL 33870 Seed Available Argentine & Paraguayan 22 Bahia grass. Aeschynomene: Common Hairy Indigo; Jap Millet; Winter and Summer Legumes. Ph: 813/385-4642 or 385-8330 Promote BEEF -every day. Support Your Florida Beef Council) Adams Ranch Braford Caftle P.O. Box 1030 Fort Pierce, FL 33450 305/461-6321 THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981 / 97

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23rd PERFORMANCE TESTED BULL SALE March 4 at the Coastal Plains Experiment Station Sale Pavilion TIFTON, GA. Sale Starts 1 p.m. A BIG DAY Selling 80 Head Polled Herefords Charolais Santa Gertrudis Simmental Limousin Angus Red Angus Ankina BULLS WITH RECORDS OF: Growth Ability Ready for light service Not highly fitted From known herds Auctioneer Gerald Bowie for additional information contact: Clyde M. Triplett Cooperative Extension Service Box 1209, Tifton, GA 31794 912/386-3407 Editor aIs; Into the second half of FCA's year Checking the calendar we noted that the second half of FCA's year under the guidance of President W. G. "Kayo" Welles is well underway. We were minded that the twenty-fourth leader of this industry organization pledged at the outset that a "grass roots" philosophy would be followed and that committees would be given latitude to function, yet retain the "team effort" concept. That and more has been accomplished these past months. It has been a working team. Much has been done and actions are being taken to do even more in the coming months. Committees have been at work in the animal health area; the marketing area, looking at the feasibility of marketing Florida's beef under a revised grading program; a watchful eye is being kept on the meat import situation; new programs and methods for promoting beef are being observed; these, and other challenges are being met by FCA's current team. Two specific points in the animal health area acted upon by FCA concern the concessions granted in conducting Florida's brucellosis program which were requested by the industry and approved at the federal level; and alerting officials to the imminent danger of foreign livestock diseases being introduced into Florida. This danger was emphasized through a resolution adopted by FCA's board of directors which urged tighter surveillance and cooperation by state and federal agencies. That Florida's revised brucellosis program is progressing at a steady pace is an established fact. Also, action taken by the Florida Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Department of Agriculture has been positive regarding foreign animal diseases as noted in the next segment of this editorial column. To be sure, the association's position has been acknowledged. It's been a busy first half for President Welles and his team. The second half will be similar, no doubt. Bear in mind, too, that the time the leadership, committee chairmen and members devote, is given voluntarily. And they're doing it for you and for the good of the industry. They're all deserving of an expression of appreciation. A seminar will be conducted As noted above, FCA has urged that cognizance be taken by all concerned of Florida's vulnerability and susceptibility to an intrusion of foreign animal diseases into this country. It was urged that consideration be given to educating involved agencies of the necessity to effectively combat the threat through certain disease preventive measures. It was suggested that an educational seminar be held. It is significant that Commissioner of Agriculture Doyle Conner has announced that a seminar aimed at safeguarding Florida Livestock and plant industries against exotic diseases and pests being carried into the state by smugglers will be held this month (see story on page 36.) Such a seminar should provide input for establishing the guidelines for the cooperative efforts needed at the various levels. The danger of an exotic disease outbreak in Florida is not restricted to the livestock industry and that has been considered by the authorities in including the plant industry and rightly so. Just look at the current problem being faced in California. Because of a Mediterranean fruit fly-said to have probably been smuggled in by a tourist from Hawaii hiding a mango or papayathat state is facing decimation of its $6 billion a year fruit and vegetable industry. That Florida's overall agriculture industry could be similarly affected is not improbable. This jointly sponsored federal/state Exotic Agriculture Threats Seminar (EATS) will greatly aid in reducing the threat to our industries. It should be given full support by all. Remember, FMD calls for mandatory slaughter-no marketing-of cattle. 98 / THE FLORIDA CATTLEMAN / FEBRUARY 1981

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'IT Yes, especially now when your cattle need a boost to help digest winter grasses and maintain health and vigor until spring. What about WINTER GRASSES? Well, there's a good amount of food in them-if your cattle can get it out! That's where P.D.Q. protein-mineral-vitamin supplements come in. They help the cattle break down the cellulose structure of the winter forages, releasing the nutritional values for digestion and assimilation. A~\ (Member, Florida Cattlemen's Association) Ask Your Local Dealer to Stock It for You or Phone 813/682-6144, P.O. Box 116, Zip 33802 Don't Put A Limit On Your Profit By Holding Back On Nutrition I

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When smut grass invades your improved pastures, fight back. The man from Superior has all the latest information on the use of Dowpon M* Grass Killer for the control of smut grass and other weed killers for the control of broad leaf weeds. Proper use of these herbicides play an important part in getting the most for your fertilizer dollar. If you have a 10% infestation of smut grass in your pastures you are already losing money. Your Superior salesman will be glad to explain this statement. The man from Superior advises you to fertilize your improved bahia, bermuda and St. Augustine pastures now, but hold off on your pangola. This is also a good time to topdress clover and rye grass pastures with Superior's special fertilizer formulas. Dowpon M is a trademark of Dow Chemical Co. ANNA MARIA Roger Hale 778-9433 BALM Dan Sumner 634-6381 BARTOW Donald Smith 533-8660 CLERMONT Carlisle Byrd 394-2959 FORT MYERS David McCormick 936-3372 FORT PIERCE Wally Long 461-0636 Robert L. Williams 461-1392 GROVELAND Steve H. Smith 429-2758 JUPITER Sunny Smith 746-5557 LAKE ALFRED Wade Wiggins 956-1433 MADEIRA BEACH C. S. Little 397-2778 OKEECHOBEE Ben Dixon 763-3257 SARASOTA Leroy Fortner 371-4148 ST. PETERSBURG Darryl Rejko 576-9214 TAMARAC Ed Haithcock 739-2772 TAMPA, Paul Bearss 961-0474 VERO BEACH G. Sidney Stinson 562-5439


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